Positive Behavior Reward System<br />By Hayley Scanlon<br />
Reward System: What is it?<br />-A positive behavior reward system is used to promote behavior modification in the classro...
How Might a Teacher Use This System?<br />The following excerpt illustrates using the positive behavior reward system with...
How Might a Teacher Use This System?<br />A positive behavior reward system does not always have to involve physical rewar...
Positives<br />Negatives<br />Good behavior increases<br />Helps build a classroom community<br />Helps teach students how...
Compare & Contrast<br />Williams, Hendrick, and Tuschinski (2008)<br />McCarthy H. & Siccone, F.<br />This article disagre...
Online Example<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpGRvstgD3c&feature=related<br />This video provides a great example of...
References<br />Bafile, Cara. "Education World ® : Curriculum: Reward Systems That  Work: What to Give and When to Give It...
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Positive behavior reward system

  1. 1. Positive Behavior Reward System<br />By Hayley Scanlon<br />
  2. 2. Reward System: What is it?<br />-A positive behavior reward system is used to promote behavior modification in the classroom.<br />-A system of rules is provided to students, and in a result of their compliance, students will receive some sort of reward in return.<br />Typically, these rewards are positive activities (free time), events (a holiday party), and objects (candy, toys, etc.).<br />"The rewards help students remember the classroom rules and commonsense manners,” -Shelley Giesbrecht<br />
  3. 3. How Might a Teacher Use This System?<br />The following excerpt illustrates using the positive behavior reward system with a form of currency/money. Students gain money by demonstrating good behavior, and get a physical reward when they have earned enough money.<br />"Students receive a $1 Birdie Buck for each day they turn in homework on time and complete," she explained. "Students also receive a Birdie Buck if they have no warnings or timeouts during the day. On Fridays, students are able to buy things from a 'Birdie Store' that I have. There are three plastic containers: a cheap box (items in this box will cost the students $5 and under in Birdie Bucks), a medium box ($6-$20), and an expensive box ($20-$100). Students may save and buy more expensive items. It is up to them.“<br />-Jen McCalley of Ainsworth Elementary in Portland<br />(Bafile, 2003)<br />
  4. 4. How Might a Teacher Use This System?<br />A positive behavior reward system does not always have to involve physical rewards, such as candy. Other rewards seen in a classroom could include (but are not limited to):<br /> “-Work with a friend.<br /> -Read a comic book.<br />-Show or tell the class something you have or did.<br /> -Have lunch with your favorite person or the teacher.”<br />(Watson, 2010)<br />
  5. 5. Positives<br />Negatives<br />Good behavior increases<br />Helps build a classroom community<br />Helps teach students how to behave in and outside of the classroom appropriately<br />Students build better relationships with teachers and students<br />Builds a controlled environment rather than a chaotic one<br />Students exemplify good behavior only to receive reward, rather than simply do what is right<br />Students may still use bad behavior outside of the classroom, since they are not being rewarded for their behavior in the outside world<br />
  6. 6. Compare & Contrast<br />Williams, Hendrick, and Tuschinski (2008)<br />McCarthy H. & Siccone, F.<br />This article disagrees with using a positive behavior reward system, stating:<br />“While a common method for motivating reluctant learners is providing extrinsic rewards, this method may not be sustainable.”<br />They go on to say that students will be reluctant to do the right thing, for they will constantly seek new experiences without rewards.<br />McCarthy & Siccone, however, would agree with using a positive behavior reward system. They believe teachers should be the source of giving students motivation. Therefore, by providing rewards to students, teachers are motivating them to learn more effectively.<br />
  7. 7. Online Example<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpGRvstgD3c&feature=related<br />This video provides a great example of using a positive behavior reward system.<br />I chose this video because it proves that even troubled students can learn more effectively using a positive behavior reward system.<br />
  8. 8. References<br />Bafile, Cara. "Education World ® : Curriculum: Reward Systems That Work: What to Give and When to Give It!" Education World® The Educator's Best Friend. 10 Jan. 2003. Web. 04 Oct. 2010. <br /> Retrieved from <http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/curr301.shtml>.<br />McCarthy, H. Siccone, F. (2001). “What Motivates People?” Pages 11-28.<br />Watson, Sue. Rewards and Positive Consequences Strategies for Behavior Students. (2010).<br /> About.com. Retrieved from < http://specialed.about.com/cs/behaviordisorders/a/rewards.htm><br />WIlliams, Lunetta M., Wanda B. Hendrick, and Linda Tuschinski. "Motivation: Going Beyond Testing to a Lifetime of Reading." Childhood Education 84.3 (2008): 135-36. Print.<br />
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