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Understanding How to Use Real Time Assessment as a Tool in Curriculum Design

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Slides from Dr. Cathy Grace's 3/13 #HatchExperts webinar

Slides from Dr. Cathy Grace's 3/13 #HatchExperts webinar

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  • 1. Cathy Grace, Ed. D. March 13, 2014 UNDERSTANDING HOW TO USE REAL TIME ASSESSMENT AS A TOOL IN CURRICULUM DESIGN www.hatchearlylearning.com | #HatchExperts
  • 2. HATCH MODERATORS Tryna KingDale McManis Rachel Brent Research Director Product Training Coordinator Social Media Specialist
  • 3. USING GOTOWEBINAR You may use either a telephone or your computer’s speakers to listen. Use the question panel to interact with the speaker or moderators. www.hatchearlylearning.com | #HatchExperts
  • 4. Following the program a recording of the presentation, the slides and a certificate of attendance will be emailed to you! www.hatchearlylearning.com | #HatchExperts
  • 5. FOLLOWING THE WEBINAR ¡  Fill out the survey for a chance to win a gift certificate! ¡  Your questions will be answered in the Q&A blog. ¡  Stick around for your chance to win! www.hatchearlylearning.com | #HatchExperts
  • 6. Join the Conversation! www.hatchearlylearning.com | #HatchExperts @HatchEarlyChild #HatchExperts
  • 7. TODAY’S SPEAKER www.hatchearlylearning.com | #HatchExperts Cathy Grace, Ed.D. Director of Early Childhood Programs Gilmore Early Learning Initiative
  • 8. Data  Driven  Decisions  Makes  for   High  Quality  Early  Childhood   Classrooms   Cathy  Grace,  Ed.D.   Early  Childhood  Coordinator   Gilmore  Early  Learning  Ini@a@ve   Collabora@ve  
  • 9. Ques@ons  to  be  Explored   •  Why  is  developmentally  appropriate  assessment   of  children  important  in  developing  high  quality,   child-­‐focused  classrooms  and  programs?   •  What  are  some  of  the  reasons  teachers  are   resistant  to  using  technology  as  an  instruc@onal   tool  in  the  classroom  and  how  can  they  be   addressed?   •  How  can  the  use  of  technology  as  an  instruc@onal   and  assessment  tool  be  beIer  integrated  into  the   overall  program  design  of  high  quality  early   childhood  programs?    
  • 10. Purpose  of  the  Promise  School  Program     The  purpose  of  the  Promise  School  Program  is  to  provide  four-­‐year  old   children  the  opportunity  to  develop  skills  needed  for  them  to  be  successful  in   kindergarten  and  throughout  school.  Appropriate  learning  experiences  are   provided  to  enhance  and  encourage  growth  in  all  domains  of  development.  
  • 11. Program  Structure:  Large  and  Small   Group  Sessions…  
  • 12.  Learning  Centers:  Math  and  Computer  
  • 13. Learning  Centers:  Art  and  Drama@c   Play      
  • 14. Learning  Centers:  Library  and   Manipula@ves    
  • 15. Learning  Centers:  Blocks  and  Science    
  • 16. Individual  Instruc@on  
  • 17. Outside  is  Learning  Time    
  • 18. Why  is    Developmentally  Appropriate  Assessment   Important?   Why  is  developmentally  appropriate  assessment  of  children  important  in   developing  high  quality,  child-­‐focused  classrooms  and  programs?  
  • 19. Begin  with  the  End  in  Mind   •  Successful  high  quality,   child  focused  programs:   -­‐  Regularly  communicate  with   teachers  to  ensure  they  know  the   end-­‐of-­‐year  learning  standards  set   by  the  program  or  school  children   are  expected  to  master;   -­‐  U@lize  student  data  through  out   the  weeks  and  months  to  make   curricular  and  instruc@onal   revisions  based  on  individual  or   groups  of  children;  and   -­‐  Provide  teachers  with  needed   resources  to  appropriately  teach   students  .  
  • 20. Defining  Assessments  and  Their  Use   •  The  defini@on  and  use  of  assessments  is  cri@cal  in   developing  a  high  quality  early  childhood  program:    -­‐  screening  for  health  purposes,  obtaining    baseline    data  on  child’s  knowledge  of  skills  and  concepts  in    different  learning  domains;    -­‐  con@nuous  for  the  purpose  of  informing  instruc@on    and  determining  child  progress  in  “real”  @me  and  for    informa@on  used  in  conferences  with  parents;  and    -­‐  quarterly  for  the  purpose  of  program  evalua@on  and    “tweaking  “  curriculum  if  needed  based  on    numbers  of  children  who  are  not  making  progress    in  a  certain  curriculum  or  domain  area.    
  • 21. Taking  a  Posi@on  on  Assessment   •  The  Na@onal  Associa@on  for  the  Educa@on  of  Young  Children     has  clearly  defined  appropriate  purposes  of  using  assessment   instruments.   •  Use  of  assessment  instruments:    -­‐for  their  intended  purpose    -­‐for  the  age  and  development  of  the  children  assessed    -­‐  in  compliance  with  the  professional  defini@on  of  quality    -­‐  for  the  purpose  of  collec@ng  educa@onal  and              developmentally  relevant  informa@on  that  is  used  for  follow-­‐  up    -­‐  for  the  gathering  of  informa@on  to  be  used  in  ways  to              improve  the  child’s  learning  and  in  as  many  authen@c  ways  as    possible   hIps://www.naeyc.org/files/naeyc/file/posi@ons/StandCurrAss.pdf      
  • 22. Assessments  Must  be  Used  in  Conjunc@on  with   Curriculum  Units  and  Learning  Themes   High  quality  programs  operate   through  an  interconnec@on  of:   •  child  development  principles   reflected  in  environmental   se`ngs  and  program  design;   •   research-­‐  based  prac@ces    on   how  children  best  learn  and  are   assessed  which  influences   instruc@onal  prac@ces;  and   •  curriculum  reflec@ve  of  a  scope   and  sequence  that  is   comprehensive  and  relevant  to   the  targeted  audience.  
  • 23. Poll  Ques@ons   •  Do  you  consider  children’s  progress  monitoring  results  in  developing    the  content  of  your   lesson  plans?     Most  of  the  @me   Some  of  the  @me   Rarely     Never-­‐I  use  district  pacing  guides       •  Do  you  consider  data  collected  through  progress  monitoring  in  how  you  construct   instruc@onal  @me?     Most  of  the  @me   Some  of  the  @me   Rarely     Never-­‐I  follow  the  lesson  plan  and/or  curriculum  guide       •  How  much  @me  to  you  average  in  collec@ng  student  data?   50-­‐75%  of  the  day   25-­‐49%  of  the  day   Less  than  25%  per  day   Only  assess  on  certain  days  of  the  week      
  • 24. Is  technology  a  tool  for  assessing  pre-­‐kindergarten   children  that  teachers  should  use?   What  are  come  of  the  reasons  teachers  are  resistant  to  using  technology   as  an  instruc@onal  tool  in  the  classroom  and  how  can  they  be  addressed?  
  • 25. Na@onal  Posi@on  on  Technology  as  an   Assessment  Tool   •  The  Na@onal  Associa@on  for  the  Educa@on  of  Young  Children  has   issued  a  posi@on  statement  on  the  use  of  technology  as  a  tool  for   assessing  young  children.  The  statement  highlights  the  following:   -­‐  allows  for  children  to  freely  explore  touch  screens  in  an  interac@ve   manner  with  an  abundance  of  well  designed  games  and  ways  for   the  child  to  feel  successful;   -­‐  provides  children  with  opportuni@es  to  explore  using  the  tradi@onal   “mouse”  and  keyboards  to  research  and  answer  ques@ons;     -­‐  records  stories  a  part  of  a  video  and/or  audio  file    on  each  child;   and   -­‐  provides  adap@ve  tools  and  accommoda@ons  for  children  with   special  needs.     hIps://www.naeyc.org/content/technology-­‐and-­‐young-­‐children/preschoolers-­‐and-­‐ kindergartners  
  • 26. Challenges  for  Teachers     •  What  is  the  teacher’s  personal  belief   and  value  system  around:   -­‐  data  collec@on  and  use  as  part  of  a  high   quality  instruc@onal  program?   -­‐  the  use  of  technology  as  a  method  of  data   collec@on?   •  Are  teachers  comfortable  with  change?   •  Are  teachers  technologically  challenged  ?   •  Do  teachers  have  the  right  tools,   infrastructure  and  knowledge  on  how  to   effec@vely  and  efficiently  use  technology  ?   •  Do  teachers  have  mentors  or  instruc@onal   leaders  to  help  them  make  the  transi@on   from  non-­‐technology  to  using  technology?   •  Do  class  schedules  and  the  @me   management  skills  of  teachers   compliment  the  use  of  technology?   •  Is  there  a  school  wide  plan  for  the  use  of   technology  in  instruc@on  and  assessment   of  students?      
  • 27. Searching  for  Solu@ons   •  When  making  a  decision  to   invest  in  technology  as  an   instruc@onal  as  well  as  an   assessment  tool  it  is  wise   to:   -­‐get  teacher  buy-­‐in  as  much  as   possible  in  advance  of  transi@on;   -­‐  invest  in  ongoing  staff  development   in  the  system  for  teachers;   -­‐u@lize  on-­‐site  technical  assistance   from  peers  in  near-­‐by  loca@ons;  and   -­‐start  small  by  pilo@ng  the  programs/ system  which  includes  professional   development.  
  • 28. Poll  Ques@ons   •  What  percentage  of  teachers  that  currently  have  technology  available  in   the  classroom  consistently  u@lize  it?   -­‐75-­‐100  %   -­‐74-­‐50  %   -­‐49-­‐25%   -­‐less  than  25%   •  What  percentage  of  professional  development  is  spent  on  suppor@ng   teachers  in  the  u@lizing  of  technology  as  a  tool  for  data  collec@on  and   instruc@on  related  to  the  data  gathered?   -­‐75-­‐100  %   -­‐74-­‐50  %   -­‐49-­‐25%   -­‐less  than  25%      
  • 29. How  should  curriculum  construc@on  be  more  inclusive       How  do  we  “retro  fit”  curriculum  to  include  more   coordina@on  with  technology  based  content?   How  can  the  use  of  technology  as  an  instruc@onal  and  assessment  tool   be  beIer  integrated  into  the  overall  program  design  of  high  quality  early   childhood  programs?    
  • 30. Pu`ng  the  Pieces  Together   •  Assess  current  tradi@onal   curriculum  and  determine  if  any   content  is  accessible  on  the   internet  or  provided  through   downloading.   •  Develop  and  use  planning  and   assessing  protocols    that   accommodate  all  required  learning   standards  and  instruc@onal   strategies  by  using  technology   based  systems  as  well  as  tradi@onal   curriculum  scope  and  sequence  lay-­‐ outs.   •  Create  a  learning  environment   where  the  use  of  technology  is   authen@c  and  integrated  into  the   daily  rou@ne  on  a  consistent  basis.  
  • 31. Lessons  Learned   •  Full  appropriate  u@liza@on  of  technology  by  teachers  in  the   classroom  is  an  ongoing  process.   •  Having  an  on-­‐site  trouble  shooter  is  cri@cal  in  reducing  teacher   anxiety  regarding  the  use  of  the  different  elements  of  the  system   •  Developing  a  “cheat”  sheet  for  teacher  use  when  planning    helps  to   iden@fy  the  specific  Smart  Board  ac@vi@es  that  correspond  to  the   skills  and  concepts  highlighted  per  unit  topic    from  the   comprehensive  curriculum  used  as  well  as  Shell  Squad  Games.  This     helps  @e  program  elements  together.   •  In  parent  conferences  we  reference  informa@on  from  both  the   H@tch  repor@ng  system  as  well  as  the  informa@on  collected   through  teacher  observa@on  and  the  comprehensive  curriculum   based  assessment.   •  A  strong  infrastructure  is  cri@cal  if  the  system  as  designed  is  fully   integrated  into  the  daily  rou@ne.  
  • 32. Polling  Ques@ons   •  How  much  @me  is  spent  on  using  cross  walks  between  curriculum  and  state  and  local   learning  standards  in  the  curriculum  unit/theme  construc@on?   -­‐Very  liIle  (less  than  one  hour  per  curriculum  unit)   -­‐  1-­‐3  hours  per  unit   -­‐  3-­‐5  hours  per  unit   -­‐  5-­‐10  hours  per  unit   •  Is  there  a  repor@ng  system  to  parents  that  is  consistent  across  the  pre-­‐kindergarten   and  kindergarten  in  the  school  or  program  ?   -­‐yes   -­‐no   •  In  discussions  around  alignment  of  programs  serving  pre-­‐kindergarten  students  what  is   the  most  discussed  curriculum  element:   -­‐  Curriculum   -­‐  Teaching  strategies   -­‐  Assessment  of  students   -­‐  Classroom  environment-­‐daily  schedule,  resources  
  • 33. Contact  Informa@on   •  For  more  informa@on   contact  Dr.  Cathy  Grace   at   Cathy@gilmorefounda@on.com     or  662.312.1395  
  • 34. Understanding How to Use Real Time Assessment as a Tool in Curriculum Design QUESTIONS? www.hatchearlylearning.com | #HatchExperts
  • 35. …with reporting technology to make progress monitoring a snap. TECHNOLOGY THAT REALLY WORKS
  • 36. COMING NEXT MONTH Learning with New Technologies: Encouraging and Scaffolding Activities & Explorations Nicola Yelland, Ph.D. Thursday, April 10th 2014 2-3:30 PM ET www.hatchearlylearning.com | #HatchExperts
  • 37. THE WINNER IS… www.hatchearlylearning.com | #HatchExperts
  • 38. THANKS! SEE YOU NEXT MONTH www.hatchearlylearning.com | #HatchExperts