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Greeks

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Check out our World History presentations at WorldHistoryPresentations.Blogspot.com …

Check out our World History presentations at WorldHistoryPresentations.Blogspot.com

Wh ch1 s1 greeks


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  • 1. CHAPTER 1: SOURCES OF THE DEMOCRATIC TRADITION (2000 BC – 1689 AD)Section 1) THE GREEK ROOTS OF DEMOCRACY (p.8-19)Section 2) THE ROMAN REPUBLIC AND EMPIRE (p.20-27)Section 3) PRINCIPLES OF JUDAISM (p.28-32)Section 4) THE RISE OF CHRISTIANITY (p.33-39)Section 5) DEMOCRATIC DEVELOPMENTS IN ENGLAND (p.40-47)CHAPTER 1 – Review (p.48-51)
  • 2. Section 1) THE GREEK ROOTS OF DEMOCRACY (p.8-19) Guided Reading Notes Review P1 P4 P6 CLICK blue #’d P2 boxes P7 to reviewthat section P5 P3 P8 P6 P12 P9 P14 P15 P10 P13 P16 P11
  • 3. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s g greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited o t and f .c) Instead, Greeks were f ,s and t .d) Also, Greeks became t ,w and a .e) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the age, which started around BC.f) W C were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of - land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble t for and . Lower Area = ____________, _________, public buildings and homes3) Population was _______ which made c_________ feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F____ ____ spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, d_______ issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in . Back to Main
  • 4. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited o t and f .c) Instead, Greeks were f ,s and t .d) Also, Greeks became t ,w and a .e) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the c a , which started around BC.f) W C were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of - land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble t for g and g . Lower Area = m ,t , public buildings and homes3) Population was s which made c feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life. Back to Main5) Whole community joined in f .
  • 5. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were f ,s and t .d) Also, Greeks became t ,w and a .e) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the c a , which started around BC.f) W C were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of - land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble t for g and g . Lower Area = m ,t , public buildings and homes3) Population was s which made c feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 6. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were f ,s and t .d) Also, Greeks became t ,w and a .e) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the c a , which started around BC.f) W C were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of - land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble t for g and g . Lower Area = m ,t , public buildings and homes3) Population was s which made c feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 7. I) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8) 2) Guided Reading Notesa) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were fishermen, sailors and tradersd) Also, Greeks became t ,w and a .e) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the c a , which started around BC.f) W C were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of - land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble t for g and g . Lower Area = m ,t , public buildings and homes3) Population was s which made c feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 8. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were fishermen, sailors and tradersd) Also, Greeks became thinkers, writers and artistse) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the c a , which started around BC.f) W C were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of - land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble t for g and g . Lower Area = m ,t , public buildings and homes3) Population was s which made c feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 9. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were fishermen, sailors and tradersd) Also, Greeks became thinkers, writers and artistse) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the classical age, which started around 500 BC.f) W C were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of - land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble t for g and g . Lower Area = m ,t , public buildings and homes3) Population was s which made c feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 10. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8) ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were fishermen, sailors and tradersd) Also, Greeks became thinkers, writers and artists End of P1 Click Back to Maine) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the classical age, which started around 500 BC.f) Western Civilization were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11) Part 2 Starts HereA) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of - land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble t for g and g . Lower Area = m ,t , public buildings and homes3) Population was s which made c feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 11. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8) ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were fishermen, sailors and tradersd) Also, Greeks became thinkers, writers and artists End of P1 Click Back to Maine) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the classical age, which started around 500 BC.f) Western Civilization were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11) Part 2 Starts HereA) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of - land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble t for g and g . Lower Area = m ,t , public buildings and homes3) Population was s which made c feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 12. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were fishermen, sailors and tradersd) Also, Greeks became thinkers, writers and artistse) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the classical age, which started around 500 BC.f) Western Civilization were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of food-producing land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble t for g and g . Lower Area = m ,t , public buildings and homes3) Population was s which made c feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 13. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were fishermen, sailors and tradersd) Also, Greeks became thinkers, writers and artistse) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the classical age, which started around 500 BC.f) Western Civilization were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of food-producing land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble temples for gods and goddesses Lower Area = m ,t , public buildings and homes3) Population was s which made c feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 14. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were fishermen, sailors and tradersd) Also, Greeks became thinkers, writers and artistse) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the classical age, which started around 500 BC.f) Western Civilization were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of food-producing land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble temples for gods and goddesses Lower Area = marketplace, theater, public buildings and homes3) Population was s which made c feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 15. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were fishermen, sailors and tradersd) Also, Greeks became thinkers, writers and artistse) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the classical age, which started around 500 BC.f) Western Civilization were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of food-producing land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble temples for gods and goddesses Lower Area = marketplace, theater, public buildings and homes3) Population was s which made c feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 16. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were fishermen, sailors and tradersd) Also, Greeks became thinkers, writers and artistse) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the classical age, which started around 500 BC.f) Western Civilization were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of food-producing land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble temples for gods and goddesses Lower Area = marketplace, theater, public buildings and homes3) Population was small which made citizens feel responsible for good and bad times.4) F spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 17. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were fishermen, sailors and tradersd) Also, Greeks became thinkers, writers and artistse) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the classical age, which started around 500 BC.f) Western Civilization were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of food-producing land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble temples for gods and goddesses Lower Area = marketplace, theater, public buildings and homes3) Population was small which made citizens feel responsible for good and bad times.4) Free men spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, debating issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in f . Back to Main
  • 18. 2) Guided Reading NotesI) Greek Roots of Democracy (p.7-8)a) Greece’s geography greatly influenced its history.b) Mountainous landscape limited overland travel and farming.c) Instead, Greeks were fishermen, sailors and tradersd) Also, Greeks became thinkers, writers and artistse) Greece’s burst of creativity is known as the classical age, which started around 500 BC.f) Western Civilization were heavily influenced by the Ancient GreeksII) Rise of Greek City-States (p.8-11)A) Basics1) City-States: city and its surrounding area.2 ) In 700s BC, why Greek colonies? Lack of food-producing land led to Greek expansion overseasB) Governing the City-States1) In Greek, city-state = Polis2) City-state structure = Higher Area = marble temples for gods and goddesses Lower Area = marketplace, theater, public buildings and homes3) Population was small which made citizens feel responsible for good and bad times.4) Free men spent much time outdoors in the marketplace, debating issues impacting their life.5) Whole community joined in festivals.
  • 19. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of g____________ were created. (Make visual) i) 1st M___________ ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for m________ and w_________ to defend king but then took power from k . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of . .• Around 650 BC, weapons replace weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus =
  • 20. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st M ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for m and w to defend king but then took power from . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 21. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for m and w to defend king but then took power from . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 22. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 23. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 24. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 25. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 26. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 27. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 28. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ? ? ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. ? iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 29. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ? ? ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. ? iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 30. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c . Let’s get rid of• Around 650 BC, I the king! weapons replace b weapons We pay for3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a and do iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P everything! – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New methodWe don’t need of fighting a king! ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 31. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and powernobles! Guards! Arrest the to m ,f and a It is your duty! . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizens You can’tC) Changes in Warfare I am king! I am the• Changes in the law! break m increase power of m c . law!• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 32. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting Then the lights went out ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 33. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from King . iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. …And method of fightingbecame a bit more “enlightened” i) New when things guess who was now in power? ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 34. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = T expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. ? iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 35. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to m ,f and a . iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ? ? ? ? ? ? ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. ? iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 36. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to merchants, farmers and artisans iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizens ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?C)We, the middle class Changes in Warfare We do everything! You• citizens, demand power! Changes in m increase power of m c . nobles do nothing!• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting Now! Yes! ? ? ? ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. ? iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d . Gee, no one cares about us slaves at the bottom
  • 37. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to We are the nobles! merchants, farmers and artisans We rule! How dare you iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizens question our power! You cannot break the ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS? Guards! tradition of our rule!C) Changes the law! It is against in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ? ? ? ? ? ? ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. ? iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 38. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to merchants, farmers and artisans iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting Then the lights went out ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 39. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to merchants, farmers and artisans iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) NewShortly after some fighting and killing… method of fighting ii) long training created deal was reached. A a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 40. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) So you’ll let us rule so i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power long as we both agree ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king to keep the slaves and women out of this? but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to merchants, farmers and artisans iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizens ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?C) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ? ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. ? iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta ? ?5) Greek Ways of life: ? ? ? i) Athens focus = i & extend p Slaves and Women r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 41. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) So you’ll let us rule so i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power long as we both agree ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king to keep the slaves and women out of this? but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to Right! We’ll call it merchants, farmers and artisans democracy… our iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizens democracy ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?C) Changes in Warfare• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ? ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. ? iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta ? ?5) Greek Ways of life: ? ? ? i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d . Slaves and Women
  • 42. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) So you’ll let us rule so i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power long as we both agree ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king to keep the slaves and women out of this? but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to Right! We’ll call it merchants, farmers and artisans democracy… our iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizens democracy ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS? Yes, we can rule together,C) Changes in Warfare but let’s keep the rest out!• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ? ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. ? iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta ? ?5) Greek Ways of life: ? ? ? i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d . Slaves and Women kept out of the picture… literally.
  • 43. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to merchants, farmers and artisans iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizens ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS? P2 is done! Click Back to MainC) Changes in Warfare Part 3 Starts Here• Changes in m increase power of m c .• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 44. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to merchants, farmers and artisans iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in military increase power of middle class• Around 650 BC, I weapons replace b weapons3) I is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 45. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to merchants, farmers and artisans iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in military increase power of middle class• Around 650 BC, iron weapons replace bronze weapons3) I is cheaper, regular citizens could a iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 46. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to merchants, farmers and artisans iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in military increase power of middle class• Around 650 BC, iron weapons replace bronze weapons3) Iron is cheaper, regular citizens could afford iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of P – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 47. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to merchants, farmers and artisans iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in military increase power of middle class• Around 650 BC, iron weapons replace bronze weapons3) Iron is cheaper, regular citizens could afford iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of Phalanx – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = i & extend p r to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 48. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to merchants, farmers and artisans iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in military increase power of middle class• Around 650 BC, iron weapons replace bronze weapons3) Iron is cheaper, regular citizens could afford iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of Phalanx – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = individual & extend political rights to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = d .
  • 49. II) Rise of Greek City-States (Continued)6) From 750 -500 BC, different forms of government were created. (Make visual) i) 1st Monarchy ruled = King or Queen had central power ii) 2nd Noble Landowners = paid for military and weapons to defend king but then took power from king iii) 3rd Middle Class = Trade expanded giving more wealth and power to merchants, farmers and artisans iv) Gradual liberalization (opening) of power and wealth to more citizensC) Changes in Warfare• Changes in military increase power of middle class• Around 650 BC, iron weapons replace bronze weapons3) Iron is cheaper, regular citizens could afford iron helmets, shields and swords.4) Impact of Phalanx – massive formation of heavily armed foot soldiers. i) New method of fighting ii) long training created a strong sense of unity between citizen-soldiers. iii) Help to create two strong but different city-states: Athens & Sparta5) Greek Ways of life: i) Athens focus = individual & extend political rights to more citizens ii) Sparta focus = discipline
  • 50. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a m state. Meaning the m was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age began military training ii) army for your e l .3) What made boys tough? i) ii) h e iii) r d .4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce h s for the a . iii) E & strengthened their b .5) Sparta Government: i) 2 ii) council of to advise the . iii) C Assembly approved decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) M b) N b c) over . v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held r p and ran d a .E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) M  2) A  3) D__________2) Athenians started = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles .5) A wants to be conserved by . .6) Fight for power: A vs D . .
  • 51. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age began military training ii) army for your e l .3) What made boys tough? i) c d ii) h e iii) r d .4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce h s for the a . iii) E & strengthened their .5) Sparta Government: i) 2 ii) council of to advise the . iii) C Assembly approved m decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) M b) N b c) over . v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held r p and ran d a .E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) M  2) A  3) D .2) Athenians started = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 52. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) c d ii) h e iii) r d .4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce h s for the a . iii) E & strengthened their .5) Sparta Government: i) 2 ii) council of to advise the . iii) C Assembly approved m decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) M b) N b c) over . v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held r p and ran d a .E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) M  2) A  3) D .2) Athenians started = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 53. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce h s for the a . iii) E & strengthened their .5) Sparta Government: i) 2 ii) council of to advise the . iii) C Assembly approved m decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) M b) N b c) over . v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held r p and ran d a .E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) M  2) A  3) D .2) Athenians started = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 54. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) E & strengthened their .5) Sparta Government: i) 2 ii) council of to advise the . iii) C Assembly approved m decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) M b) N b c) over . v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held r p and ran d a .E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) M  2) A  3) D .2) Athenians started = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 55. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: i) 2 ii) council of to advise the . iii) C Assembly approved m decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) M b) N b c) over . v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held r p and ran d a .E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) M  2) A  3) D .2) Athenians started = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 56. What a wonderful life, eh? What, if anything, is expected of Torrancians (you people) throughout life?1) When does school start for you? 2) Is school for everyone or some?3) When are girls expected to marry? 4) Do boys have to become soldiers?5) How is retirement changing today? 6) How is your life different than Ancient Greeks? Beware! This is spooky! Ask Mr P, if you dare!7) How was Greek life better than yours? 8) Share a cool observation or ask a question.
  • 57. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army Click Here iii) Exercised & strengthened their body To see Spartan Govt Chart5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) C Assembly approved m decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) M b) N b c) over . v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held r p and ran d a .E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) M  2) A  3) D .2) Athenians started = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 58. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) M b) N b c) over . v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held r p and ran d a .E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) M  2) A  3) D .2) Athenians started = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 59. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held r p and ran d a .E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) M  2) A  3) D .2) Athenians started = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 60. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs. End of P3 Go Back to MainE) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) M  2) A  3) D .2) Athenians started = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 61. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs.E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10) Part 4 Starts Here1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) M_______  2) A  3) D .2) Athenians started D = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 62. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs.E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) Monarchy  2) A  3) D .2) Athenians started D = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 63. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs.E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) Monarchy  2) Aristocracy  3) D .2) Athenians started D = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 64. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs.E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) Monarchy  2) Aristocracy  3) Democracy2) Athenians started D = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 65. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9) (p,9) Democracy1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs.E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) Monarchy  2) Aristocracy  3) Democracy2) Athenians started Democracy = government by the people3) D demanded by ordinary people i) M ii) Soldiers iii) F .4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 66. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9) (p,9) Democracy1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs.E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) Monarchy  2) Aristocracy  3) Democracy2) Athenians started Democracy = government by the people3) Democracy demanded by ordinary people i) Merchants ii) Soldiers iii) Farmers4) A = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 67. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p,9) Aristocracy1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most Nobles’ power based on: important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta. 2) Tradition they enforced2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life land area 3) Owned large 4) Were rich and could3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing buy power of military ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs.E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) Monarchy  2) Aristocracy  3) Democracy2) Athenians started Democracy = government by the people3) Democracy demanded by ordinary people i) Merchants ii) Soldiers iii) Farmers4) Aristocracy = government by rich privilege nobles5) A wants to be conserved by .6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 68. D) Sparta: Nation of Soldiers (p.9)1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs.E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) Monarchy  2) Aristocracy  3) Democracy2) Athenians started Democracy = government by the people3) Democracy demanded by ordinary people i) Merchants ii) Soldiers iii) Farmers4) Aristocracy = government by rich privilege nobles5) Aristocracy wants to be conserved by nobles6) Fight for power: A vs D .
  • 69. D) Sparta:Aristocracy of Soldiers (p,9) Nation Democracy1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: vs. i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid disciplineQuestion Also, had a rigorous upbringing4) Girls: i) ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army #2 iii) Exercised & strengthened their body5) Sparta Government: Question #1 i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings Question iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) Question iv) Spartan Citizen = a) Male b) Native born c) over #2 30 Question #3 #3 v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs.E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) Monarchy  2) Aristocracy  3) Democracy2) Athenians started Democracy = government by the people3) Democracy demanded by ordinary people i) Merchants ii) Soldiers iii) Farmers4) Aristocracy = government by rich privilege nobles5) Aristocracy wants to be conserved by nobles6) Fight for power: Aristocracy vs Democracy
  • 70. D) Sparta:Aristocracy of Soldiers (p,9) Nation Democracy1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: vs. i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline 2) 51% of4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing Populationnot allowedii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army to 1) Whoever controls this groupparticipate? Exercised & strengthened their body iii) 2) 51% of i) 2 kings have power? will likely5) Sparta Government: ii) council of elders to advise the kings Population What group is this? 3) Theiii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie not allowed to 3) The invisible invisible War) 80% that didn’t Citizen = iv) Spartan a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 80% that didn’t participate? v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs. “count” “count”E) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) Monarchy  2) Aristocracy  3) Democracy2) Athenians started Democracy = government by the people3) Democracy demanded by ordinary people i) Merchants ii) Soldiers iii) Farmers4) Aristocracy = government by rich privilege nobles5) Aristocracy wants to be conserved by nobles6) Fight for power: Aristocracy vs Democracy
  • 71. D) Sparta:Aristocracy of Soldiers (p,9) Nation Democracy1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys:3) Whatof vs. i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life 2) 51% made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline Military4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing Populationnot allowedii) Expected to produce healthykilled for… army to Kills and is sons for theparticipate? Exercised & strengthened their body iii) 2) 51% of 2) Women Population5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings not allowed to 3) The invisible 3) Theiii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) invisible participate? a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 80% that didn’t 80% that didn’t Citizen = iv) Spartan v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs. “count” “count” 3) SlavesE) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) Monarchy  2) Aristocracy  3) Democracy2) Athenians started Democracy = government by the people3) Democracy demanded by ordinary people i) Merchants ii) Soldiers iii) Farmers4) Aristocracy = government by rich privilege nobles5) Aristocracy wants to be conserved by nobles6) Fight for power: Aristocracy vs Democracy
  • 72. D) Sparta:Aristocracy of Soldiers (p,9) Nation Democracy1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: vs. i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline Military4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing Kills and is killed for… ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body 2) Women5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings3) Theiii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) 3) The invisible invisible80% that didn’t Citizen = iv) Spartan a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 80% that didn’t v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs. “count” “count” 3) Slaves 2) WomenE) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) Monarchy  2) Aristocracy  3) Democracy2) Athenians started Democracy = government by the people3) Democracy demanded by ordinary people i) Merchants ii) Soldiers iii) Farmers4) Aristocracy = government by rich privilege nobles5) Aristocracy wants to be conserved by nobles6) Fight for power: Aristocracy vs Democracy
  • 73. D) Sparta:Aristocracy of Soldiers (p,9) Nation Democracy1) Sparta was a military state. Meaning the military was the most important, influential and powerful thing in Sparta.2) Boys: vs. i) Age 7 began military training ii) army for your entire life3) What made boys tough? i) coarse diet ii) hard exercise iii) rigid discipline Military4) Girls: i) Also, had a rigorous upbringing Kills and is killed for… ii) Expected to produce healthy sons for the army iii) Exercised & strengthened their body 2) Women5) Sparta Government: i) 2 kings ii) council of elders to advise the kings iii) Citizen Assembly approved major decisions (ie War) iv) Spartan Citizen = a) Male b) Native born c) over 30 v) Assembly elected 5 ephors that held real power and ran daily affairs. 3) Slaves 2) Women 3) SlavesE) Athens: A Limited Democracy (p.10)1) Athens Govt over Time = 1) Monarchy  2) Aristocracy  3) Democracy2) Athenians started Democracy = government by the people3) Democracy demanded by ordinary people i) Merchants ii) Soldiers iii) Farmers4) Aristocracy = government by rich privilege nobles5) Aristocracy wants to be conserved by nobles6) Fight for power: Aristocracy vs Democracy
  • 74. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p.10)7) Solon’s Liberal Rule & ReformI) Reforms – a) outlawed s . b) freed those sold into slavery due to d . c) made it easier to become a c . d) opened up g . positions to more citizens e) Allowed Athenian Assembly to speak on b d .II) Reforms’ Impact – a) Ensured more b) Better . .III) Reform Limits – a) C . still remained limited b) Many Govt positions were open only to wealthy l ..
  • 75. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p.10)7) Solon’s Liberal Rule & ReformI) Reforms – a) outlawed slavery. b) freed those sold into slavery due to d . c) made it easier to become a c d) opened up g positions to more citizens e) Allowed Athenian Assembly to speak on b d .II) Reforms’ Impact – a) Ensured more . b) Better .III) Reform Limits – a) C still remained limited b) Many Govt positions were open only to wealthy l .
  • 76. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p.10)7) Solon’s Liberal Rule & ReformI) Reforms – a) outlawed slavery b) freed those sold into slavery due to debt c) made it easier to become a c d) opened up g positions to more citizens e) Allowed Athenian Assembly to speak on b d .II) Reforms’ Impact – a) Ensured more . b) Better .III) Reform Limits – a) C still remained limited b) Many Govt positions were open only to wealthy l .
  • 77. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p.10)7) Solon’s Liberal Rule & ReformI) Reforms – a) outlawed slavery b) freed those sold into slavery due to debt c) made it easier to become a citizen d) opened up g positions to more citizens e) Allowed Athenian Assembly to speak on b d .II) Reforms’ Impact – a) Ensured more . b) Better .III) Reform Limits – a) C still remained limited b) Many Govt positions were open only to wealthy l .
  • 78. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p.10)7) Solon’s Liberal Rule & ReformI) Reforms – a) outlawed slavery b) freed those sold into slavery due to debt c) made it easier to become a citizen d) opened up government positions to more citizens e) Allowed Athenian Assembly to speak on b d .II) Reforms’ Impact – a) Ensured more . b) Better .III) Reform Limits – a) C still remained limited b) Many Govt positions were open only to wealthy l .
  • 79. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p.10)7) Solon’s Liberal Rule & ReformI) Reforms – a) outlawed slavery b) freed those sold into slavery due to debt c) made it easier to become a citizen d) opened up government positions to more citizens e) Allowed Athenian Assembly to speak on big decisions.II) Reforms’ Impact – a) Ensured more . b) Better .III) Reform Limits – a) C still remained limited b) Many Govt positions were open only to wealthy l .What will Del Amo Mall look like 2,500 years from now?
  • 80. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p.10)7) Solon’s Liberal Rule & ReformI) Reforms – a) outlawed slavery b) freed those sold into slavery due to debt c) made it easier to become a citizen d) opened up government positions to more citizens e) Allowed Athenian Assembly to speak on big decisions.II) Reforms’ Impact – a) Ensured more fairness b) Better justiceIII) Reform Limits – a) C still remained limited b) Many Govt positions were open only to wealthy l .
  • 81. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p.10)7) Solon’s Liberal Rule & ReformI) Reforms – a) outlawed slavery b) freed those sold into slavery due to debt c) made it easier to become a citizen d) opened up government positions to more citizens e) Allowed Athenian Assembly to speak on big decisions.II) Reforms’ Impact – a) Ensured more fairness b) Better justiceIII) Reform Limits – a) Citizenship still remained limited b) Many Govt positions were open only to wealthy l . 3) Slaves Not for Slaves Not for Women
  • 82. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p.10)7) Solon’s Liberal Rule & ReformI) Reforms – a) outlawed slavery b) freed those sold into slavery due to debt c) made it easier to become a citizen d) opened up government positions to more citizens e) Allowed Athenian Assembly to speak on big decisions.II) Reforms’ Impact – a) Ensured more fairness b) Better justiceIII) Reform Limits – a) Citizenship still remained limited b) Many Govt positions were open only to wealthy landowners. P4 is done! Good job! Now click here to Go Back to Main
  • 83. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrants Part 5 Starts HereI) . – leader who gains power by .II) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make p . to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain s .of poor and merchants c) Make few c . to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an e and should be e . f) Now full power can be forced on all p who now live in f .III) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary c . ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over ) iii) Assembly was a l . – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 84. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by .II) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make p to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain s of poor and merchants c) Make few c to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an e and should be e . f) Now full power can be forced on all p who now live in f .III) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary c . ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over ) iii) Assembly was a l – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only m participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 85. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make p to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain s of poor and merchants c) Make few c to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an e and should be e . f) Now full power can be forced on all p who now live in f .III) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary c . ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over ) iii) Assembly was a l – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only m participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 86. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain s of poor and merchants c) Make few c to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an e and should be e . f) Now full power can be forced on all p who now live in f .III) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary c . ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over ) iii) Assembly was a l – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only m participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 87. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few c to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an e and should be e . f) Now full power can be forced on all p who now live in f .III) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary c . ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over ) iii) Assembly was a l – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only m participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 88. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an e and should be e . f) Now full power can be forced on all p who now live in f .III) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary c . ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over ) iii) Assembly was a l – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only m participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 89. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated f) Now full power can be forced on all p who now live in f .III) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary c . ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over ) iii) Assembly was a l – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only m participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 90. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated f) Now full power can be forced on all people who now live in fearIII) Tyrants of TO GREEK TYRANNY CYCLE reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary c . ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over ) iii) Assembly was a l – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only m participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 91. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated f) Now full power can be forced on all people who now live in fearIII) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary c . ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over ) iii) Assembly was a l – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only m participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 92. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated f) Now full power can be forced on all people who now live in fearIII) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary citizens ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over ) iii) Assembly was a l – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only m participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 93. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated f) Now full power can be forced on all people who now live in fearIII) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary citizens ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over 30) iii) Assembly was a l – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only m participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 94. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated f) Now full power can be forced on all people who now live in fearIII) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary citizens ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over 30) iii) Assembly was a legislature – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only m participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 95. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated f) Now full power can be forced on all people who now live in fearIII) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary citizens ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over 30) iii) Assembly was a legislature – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only male participants in governmentII) W were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 96. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) ? a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated f) Now full power can be forced on all people who now live in fearIII) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary citizens ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over 30) iii) Assembly was a legislature – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only male participants in governmentII) Woman were NOT a part of public lifeIII) S were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 97. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated f) Now full power can be forced on all people who now live in fearIII) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary citizens ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over 30) iii) Assembly was a legislature – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only male participants in governmentII) Woman were NOT a part of public lifeIII) Slaves were not a part of democracyIV) C had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 98. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated f) Now full power can be forced on all people who now live in fearIII) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary citizens ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over 30) iii) Assembly was a legislature – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only male participants in governmentII) Woman were NOT a part of public lifeIII) Slaves were not a part of democracyIV) Citizens had time to participate in g because s did all the work
  • 99. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated f) Now full power can be forced on all people who now live in fearIII) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary citizens ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over 30) iii) Assembly was a legislature – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only male participants in governmentII) Woman were NOT a part of public lifeIII) Slaves were not a part of democracyIV) Citizens had time to participate in government because s did all the work
  • 100. Ancient Athenian Democracy D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated was built upon slavery. f) Now full power can be forced on all people who now live in fearIII) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – Is democracy today different? i) broaden role of ordinary citizens ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over 30) ANY QUESTIONS iii) Assembly was a legislature – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them. or COMMENTS?9) Limits of Athenian DemocracyI) Only male participants in governmentII) Woman were NOT a part of public lifeIII) Slaves were not a part of democracyIV) Citizens had time to participate in government because slaves did all the work
  • 101. D) Athens: A Limited Democracy (Continued p. 10 paragraph 4)8) Rise of tyrantsI) Tyrant – leader who gains power by forceII) Road to tyranny – (How to become a tyrant?) a) make promises to both poor and merchant (Biz) class Use brain, not book b) Gain support of poor and merchants c) Make few changes to keep them happy d) Then start to do as tyrant wishes e) Any person who objects is an enemy and should be eliminated f) Now full power can be forced on all people who now live in fearIII) Tyrants of reform a) Pisistratus in 546 BC – gave greater voice to farmers and poor b) Cleisthenes in 507 BC – i) broaden role of ordinary citizens ii) Created Council of 500 (Members selected by all citizens over 30) iii) Assembly was a legislature – group debated laws before it accepts or rejects them.9) Limits of Athenian Democracy ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?I) Only male participants in governmentII) Woman were NOT a part of public life P5 is done! Go Back to MainIII) Slaves were not a part of democracyIV) Citizens had time to participate in government because slaves did all the work
  • 102. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, . was the w . Greek City State Part 6 Starts Here• Soon . Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from .IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an .• Under the leadership of ., economy grew and govt became more d .• Age of Pericles = BC – BCA) Political Life• D . d . = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• R . D . = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of . or S . C ., should partake in govt.• P . given to men who held public office, which allowed . men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for . killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a . but of the . people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the . of the people but also the . of the individual.
  • 103. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the w Greek City State• Soon Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from .IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an .• Under the leadership of P , economy grew and govt became more d .• Age of Pericles = BC – BCA) Political Life• D d = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• R d = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of or s c , should partake in govt.• P given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.
  • 104. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from .IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an .• Under the leadership of P , economy grew and govt became more d .• Age of Pericles = BC – BCA) Political Life• D d = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• R d = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of or s c , should partake in govt.• P given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.
  • 105. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from .IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an .• Under the leadership of P , economy grew and govt became more d .• Age of Pericles = BC – BCA) Political Life• D d = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• R d = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of or s c , should partake in govt.• P given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.
  • 106. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an .• Under the leadership of P , economy grew and govt became more d .• Age of Pericles = BC – BCA) Political Life• D d = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• R d = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of or s c , should partake in govt.• P given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.
  • 107. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of P , economy grew and govt became more d .• Age of Pericles = BC – BCA) Political Life• D d = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• R d = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of or s c , should partake in govt.• P given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.
  • 108. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more d .• Age of Pericles = BC – BCA) Political Life• D d = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• R d = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of or s c , should partake in govt.• P given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.
  • 109. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = BC – BCA) Political Life• D d = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• R d = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of or s c , should partake in govt.• P given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.
  • 110. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life• D d = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• R d = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of or s c , should partake in govt.• P given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.
  • 111. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life• Direct democracy = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• R d = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of or s c , should partake in govt.• P given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.• Man not involved in public life is .
  • 112. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13) • Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state • Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empireClick here •to enlarge Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic • chart Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life• Direct democracy = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• Representative democracy = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of or s c , should partake in govt.• P given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.• Man not involved in public life is .
  • 113. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life• Direct democracy = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• Representative democracy = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least 6,000 members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of or s c , should partake in govt.• P given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.• Man not involved in public life is .
  • 114. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life• Direct democracy = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• Representative democracy = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least 6,000 members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of wealth or social class, should partake in govt.• P given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.• Man not involved in public life is .
  • 115. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life• Direct democracy = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• Representative democracy = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least 6,000 members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of wealth or social class, should partake in govt.• Pay given to men who held public office, which allowed men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.• Man not involved in public life is .
  • 116. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?• Direct democracy = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• Representative democracy = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least 6,000 members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of wealth or social class, should partake in govt.• Pay given to men who held public office, which allowed poor men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration End of P6 Go Back to Main• Speech given by Pericles for killed in .• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.• Man not involved in public life is .
  • 117. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life• Direct democracy = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• Representative democracy = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least 6,000 members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of wealth or social class, should partake in govt.• Pay given to men who held public office, which allowed poor men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Part 7 Start Here Speech given by Pericles for killed in ______.• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.• Man not involved in public life is .
  • 118. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life• Direct democracy = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• Representative democracy = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least 6,000 members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of wealth or social class, should partake in govt.• Pay given to men who held public office, which allowed poor men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for Athenians killed in battle.• In Athens, power rested “not of a but of the people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the of the people but also the of the individual.• Man not involved in public life is .
  • 119. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life• Direct democracy = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• Representative democracy = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least 6,000 members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of wealth or social class, should partake in govt.• Pay given to men who held public office, which allowed poor men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for Athenians killed in battle.• In Athens, power rested “not of a minority but of the whole people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the r of the people but also the d of the individual.
  • 120. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life• Direct democracy = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• Representative democracy = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least 6,000 members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of wealth or social class, should partake in govt.• Pay given to men who held public office, which allowed poor men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for Athenians killed in battle.• In Athens, power rested “not of a minority but of the whole people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the rights of the people but also the d of the individual.• Man not involved in public life is .
  • 121. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life• Direct democracy = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• Representative democracy = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least 6,000 members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of wealth or social class, should partake in govt.• Pay given to men who held public office, which allowed poor men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for Athenians killed in battle.• In Athens, power rested “not of a minority but of the whole people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the rights of the people but also the duties of the individual.• Man not involved in public life is u .
  • 122. III) Persian Wars (p.11)• By 500, Athens was the wealthiest Greek City State• Soon Persian Empire was expanding into Greece• Greeks resist attacks from PersiaIV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (p.11-13)• Following Persian Wars, Athens was most powerful Greek city-state• Athens dominates other Greek city-states and gradually builds an empire• Under the leadership of Pericles, economy grew and govt became more democratic• Age of Pericles = 460 BC – 429 BCA) Political Life• Direct democracy = large number of citizens took direct part in day to day govt affairs• Representative democracy = common today, citizens elect representatives to run govt• Assembly met several times a month• At least 6,000 members had to be present to decide important issues• Pericles believed all citizens, regardless of wealth or social class, should partake in govt.• Pay given to men who held public office, which allowed poor men to serve in governmentB) Funeral Oration• Speech given by Pericles for Athenians killed in battle.• In Athens, power rested “not of a minority but of the whole people.”• Pericles stressed NOT just the rights of the people but also the duties of the individual.• Man not involved in public life is useless
  • 123. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild A destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best a and s to Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ by creating for & .5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The s bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) vs led all of Greece to be at war for years.2) In 404 BC, captured , ending domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of . but not .4) Democratic government suffered = i) . ii) . iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) . = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by .3) Instead, they used o . and r . to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) . . ii) Western political thought = how g . and s . should work
  • 124. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best a and s to Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ by creating for & .5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The s bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) vs led all of Greece to be at war for years.2) In 404 BC, captured , ending domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of c but not p .4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom Wow! Some guy named2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, Jeff wrote o book aboutand r they used a to determine why things happened.4) Their search forvery answer! the universe influenced: this laws that ruledi) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 125. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ by creating for & .5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The s bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) vs led all of Greece to be at war for years.2) In 404 BC, captured , ending domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of c but not p .4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 126. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ by creating for & .5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The s bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) vs led all of Greece to be at war for years.2) In 404 BC, captured , ending domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of c but not p .4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 127. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating for & .5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The s bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) vs led all of Greece to be at war for years.2) In 404 BC, captured , ending domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of c but not p .4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 128. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for & .5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The s bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) vs led all of Greece to be at war for years.2) In 404 BC, captured , ending domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of c but not p .4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 129. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The g s bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) vs led all of Greece to be at war for years.2) In 404 BC, captured , ending domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of c but not p .4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 130. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) vs led all of Greece to be at war for years.2) In 404 BC, captured , ending domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of c but not p .4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 131. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for years.2) In 404 BC, captured , ending domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of c but not p .4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 132. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, captured , ending domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of c but not p .4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 133. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of c but not p .4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 134. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending Athenian domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of c but not p .4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 135. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending Athenian domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of culture but not p .4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 136. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending Athenian domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of culture but not power4) Democratic government suffered = i) ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 137. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending Athenian domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of culture but not power4) Democratic government suffered = i) Corruption ii) iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 138. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending Athenian domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of culture but not power4) Democratic government suffered = ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS? i) Corruption ii) Selfish interests iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-state End of P7 Click Back to MainV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics P8 Starts Here1) P = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 139. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending Athenian domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of culture but not power4) Democratic government suffered = i) Corruption ii) Selfish interests iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) Philosophers = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by g .3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 140. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending Athenian domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of culture but not power4) Democratic government suffered = i) Corruption ii) Selfish interests iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) Philosophers = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by gods.3) Instead, they used o and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 141. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending Athenian domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of culture but not power4) Democratic government suffered = i) Corruption ii) Selfish interests iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) Philosophers = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by gods.3) Instead, they used observation and r to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 142. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending Athenian domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of culture but not power4) Democratic government suffered = i) Corruption ii) Selfish interests iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) Philosophers = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by gods.3) Instead, they used observation and reason to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) M s ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 143. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending Athenian domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of culture but not power4) Democratic government suffered = i) Corruption ii) Selfish interests iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) Philosophers = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by gods.3) Instead, they used observation and reason to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) Modern science ii) Western political thought = how g and s should work
  • 144. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending Athenian domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of culture but not power4) Democratic government suffered = i) Corruption ii) Selfish interests iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) Philosophers = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by gods.3) Instead, they used observation and reason to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) Modern science ii) Western political thought = how governments and s should work
  • 145. IV) Athens in the Age of Pericles (Continued p.13)C) Economic and Cultural Life1) Athen’s economy improved during Pericles’ Age2) Pericles used riches of Athenian Empire, to rebuild Acropolis destroyed during Persian War.3) Hired the best architects and sculptors to beautify Athens4) Building projects increased Athenians’ prosperity by creating jobs for artisans & workers.5) This also ‘reminded’ Athenians that: The gods bless Athens! (Not: God bless America)D) Peloponnesian War (431BC – 404BC)1) Athens vs Sparta led all of Greece to be at war for 27 years.2) In 404 BC, Sparta captured Athens, ending Athenian domination of the Greek world.3) Athens remained the center of culture but not power4) Democratic government suffered = i) Corruption ii) Selfish interests iii) replaced old ideals of service to the city-stateV) Greek Philosophers (p.13–15)A) Basics1) Philosophers = Lovers of Wisdom2) They challenged the belief that events were caused by gods.3) Instead, they used observation and reason to determine why things happened.4) Their search for laws that ruled the universe influenced:i) Modern science ii) Western political thought = how governments and society should work WHO ARE THE BIG 3 PHILOSOPHERS OF ANCIENT GREECE? Click here and read about them
  • 146. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of ii) Establishing standards of human .2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form .3) S questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just o , not principles.5) Sophists felt was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and p .2) Outspoken critic of S .3) He never . anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student .5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) Socratic Method: posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him.
  • 147. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of ii) Establishing standards of human .2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form .3) S questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just o , not principles.5) Sophists felt was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) P War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and p .2) Outspoken critic of S .3) He never anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student .5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 148. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form .3) S questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just o , not principles.5) Sophists felt was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) P War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and p .2) Outspoken critic of S .3) He never anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student .5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 149. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) S questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just o , not principles.5) Sophists felt was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) P War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and p .2) Outspoken critic of S .3) He never anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student .5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 150. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just o , not principles.5) Sophists felt was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) P War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and p .2) Outspoken critic of S .3) He never anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student .5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 151. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) P War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and p .2) Outspoken critic of S .3) He never anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student .5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 152. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) P War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and p .2) Outspoken critic of S .3) He never anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student .5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 153. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and p .2) Outspoken critic of S .3) He never anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student .5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 154. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship End of P8 Click Back to Main1) Socrates was a stonemason and p . P9 Starts Here2) Outspoken critic of S .3) He never anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student .5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 155. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of S .3) He never anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student .5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 156. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student .5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 157. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student .5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 158. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for the minds of . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 159. B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their .6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for c the minds of y . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 160. B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the ?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for c the minds of y . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 161. B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the greatest good?”7) : posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for c the minds of y . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 162. B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the greatest good?”7) Socratic Method: posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek and - .9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for c the minds of y . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 163. B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the greatest good?”7) Socratic Method: posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek truth and self-knowledge9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional .10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for c the minds of y . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 164. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the greatest good?”7) Socratic Method: posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek truth and self-knowledge9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional power.10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for c the minds of y . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 165. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the greatest good?”7) Socratic Method: posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek truth and self-knowledge9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional power.10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for corrupting the minds of y . ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 166. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the greatest good?”7) Socratic Method: posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek truth and self-knowledge9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional power.10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for corrupting the minds of youth. ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to d iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 167. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the greatest good?”7) Socratic Method: posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek truth and self-knowledge9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional power.10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for corrupting the minds of youth. ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to death iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to e . iv) Socrates believed so much in and he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 168. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the greatest good?”7) Socratic Method: posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek truth and self-knowledge9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional power.10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for corrupting the minds of youth. ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to death iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to escape. iv) Socrates believed so much in d and l he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 169. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the greatest good?”7) Socratic Method: posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek truth and self-knowledge9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional power.10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for corrupting the minds of youth. ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to death iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to escape. iv) Socrates believed so much in democracy and law he let it him. v) death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 170. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the greatest good?”7) Socratic Method: posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek truth and self-knowledge9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional power.10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for corrupting the minds of youth. ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to death iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to escape. iv) Socrates believed so much in democracy and law he let it kill him. v) A death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 171. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists End of P9 Click Back to Main3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the greatest good?”7) Socratic Method: posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek truth and self-knowledge9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional power.10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for corrupting the minds of youth. ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to death iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to escape. iv) Socrates believed so much in democracy and law he let it kill him. v) Accepting death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 172. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)B) Moral and Ethical Principles1) What? i) Concerns the idea of goodness ii) Establishing standards of human behavior2) Example: Debating issues from proper public dress  best form of government3) Sophists questioned accepted ideas4) Sophists felt moral and ethical truths were just opinions, not principles.5) Sophists felt success was more important than morals and ethical truths.6) Peloponnesian War with Sparta led many young Athenians to follow Sophists7) Older citizens accused Sophists of undermining traditional Athenian values.C) Socrates and Citizenship ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?1) Socrates was a stonemason and philosopher.2) Outspoken critic of Sophists End of P9 Click Back to Main3) He never wrote anything4) Most of what is known of him was written by his student Plato.5) Socrates roamed the marketplace questioning fellow citizens about their belief6) Socrates famous conversation starter: “What is the greatest good?”7) Socratic Method: posing a series of questions challenging a persons answers and beliefs8) Socratic Method: Simple and patient way at helping people seek truth and self-knowledge9) Many influential older Athenians disliked Socrates because he threatened traditional power.10) Socrates’ Trial: i) At 70, he as put on trial for corrupting the minds of youth. ii) Jury of 500 condemned him to death iii) According to Plato, Socrates refused to escape. iv) Socrates believed so much in democracy and law he let it kill him. v) Accepting death penalty, drank hemlock, a deadly poison.
  • 173. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason PART 10 Starts Here!1) Plato democracy because of the of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started called the Academy.4) He taught r , not experiences of the s , led to true .5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover u ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect b . iii) Learn best how to organize s .6) Republic – a book written by . i) Describes his vision of an ideal ii) Rejects Athenian because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest. iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 174. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the e of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started called the Academy.4) He taught r , not experiences of the s , led to true .5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover u ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect b . iii) Learn best how to organize s .6) Republic – a book written by . i) Describes his vision of an ideal ii) Rejects Athenian because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 175. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started called the Academy.4) He taught r , not experiences of the s , led to true .5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover u ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect b . iii) Learn best how to organize s .6) Republic – a book written by . i) Describes his vision of an ideal ii) Rejects Athenian because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 176. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught r , not experiences of the s , led to true .5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover u ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect b . iii) Learn best how to organize s .6) Republic – a book written by . i) Describes his vision of an ideal ii) Rejects Athenian because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 177. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the s , led to true .5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover u ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect b . iii) Learn best how to organize s .6) Republic – a book written by . i) Describes his vision of an ideal ii) Rejects Athenian because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 178. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true .5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover u ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect b . iii) Learn best how to organize s .6) Republic – a book written by . i) Describes his vision of an ideal ii) Rejects Athenian because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 179. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover u ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect b . iii) Learn best how to organize s .6) Republic – a book written by . i) Describes his vision of an ideal ii) Rejects Athenian because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 180. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover unchanging ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect b . iii) Learn best how to organize s .6) Republic – a book written by . i) Describes his vision of an ideal ii) Rejects Athenian because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 181. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover unchanging ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect beauty iii) Learn best how to organize s .6) Republic – a book written by . i) Describes his vision of an ideal ii) Rejects Athenian because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 182. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover unchanging ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect beauty iii) Learn best how to organize society6) Republic – a book written by . i) Describes his vision of an ideal ii) Rejects Athenian because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 183. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover unchanging ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect beauty iii) Learn best how to organize society6) Republic – a book written by Plato i) Describes his vision of an ideal ii) Rejects Athenian because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order One of Mr P’s favorites. He highly recommends you read it before you die. You have plenty of time.
  • 184. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover unchanging ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect beauty iii) Learn best how to organize society6) Republic – a book written by Plato i) Describes his vision of an ideal state ii) Rejects Athenian because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 185. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover unchanging ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect beauty iii) Learn best how to organize society6) Republic – a book written by Plato i) Describes his vision of an ideal state ii) Rejects Athenian democracy because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 186. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover unchanging ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect beauty iii) Learn best how to organize society6) Republic – a book written by Plato i) Describes his vision of an ideal state ii) Rejects Athenian democracy because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) State should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest. iv) All are at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 187. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover unchanging ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect beauty iii) Learn best how to organize society6) Republic – a book written by Plato i) Describes his vision of an ideal state ii) Rejects Athenian democracy because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) State should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest. iv) All are equal at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 188. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover unchanging ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect beauty iii) Learn best how to organize society6) Republic – a book written by Plato i) Describes his vision of an ideal state ii) Rejects Athenian democracy because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) State should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest. iv) All are equal at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) workers – produce the necessities of life b) – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 189. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover unchanging ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect beauty iii) Learn best how to organize society6) Republic – a book written by Plato i) Describes his vision of an ideal state ii) Rejects Athenian democracy because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) State should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest. iv) All are equal at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) workers – produce the necessities of life b) soldiers – to defend the state c) – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 190. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover unchanging ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect beauty iii) Learn best how to organize society6) Republic – a book written by Plato i) Describes his vision of an ideal state ii) Rejects Athenian democracy because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) State should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest. iv) All are equal at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) workers – produce the necessities of life b) soldiers – to defend the state c) philosopher kings – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 191. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.14–15)D) Plato and Reason1) Plato distrusted democracy because of the execution of his teacher Socrates.2) Upon Socrates’ death, Plato fled Athens for 10 years3) He returned and started a school called the Academy.4) He taught reason, not experiences of the senses, led to true knowledge.5) Through rational thought, people could: i) Discover unchanging ethical principles ii) Recognize perfect beauty iii) Learn best how to organize society ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?6) Republic – a book written by Plato i) Describes his vision of an ideal state End of P10 Click Back to Main ii) Rejects Athenian democracy because it killed his teacher Socrates iii) State should regulate every aspect of its citizens’ lives to provide for their best interest. iv) All are equal at birth, but could and should rise as far as their ability allows them v) 3 Classes of Ideal Society a) workers – produce the necessities of life b) soldiers – to defend the state c) philosopher kings – rule the state thru special training to guarantee justice & order
  • 192. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) ’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from . to .3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred .4) Preferred govt by the . not by the .5) Like Plato, suspicious of and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the .7) - . represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) - . allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of l , that even . must follow10) Aristotle disliked t . because t . stood above the .11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l .13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 193. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from to .3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred .4) Preferred govt by the not by the .5) Like Plato, suspicious of and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the .7) - represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) - allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of l , that even r must follow10) Aristotle disliked t because t stood above the .11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l .13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 194. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to d .3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred .4) Preferred govt by the not by the .5) Like Plato, suspicious of and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the .7) - represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) - allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of l , that even r must follow10) Aristotle disliked t because t stood above the .11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l .13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 195. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred .4) Preferred govt by the not by the .5) Like Plato, suspicious of and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the .7) - represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) - allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of l , that even r must follow10) Aristotle disliked t because t stood above the .11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l .13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 196. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the not by the .5) Like Plato, suspicious of and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the .7) - represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) - allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of l , that even r must follow10) Aristotle disliked t because t stood above the .11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l .13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 197. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the .7) - represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) - allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of l , that even r must follow10) Aristotle disliked t because t stood above the .11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l .13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 198. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of democracy and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the .7) - represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) - allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of l , that even r must follow10) Aristotle disliked t because t stood above the .11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l .13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 199. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of democracy and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the middle class.7) - represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) - allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of l , that even r must follow10) Aristotle disliked t because t stood above the .11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l .13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 200. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of democracy and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the middle class.7) City-state represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) - allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of l , that even r must follow10) Aristotle disliked t because t stood above the .11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l .13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 201. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of democracy and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the middle class.7) City-state represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) City-state allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of l , that even r must follow10) Aristotle disliked t because t stood above the .11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l .13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 202. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of democracy and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the middle class.7) City-state represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) City-state allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of law, that even r must follow10) Aristotle disliked t because t stood above the .11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l .13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 203. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of democracy and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the middle class.7) City-state represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) City-state allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of law, that even rulers must follow10) Aristotle disliked t because t stood above the .11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l . No one is above the law!13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 204. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of democracy and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the middle class.7) City-state represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) City-state allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of law, that even rulers must follow10) Aristotle disliked tyranny because tyrants stood above the law.11) Ethical question: How should people live? In between .12) Reason is guiding force for l . Tyrants stand above the law!13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 205. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of democracy and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the middle class.7) City-state represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) City-state allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of law, that even rulers must follow10) Aristotle disliked tyranny because tyrants stood above the law.11) Ethical question: How should people live? In moderation between extremes12) Reason is guiding force for l .13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 206. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of democracy and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the middle class.7) City-state represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) City-state allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of law, that even rulers must follow10) Aristotle disliked tyranny because tyrants stood above the law.11) Ethical question: How should people live? In moderation between extremes12) Reason is guiding force for learning13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of k .14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 207. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of democracy and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the middle class.7) City-state represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) City-state allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of law, that even rulers must follow10) Aristotle disliked tyranny because tyrants stood above the law.11) Ethical question: How should people live? In moderation between extremes12) Reason is guiding force for learning13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of knowledge14) He wrote about p ,e ,l , biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 208. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15)E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student.2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of democracy and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the middle class.7) City-state represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) City-state allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of law, that even rulers must follow10) Aristotle disliked tyranny because tyrants stood above the law.11) Ethical question: How should people live? In moderation between extremes12) Reason is guiding force for learning13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of knowledge14) He wrote about politics, ethics, logic, biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European u appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 209. V) Greek Philosophers (Continued p.15) ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?E) Aristotle and the Rule of Law1) Plato’s most famous student. End of P11 Click Back to Main2) Analyzed all forms of government from monarchy to democracy3) Found good and bad in all forms of govt but preferred democracy4) Preferred govt by the many not by the few5) Like Plato, suspicious of democracy and afraid of mob rule6) Favored a constitutional government ruled by members of the middle class.7) City-state represents the best and most natural form of human community.8) City-state allows people to reach their full potential and achieve the ‘good life’9) City-state works only if there is rule of law, that even rulers must follow10) Aristotle disliked tyranny because tyrants stood above the law.11) Ethical question: How should people live? In moderation between extremes12) Reason is guiding force for learning13) Aristotle started a school: The Lyceum – for the study of all branches of knowledge14) He wrote about politics, ethics, logic, biology, literature and other subjects.15) When European universities appeared 1500 years later, courses based on Aristotle’s work.
  • 210. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) PART 12 Starts Here A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland . • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son . • After Athens & Thebes attack, . defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the . Empire but was . Click for larger map B) Conquest of Persia 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the map A) Minor B) down to P . D) back up & east C) south to E . to B . E) then seized F) A . P CapitalsH) Back to Babylon = G) I ValleyD in 323 BC at . 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central to I
  • 211. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son . • After Athens & Thebes attack, defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Empire but was . Click for larger map B) Conquest of Persia 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the mapA) A . Minor B) down to P .D) back up & east C) south to E . to B . E) then seized F) A . P CapitalsH) Back to Babylon = G) I ValleyD in 323 BC at . 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central A to
  • 212. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son Alexander. • After Athens & Thebes attack, defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Empire but was . Click for larger map B) Conquest of Persia 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the mapA) A . Minor B) down to P .D) back up & east C) south to E . to B . E) then seized F) A . P CapitalsH) Back to Babylon = G) I ValleyD in 323 BC at . 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central A to
  • 213. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son Alexander. • After Athens & Thebes attack, Phillip II defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Empire but was . Click for larger map B) Conquest of Persia 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the mapA) A . Minor B) down to P .D) back up & east C) south to E . to B . E) then seized F) A . P CapitalsH) Back to Babylon = G) I ValleyD in 323 BC at . 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central A to
  • 214. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son Alexander. • After Athens & Thebes attack, Phillip II defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Persian Empire but was assassinated. Click for larger map B) Conquest of Persia 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the mapA) A . Minor B) down to P .D) back up & east C) south to E . to B . E) then seized F) A . P CapitalsH) Back to Babylon = G) I ValleyD in 323 BC at . 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central A to
  • 215. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son Alexander. • After Athens & Thebes attack, Phillip II defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Persian Empire but was assassinated. B) Conquest of Persia Click for larger ma 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the map A A) Asia Minor B) down to P .D) back up & east C) south to E . to B . E) then seized F) A . P CapitalsH) Back to Babylon = G) I ValleyD in 323 BC at . 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central A to
  • 216. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son Alexander. • After Athens & Thebes attack, Phillip II defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Persian Empire but was assassinated. B) Conquest of Persia Click for larger ma 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the map A A) Asia Minor B) down to PalestineD) back up & east B C) south to E . to B . E) then seized F) A . P CapitalsH) Back to Babylon = G) I ValleyD in 323 BC at . 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central A to
  • 217. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son Alexander. • After Athens & Thebes attack, Phillip II defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Persian Empire but was assassinated. Click for larger map B) Conquest of Persia 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the map A A) Asia Minor B) down to PalestineD) back up & east B C) south to Egypt to B . E) then seized F) A . P Capitals CH) Back to Babylon = G) I ValleyD in 323 BC at . 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central A to
  • 218. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son Alexander. • After Athens & Thebes attack, Phillip II defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Persian Empire but was assassinated. Click for larger map B) Conquest of Persia 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the map A A) Asia Minor B) down to PalestineD) back up & east B C) south to Egypt D to Babylon E) then seized F) A . P Capitals CH) Back to Babylon = G) I ValleyD in 323 BC at . 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central A to
  • 219. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son Alexander. • After Athens & Thebes attack, Phillip II defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Persian Empire but was assassinated. Click for larger map B) Conquest of Persia 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the map A A) Asia Minor B) down to PalestineD) back up & east B C) south to Egypt D E to Babylon E) then seized F) A . Persian Capitals CH) Back to Babylon = G) I ValleyD in 323 BC at . 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central A to
  • 220. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son Alexander. • After Athens & Thebes attack, Phillip II defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Persian Empire but was assassinated. Click for larger map B) Conquest of Persia 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the map A A) Asia Minor B) down to Palestine FD) back up & east B C) south to Egypt D E to Babylon E) then seized F) Afghanistan Persian Capitals CH) Back to Babylon = G) I ValleyD in 323 BC at . 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central A to
  • 221. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son Alexander. • After Athens & Thebes attack, Phillip II defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Persian Empire but was assassinated. Click for larger map B) Conquest of Persia 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the map A A) Asia Minor B) down to Palestine FD) back up & east B C) south to Egypt D E to Babylon E) then seized F) Afghanistan G Persian Capitals CH) Back to Babylon = G) Indus ValleyD in 323 BC at . 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central A to
  • 222. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son Alexander. • After Athens & Thebes attack, Phillip II defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Persian Empire but was assassinated. Click for larger map B) Conquest of Persia 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the map A A) Asia Minor B) down to Palestine FD) back up & east B C) south to Egypt D E to Babylon E) then seized F) Afghanistan H G Persian Capitals CH) Back to Babylon = G) Indus ValleyDeath in 323 BC at 32 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the M Sea across the M E to Central A to
  • 223. VI) Alexander and Hellenistic Age (p.15-17) A) Basics ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS? • After Plato’s death, Aristotle left Athens • 345 BC, Aristotle went to his homeland Macedonia End of P12 Click Back to Main • In Macedonia, Aristotle tutored Macedonian King Philip II’s son Alexander. • After Athens & Thebes attack, Phillip II defeats Greeks & soon took all of Greece • Phillip II dreamed of conquering the Persian Empire but was assassinated. Click for larger map B) Conquest of Persia 1) Phillip II son  Alexander  King at 20 2) Alexander also wanted to conquer Persia. 3) 334 BC, Alexander beats Persians in: Draw the letters A-H on the map A A) Asia Minor B) down to Palestine FD) back up & east B C) south to Egypt D E to Babylon E) then seized F) Afghanistan H G Persian Capitals CH) Back to Babylon = G) Indus ValleyDeath in 323 BC at 32 4) By 327 BC, Alexander’s empire stretched more than 2,000 miles from the Mediterranean Sea across the Middle East to Central Asia to India
  • 224. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of in Babylon at age 32 PART 13 Starts Here2) Generals divided up the empire3) For years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new c . b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek s ,t and settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed ideas. E) Greeks adopted local . e) Mix of and cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by G ,P ,E and I .5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few remainedb) Powerful or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant managed citiesd) had ultimate controle) Early Greek codes of were NOT relevant
  • 225. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) Generals divided up the empire3) For years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new c . b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek s ,t and a settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed ideas. E) Greeks adopted local c . e) Mix of and cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by G ,P ,E and I .5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few remainedb) Powerful or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant managed citiesd) had ultimate controle) Early Greek codes of were NOT relevant
  • 226. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire3) For years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new c . b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek s ,t and a settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed ideas. E) Greeks adopted local c . e) Mix of and cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by G ,P ,E and I .5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few remainedb) Powerful or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant managed citiesd) had ultimate controle) Early Greek codes of were NOT relevant
  • 227. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire3) For 300 years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new c . b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek s ,t and a settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed ideas. E) Greeks adopted local c . e) Mix of and cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by G ,P ,E and I .5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few remainedb) Powerful or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant managed citiesd) had ultimate controle) Early Greek codes of were NOT relevant
  • 228. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire3) For 300 years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new cities b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek s ,t and a settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed ideas. E) Greeks adopted local c . e) Mix of and cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by G ,P ,E and I .5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few remainedb) Powerful or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant managed citiesd) had ultimate controle) Early Greek codes of were NOT relevant
  • 229. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire3) For 300 years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new cities b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek soldiers, traders and artisans settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed ideas. E) Greeks adopted local c . e) Mix of and cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by G ,P ,E and I .5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few remainedb) Powerful or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant managed citiesd) had ultimate controle) Early Greek codes of were NOT relevant
  • 230. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire3) For 300 years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new cities b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek soldiers, traders and artisans settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed Greek ideas. E) Greeks adopted local customs e) Mix of E and W cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by G ,P ,E and I .5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few remainedb) Powerful or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant managed citiesd) had ultimate controle) Early Greek codes of were NOT relevant
  • 231. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire3) For 300 years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new cities b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek soldiers, traders and artisans settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed Greek ideas. E) Greeks adopted local customs e) Mix of Eastern and Western cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: H civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by G ,P ,E and I . West5) Hellenistic World (p.17) Far-Easta) Few remainedb) Powerful West Mid-East East or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant managed citiesd) had ultimate controle) Early Greek codes of were NOT relevant This time influenced the layout of today between east and west
  • 232. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire3) For 300 years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new cities b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek soldiers, traders and artisans settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed Greek ideas. E) Greeks adopted local customs e) Mix of Eastern and Western cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: Hellenistic civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by G ,P ,E and I .5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few remainedb) Powerful or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant managed citiesd) had ultimate controle) Early Greek codes of were NOT relevant
  • 233. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire3) For 300 years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new cities b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek soldiers, traders and artisans settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed Greek ideas. E) Greeks adopted local customs e) Mix of Eastern and Western cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: Hellenistic civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by Greeks, Persians, Egyptians and Indians Point to these 4 areas on the map5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few remainedb) Powerful or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant managed citiesd) had ultimate control
  • 234. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire3) For 300 years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new cities b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek soldiers, traders and artisans settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed Greek ideas. E) Greeks adopted local customs e) Mix of Eastern and Western cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: Hellenistic civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by Greeks, Persians, Egyptians and Indians5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few democracies remainedb) Powerful or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant managed citiesd) had ultimate control
  • 235. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire3) For 300 years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new cities b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek soldiers, traders and artisans settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed Greek ideas. E) Greeks adopted local customs e) Mix of Eastern and Western cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: Hellenistic civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by Greeks, Persians, Egyptians and Indians5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few democracies remainedb) Powerful individuals or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant managed citiesd) had ultimate control
  • 236. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire3) For 300 years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new cities b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek soldiers, traders and artisans settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed Greek ideas. E) Greeks adopted local customs e) Mix of Eastern and Western cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: Hellenistic civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by Greeks, Persians, Egyptians and Indians5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few democracies remainedb) Powerful individuals or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant governors managed citiesd) had ultimate control
  • 237. C) Legacy of Alexander1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire3) For 300 years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new cities b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek soldiers, traders and artisans settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed Greek ideas. E) Greeks adopted local customs e) Mix of Eastern and Western cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: Hellenistic civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by Greeks, Persians, Egyptians and Indians5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few democracies remainedb) Powerful individuals or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant governors managed citiesd) King had ultimate control
  • 238. C) Legacy of Alexander ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS?1) Alexander died of fever in Babylon at age 322) 3 Generals divided up the empire End of P13 Click Back to Main3) For 300 years, their descendants competed for power over the lands Alex conquered4) Although Alex’s Empire crumbled, it unleashed many changes: a) Alex found many new cities b) Generals after him did the same c) Greek soldiers, traders and artisans settled in these new cities. d) Local people absorbed Greek ideas. E) Greeks adopted local customs e) Mix of Eastern and Western cultures f) Then a new culture emerged: Hellenistic civilization g) Hellenistic world was influenced by Greeks, Persians, Egyptians and Indians5) Hellenistic World (p.17)a) Few democracies remainedb) Powerful individuals or groups usually ruled cities.c) Distant governors managed citiesd) King had ultimate control
  • 239. 6) Stoicism (p.17) PART 14 Starts Here• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in A by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) d ii) d .• Zeno advised to calmly a whatever life brought• Stoics preached high m standards: i) b d ii) e .• All people could r (including w and s )7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, emerged as a powerful new state.• After takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 240. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) d ii) d .• Zeno advised to calmly a whatever life brought• Stoics preached high m standards: i) b d ii) e .• All people could r (including w and s ) What does this cartoon mean? Go over C & D and find out7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, emerged as a powerful new state.• After takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 241. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) d .• Zeno advised to calmly a whatever life brought• Stoics preached high m standards: i) b d ii) e .• All people could r (including w and s )7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, emerged as a powerful new state.• After takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 242. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly a whatever life brought• Stoics preached high m standards: i) b d ii) e .• All people could r (including w and s )7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, emerged as a powerful new state.• After takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 243. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high m standards: i) b d ii) e .• All people could r (including w and s ) Get it now? Who can explain? Participation pts await you!7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, emerged as a powerful new state.• After takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 244. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) b d ii) e .• All people could r (including w and s )7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, emerged as a powerful new state.• After takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 245. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) e .• All people could r (including w and s )7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, emerged as a powerful new state.• After takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 246. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) equality of all.• All people could r (including w and s )7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, emerged as a powerful new state.• After takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 247. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) equality of all.• All people could reason (including w and s )7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, emerged as a powerful new state.• After takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 248. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) equality of all.• All people could reason (including women and s )7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, emerged as a powerful new state.• After takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 249. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) equality of all.• All people could reason (including women and slaves)7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, emerged as a powerful new state.• After takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 250. Emerging Emerged6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) equality of all.• All people could reason (including women and slaves)7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, Rome emerged as a powerful new state.• After takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world. Watch Rome Rise and Fallc) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 251. 6) Stoicism (p.17) Roman Empire around133 BC• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life broughtAsia Minor• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) equality of all.• All people could reason (including women and slaves)7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, Rome emerged as a powerful new state.• After Rome takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 252. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) equality of all.• All people could reason (including women and slaves)7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, Rome emerged as a powerful new state.• After Rome takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces Greece as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) l ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 253. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) equality of all.• All people could reason (including women and slaves)7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, Rome emerged as a powerful new state.• After Rome takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces Greece as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) law ii) f iii) j iv) g .
  • 254. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) equality of all.• All people could reason (including women and slaves)7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, Rome emerged as a powerful new state.• After Rome takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces Greece as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) law ii) freedom iii) j iv) g .
  • 255. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) equality of all.• All people could reason (including women and slaves)7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, Rome emerged as a powerful new state.• After Rome takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces Greece as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) law ii) freedom iii) justice iv) g .
  • 256. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) equality of all.• All people could reason (including women and slaves)7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, Rome emerged as a powerful new state.• After Rome takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces Greece as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) law ii) freedom iii) justice iv) government .
  • 257. 6) Stoicism (p.17)• Uncertain times contributed to the rise of new schools of philosophy.• Stoicism was found in Athens by Zeno• Zeno urged people to avoid i) desires ii) disappointment.• Zeno advised to calmly accept whatever life brought• Stoics preached high moral standards: i) belief in dignity ii) equality of all.• All people could reason (including women and slaves)7) Hellenistic Age Revisited (p.17)• During the Hellenistic era, Rome emerged as a powerful new state.• After Rome takes Asia Minor in 133 BC, it replaces Greece as the main powerin the Mediterranean world.c) Greek greatest contributions and influence to the present day i) law ii) freedom iii) justice iv) government . ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS? End of P14 Click Back to Main
  • 258. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18) PART 15 Begins Here• A completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of .• Concerned with a Just: a) S b) I .• Written in d format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers.• Topic of this Primary Source: T is NOT a good form of govt.• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answerVIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19)A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being tooC) Concerned with: i) a ii) w c -s .D) Believes L is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) M ii) A I .E) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 259. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of j .• Concerned with a Just: a) S b) I .• Written in d format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers.• Topic of this Primary Source: T is NOT a good form of govt.• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answerVIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19)A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too .C) Concerned with: i) a ii) w c -s .D) Believes L is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) M ii) A I .E) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 260. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of justice• Concerned with a Just: a) S b) I .• Written in d format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers.• Topic of this Primary Source: T is NOT a good form of govt.• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answerVIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19)A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too .C) Concerned with: i) a ii) w c -s .D) Believes L is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) M ii) A I .E) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 261. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of justice• Concerned with a Just: a) State b) Individual• Written in d format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers.• Topic of this Primary Source: T is NOT a good form of govt.• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answerVIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19)A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too .C) Concerned with: i) a ii) w c -s .D) Believes L is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) M ii) A I .E) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 262. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of justice• Concerned with a Just: a) State b) Individual• Written in dialogue format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers.• Topic of this Primary Source: T is NOT a good form of govt.• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answer 1) Look! Mr P picked us to demonstrate dialogue. 2) Yes! But what shall Isn’t that great? we dialogue about?VIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19) 3) Dialogue!A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too .C) Concerned with: i) a ii) w c -s .D) Believes L is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) M ii) A I .E) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F) Glaucon Socrates (Plato’s Brother)
  • 263. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of justice• Concerned with a Just: a) State b) Individual• Written in dialogue format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers.• Topic of this Primary Source: Tyranny is NOT a good form of govt.• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answerVIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19)A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too .C) Concerned with: i) a ii) w c -s .D) Believes L is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) M ii) A I .E) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 264. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of justice• Concerned with a Just: a) State b) Individual• Written in dialogue format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers.• Topic of this Primary Source: Tyranny is NOT a good form of govt.• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answer ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS? End of P15 Click Back to MainVIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19) PART 16 Begins HereA) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too .C) Concerned with: i) a ii) w c -s .D) Believes L is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) M ii) A I .E) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 265. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of justice• PLATO Concerned with a Just: a) State b) Individual points up to the ideal.• Written in dialogue format – two characters talking back and forth What could be?• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers.• Topic of this Primary Source: Tyranny is NOT a good form of govt.• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answer ARISTOTLE points down to the here and now What is?VIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19)A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too ideal.C) Concerned with: i) a ii) w c -s .D) Believes L is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) M ii) A I .E) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 266. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of justice• Concerned with a Just: a) State b) Individual• Written in dialogue format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers.• Topic of this Primary Source: Tyranny is NOT a good form of govt.• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answerVIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19)A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too ideal.C) Concerned with: i) actual working of govt ii) w c -s .D) Believes L is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) M ii) A I .E) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 267. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of justice• Concerned with a Just: a) State b) Individual• Written in dialogue format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers.• Topic of this Primary Source: Tyranny is NOT a good form of govt.• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answerVIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19)A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too idealC) Concerned with: i) actual working of govt ii) what govt best suits city-stateD) Believes L is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) M ii) A I .E) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 268. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of justice• Concerned with a Just: a) State b) Individual• Written in dialogue format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers.• Topic of this Primary Source: Tyranny is NOT a good form of govt.• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answerVIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19)A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too idealC) Concerned with: i) actual working of govt ii) what govt best suits city-stateD) Believes Law is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) M ii) A I .E) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 269. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of justice• Concerned with a Just: a) State b) Individual• Written in dialogue format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers.• Topic of this Primary Source: Tyranny is NOT a good form of govt.• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answerVIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19)A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too idealC) Concerned with: i) actual working of govt ii) what govt best suits city-stateD) Believes Law is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) Monarch ii) A I .E) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 270. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of justice• Concerned with a Just: a) State b) Individual• Written in dialogue format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers. Law is supreme• Topic of this Primary Source: Tyranny is NOT a good form of govt. over people• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answerVIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19)A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too idealC) Concerned with: i) actual working of govt ii) what govt best suits city-stateD) Believes Law is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) Monarch ii) Any individualE) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 271. VII) Republic by Plato (p.18)• A book completed around 360 BC B) Explains the ideal of justice• Concerned with a Just: a) State b) Individual• Written in dialogue format – two characters talking back and forth• Main character is Socrates, who asks questions to Glaucon, who answers. Law is supreme• Topic of this Primary Source: Tyranny is NOT a good form of govt. over people• What is Plato’s opinion of tyranny? Give details to support your answer ANY QUESTIONS or COMMENTS? End of P16 Click Back to MainVIII) Politics by Aristotle (p.19)A) Book completed around 322 BC B) Criticized Plato for being too idealC) Concerned with: i) actual working of govt ii) what govt best suits city-stateD) Believes Law is superior to trusting Govt than to: i) Monarch ii) Any individualE) Does Aristotle believe that humans beings are incapable of governing in a just way?E)F) What might Aristotle have to say about Plato’s idea of a philosopher-king rule?F)
  • 272. Spartan Government Chart Return
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  • 274. EMPIRE OF ALEXANDER THE GREATTap backspace for previous map Click back to smaller map
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