Seminar Report
1
1
Windows 8 Consumer Preview:
Frequently asked questions
Windows 8: Inside What and How
Harsh Kishore Mis...
2Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
1.Introduction
Microsoft Windows 8, the latest “Next gene...
Windows 8: Inside What and How
The first version of Microsoft Windows,
degree of functionality, achieved little popularity...
4Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
In July 1993, Microsoft released Windows NT based on a ne...
5Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
This new version was widely praised in computer magazines...
Windows 8: Inside What and How
On October 22, 2009, Microsoft released
which introduced a large number of new features, Wi...
7Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
3.Windows 8 Pre-Releases
Windows 8 is available in pre-re...
8Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
2. Windows 8 Consumer Preview
At Mobile World Congress in...
9Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
• Broad range of product changes and improvements: Since ...
10Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
4.Windows 8 Features
Windows 8 is a reimagined windows w...
11Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
Major Features at a Glance
Metro interface
New App model...
12Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
Metro Interface
The major difference between Windows 8 a...
13Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
New App Model
Apps work together: Windows 8 makes it eas...
14Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
The New Start screen
The new Start screen has all of the...
15Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
Charms
One new interface feature that takes some getting...
16Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
visible was for using two monitors with Windows 8 -- I f...
17Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
Old Desktop Interface
When you click the Desktop tile on...
18Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
The Quick Launch bar has also been eliminated. In Window...
19Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
New Ribbon Interface
New ribbon interface is being used ...
Windows 8: Inside What and How
Well, it appears that Microsoft felt our pain at the demise of the Up button in Vista and 7...
21Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
Windows To Go
A feature first seen on Linux is now makin...
22Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
returning to that computer Windows To Go will identify t...
Windows 8: Inside What and How
With Internet Explorer 10 Consumer Preview, we’ve reimagined what a great web
experience ca...
24Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
The Developer Preview shipped with a small number of Met...
25Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
The People app is your most complete address book. You c...
26Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
Navigation and Mousing around
Although the large tiles p...
27Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
At first, there doesn't seem to be a way to actually clo...
28Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
can communicate effectively right from the start. Window...
29Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
FAQs
Windows 8 Consumer Preview:
Frequently asked questi...
30Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
Downloading and installing
What are the system requireme...
31Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
Current operating system What you can keep
Windows Devel...
32Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
How do l install Windows 8 Consumer Preview?
The easiest...
33Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
If you've already installed Windows 8 Consumer Preview a...
34Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
1. Open Windows Store, swipe in from the right edge of t...
35Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
Conclusion
If you haven't downloaded Windows 8 Consumer ...
36Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT
References
www.microsoft.com
www.techrepublic.com
www.re...
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Windows 8: inside what and how

  1. 1. Seminar Report 1 1 Windows 8 Consumer Preview: Frequently asked questions Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech. IT International Institute of Management Engineering and Technology, Jaipur
  2. 2. 2Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT 1.Introduction Microsoft Windows 8, the latest “Next generation” operating system from Microsoft Corp.. Windows 8 has been the most buzzing word in computing since Oct,09, the time when Microsoft Corporation launched its operating system Windows 7. Due to huge success, stability and reliability of Windows 7, there was a talk started about what’s next? Windows 8 was just one of possible names for the succesor of 7. Microsoft also confirmed that Windows 8 would be its next operating System. On 29th 02 2012, a big day for the Windows team. At Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain a few moments ago, they unveiled the Windows 8 Consumer Preview to partners and press. Microsoft Windows 8 has been reimagined to focus on your life. The beautiful, fast, and fluid design is perfect for a range of hardware: from compact, touch- enabled slates and lightweight laptops, to large, powerful all-in-ones with high-definition screens. It’s smooth, intuitive, and gives you instant access to your people, apps, and stuff, so you spend less time searching and more time doing. You’ll love browsing through the Windows Store and downloading apps to help you work more efficiently, or install the latest games and compete with friends. Apps can work together, too, so you can share photos, maps, contacts, links, and whatever else you want faster and easier. No matter what task you want to complete, Windows 8 helps you get it done quickly. It’s fast—whether you’re completing a project or playing a game. Windows 8 starts quickly and uses less memory so there’s more room for your apps and data. Windows 8 is cloud connected so you can access your photos, documents, and settings from wherever you are, on any Windows 8 PC. Windows 8 has the flexibility you need.
  3. 3. Windows 8: Inside What and How The first version of Microsoft Windows, degree of functionality, achieved little popularity and was to compete with Apple's own operating system. The first version of Microsoft Windows included a simple graphi painting program called Windows Paint appointment "calendar"; a "cardfiler"; a " terminal"; "Clipboard"; and RAM called Reversi.Windows 1.0 is not a complete operating system; rather, it extends Microsoft Windows version 2.0 popular than its predecessor. Windows 2.03 (release date January 1988) had changed the OS from tiled windows to overlapping windows. The result of this change led to Apple Co filing a suit against Microsoft alleging infringement on Apple's copyrights. Microsoft Windows version 3.0 to achieve broad commercial success, selling 2 million copies in the first six months. It featured improvements to the user interface and to multitasking capabilities. It received a facelift in Windows 3.1, made generally available on ended on December 31, 2001. Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech. 2.History of Windows The first version of Microsoft Windows, version 1.0, released in November 1985, lacked a degree of functionality, achieved little popularity and was to compete with Apple's own The first version of Microsoft Windows included a simple graphi Windows Paint; Windows Write, a simple word processor appointment "calendar"; a "cardfiler"; a "notepad"; a "clock"; a "control panel RAM driver. It also included the MS-DOS Executive Windows 1.0 is not a complete operating system; rather, it extends version 2.0 was released in November 1987 and was slightly more popular than its predecessor. Windows 2.03 (release date January 1988) had changed the OS from tiled windows to overlapping windows. The result of this change led to Apple Co filing a suit against Microsoft alleging infringement on Apple's copyrights. Fig:The Windows family tree. version 3.0, released in 1990, was the first Microsoft Windows version to achieve broad commercial success, selling 2 million copies in the first six months. It featured improvements to the user interface and to multitasking capabilities. It received a facelift in Windows 3.1, made generally available on March 1, 1992. Windows 3.1 support ended on December 31, 2001. 3Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT , released in November 1985, lacked a degree of functionality, achieved little popularity and was to compete with Apple's own The first version of Microsoft Windows included a simple graphics word processor; an control panel"; a "computer DOS Executive and a game Windows 1.0 is not a complete operating system; rather, it extends MS-DOS. was released in November 1987 and was slightly more popular than its predecessor. Windows 2.03 (release date January 1988) had changed the OS from tiled windows to overlapping windows. The result of this change led to Apple Computer filing a suit against Microsoft alleging infringement on Apple's copyrights.. osoft Windows version to achieve broad commercial success, selling 2 million copies in the first six months. It featured improvements to the user interface and to multitasking capabilities. It received a March 1, 1992. Windows 3.1 support
  4. 4. 4Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT In July 1993, Microsoft released Windows NT based on a new kernel. Windows NT 3.1 was the first release of Windows NT. NT was considered to be the professional OS and was the first Windows version to utilize pre-emptive multitasking. Windows NT would later be retooled to also function as a home operating system, with Windows XP. On August 24, 1995, Microsoft released Windows 95, a new, and major, consumer version that made further changes to the user interface, and also used pre-emptive multitasking. Windows 95 was designed to replace not only Windows 3.1, but also Windows for Workgroups, and MS-DOS. It was also the first Windows operating system to use Plug and Play capabilities. The changes Windows 95 brought to the desktop were revolutionary, as opposed to evolutionary, such as those in Windows 98 and Windows Me. Mainstream support for Windows 95 ended on December 31, 2000 and extended support for Windows 95 ended on December 31, 2001. Next in the consumer line was Microsoft Windows 98 released on June 25, 1998. It was followed with the release of Windows 98 Second Edition (Windows 98 SE) in 1999. Second Edition was also much easier to use and much smoother than the first edition of Windows 98. Hardware support through device drivers was increased. Many minor problems present in the original Windows 98 were found and fixed which make it, according to many, the most stable release of Windows 9x family—to the extent that commentators used to say that Windows 98's beta version was more stable than Windows 95's final (gamma) version. Mainstream support for Windows 98 ended on June 30, 2002 and extended support for Windows 98 ended on July 11, 2006. As part of its "professional" line, Microsoft released Windows 2000 in February 2000. During 2004 part of the Source Code for Windows 2000 was leaked onto the Internet. This was bad for Microsoft as the same kernel used in Windows 2000 was used in Windows XP. The consumer version following Windows 98 was Windows Me (Windows Millennium Edition). Released in September 2000, Windows Me implemented a number of new technologies for Microsoft: most notably publicized was "Universal Plug and Play". Windows Me was heavily criticized due to slowness, freezes and hardware problems. In October 2001, Microsoft released Windows XP, a version built on the Windows NT kernel that also retained the consumer-oriented usability of Windows 95 and its successors.
  5. 5. 5Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT This new version was widely praised in computer magazines. It shipped in two distinct editions, "Home" and "Professional", the former lacking many of the superior security and networking features of the Professional edition. Windows XP SP1 was released in September 2002, SP2 came out in August 2004 and SP3 came out in April 2008. Service Pack 2 provided significant improvements and encouraged widespread adoption of XP among both home and business users. Windows XP lasted longer as Microsoft's flagship operating system than any other version of Windows, from 25 October 2001 to 30 January 2007 when it was succeeded by Windows Vista. Additionally, the first "Media Center" edition was released in Fig: Windows XP 2002, with an emphasis on support for DVD and TV functionality including program recording and a remote control. Mainstream support for Windows XP ended on April 14, 2009. Extended support will continue until April 8, 2014. In April 2003, Windows Server 2003 was introduced, replacing the Windows 2000 line of server products with a number of new features and a strong focus on security; this was followed in December 2005 by Windows Server 2003 R2. On January 30, 2007, Microsoft released Windows Vista. It contains a number of new features, from a redesigned shell and user interface to significant technical changes, with a particular focus on security features. It is available in a number of different editions, and has been subject to some criticism.
  6. 6. Windows 8: Inside What and How On October 22, 2009, Microsoft released which introduced a large number of new features, Windows 7 was intended to be a more focused, incremental upgrade to the Windows line, wi applications and hardware which Windows Vista was not at the time. Windows 7 has touch support, a redesigned Windows shell home networking system called HomeGroup, and performance improvements. Windows 8 has been the most buzzing word in computing since Oct,09, the time whe Microsoft Corporation launched it’s operating system Windows 7. Windows 8 was just one of possible names for the succesor of 7. Microsoft also confirmed that Wind it’s next operating System. On 29 World Congress in Barcelona, Spain a Consumer Preview to partners and press. Fig: Windows 7 Logo Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech. On October 22, 2009, Microsoft released Windows 7. Unlike its predecessor, Windows Vista, which introduced a large number of new features, Windows 7 was intended to be a more focused, incremental upgrade to the Windows line, with the goal of being compatible with applications and hardware which Windows Vista was not at the time. Windows 7 has Windows shell with a new taskbar, referred to as the home networking system called HomeGroup, and performance improvements. Fig: Windows 7 taskbar Windows 8 has been the most buzzing word in computing since Oct,09, the time whe Microsoft Corporation launched it’s operating system Windows 7. Windows 8 was just one of possible names for the succesor of 7. Microsoft also confirmed that Wind it’s next operating System. On 29th 02 2012, a big day for the Windows team. At Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain a few moments ago, they unveiled Consumer Preview to partners and press. Fig: Windows 8 Logo 6Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT . Unlike its predecessor, Windows Vista, which introduced a large number of new features, Windows 7 was intended to be a more th the goal of being compatible with applications and hardware which Windows Vista was not at the time. Windows 7 has multi- , referred to as the Superbar, a home networking system called HomeGroup, and performance improvements. Windows 8 has been the most buzzing word in computing since Oct,09, the time when Microsoft Corporation launched it’s operating system Windows 7. Windows 8 was just one of possible names for the succesor of 7. Microsoft also confirmed that Windows 8 would be 02 2012, a big day for the Windows team. At Mobile few moments ago, they unveiled the Windows 8 Windows 8 Logo
  7. 7. 7Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT 3.Windows 8 Pre-Releases Windows 8 is available in pre-release versions till now. Two pre-releases are available. Windows 8 Consumer Preview is a prerelease version of Windows 8 that focuses on people and apps and gives you powerful new ways to use social technologies to connect with the people who are important to you. It's Windows reimagined. Windows 8 Consumer Preview is built on the rock-solid foundation of Windows 7 and has the security and reliability features you expect from Windows, but we’ve made it even better. It’s fast, and it’s made to work on a variety of form factors—especially the new generation of touch devices. Before Microsoft Windows 8 Consumer Preview (further referenced as “Windows 8”), Windows 8 Developers Preview was launched in September, 2011. 1. Windows 8 Developers Preview Microsoft unveiled new Windows 8 features and improvements on September 13, 2011, day one of the BUILD developer conference. Microsoft also released a developer preview (build 8102) of Windows 8 for the developer community to download and start working with. This developer preview includes tools for building "metro style apps", such as Microsoft Windows SDK for Metro style applications, Microsoft Visual Studio 11 Express for Windows 8 Developer Preview and Microsoft Expression Blend 5 developer preview. According to Microsoft, there were more than 500,000 downloads of the developer preview within the first 12 hours of its release. The Developer Preview introduced the Start screen. The Start button opens the Start screen instead of the Start menu in this build. Microsoft has released the Windows 8 Developer Preview or pre-beta version of its next Operating System. Windows 8 Developer Preview or pre-beta version can be downloaded directly from Microsoft servers by anyone who wants to try it. In this blog post we will be talking about some of the features which come with this new operating system compared to previous versions. On 16 February 2012, Microsoft postponed the expiration date of the developer preview. Originally set to expire on 11 March 2012, this release is now set to expire on 15 January 2013.
  8. 8. 8Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT 2. Windows 8 Consumer Preview At Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Microsoft unveiled the Windows 8 Consumer Preview to partners and press. Based on a broad range of feedback, claimed over 100,000 code changes and the Consumer Preview represents a refined product ready for broad and daily usage by those of you willing to test a pre-release OS. Key among the changes and additions are new navigation features, completely revamped Metro apps and the addition of "charms," which are tools that bring a variety of features such as Search within easy reach. Whether you have a logo PC or you’ve built your own PC, the recommendations for the Consumer Preview include: • 1 GHz or faster processor • 1 GB RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit) • 16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit) • DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver This setup gets you going with Windows 8 such that it is functionally equivalent to Windows 7, and as we have talked about previously, you should see measureable improvements in performance in a number of dimensions with a system at this level. With so much to dive into, let’s talk about what is different in the Consumer Preview at a high level: Fig:Windows 8 Start Screen
  9. 9. 9Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT • Broad range of product changes and improvements: Since the Developer Preview in September, designed to preview the programming platform, Windows 8 has progressed across every dimension. From completing the user experience for touch, keyboard, and mouse, to refining the development platform, to improving performance, quality, and reliability across all subsystems as well as new features, the Consumer Preview represents a complete view of the capabilities of Windows 8. • Windows Store with an “App Preview” of new apps: The Windows 8 Consumer Preview marks the opening of the Windows Store for testing. You’ll see a variety of new Metro style apps from both third-party developers and Microsoft. During the Consumer Preview, these apps are available to try and experience at no cost to users. Please note, these apps and the set of preinstalled apps are at an early stage of development and are available as an early App Preview, and will be updated via the Windows Store. In addition, the Store will offer personalized recommendations, and Windows 8 gives users the ability to take their apps and settings with them across multiple PCs, making it easy to discover and try new apps while offering developers the greatest opportunity of any platform • Connecting to the cloud across Windows PCs and Windows Phones: You’ll experience seamless integration with the content across your web services. Optionally signing in with a Microsoft account provides access to features including the ability to roam all settings, use cloud storage, communicate with email, calendar, and contacts, and connect to a broad range of services. Your connection to the cloud works across your Windows PCs and your Windows Phones. You’ll also experience early previews of the Metro style apps for Mail, Calendar, People, Messaging, Photos, and SkyDrive. • Internet Explorer 10 Platform Preview 5: With IE10, we reimagined the browser to create a new experience designed specifically for Windows 8 devices. It provides an edge to edge interface that is all about less browser, and more web. Fast and fluid, IE is hardware-accelerated to enable web performance. The same rendering engine and high-performance script engine is available on the Windows desktop as well.
  10. 10. 10Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT 4.Windows 8 Features Windows 8 is a reimagined windows with a new user interface and designed especially for new touch screen devices. Of course, Windows 8 offers much more with it’s feature rich design. Windows 7, only better Behind the bold, new look of Windows 8, is the rock-solid foundation you’ve come to expect from Windows® 7. Immerse yourself in the exciting features of a new generation of PCs while enjoying the full power of Windows. In addition to the sleek, new look of the Start screen, Windows 8 incorporates the desktop that you’re already familiar with. In the desktop, you’ll see that the settings, devices, and features you used in Windows 7 are still there. You can run older apps, too. And just like Windows 7, security and reliability is built into Windows 8. Everything that was great about Windows 7, we made even better. Beautiful design Windows 8 has a bold new style that’s sleek and modern, and it’s been beautifully designed. From the clean look of the words on your screen to the way apps animate, the experience is new and the way it works is intuitive, so you can get started right away.
  11. 11. 11Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT Major Features at a Glance Metro interface New App model New Start Screen Charms Reset and Refresh feature Old Windows Desktop New Ribbon interface Multiple monitor support Windows To Go. No activation Skydrive and Windows Live integration Social integration with Facebook & Twitter Faster Boot times USB 3.0 support. Internet Explorer 10: the web by Touch Built-in Metro apps Tools for power users. Navigating & Mousing around Touch or Keyboard or Mouse: your Choice
  12. 12. 12Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT Metro Interface The major difference between Windows 8 and any other previous ones is the Metro Interface which basically somewhat similar to how the interface of popular tablets look like. Instead of Normal desktop Layout, you will find a fluid layout which flows quite smoothly. If you want your old Windows 7 kind of Desktop layout, you can get that by using the Desktop Metro app which means that the old Explorer interface is just now another Metro app in Windows 8. Metro, which is patterned after the Windows Phone 7 interface, made its appearance in the Developer Preview, and it's seen considerable improvements, including the newfound ability to place apps into customized groups. Windows 8 boots directly into the Windows 8 Metro Start screen. Rather than seeing the traditional Windows Desktop, you're greeted by a group of large colorful tiles, each of which is a separate app. (To show how Microsoft has relegated the Desktop to the sidelines, the Desktop is merely one app among many on the Start screen. It's also the only app that isn't written for Metro.) Metro apps are "live" -- that is, they can grab information from elsewhere, such as from social networking services or other Internet locations, and use it and display it right in the tile itself. So the weather app, for example, displays the current weather, a stock app displays current stock prices, a calendar displays current meetings, and a social networking app (called People) can display the latest updates from social networking services. In this way, you don't have to open many of the apps to reap their benefits; all you need to do is glance at them on-screen. You can, of course, click on any app to launch it in order to get more information and interact with it. Metro is very clearly designed for tablets, because the tiles are all quite large, even those that don't display changing information. There are so many tiles that they scroll off to the right of the screen. On a tablet, you use the swipe gesture to see them. On a traditional computer, you need to scroll to the right, which is a lot more awkward. Although the Metro start screen is aesthetically pleasing, I found myself longing for the Desktop's more efficient use of real estate; there, I could see all my apps on a single screen.
  13. 13. 13Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT New App Model Apps work together: Windows 8 makes it easier for you to do the things you love because it allows apps to work together so you can share information between them. In the Photos app, select a picture from an album and email it to your one of your contacts using the Mail app. Even better, Windows 8 enables any app—if you so choose—to have the power to consume your content in Microsoft SkyDrive®, lets you share with any of your contacts in the People app, and makes it easy to send mail to anyone you know. Fig: Apps in Windows 8 The more apps you have, the more you can do. For example, without any apps, searching in Windows 8 will search only files and settings. With your personal set of apps installed, the search will include the content in your apps, so you can find books on Amazon, movies on Netflix, information on Bing, and more. You can watch, buy, or explore in ways that work for you. So go ahead and add a lot of apps. The more you add, the better they work together.
  14. 14. 14Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT The New Start screen The new Start screen has all of the information you care about in one place, such as your contacts, the weather, and the next appointment on your calendar. Windows 8 is truly yours: websites, playlists, photo albums, contacts, and your favorite apps are front and center. Because you decide how to organize and group things on the screen, viewing and interacting with content is faster than ever. Fig: Start Screen with Apps Options The tiles on your Start screen are brimming with content, and they change and update in real time so you can see what’s going on and stay on top of things. You can share and connect with other people in a couple of clicks, and get real-time updates about things like news, sports, and what your friends are up to. Check your schedule or get the latest weather forecast—all without searching for information. Tiles are a quick way to see it all. Launch apps, switch between tasks, and check notifications without digging for information. It’s all right here on the Start screen. Windows 8 also incorporates the PC desktop that you’re already familiar with. In the desktop, you’ll see that the settings and features you used in Windows 7 are still there.
  15. 15. 15Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT Charms One new interface feature that takes some getting used to is what Microsoft calls "charms" -- icons that let you perform an action, such as searching or changing options. When you move your cursor to the upper-right corner or lower-right corner of the screen, five of these charms appear: Search, Share, Start, Devices and Settings. Some are quite useful, while others appear to serve no purpose. Fig:"Charms" Search, as its name indicates, lets you search through local apps, through local files or via the Web -- it's quite customizable. Share is designed to let you share with others from within your current app, but I was unable to find a way to use it. When I clicked it in the Mail app, for example, I got the message "Mail can't share." I received the same message when I attempted to use it in every app I tried, even in the People social networking app, whose primary purpose is sharing. Perhaps it will work better in future versions of Windows 8. The Devices charm is also somewhat baffling. By its name, one would expect that it would help with configuring and managing devices. However, the only device setting that was
  16. 16. 16Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT visible was for using two monitors with Windows 8 -- I found none for tasks such as setting up a printer. And when I attached an external USB hard drive to my test system, that wasn't listed. One would expect that clicking the Start charm would always bring you back to the Metro Start screen, but that's not what it does. Instead, it switches you to whatever you were just doing -- the same thing that happens when you press the Windows key or click in the lower left portion of the screen. The Settings charm, as the name indicates, allows you to change systems and/or settings, depending on the context. In Metro and Metro apps, the Settings charm is context-sensitive and will change the settings related to the app you're currently in. Inside Desktop apps, however, you can only change the overall Desktop settings, not those for the program you're running. Reset and Refresh Feature Windows 8 Developer Preview comes with a new Reset and Refresh Feature. Its like system restore feature of Windows 7 redefined. No one likes to have computer problems, but sometimes things go wrong. With new options to refresh your PC, Windows 8 makes it simple to go back to a fresh installation of Windows without losing your personal files or settings, or any apps you’ve installed from the Windows Store. You don’t have to get out an installation disc or burn DVDs to back up your photos, videos, or music. Just start the process, and Windows will do all the work and get you back in action. Reset feature of Windows 8 deletes all data on the system and returns your computer to its out of box state i.e. just like when it was shipped to you or you can call it as Factory reset. All this process takes 15-20 minutes. ( In my HP laptop with Windows 7, Factory reset for me takes 3 hours to complete). Refresh feature of Windows 8 preserves user data like pictures, Music, Documents etc. (including Metro Apps) and deletes everything else. This feature is useful when you don’t want a Factory reset kind of restore and want to keep your data intact.
  17. 17. 17Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT Old Desktop Interface When you click the Desktop tile on the Metro Start screen, you're sent to what is essentially the old Windows Desktop, including the taskbar at the bottom, icons for launching programs, and so on. It looks and works like the Desktop you've grown used to over the years, with a few minor changes. The biggest change, and possibly the worst one, is that the Desktop no longer has the Start button -- which seems to me like a step back. In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, the Start button was a paragon of simplicity, packing many useful features into a small amount of real estate. You could click it to launch recently-run and commonly-run programs, to search your computer and the Internet, to open documents you'd recently used, to run the Control Panel, and to see a menu of all the programs on your computer, among other tasks. Taking away the Start button makes the Desktop less useful than it was in Windows Vista and Windows 7. Fig: Windows Old Desktop
  18. 18. 18Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT The Quick Launch bar has also been eliminated. In Windows 7 and Windows Vista, that bar made it easy to quickly launch the applications you most commonly use. In Windows 8, you can no longer do that, because the bar is gone. Because the Start button has been killed, its search box has been too, and that's a loss. To do a search, you now have to move your mouse to the upper right or lower right portion of the screen, and select the Search charm. And the search you can perform simply isn't as good as the older version. In Windows Vista and Windows 7, the search displayed multiple results in a small, easy-to-scan list, and it let you quickly switch between searching your computer and the Internet. Not so with the Search charm -- it drops you into a Metro interface in which each result takes up more real estate. The new Search charm does let you more easily narrow your search -- still, Microsoft should have kept the old Desktop search, to give you a choice of different search methods. The Desktop also isn't integrated well with Metro. Inside Metro apps, for example, the Settings charm is context-sensitive -- those settings are specific to the app you're running. But inside the Desktop, the charm isn't, and doesn't relate to the app itself. Rather, it relates to the Desktop. On the plus side, the Desktop seems to run Desktop-based Windows applications with no problems. I ran SugarSync, Microsoft Office and Libre Office with no trouble. Skydrive and Windows Live integration It comes with Skydrive and Windows Live integration. This developer preview though doesn’t have Skydrive integration. Finally, SkyDrive, which is Microsoft’s own cloud service, is a part of Windows 8. The SkyDrive Metro application makes it easier to sync files to your SkyDrive account. Gone are the days when you have to be downloading third party softwares to get a mediocre SkyDrive experience sync experience on the desktop. Now everything works as expected with room for improvement. Windows live integration lets you create a user account on your system with having to create a local user account and you can sign in into your system using your Windows live account.
  19. 19. 19Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT New Ribbon Interface New ribbon interface is being used everywhere in Windows 8 which includes windows explorer too. Instead of the old menu, you will find the new ribbon interface in all the user interface. Of course, we all remember that we were first introduced to the Ribbon toolbar in Office 2007. And, when Windows 7 was released, we found the Ribbon in WordPad and Paint, two applets whose UIs had remained virtually unchanged for 14 years. The Ribbon then appeared in Windows Live applets, such as Movie Maker and Photo Gallery. So I guess that it was inevitable that we would see more of the Ribbon in Windows 8. Another benefit of using a Ribbon for Windows Explorer is that it lends itself well to a touch interface. Microsoft also promised that this new version of Windows Explorer would provide a level of customization like we had in the Windows XP’s version with the Customize Toolbar feature. The Windows Explorer Ribbon contains the File menu and three Core tabs titled Home, Share, and View that always appear in the Ribbon, as shown in Figure A. There are also a set of colored Contextual tabs that appear based on the type of object that you have selected, such as a location, a folder, or a file, and provide a set of related commands. For example, when you open the Pictures folder or select a JPG file, the Picture Tools tab appears; when you select a drive in Computer, the Disk Tools tab appears. This system of Core and Contextual tabs is designed to expose close to 200 different file management commands in Windows Explorer without having them buried in numerous nested menus, pop-ups, dialog boxes, or right-click/context menus. Figure A Windows Explorer’s base Ribbon contains the File menu and three Core tabs titled Home, Share, and View.
  20. 20. Windows 8: Inside What and How Well, it appears that Microsoft felt our pain at the demise of the Up button in Vista and 7 and now it is back in Windows 8. It’s right between the Address box and the Back and Forward buttons, as shown in Figure B Figure B The Up button is back in Windows Explorer. As I mentioned, the Contextual tabs are colored so that they stand out and get im noticed. In the Consumer Preview, Microsoft has tweaked the colors in an attempt to make them more appealing. For example the Picture Tools tab is now a light orange rather than a light purple, the Disk Tools tab is now light purple rather than l Tools tab is now light orange rather than light green, shown in like a big deal, but I bet there is a lot of usability study that went into these changes. Figure C Microsoft changed the color of m Multiple monitor support It comes with multi monitor support letting you span your single desktop background across multiple monitors. You will also find a slider kind of interface in Metro App when Wind is started and you need to slide it to get access to different metro apps. Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech. Well, it appears that Microsoft felt our pain at the demise of the Up button in Vista and 7 and now it is back in Windows 8. It’s right between the Address box and the Back and Forward Figure B. The Up button is back in Windows Explorer. As I mentioned, the Contextual tabs are colored so that they stand out and get im noticed. In the Consumer Preview, Microsoft has tweaked the colors in an attempt to make them more appealing. For example the Picture Tools tab is now a light orange rather than a light purple, the Disk Tools tab is now light purple rather than light yellow, and the Library Tools tab is now light orange rather than light green, shown in Figure C. This may not sound like a big deal, but I bet there is a lot of usability study that went into these changes. Microsoft changed the color of most of the Contextual tabs in the Consumer Preview. Multiple monitor support It comes with multi monitor support letting you span your single desktop background across multiple monitors. You will also find a slider kind of interface in Metro App when Wind is started and you need to slide it to get access to different metro apps. 20Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT Well, it appears that Microsoft felt our pain at the demise of the Up button in Vista and 7 and now it is back in Windows 8. It’s right between the Address box and the Back and Forward As I mentioned, the Contextual tabs are colored so that they stand out and get immediately noticed. In the Consumer Preview, Microsoft has tweaked the colors in an attempt to make them more appealing. For example the Picture Tools tab is now a light orange rather than a ight yellow, and the Library . This may not sound like a big deal, but I bet there is a lot of usability study that went into these changes. ost of the Contextual tabs in the Consumer Preview. It comes with multi monitor support letting you span your single desktop background across multiple monitors. You will also find a slider kind of interface in Metro App when Windows
  21. 21. 21Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT Windows To Go A feature first seen on Linux is now making its way to Windows 8. Basically, with Windows To Go, you can carry Windows 8 on a thumb drive and boot it in any machine. Exciting? You bet it is. By making a copy of Windows 8 on a thumb drive, you can walk with your OS and your files for use on any machine that supports Windows 7 or Windows 8. Windows To Go is an enterprise feature of Windows® 8 Consumer Preview that enables users to boot Windows from a USB-connected external drive. Windows To Go drives can use the same image enterprises use for their desktops and laptops and can be managed the same way. Windows To Go is not intended to replace desktops, laptops or supplant other mobility offerings. Rather, it provides support for efficient use of resources for alternative workplace scenarios. Windows To Go operates just like any other installation of Windows with a few exceptions. These exceptions are: • Hibernate and sleep are disabled by default. To help prevent Windows To Go from accidental data corruption during roaming hibernate and sleep are disabled. They can be re-enabled by using Group Policy settings. • Internal disks are offline. To ensure data isn’t accidentally disclosed, internal hard disks on the host computer are offline by default when booted into a Windows To Go. Similarly if a Windows To Go drive is inserted into a running system the Windows To Go drive will not be listed in Windows Explorer. • Trusted Platform Module (TPM) isn’t used. When using BitLocker Drive Encryption a pre-operating system boot password will be used for security rather than the TPM since the TPM is tied to a specific computer and Windows To Go drives will move between computers. • Windows Recovery Environment isn’t available. In the rare case that you need to recover your Windows To Go drive, you should re-image it with a fresh image of Windows. • Push Button Reset isn’t available. Resetting to the manufacturer’s standard for the computer doesn’t really apply when running Windows To Go, so the feature was disabled. Windows To Go drives can be booted on multiple computers. During the first boot on a computer Windows To Go will detect all hardware on the computer and install drivers. When
  22. 22. 22Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT returning to that computer Windows To Go will identify the computer and load the correct drivers automatically. Users can do this on multiple computers with the same Windows To Go drive enabling the ability to roam between them. The applications that you want to use from the Windows To Go workspace should be tested to make sure they also support roaming. Some applications bind to the computer hardware which will cause difficulties if the workspace is being used with multiple host computers. No Activation It also comes without any kind of restrictions on who can test it. You don’t need a key to activate it or rearm after you are finished with installing Windows 8 on your System. This small step will help Microsoft in gaining loads of beta testers for its Windows 8 which can help in building a excellent product when its launched finally. Keep in mind, No Activation is applicable only for this build and hopefully when final version of Windows 8 comes out, it will come with some kind of Activation Mechanism. Social integration with Facebook & Twitter It comes with two metro apps which integrates your twitter and Facebook account directly on your Windows 8 Desktop. Even though these apps are far from perfect, still Microsoft have long time to fix bugs before the final version of Windows 8 comes out. Faster Boot times Windows 8 boosts of faster boot times in the range of 5-10 seconds. Keep in mind, this faster boot times wont be achieved on older systems with spinning hard disk. You will need solid state drives, new hardware to achieve almost switch ON OFF kind of booting. Normal systems which we have will still see some great improvements in booting times compared to previous versions of Windows. USB 3.0 support It comes with support for USB 3.0 which means ultra fast copy and transfer of data between two compatible devices. Internet Explorer 10: the web by Touch
  23. 23. Windows 8: Inside What and How With Internet Explorer 10 Consumer Preview, we’ve reimagined what a great web experience can look like. Internet Explorer is designed to dedicate your entire screen, edge to edge, to your websites. Websites extend over your whole screen, and tabs and navigation controls appear only when you need them and then quietly get out of the way when you don’t. Browsing is as easy as using the rest of Windows.. Everything you want to do on the web is a swipe or tap away, and it uses protection,hardware acceleration, modern browser standards like HTML5, and the quick core of Windows to make browsing fast and fluid. Internet Explorer is a leader in protection against malware and phishing, and it will help keep you more secure when browsing the web. SmartScreen Filter identifies scams and sites that are known to be malicious and warns you when your security might be threatened. Metro style Internet Explorer 10 browsing experience that’s all a app-like. The address bar is at bottom and not visible always. interface of Internet explorer Internet explorer from there and you w Built-in Metro apps Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech. With Internet Explorer 10 Consumer Preview, we’ve reimagined what a great web experience can look like. Internet Explorer is designed to dedicate your entire screen, edge to edge, to your websites. Websites extend over your whole screen, and tabs and gation controls appear only when you need them and then quietly get out of the way when you don’t. Browsing is as easy as using the rest of Windows.. Everything you want to do on the web is a swipe or tap away, and it uses re acceleration, modern browser standards like HTML5, and the quick core of Windows to make browsing fast and fluid. Fig: Metro Style IE 10 Internet Explorer is a leader in protection against malware and phishing, and it will help hen browsing the web. SmartScreen Filter identifies scams and sites that are known to be malicious and warns you when your security might be Metro style Internet Explorer 10 provides a fast and fluid touch browsing experience that’s all about your sites, making them feel increasingly more like. The address bar is at bottom and not visible always. If you want your interface of Internet explorer, that too you can have under desktop App. Just run Internet explorer from there and you will have the older interface with tabs etc.. in Metro apps 23Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT With Internet Explorer 10 Consumer Preview, we’ve reimagined what a great web experience can look like. Internet Explorer is designed to dedicate your entire screen, edge to edge, to your websites. Websites extend over your whole screen, and tabs and gation controls appear only when you need them and then quietly get out of the way when you don’t. Browsing is as easy as using the rest of Windows.. Everything you want to do on the web is a swipe or tap away, and it uses better security re acceleration, modern browser standards like HTML5, and the Internet Explorer is a leader in protection against malware and phishing, and it will help hen browsing the web. SmartScreen Filter identifies scams and sites that are known to be malicious and warns you when your security might be provides a fast and fluid touch-first bout your sites, making them feel increasingly more If you want your old , that too you can have under desktop App. Just run ill have the older interface with tabs etc..
  24. 24. 24Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT The Developer Preview shipped with a small number of Metro apps, which were a bit rough around the edges. But the Consumer Preview comes with a full suite of them, including email, calendaring, maps, SkyDrive, messaging, Xbox and social networking, among others. As expected, they appear to have been designed more for tablets than traditional computers, with simple, colorful bold interfaces. The results are often striking; take, for example, the visually compelling Weather app. However, in the pursuit of simplicity and tablet friendliness, Metro apps often sacrifice power and functionality. Fig: Apps in Windows 8 Mail allows you to see all of your mail in one place, whether it’s Hotmail, Gmail or your company’s Exchange mail. Just like the Mail app, Calendar combines your information into a single view and enables you to have one view of the day, week or month, by pulling together your multiple calendars. With Microsoft SkyDrive® you never need to worry about being able to access your documents and photos because when they’re in your SkyDrive, you can access them seamlessly from any device. Photos puts your pictures at your fingertips. Your albums from Facebook, Flickr, and Microsoft SkyDrive®, and of course your PC, are there when you connect your Microsoft account to these services.
  25. 25. 25Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT The People app is your most complete address book. You can include contacts from Hotmail, Messenger, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Gmail, and others. Quickly see what’s new, share an update, comment, or initiate a conversation. Messaging makes it easy to chat with all your friends on Messenger and Facebook. The best example of this is the Mail app. On the plus side, it's simple, colorful and makes it very easy to add and read mail from multiple mail accounts. On the downside, it offers very few tools that you expect in a modern email program, such as creating rules to automatically route mail to specific folders. In smartphone and tablet-based email software, these limitations aren't unusual, because those devices typically aren't someone's primary computing device. But you expect more in a desktop or laptop app. The Mail app simply won't be up to the task for users of desktops and laptops. The Metro-based Mail app Where the Metro apps generally shine is in their ability to grab information from elsewhere and display or use it in some way. For example, the Calendar app automatically grabs the birthdays of your Facebook friends and displays them on the proper day. And if you've created a Google account, it will also automatically populate and sync the Calendar with your Google Calendar information. Metro apps do take some getting used to. They don't have menus, and so it's not clear at first how to access certain features. But right-click anywhere on the screen, and a series of icons appear for that app, such as adding locations in the Weather app, or viewing all of your accounts in the Mail app. There is one very simple and useful navigational tool missing, though: There's no minimize button. That's because you don't minimize Metro apps -- you just switch away from them. Tools for Power Users It comes with tools for power users including a better task manager. The new Task Manager is your easy-to-use, all-in-one dashboard for monitoring and controlling your PC with colour- coded tiles, real-time summary graphs and detailed information on processes, applications, and history. You can also see the services associated with each process on one screen. File management. Windows Explorer is enhanced to make file management and navigation straightforward. The ribbon organizes Windows Explorer and reveals features that used to be hidden. We’ve brought back a long-lost favorite: the Up button. It’s easier to view and manage all of your file operations in one place.
  26. 26. 26Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT Navigation and Mousing around Although the large tiles practically cry out to be touched rather than clicked upon, Metro is still navigable using a mouse. If you're like me, at first you'll find it takes some getting used to. But after a full day, I found myself comfortable with it, so much so that when I went back to my Windows Vista and Windows 7 machines, I occasionally found myself using the Windows 8 mouse movements (to no avail, of course). Apps themselves are launched with single clicks rather than double-clicks. Although the navigation inside Metro apps varies on an app-by-app basis, generally you'll find yourself using scroll bars. (On a tablet, you'd be swiping to your heart's content.) Windows 8 employs global navigation, usable when you're in Metro, the Desktop, a Metro app or a Desktop app. in other words, no matter where you are. To switch between your current app and the last app you used, either press the Windows key on your keyboard or move your mouse to the lower left corner of the screen and click. If you want to see a thumbnail of the last app you used, hover your mouse over that lower left corner. If you hover the cursor over the upper left corner of the screen, you'll also see a thumbnail of your last app -- but if you then move your cursor down, you'll display the thumbnails of your other open apps. There are keyboard shortcuts as well. You can press the Windows key and Tab key simultaneously to open thumbnails of your open apps, and then move to any you want to run. And the old Alt-Tab standby still works. Fig: Intracting with Windows
  27. 27. 27Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT At first, there doesn't seem to be a way to actually close a Metro app. I finally discovered that it's possible by moving the cursor to the top of the screen and dragging it down towards the bottom of the screen. The app first shrinks from full-screen size to a window, and when you drag it off the bottom of the screen, the app closes. Touch or keyboard and mouse: your choice Windows 8 is hands-on. On touch-enabled PCs, the things you used to do with a mouse and keyboard are now easy to do with touch. You can switch between apps, organize your Start screen, and pan and zoom. With the innovative touch keyboard, you can navigate, type, and interact on the go. The touch keyboard has two modes designed to suit the way you work. It’s a full-sized touch keyboard with large buttons that converts to a unique thumb keyboard so it’s easy to use when you want to take it with you. This flexibility makes it more comfortable. Typing feels natural whether you’re sitting down or walking around. The touch keyboard in Windows 8 helps you speed up your typing and makes it more accurate. The keyboard technology is designed to increase efficiency and reduce mistakes. Fig: Type naturally with the touch keyboard If you mistype a word, Windows will suggest words as you type so you can get it right with a single tap. Type naturally with the touch keyboard.The innovative thumb keyboard makes typing on portable devices easier The Windows 8 keyboard speaks your language. On touch- enabled PCs, the keyboard layout automatically adjusts to the language you choose for Windows. Your language settings apply to the whole PC rather than just certain apps, so you
  28. 28. 28Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT can communicate effectively right from the start. Windows 8 is equally at home with a mouse and keyboard. You can choose how to interact with your PC. Plug in a keyboard and mouse and you have familiar methods of getting to your apps. People work in different ways and Windows 8 adapts to your needs. So whether you want to type and click, or swipe and tap, you can navigate easily with Windows 8. The choice is yours. Rotate to turn Rotating two or more fingers turns an object. You can turn the whole screen by 90 degrees when you rotate your device. Mouse equivalent: Support for rotating an object depends on whether the specific app supports it. Swipe from the bottom or top edge for app commands App commands are revealed by swiping from the bottom or top edge. Swiping from the top to the bottom of the screen lets you dock or close the current app. Mouse equivalent: Right-click on the app to see the apps commands. Swipe from the right or left edge for system commands Swiping from the right side of the screen reveals the charms with system commands. Swiping from the left brings up previously used apps. Mouse equivalent: Place the mouse pointer in the lower-right corner of the screen Press and hold to learn You can see detailed information without having to commit to an action. In some cases, pressing and holding opens a menu with more options. Mouse equivalent: Hover over an item to see more options. Tap to perform an action Tapping something causes an action, such as launching an app, following a link, or performing a command. Mouse equivalent: Left-click on an item to perform an action.
  29. 29. 29Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT FAQs Windows 8 Consumer Preview: Frequently asked questions Here are answers to some common questions about Windows 8 Consumer Preview. We'll update this list with more questions and answers, so check back later. Is Windows 8 Consumer Preview ready for everyone to try? We strongly recommend that only experienced PC users download Windows 8 Consumer Preview. Before you download the preview, you should weigh the pros and cons of installing software that's still in development. If you install the preview release, you'll get to try out the many new features, but you might also encounter errors that you wouldn't encounter using a released version of Windows. You should consider downloading the Windows 8 Consumer Preview only if all of the following apply to you: • You like to use the latest software and enjoy experimenting with new technology. • You're comfortable backing up a PC, formatting a hard drive, and installing an operating system from scratch. • You feel comfortable troubleshooting PC problems yourself. • You don't mind updating software frequently. • You have the installation or recovery media and the knowledge to restore your previous operating system after you're done testing Windows 8 Consumer Preview. Are there risks to installing Windows 8 Consumer Preview? Yes. Windows 8 Consumer Preview is stable and has been thoroughly tested, but it’s not the finished product. Your PC could crash and you could lose important files. You should back up your data and you shouldn't test Windows 8 Consumer Preview on your primary home or business PC. You might also encounter problems like: • Software that doesn’t install or work correctly, including antivirus or security programs. • Printers, video cards, or other hardware that doesn’t work. • Difficulty accessing corporate or home networks. • Files that might become corrupted. You should carefully balance the risks and rewards of trying out the Windows 8 Consumer Preview before you install it.
  30. 30. 30Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT Downloading and installing What are the system requirements for Windows 8 Consumer Preview? Windows 8 Consumer Preview works great on the same hardware that powers Windows 7: • Processor: 1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster • RAM: 1 gigabyte (GB) (32-bit) or 2 GB (64-bit) • Hard disk space: 16 GB (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit) • Graphics card: Microsoft DirectX 9 graphics device or higher Additional requirements to use certain features: • To use touch, you need a tablet or a monitor that supports multitouch. • To access the Windows Store and to download and run apps, you need an active Internet connection and a screen resolution of at least 1024 x 768. • To snap apps, you need a screen resolution of at least 1366 x 768. What happens when I download Windows 8 Consumer Preview Setup? When you download Windows 8 Consumer Preview Setup, the following happens: 1. Windows 8 Consumer Preview Setup checks your PC to see if it can run the consumer preview, and provides a compatibility report that you can save or print (make sure your devices are connected to your PC and turned on before you run the Setup program). The Setup program then selects the optimized version of the download (up to 25% smaller) that is right for your PC (32-bit or 64-bit). 2. The built-in download manager lets you start, stop, and resume the download at any time. 3. Once Windows 8 Consumer Preview is downloaded, you choose how and when to install it. You can install on the current drive or you can make an ISO or bootable flash drive for installing Windows 8 Consumer Preview on another partition, virtual machine, or another PC (requires Windows Vista or Windows 7). Is there an alternative to using Setup? Can I just download an ISO image? Yes. As an alternative to using Setup, Windows 8 Consumer Preview is also available to download as an ISO image. Can I upgrade from previous versions of Windows to Windows 8 Consumer Preview? Yes, you can upgrade to Windows 8 Consumer Preview from Windows Developer Preview, Windows 7, Windows Vista, or Windows XP, but you might not be able to keep all of your files, programs, and settings. The following table shows what you can keep during an upgrade depending on the current version of Windows running on your PC:
  31. 31. 31Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT Current operating system What you can keep Windows Developer Preview • User accounts and files Windows 7 • Programs • Windows settings • User accounts and files Windows Vista • Windows settings • User accounts and files Windows XP • User accounts and files If you create installation media, start your PC from the media, and then install Windows 8 Consumer Preview, you won't be able to keep your files, programs, or settings. You must install Windows 8 Consumer Preview using the Windows 8 Consumer Preview Setup program to move files and settings over to Windows 8 Consumer Preview. How large are the Windows 8 Consumer Preview download files? The Windows 8 Consumer Preview Setup program will check to see if your PC can run Windows 8 Consumer Preview before downloading either the 32-bit (x86) or the 64-bit (x64) version and will select the architecture that’s currently installed on your PC. If you prefer to choose a different architecture, you can download an ISO image. The table below shows the sizes of the download packages when using Setup. Download Download package size (approximate) Setup 5.0 MB 32-bit (x86) Windows 8 Consumer Preview 1.5 GB 64-bit (x64) Windows 8 Consumer Preview 1.9 GB Will my devices and programs work with Windows 8 Consumer Preview? Windows 8 Consumer Preview should work with the same devices and programs that work with Windows 7. In some cases, the device or program might require an update or you might need to uninstall some programs, and then reinstall them after installing Windows 8 Consumer Preview. The Windows 8 Consumer Preview Setup program will scan your PC to determine what's compatible and provide a report that you can save or print. Make sure your devices are connected to your PC and turned on before you run the Setup program. If you want compatibility info for a specific device or program, see the Windows 8 Consumer Preview Compatibility Center.
  32. 32. 32Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT How do l install Windows 8 Consumer Preview? The easiest method is to start downloading from the Download Windows 8 Consumer Preview page. Once the download has completed, you have a couple of options: • Run the Windows 8 Consumer Preview Setup program from the PC where you want to install the preview. (Setup checks to see if your PC is running a 32-bit or 64-bit version of Windows and provides you with the correct download.) • Run the Windows 8 Consumer Preview Setup program and use the built-in tools for converting an ISO image into installation media, such as a DVD or USB bootable flash drive (requires Windows Vista, Windows 7, or Windows Developer Preview). You can then use this media to install the preview on another partition, virtual machine, or another PC. If you don't want to use the Windows 8 Consumer Preview Setup program, you can download an ISO image and use it to create a bootable DVD or USB flash drive to install Windows 8 Consumer Preview. Do I need a product key to install Windows 8 Consumer Preview? If you install Windows 8 Consumer Preview using the Windows 8 Consumer Preview Setup program, you won't need to enter a product key—the setup program automatically provides the product key. If you create installation media, start your PC from the media, and then install Windows 8 Consumer Preview. You'll need to enter this product key: DNJXJ- 7XBW8-2378T-X22TX-BKG7J. What is a Microsoft account and do I need one to use Windows 8 Consumer Preview? A Microsoft account is an email address and password that you use to sign in to Windows. You can use any email address, but it's best if you choose the one you already use to communicate with friends and sign in to your favorite websites. You don't need a Microsoft account to use Windows 8 Consumer Preview, but we highly recommend that you use one. When you sign in to your PC with a Microsoft account, you’ll connect your PC to the people, files, and devices you care about. (If you need an email address, we can give you one for free.) When you sign in with a Microsoft account, your PC is connected to the cloud and: • Your friends’ contact info and status automatically stay up to date from places like Hotmail, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn as soon as you connect those services to your Microsoft account. • You can get to and share your photos, docs, and other files from places like SkyDrive, Facebook, and Flickr. • Your personal settings are synced to any PC running Windows 8 Consumer Preview that you sign in to, including your themes, language preferences, browser favorites, and apps. • You can get apps in the Windows Store and use them on any PC running Windows 8 Consumer Preview that you sign in to.
  33. 33. 33Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT If you've already installed Windows 8 Consumer Preview and didn't sign in with a Microsoft account or you don't have a Microsoft account and want to get one, follow these steps: 1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Settings. (If you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, and then click Settings.) 2. Tap or click More PC settings. 3. Tap or click Users. 4. Tap or click Switch to a Microsoft account. Apps and the Windows Store Do I need a Microsoft account to use the Windows Store? Yes. With a Microsoft account, you can see all of the apps you bought from the Store and you can install any of those apps on up to five PCs. To sign up for a Microsoft account 1. Open Windows Store, swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Settings. (If you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, and then click Settings.) 2. Tap or click Accounts and preferences, tap or click Sign in, and then tap or click Don't have a Microsoft account? I got an app from the Store but can't find it on my PC. Where is it? After apps are installed, a tile for the app appears on the Start screen. If you don't see the tile for an app, you can try searching for the app on your PC: 1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. (If you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, and then click Search.) 2. Make sure the search is set to Search Apps, and then enter the name of the app. If an app doesn't appear in the search results, you can reinstall it on your PC: 1. Open Windows Store, swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Settings. (If you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, and then click Settings.) 2. Tap or click Accounts and preferences, tap or click View your apps, and then choose the app you want to reinstall. How do I use my apps on other PCs? You can install any of the apps you bought from the Store on up to five PCs. To install one of your apps on another PC:
  34. 34. 34Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT 1. Open Windows Store, swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Settings. (If you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, and then click Settings.) 2. Tap or click Accounts and preferences, tap or click View your apps, and then choose the app you want to reinstall. Internet Explorer 10 Consumer Preview Why don’t toolbars and add-ons work? Internet Explorer 10 provides an “add-on free” experience. It supports HTML 5 for video content, but you can't install toolbars and add-ons in Internet Explorer 10. If you are viewing a webpage that requires an add-on or uses Flash, you can view the content by opening the website in Internet Explorer for the desktop. To do this, swipe in from the right edge of the screen (if you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen), tap or click Settings, and then tap or click Use the desktop. Where do I find my favorites? Internet Explorer 10 doesn't use the traditional Favorites from previous versions. Instead, you can pin websites to the Start screen or open a list of pinned sites and frequently visited sites using New tab. If you open Internet Explorer for the desktop, you can use the traditional Favorites, but you can’t access the pinned sites from the Start screen. I can't find the Internet Explorer 10 tile on the Start screen. How do I get it back? Internet Explorer 10 might have accidentally become unpinned. To pin it back to your Start screen, follow these steps: 1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. (If you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, and then click Search.) 2. Enter Internet Explorer, and then tap or click Apps. 3. In the search results, swipe down on the Internet Explorer icon, and then tap Pin to Start. (If you're using a mouse, right-click Internet Explorer, and then click Pin to Start.)
  35. 35. 35Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT Conclusion If you haven't downloaded Windows 8 Consumer Preview yet, and want to try it, the setup can be downloaded from Microsoft's website, while the .iso images can be found here. http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-8/iso The new version of Windows breaks with its past -- and for tablet owners, that will be a good thing. The new Metro interface is ideally suited for tablets and touch. But desktop and laptop owners will likely see it as a mixed success. Metro apps are more visually compelling than Desktop-based ones, and they do an excellent job of integrating information piped in from the Internet. But the Desktop is underpowered compared to previous Windows versions, and overall the operating system feels more natural to touch-based interaction than it does to mouse- and keyboard- based use. I certainly look forward to using Windows 8 on a tablet, because it offers useful and innovative features, such as displaying changing information directly on tiles. I can't say that I'm as enthusiastic about using it on a traditional computer, though. Switching between Metro and the Desktop feels awkward, and I never shook the sense that I was using two different operating systems. While I appreciate Metro's new features, I think Microsoft should have worked on adding new features to the Desktop as well, and done a better job of integrating the separate interfaces. Given that the software that many people use on a daily basis -- Microsoft Office -- works only on the Desktop, and that the next version of Office will be a Desktop app as well, many people will spend a good deal of their time on Windows 8 desktops and laptops using the Desktop. I certainly will. So while I'm looking forward to taking advantage of Metro's new features, I'm not at all pleased to know that for most of the time. So should Windows 8 be downloaded? We say yes. The OS is great and feature rich, and because you need to learn a bit about how to use it, it is best that you do it now rather than wait until the full version is released some time in Q4 2012.
  36. 36. 36Windows 8: Inside What and How Harsh Kishore Mishra, B.Tech.-IT References www.microsoft.com www.techrepublic.com www.redmondpie.com www.computerworld.com

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