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Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters
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Senior Executive Team Conversation Starters

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What if everyone is not on the same page? What if there are doubts, upsets, withholds? To solidify your team’s performance basics, discuss one topic each week, quarter after quarter. These timeless, …

What if everyone is not on the same page? What if there are doubts, upsets, withholds? To solidify your team’s performance basics, discuss one topic each week, quarter after quarter. These timeless, essential, generative questions are never tired or tiring. You can rely on them to keep your uppermost priorities fresh and top of mind. Like leafy green vegetables replenish our bodies, these questions will nourish your team’s performance.

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  • 1. eBook for Senior Executive Teams by Pamela Stambaugh, MBA Conversation Starters Quick yet Powerful Questions for Senior Executive Team Weekly Meetings Back to Basics 13 Questions, One per Week (13 weeks X 4 quarters = one year, 52 weeks) What if everyone is not on the same page? What if there are doubts, upsets, withholds? To solidify your team’s performance basics, discuss one topic each week, quarter after quarter. These timeless, essential, generative questions are never tired or tiring. You can rely on them to keep your uppermost priorities fresh and top of mind. Like leafy green vegetables replenish our bodies, these questions will nourish your team’s performance. ©  2013  Pamela  Stambaugh  -­‐  Accountability  Pays.    All  Rights  Reserved.  
  • 2. Table  of  Contents   #1.    ExecuBve  Excellence  =  conscious  leadership   #2.    CommunicaBon  =  business  communicaBon   #3.    Accountability  =  commitment,  truth,  outcomes   #4.    Transparency  =  a  culture  of  candor   #5.    Leaders  Leading  Leaders  =  principles,  laws,  consequences   #6.    About  Trust  =  invisible  yet  powerful  link  between  people   #7.    Employee  Engagement  =  discreBonary  effort   #8.    Hire  “A”  Players  =  select  wisely   #9.    Right  People  in  the  Right  Seats  on  the  Bus  =  good  to  great   #10.    Assess  and  Develop  Team  =  beyond  talent    opBmal                        performance  of  the  team   #11.    Breakaway  Success  =  beaBng  the  odds   #12.    Truth  Exploring  and  ConstrucBve  Debate  =  measure  what                        maYers   #13.    Ge[ng  to  GeneraBve,  Inspired,  Focused  Performance  =                      discovering  and  working  with  leverage  points,  the  culminaBon                      of  thinking  completely  and  though^ully  through  #1-­‐#12.   2   4   ApplicaBon   Get Accountable Get Proactive Get Results What you Measure Improves
  • 3. Defini1on:  Conscious  leadership  that   gives  room  for  and  encourages   employees,  customers,  vendors  and  any   other  stakeholders  to  speak  their  truth   to  power,  even  when  —  in  fact   especially  when  —  it  is  bad  news.     Excellence  at  the  top  of  the  organizaBon  requires  rigorous  review,   congruence  and  applicaBon  of  accountability  standards,  two-­‐way   communicaBons  (internal  and  external)  and  transparency  in  guiding   the  organizaBon  and  receiving  feedback  from  all  levels  in  the   organizaBon.  ExecuBve  Excellence  includes  values-­‐based  decision-­‐ making  and  authenBcity.  Mutual  respect  is  a  key  value  and  building   block  of  execuBve  excellence.  These  qualiBes  foster  trust.          “The  leaders  who  work  most  effec2vely,  it  seems  to  me,  never  say   ‘I.’  And  that’s  not  because  they  have  trained  themselves  not  to  say  ‘I.’   They  don’t  think  ‘I.’  They  think  ‘we’;  they  think  ‘team.’  They   understand  their  job  to  be  to  make  the  team  func2on.  They  accept   responsibility  and  don’t  sidestep  it,  but  ‘we’  gets  the  credit.  This  is   what  creates  trust,  what  enables  you  to  get  the  task  done.”  –  Peter  F.   Drucker   Q  #1   How  do  I,  and  our  team,  measure  our  effec2veness  as  leaders?     Do  we  do  this  on  a  regular  basis?    How  oHen?   Execu1ve  Excellence   3  
  • 4. Q  #2   How  can  I,  and  our  team,  open  up  free  flowing  communica2on   with  our  subordinates?    Our  peers?    For  instance,  do  we  allow   failure,  express  vulnerability  and  learn  from  these  moments?   Communica1on   Defini1on:    Excellent  verbal  and  wriYen  communicaBons  allow   you  to  improve  the  performance  of  your  employees,  to   improve  the  performance  of  the  teams,  and  to  improve  the   performance  of  your  organizaBon  with  the  common  purpose   to  execute  the  organizaBon’s  strategy,  reach  its  vision,  and   fulfill  its  mission.    Focus  and  clarity  are  the  master  keys  to   communicaBon  excellence.  Focus  and  clarity  are  parBcularly   important  for  generaBng  employee  effecBveness.          “Great  places  to  work  show  a  strong  commitment  from  CEO   and  senior  management,  a  genuine  belief  that  people  are   indispensable  for  the  business,  acBve  communicaBon   throughout  the  organizaBon,  percepBon  of  a  unique  culture   and  idenBty  (‘we  are  not  like  the  others’),  an  arBculated  vision   and  values  that  are  lived  and  experienced  at  all  levels  of  the   organizaBon.  And,  most  importantly,  the  CEO  and  the   members  of  the  execuBve  team  are  role  models  of  integrity   and  honesty.”  Manfred  Kets  de  Vries,  ReflecBons  on  Character   and  Leadership.   4  
  • 5. Q  #3   How  well  do  I,  and  our  team  keep  my/our  commitments  to   employees?    To  stakeholders?    Do  we  quickly  communicate   when  a  commitment  will  be  missed?   Accountability   Defini1on:  At  the  surface  accountability  is  doing  what  you  said   you  would  do,  when  you  said  you  would  do  it  and  if  you   cannot,  acknowledging  that  to  the  expectant  parBes  with  a  re-­‐ commitment  to  a  new  outcome  Bme  and  date.  A  deeper   meaning  would  include  core,  perhaps  immeasurable   commitments  that  live  like  values,  and  rigorous  adherence  to   their  intenBon  and  meaning.  For  example,  accountability  to  tell   the  truth  even  if  it  hurts  means  telling  the  truth  even  when  the   truth  has  adverse  impacts  on  profitability  or  other  measurable   outcomes  for  which  one  is  accountable.  Historically  one  could   say  that  the  sooner  the  truth  is  told,  the  beYer  the  outcome   for  all.          “Our  lives  begin  to  end  the  day  we  become  silent  about  the   things  that  maOer.“  –  MarBn  Luther  King.          “Policies  are  many,  Principles  are  few,  Policies  will  change,   Principles  never  do.”  –  John  C.  Maxwell          “I  am  not  bound  to  win  but  I  am  bound  to  be  true;  I  am  not   bound  to  succeed  but  am  bound  to  live  up  to  what  light  I  have.”   –  Abraham  Lincoln          “There  is  only  one  real  failure  in  life  that  is  possible,  and  that   is,  not  to  be  true  to  the  best  one  knows.”  –  Farrar   5  
  • 6. Q  #4   How  open  am  I,  and  our  team,  to  acknowledge  when  I/we   have  made  an  error?    Do  I  and  our  team  keep  our  associates   fully  informed  about  our  agendas  and  plans?   Transparency    Defini1on:  A  culture  of  candor.            “When  we  speak  of  “transparency,”  we  mean  much  more   than  the  standard  business  definiBon  of  the  term—full   disclosure  of  financial  informaBon  to  investors.  While  such   honesty  is  obviously  necessary,  that  narrow  interpretaBon   produces  an  unhealthy  focus  on  legal  compliance  to  the   exclusion  of  equally  important  ethical  concerns,  and  on  the   needs  of  shareholders  to  the  exclusion  of  the  needs  of  other   consBtuencies.  Worse,  it’s  predicated  on  the  blinkered   assumpBon  that  a  company  can  be  transparent  to   shareholders  without  first  being  transparent  to  the  people   who  work  inside  it.  Because  no  organizaBon  can  be  honest   with  the  public  if  it’s  not  honest  with  itself,  we  define   transparency  broadly,  as  the  degree  to  which  informaBon   flows  freely  within  an  organizaBon,  among  managers  and   employees,  and  outward  to  stakeholders.          “Companies  can’t  innovate,  respond  to  changing  stakeholder   needs,  or  funcBon  efficiently  unless  people  have  access  to   relevant,  Bmely,  and  valid  informaBon.  It’s  thus  the  leader’s   job  to  create  systems  and  norms  that  lead  to  a  culture  of   candor.”      Transparency,  James  O’Toole  and  Warren  Bennis   6  
  • 7. Q  #5   How  clearly  do  we  communicate  who  is  responsible  for  what?     Am  I,  and  is  our  team,  gran2ng  the  corresponding  and   sufficient  authority  to  get  those  things  done?    Do  people  feel   empowered?   Leaders  Leading  Leaders   Defini1on:    Anyone  who  is  leading  even  one  other  person  is  a   leader  leading  another  leader,  because  we  are  all  leaders  in   our  own  lives.  Acknowledging  this  is  a  place  to  stand,  a  place   to  come  from,  an  acknowledgment  of  the  other  person’s   importance  in  the  dialog.   Department  heads,  even  individuals  who  are  leading   themselves  can  create  accountability  by  having  a  conversaBon   to  clearly  define  how  people  will  work  together.  First,  include   consequences  in  that  conversaBon.   There  are  two  kinds  of  consequences  –  natural  and  negoBated.   If  you  put  your  hand  on  a  hot  stove,  it  will  burn.  That  is  a   natural  consequence.  NegoBated  consequences  require   gaining  AGREEMENT  first,  then  behavioral  alignment.  Second,   keep  all  lines  of  communicaBon  open.  Third,  listen  with  an   open  mind  and  a  humble  heart.  There  are  many  ways  to   accomplish  the  goal.  If  you  have  an  ‘A’  player,  he  or  she  will  be   moBvated  by  producing  results  and  will  not  respond  well  to   being  micro-­‐managed.    At  every  level  of  an  organizaBon   principles  and  laws  are  at  work,  whether  we  know  it  or  not.   Understanding  these  principles  and  these  laws  provides   mastery  over  the  things  that  make  the  most  difference.  For   instance,  the  law  of  leverage  is  always  present.   7  
  • 8. Q  #6   Am  I,  and  is  our  team,  an  example  of  trustworthiness  as  well  as   trus2ng  others?    Do  we  walk  our  talk?    Where  trust  is  an  issue,   how  do  we  go  about  re-­‐establishing  trust?   Trust   Defini1on:  The  invisible  yet  powerful  unspoken  link  that  either   exists  or  does  not  exist  between  two  people.  Without  it,   barriers  are  erected  to  protect  one’s  self.  When  it  is  present,   openness  and  all  possibility  exists  in  the  relaBonship.  Distrust   is  the  absence  of  trust.  For  a  sense  of  how  leaders  damage   trust,  download  The  Seven  Costly  Mistakes  Senior  Execu7ves   Make  that  Cause  Performance,  Produc7vity  and  People  to   Suffer  on  accountabilitypays.com.   “To  improve  trust  levels  among  their  employees,  companies   can,  first  and  foremost,  pay  aYenBon  to  the  red  flags  —  key   warning  signs  of  broken  or  eroded  trust.  Are  people   disengaged?  Are  teams  missing  targets  or  deadlines?  Are   groups  operaBng  in  silos?  Also,  leadership  should  get  curious.   Ask  employees  what’s  happening  for  them  and  acknowledge   their  experience.  Allow  feelings  to  surface,  share  informaBon   and  show  the  larger  context  for  business  decisions.”  Dennis   and  Michelle  Reina,  the  Reina  Trust  Building  InsBtute.     8  
  • 9. Q  #7   Do  our  employees  engage  with  their  work  in  the  way  that   demonstrates  they  have  something  at  stake  in  the  future   success  of  the  organiza2on?    Do  we  represent  the  vision  and   mission  of  the  organiza2on  as  something  that  is  worthy  of  our   associates  connec2ng  to?   Employee  Engagement   Defini1on:  Employees  working  in  an   organizaBon  in  a  way  that  an  owner  would   work,  with  something  at  stake  in  the   future  success  of  the  organizaBon,  and  a   sense  of  worth  that  comes  from   contribuBng  to  something  greater  than   their  own  self-­‐interest.   According  to  Daniel  Goleman,  Primal  Leadership,  for  every  1%   improvement  in  employee  service  climate,  there  is  a  2%   improvement  in  revenue.  The  service  climate  refers  to  the   environment  a  company  creates  –  does  it  foster  enthusiasm,   engagement  with  employees?  If  your  employees  feel  valued,   they  will  be  more  producBve.   “Ge[ng  on  the  path  to  outstanding  performance  as  an   organizaBon  requires  at  least  a  criBcal  mass  of  people  who  are   no  longer  children  —  people  who  have  assumed  an  adequate   level  of  responsibility  for  themselves  and  for  how  well  they   perform  the  role  they  are  in.”  Lee  Thayer,  Leadership:  Thinking,   Being,  Doing   9  
  • 10. Q  #8   Are  we  tolera2ng  less  than  ‘A’  player  performance,  perhaps  by   not  clearly  defining  ‘A’  performance?    Or  by  leVng  ‘B’   performers  slide  even  with  clear  performance  objec2ves?    Or   by  allowing  personali2es/outside  of  work  rela2onships  to   result  in  tolerance  of  under  performance?   Hire  ‘A’  Players    “AnyBme  you  have  the  opportunity  to  hire  someone  to  join  a   team,  you  have  the  possibility  of  either  adding  to  the  strength   of  the  team  or  disrupBng  it.  Select  wisely.”  William  C.  Sproule,   Top  Box  Leadership   Research  has  shown  that  only  46%  of  senior  execuBves  hired   will  last  longer  than  2  years  in  their  job,  because  they  were  not   a  fit  in  some  way,  according  to  Barry  Deutsch.  These  odds  are   worse  than  a  coin  toss!  Eligibility  PLUS  suitability  need  to  be   considered  for  a  great  hire  to  occur,  and  having  ‘A’  players   makes  a  significant  difference  to  the  opportunity  for   breakaway  success.          “Great  people  –  the  ‘A  Players’  –  are  a  very  different  breed   from  the  good  (B  Players)  and  mediocre  (C  Players).  Great   people  are  more  likely  to  be  employed  with  a  company  since  a   great  person  is  oven  over  3  Bmes  as  producBve  as  a  good   person.  Joel  Spolsky  argues  in  Smart  &  Gets  Things  Done  that   an  A  Player  is  anywhere  from  5-­‐10  Bmes  as  producBve...”   Auren  Hoffman,  CEO  of  Rapleaf  and  an  investor  in  over  30   technology  companies.   10  
  • 11. Q  #9   Do  we  have  the  right  organiza2on  chart  based  on  our  business   needs?    Then,  do  we  have  the  right  people  in  the  right  seats  on   the  bus  based  upon  their  eligibility  and  suitability  (fit  for  the   job)?    Do  our  associates  enjoy  at  least  75%  of  their  work?     “Research  has  shown  that  people  who  enjoy  at  least  75%  of   their  work  are  3  2mes  more  produc2ve.”    Dr.  Dan  Harrison,   Harrison  Assessments  Talent  Solu2ons   Right  People  in  the   Right  Seats  on  the  Bus   “When  we  began  the  research   project,  we  expected  to  find  that   the  first  step  in  taking  a  company  from  good  to  great  would   be  to  set  a  new  direcBon,  a  new  vision  and  strategy  for  the   company,  and  then  to  get  people  commiYed  and  aligned   behind  that  new  direcBon.  We  found  something  quite  the   opposite.  The  execuBves  who  ignited  the  transformaBons   from  good  to  great  did  not  first  figure  out  where  to  drive   the  bus  and  then  get  people  to  take  it  there.  No,  they  first   got  the  right  people  on  the  bus  (and  the  wrong  people  off   the  bus)  and  then  figured  out  where  to  drive  it.  They  said,  in   essence,  ‘Look,  I  don’t  really  know  where  we  should  take   this  bus.  But  I  know  this  much:  If  we  get  the  right  people  on   the  bus,  the  right  people  in  the  right  seats,  and  the  wrong   people  off  the  bus,  then  we’ll  figure  out  how  to  take  it   someplace  great.’”  Jim  Collins,  Good  to  Great.   11  
  • 12. Q  #10   Are  we  crea2ng  structures  and  having  conversa2ons  that   inspire  ‘A’  performance  from  our  associates?    Are  we  structured   for  team  performance?    Are  we  recognizing  and  rewarding   performance  such  that  people  are  recognized  for  genera2ng   personal  and  team  achievement?   Assess  and  Develop  ‘A’   Teams        “The  Harrison  Assessments   system  reveals  deeply  rooted   insights  that  determine  essenBal   high  performance  traits  and  those   that  will  accelerate  or  hinder   performance  related  to  specific   posiBons.        “In  today’s  specialized  work  environment,  talent  is  not   enough.  Talented  people  must  effecBvely  work  together  in   order  for  the  organizaBon  to  succeed.  Harrison  Assessments   Paradox  Theory  reveals  team  dynamics  in  a  way  that  has  never   before  been  possible,  enabling  individual  team  members  to   easily  idenBfy  how  their  own  behaviors  contribute  or  obstruct   the  team  objecBves.  It  also  provides  a  step-­‐by-­‐step  plan  in   which  each  team  member  can  make  adjustments  to  facilitate   opBmal  team  performance.  A  team  building  tool  to  create   teams  with  effecBve  interacBons;  discover  the  strengths  and   challenges  of  a  team  including  team  decision-­‐making  potenBal,   idenBfy  the  best  roles  for  each  team  member,  assess  the   potenBal  for  cooperaBon  or  conflict,  establish  clear  guidelines   for  effecBve  interacBons.”  Harrison  Assessments  Talent   SoluBons,  Dan  Harrison   12  
  • 13. Q  #11   How  do  I,  and  our  team,  use  key  performance  indices  and  other   measures  for  performance?    Have  I,  and  has  our  team,  done  a   good  job  of  defining  those  measures  that  drive  success  in  our   business?    Do  we  know  what  our  leverage  points  are?    (A   leverage  point  is  a  place  in  the  organiza2on  where  a  small   change  can  make  a  significant  difference  in  producing  the   desired  results).   Measuring  Performance  for   Breakaway  Success   Defini1on:  BeaBng  the  Odds  by   Measuring  what  MaVers.   Breakaway  Success  requires   leveraging  ‘A’  players  and  their  ‘A’   teams  to  produce  results  beyond  the   “average,  acceptable”  range  of  possibiliBes,  including  but  not   limited  to  revenues  and  profits.   “Breakaway  Success  empowers  employees  to  be  their  best  and   rewards  excepBonal  performance.  ‘A’  players  want  to  be   measured.  They  want  to  surround  themselves  with  other  ‘A’   players  (whereas  ‘B’  players  tend  to  hire  ‘C’  players).   In  an  organizaBon  commiYed  to  Breakaway  Success,  people,   performance  and  results  are  measured  with  an  eye  to   conBnuous  improvement  and  in  a  culture  of  excellence  and   transparency.  Mistakes  are  encouraged  because  everyone   knows  that  the  sooner  they  are  idenBfied  the  sooner  they  can   be  corrected.”    Pamela  Stambaugh   13  
  • 14. Q  #12   Do  I,  and  our  team,  allow  open  discussion  of  every  aspect  of   our  business?    Do  we  listen  to  customer  and  outside  feedback   and  consider  it  as  important  to  our  success?    Do  I,  and  our   team,  create  openings  for  truth  exploring  and  openings  for   challenge  to  anything  that  we  do  or  believe?   Truth  Exploring  and   Construc1ve  Debate  for   Breakaway  Success   Defini1on:  What  you  measure  is  a  significant  part  of  truth   exploring.    Lagging  indicators  are  found  in  accounBng   records,  and  it  is  astounding  how  much  weight  is  put  on   those  indicators.    They  are  not  predicBve  of  anything.   The  problem  is,  by  the  Bme  the  P&L  and  balance  sheet  have   been  run  the  damage  is  already  done.    Leading  indicators   are  required  to  predict  success,  which  are  derived  from   making  assumpBons  about  what  causes  results,  then  tesBng   those  assumpBons  by  measuring  acBons  that  are  assumed   to  lead  to  results.  If,  aver  some  Bme  of  measuring,  there  is   a  correlaBon  between  acBons  taken  and  results,   congratulaBons.  You  have  proven  your  assumpBon  right.     Keep  doing  what  you  know  works.   If,  aver  some  Bme  of  measuring  indices,  there  is  no   correlaBon,  try  again.  Determining  the  cause  of  results  is  an   iteraBve  process  that  may  take  several  tries.  However,  if  you   are  wrong  or  you  don’t  try,  you  hardly  have  a  system  for   predicBng  your  success,  in  which  case  you  are  as  likely  to   not  succeed  as  you  are  to  succeed.  If  you  were  lucky  and   succeeded  and  you  wanted  to  replicate  your  success   without  knowing  how  you  achieved  it,  you  couldn’t.   Con1nued   14  
  • 15. Q  #12   Con1nued   Other  significant  measure  are  what  customers,  team   members,  sales  people  have  to  say.    What  you  do  not  know   about  your  organizaBon  can  and  does  make  a  difference  to   outcomes.    Providing  an  opening  for  feedback  can  be  as   formal  as  rouBne  feedback  mechanisms  (suggesBon  boxes,   surveys)  or  as  subtle  as  listening  in  conversaBons  to  not   only  what  is  being  said,  but  the  body  language  that   accompanies  the  message.    When  these  are  incongruent,   there  is  undelivered  communicaBon.    The  potenBal  for   contribuBon  oven  lies  in  the  subtle  clues.   “In  the  past  decade  and  a  half,  hundreds  of  billions  of   dollars  of  market  value  have  migrated  from  old  business   designs  to  new.  The  highest  valuaBons  now  go  to  those  who   have  the  most  effecBve  business  design.”    Skywotzky  and   Morrison,  Profit  PaYerns   “Most  people  think  that  profit  is  paramount  in  business,   and  it  certainly  is  important,  but  cash  is  king.  I’m  talking   here  about  the  stuff  you  use  to  pay  your  bills  every  month.  I   don’t  think  anyone  really  understands  what  it  takes  to   succeed  in  business  unBl  you’ve  tried  to  operate  without   cash.”        Jack  Stack,  A  Stake  in  the  Outcome   15  
  • 16. Q  #13   Do  we  have  a  culture  of  success?    Are  our  people  (suppliers,   employees,  customers,  other  stakeholders)  having  genera2ve   conversa2ons  as  full  par2cipants  in  the  success  of  the   organiza2on,  or  are  they  just  going  along  to  get  along?    Are   people  inspired?    Do  we  have  a  culture  where  any  associate   can  suggest  and  make  improvements  to  our  organiza2on?    Are   they  appropriately  recognized  and  rewarded  for  making  a   difference?   Genera1ve,  Inspired,   Focused  Performance   for  Breakaway  Success   Once  you  have  an  ‘A’  Player,  he  or  she  is  sBll  a  human  being  who   can  be  developed  to  their  highest  potenBal,  and  perhaps  set  on   a  succession  path.          “Strategic  criBcal  thinking  is  not  about  having  all  the  answers,   but  about  being  totally  immersed  in  the  quesBons.  The  cold,   hard  fact  is  that  there  is  seldom  much  credible  informaBon   about  the  future,  the  terrain  of  strategy.  If  one  waits  to  act  unBl   complete  or  perfect  informaBon  is  available,  the  Bme  to  act  will   have  passed.”    Mardig  Sheridan,  Mardig  and  Company   I  believe  in  the  “Systems  Thinking”  approach  to  strategic   planning,  which  involves,  among  many  other  things,  idenBfying   leverage  points,  which  are  places  where  a  small  change  can   make  a  significant  improvement  in  results.     Con1nued   16  
  • 17. Q  #13   The  following  excerpt  references  ways  to  look  for  leverage   points  and  how  to  go  about  that.  If  you  want  to  know  more   about  Systems  Thinking  approach,  a  famous  resource  is  The   Fivh  Discipline:  The  Art  and  PracBce  of  the  Learning   OrganizaBon  by  Peter  Senge.  This  book  re-­‐launched  the   concept  of  Systems  Thinking  which  began  in  biology  many,   many  years  ago.  Another  source  of  Systems  Thinking  books   and  experBse  is  the  Haines  Centre  for  Strategic  Management.   Con1nued   Discovering  and  Working  with  Leverage  Points   To  get  to  the  cause,  never  look  where  the  problem  is  —  it  is   almost  never  in  the  same  Bme  or  space  as  the  effect.   Leverage  points  are  almost  always  found  in  the  “balancing   loop”  and  will  generally  take  the  form  of  a  thermostat   se[ng.  They  tend  to  be  quite  subtle  in  nature.  They  should   always  address  the  quesBon,  “What  does  it  take  to  maintain   balance  and  achieve  opBmum  growth?”          IdenBfy  leverage  points.  Ask,  “What  will  remove  the   source  of  upset  condiBons  and  limits  to  growth?”          Examine  the  underlying  structure  of  the  organizaBon  that   you  have  mapped  out  and  discover  the  true  source  of  upset   condiBons  (hint:  look  for  the  source  or  cause  of  any   imbalances).   Con1nued   17  
  • 18. Q  #13    Most  leverage  points  tend  to  be  developmental  in  nature  and   are  based  on  becoming  a  competency-­‐development   organizaBon.          Author’s  Notes,  “The  GeneraBve  OrganizaBon,  from  ReacBve   Behavior  to  Inspired  Performance.”    William  J.  Schwarz   GeneraBve,  inspired,  focused  performance  is  the  result  of   execuBve  excellence,  hiring  ‘A’  players,  measuring  the  right   things,  assessing  and  then  developing  ‘A’  teams,  employee   engagement,  having  the  right  people  in  the  right  seats  on  the   bus,  and  effecBve  planning  and  execuBon.  The  result  of   generaBve,  inspired,  focused  performance  is  Breakaway   Success  and  the  financial  rewards  that  come  from  having   focused  energy  in  the  appropriate  channels  producing  the   desired  results.  If  that  describes  your  organizaBon,  please   accept  this  acknowledging  High  Five!      If  not,  the  next  page  of  this  e-­‐book  is  for  your  tracking  benefit   as  you  put  these  ques2ons  into  ac2on  in  your  organiza2on.   Con1nued   18  
  • 19. 19   Company____________________________________________________ ! Date Conversation Starter Resulting Insights/Actions ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !
  • 20. Pamela  Stambaugh,  President  and  Founder  of   Accountability  Pays  for  27  years,  has  guided  senior   execuBves  to  unleash  the  power  of  their  people  and   their  own  potenBal  since  1999  with  the  addiBon  of   the  Harrison  Assessments.    She  will  lead  you  to   opBmize  the  performance  of  your  execuBve  team  as   an  ‘A-­‐Team’.    With  ‘A’  performers,  all  work  is  easier   and  more  fun.  Hiring?    She  can  advance  your   organizaBon  to  predictably  hire  ‘A’  Players  using  a   powerful  system  for  candidate  evaluaBon.   To  learn  more  about  Harrison  Assessments  Talent   SoluBons,  Team  Building,  Performance  Management,   or  holding  people  accountable  for  results,  contact   Pamela  Stambaugh  at  AccountabilityPays.com.     20   About  the  Author   These  Senior  ExecuBve  Team  ConversaBon  Starters  are  also   available  as  three  half-­‐page  four-­‐color  cards  in  an  envelope.    If  you   would  like  them  in  this  physical  form,  or  you  have  other  quesBons,   call  619-­‐231-­‐0195  or  e-­‐mail  pstambaugh@AccountabilityPays.com   for  more  informaBon.   ©  2013  Pamela  Stambaugh  —  Accountability  Pays.    All  Rights  Reserved.  

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