Field Report on Khokana and Bungmati
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Field Report on Khokana and Bungmati

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This is a field report prepared by Suraj Ghimire about the one of the most untouched Newari Settlement in Kathmandu valley, Khokana and Bungmati. These places are famous for their cultural heritage ...

This is a field report prepared by Suraj Ghimire about the one of the most untouched Newari Settlement in Kathmandu valley, Khokana and Bungmati. These places are famous for their cultural heritage and have got huge prospects of agro-tourism.

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Field Report on Khokana and Bungmati Field Report on Khokana and Bungmati Document Transcript

  • EVALUATE THE STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA [An assignment provided as a partial requirement for the course of Hospitality Management Seventh semester, Kings College ] Submitted by Suraj Ghimire Submitted to Kings College BBA VII(Marketing) Bijuli Bajar, Kathmandu
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] ACKNOWLEDGEMENT To everyone who helped in preparing this report . My friends Sunil Limbu, Shekhar Basnet and Umesh BC. Also to the Locals of Bungmati and Khokana, the Bungmati Foundation and especially Mr. Naresh Shakya who provided lots of information to us. Also my due thanks goes to Rajeev sir who made us realize that true knowledge is not to be found in the pages of book but in the terrace of mustard fields. A HOMAGE TO BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA … Suraj Ghimire Page 1
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] Bungamati बुङगमती Bunga:, Amarapur (Old) — Model Village Development Committee — Coordinates: Country 27.62°N 85.30°E Nepal Zone Bagmati Zone District Lalitpur District Population (2011) 5,966 INTRODUCTION OF THE PLACE: BUNGMATI Bungamati is a village development committee in Lalitpur District in the Bagmati Zone of central Nepal. Bungamati or Bunga: (called by local people in Newa: (Nepal Bhasa) language ) or Amarapur (an old name) is a classic Newa: village dating from the 16th century. There are suspicions that Bungamati existed as early as the 7th century under the name „Bugayumi‟. However, its official founding date falls somewhere in the 16th century. It is perched on a spur of land overlooking the Bagmati river.Bungamati is the birth place of Rato Macchindranath,regarded as the patron of the valley and the large Rato Macchindranath, shikhar-style temple in the center of the village square is his home for six months of the year(he spends the rest of his time in patan).The process of moving him around patan and backward and forward to Bungamati Central to one of the most important annual festivals in the valley.The chowk around the temple is one of the most beautiful in the valley. It used to be an autonomous province in Kathmandu Valley. Regardless of the rapid changes in lifestyle of the urban population and the globalized way of living, the Bungamati locals have remained untouched by modern waves and are living the life that they know best--simply rural-from the past several centuries. Suraj Ghimire Page 2
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] LOCATION Bungmati is a medieval village lies about 6km South of Patan and 10 kilometres south from the heart of Kathmandu the capital city of Nepal. One has to go straight road from Jawalakhel (Tibetan Refugee Camp) crossing the ring road. About 6km. From Khokana, Bungmati is 15 minutes walk.There is regular micro bus service from Patan. We can reach Bungamati by bus, bicycle or by trekking and we can be sure that visiting this small village will be an experience on its own. Because it is not easily reached by road or by air, not many people choose to visit Bungamati in Nepal. However, that does not mean that it is not worth visiting. Quite on the contrary: Bungamati‟s lack of easy access to the rest of Nepal has spared it from a lot of the development and cultural degradation that has occurred in some larger cities. As the village is only about 10 kilometers south from downtown Kathmandu so it is not far away at all! DEMOGRAPHY AND LIFESTYLE The latest survey of 2011 shows that 5,966 people live in Bungmati in 1,304 households. Among which 2,981 are male and 2,985 are female. Most of the people are Newars and in these villages one can see typical Newari houses.In the Bungmati VDC, there are 9 wards. Among them ward 1-6 are dominated by the Newars and rest three are dominated partly by Tamang and chhetri. The place is a kind of suburb area of the valley are popular for chilly and mustard oil. The best time to visit Bungmati and Khokana is in October and November because at that time the whole village looks colorful. They hand red chilly garland from the top floor to the ground floor in the whole village. Most of the farmers in these villages are either involved in spinning or oil pressing business. The mustard oil of Khokana is still popular in Kathmandu valley. The village has hundreds of master wood carver and sculpture producers. Some years ago more than 75 % of the population were engaged in wood work but now the percentage has dropped to almost 30%. What makes Bungamati special is the fact that it is a traditional Newari village – a place where not much has changed over the last couple of centuries. As we walk the streets, we will find hundreds of masterful wood carvers and sculptors offering us excellently hand-crafted items at bargain prices. Most of them work from home and they may even offer other articles for sale on the side. Generally speaking, the Newars who live here live rural lives, following in the steps of their fathers and forefathers which lived long before them. The Bungamati Newari enjoy an incredibly rich culture which extends over the fields of language, writing, art, architecture and even trans-Himalayan commerce. The people who live here have been practicing their skill or trade, which has been passed down for generations, for most of their lives and they always greet us with a smile. The women are also productive, utilizing their spare time to engage in weaving, knitting and hand-sewing. However, the village is probably best known for it‟s wood carvers whose expertise in their field really stands out. Suraj Ghimire Page 3
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] The village is full of traditional Newar houses where garlic can be seen hanging on the trunks of the roofs. The locals are Newars and the aged Newars there have their own lifestyle. They have a different world of their own and they have plenty to do within their locality. The old aged women are seen to be busy playing with hay and most of them don‟t speak any other language than Newar. The majority of the population is engaged in agriculture and there are quite a number of carpenters who are rather into artistic carving than modern architecture.Though a small congested area, Bungmati is a real wooden craft gallery. It is a must visit place in the Kathmandu valley. HISTORY The 16th century Malla king who ruled Kathmandu from Patan, concerned that his subjects might move too far from the city to serve its defense, established two settlements Bungmati and Khokana near the Karya Binayak shrine, amid fertile fields. During a major drought, the king sought the blessings of the rain god, Machhendranath, at a temple in India, inviting the deity to come and settle in the Valley. He built a shrine at Bungmati where, sometime in the last decade of the 16th century; it became the custom to keep the image of the Rato Machhendra during winter, moving it back to Patan by palanquin in summer. RELIGIOUS SHRINES Bungmati is a home, one of the most important Gods of the Kathmandu Valley known as Machhindranath (Matsyendranath), the God of rain and compassion, worshipped equally by Hindus and Buddhists and accredited by locals with the introduction of paddy-rice plantations in the valley. There is a Machhindranath Temple in Bungmati, where the God Machhindranath is kept for 3 - 4 months in a year as well as one temple in Patan. The central ritual focus of Bungamati is the Temple of Macchindranath. To the villagers, Macchindranath is known by the name “Bungadeya”; the name is derived either after the village founded at the spot where Bhairav howled “bu” (birthplace), or from the word “Bungaa:” meaning “watering place” or “spring” like the explanation of the name of the village and several residents in Bungamati offer the second derivation. Bungadeya has many important mythological, historical and contemporary ritual associations with water.Bungadeya being a primordial rain god, who was later identified with the benevolent Aryavalokiteshvara. Macchindranath is also known by the name of “Karunamaya” meaning an embodiment of love and kindness like a mother figure. While Bungamati Newa: people refer to Macchindranath as Bungadeya, Newah from other parts of the valley use the name Karunamaya to refer to Machendranath. Machendranath‟s identity as Padmapani, Lokeshvara, and Aryavalokiteshvara is widely known. The village is in fact noted for this strongly stated, shikhara-style Rato Machhendranath temple. The adjacent Lokeshwar shrine contains an image of Bhairav's massive head in full, demoniac fury located at Machhindra Bahal. Suraj Ghimire Page 4
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] Karyabinayak, one of four popular Ganesh temples in the valley, lies on the north of the town at walking distance. -here one can see the heart of a functioning Newa: town. In Bungamati the Karya Binayak temple is also one of the most important temples in Nepal, is dedicated to Ganesh,the view is spectacular from the Karya Binayak, surrounding by trees and large bamboos and can look at the Bagmati valley to the foothills. STUDY OF THE CONDITION 4 AS OF TOURISM AT BUNGMATI 1: A TTRACTIONS (N ATURAL, MAN -MADE, CULTURAL, FESTIVALS / EVENTS ) Bungmati consists of all sorts of attractions i.e. man made, Natural, Cultural, festivals, events etc. Among the natural attraction, the village itself situated in the hilltop clad with beautiful forest can be a major hangout for those seeking to go away from the hassles of City chores. The eccentric way followed by Nearby Bagmati River can also be a source of attraction albeit it‟s pathetic condition now. Bungamti also offers hiking trail and can also be a place to ride for adventure cyclists. Two ponds are dug in the entry/exit point of the Bungmati which is believed to offer good luck for a safe journey and welcome back home. It is a common tradition in Nepal tobid farewell to our near ones with full vessel of water in the main gate. There are altogether six such ponds in Bungmati. Traditional houses made out of mud and brick with tiled roofs, stone paved streets, old temples, stupas, ponds and other old architecture provides glimpse of medieval era. Villagers spinning, caring for children, gossiping, processing crops in the sun are another amazing attractions of this village. Wood carving is a tradition alive and strong here and it is possible to see beautiful pieces being produced, including doors and window frames. The villages are surrounded by green fields and hills which invite tourists for day hikes and walks. Bungmati is rich in cultural heritage and seasonal events and festivals. Event like Rato Macchindranath chariot ride starts from here. The rope for pulling the chariot is dipped in the Pond called “De Pokhu” for about one and half months. The idol of lord Machhindranth is Kept inside the temple for six months. A fair of “De pokhu” is held every 12 years in Bungmati. The next Mela is due to be held in 2072 BS. This place has a great importance among Newar tribes. The Bungmati temple itself is an example of art and culture and it reflects the artistic proficiency of the village. People in Bungamati feel proud to save their culture. Typical Newari dress,living style as well old cultural houses are strong site of attraction for tourists . A museum is also located in the Bungmati maintained by local people. 2: ACCOMMODATION Suraj Ghimire Page 5
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] Bungmati has no facility for accommodation except for the 3-4 newly registered homes for the purpose of Home stay. Some houses are there undergoing the process to register for homestay. The residents of Bungmati and the VDC office strongly object any move like opening up modern styled restaurants and lodge in their locality. So on so, outsiders are not even allowed to purchase land or settle there permanently. WHERE TO STAY AND EAT Not being far away from the Main city of Kathmandu, normally, tourists opt to stay their night back in Kathmandu. These tourists roam around the place whole day and return back at evening. But for those who are not lucky enough to get the home stay and still want a abode at a walking distance, Guest house located at Bhaisepati can be a good choice. 3: ACCESSIBILITY ( EASE OF ACCESS REGARDING TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES )       Maximum 40 minute of drive in bus/ taxi from the centre of Kathmandu. Motor bike can be better option to cross the busy streets of Kathmandu and narrow lanes of Bungmati. 25-30 minutes from Patan. 1 hour from Bhaktapur. 5 minutes from Bhaisepati. Private Tourist Car/ Van/ Coaster to or from Kathmandu and Pokhara are also arranged by the hotels or travel agencies. An individual can also make an excellent bike ride to here, but it is a really tough ride. 4: A MENITIES ( INFRASTRUCTURE AND A DDITIONAL / SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICE THAT EFFICIENTLY AND SUFFICIENTLY ENHANCE THE TOURIST ) Being adjacent to the capital city, Bungmati is not deficient in the resources and infrastructures available in Kathmandu. In fact it is claimed that Bungmati and Khokana were electrified even before the Kathmandu city. There might be some truth in it because Nepal‟s first hydro electric power station of Pharping is nearby the place. Talking of today, like Kathmandu, Bungmati lacks access to safe drinking water. There are no big hospitals or health posts in the locality itself but Patan hospital and hospitals like B&B are not far away. Tourists can‟t expect healthy and hygienic atmosphere but what is available can‟t be deemed unsatisfactory because of its authenticity and chastity. Suraj Ghimire Page 6
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] Khokana खोकना — Village development committee — Coordinates: 27.64°N 85.29°E Coordinates: 27.64°N 85.29°E Country Nepal Zone Bagmati Zone District Lalitpur District Population (2011) 4,927 Khokana is a village development committee in Lalitpur District in the Bagmati Zone of central Nepal. The census of 2011 shows that Khokana has a population of 4,927 people living in 1,027 individual households. It is a brick-paved village famous for the manufacture of mustard oil. Khokana has its own history and has retained its tradition and culture. It is a living museum and recalls medieval times. In the tentative list of the World heritage site of UNESCO, Khokana is described as, "Khokana is a unique village which can be taken as a model of a medieval settlement pattern with a system of drainage and chowks. It houses chaityas and a Mother Goddess temple. The mustard-oil seed industry has become the living heritage of the village." LOCATION: KHOKANA Khokana in Nepal is situated just north of Bungamati at a 20-30 minutes walking distance. It is located 8km south of Kathmandu on the outskirts of Patan. A taxi from Thamel could cost as much as 500NR. A local bus operates from the Ring Road, south of the Ekantakuna area of Patan, which is a much cheaper option. It is 10 minutes walk away of Bungmati. Suraj Ghimire Page 7
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] In the center of town we can find that the main street is particularly wide – especially for a village of such diminutive size. The street was widened significantly during the rebuilding process after an earthquake shook the village in 1934. Another thing that is noticed no matter where we go in this tiny village is a large three-storied temple. This massive building certainly dominates the „skyline‟ of the village and can be seen from virtually anywhere in the area. The temple is dedicated to the local mother goddess,the goddess of nature, Shikali Mai or Rudrayani, and it is regularly used by the local people. A similar temple to the northeast of the village is mainly only used during times of epidemic. Clearly, Khokana does have something to offer – even if it will only keep one busy for a few hours. LIFESTYLE 4,927 indigenous people inhabit in Khokana. The male and female population is 2,452 and 2475 respectively. There are 1,056 households in Khokana.The farming community of Newars who live here are mostly dependent on agriculture and much of their daily activities take place outside of their dwellings. It is a tiny Newari village with a reputation for two things – mustard oil and the local temple. The Newari who live here eke out a simple living off the land. Much of their daily activities take place outside of their dwellings and they really do seem to embrace nature. Thus, as we make our way down the main street of the village, we can see woman sitting outside spinning, men crushing seeds, and other daily activities. The village is famous for its unusual mustard oil harvesting process in which a heavy wooden beam is used to crush the mustard seeds in order to extract the oil. This oil can be eaten if desired but it can also be used for therapeutic massage. Even if we are not a fan of the mustard plant, we simply have to enjoy the local mustard oil in whatever way appeals to us the most. There are women sitting outside spinning, men crushing seeds, and other daily activities. The village is famous for its unusual mustard-oil harvesting process in which a heavy wooden beam is used to crush the mustard seeds in order to extract the oil. It is believed that a share system was used in the past here. This oil can be consumed if desired, but it can also be used for therapeutic massage. This was also the first village, indeed the first habitation, to be electrified, before Kathmandu. CULTURE One of the most famous festival "Gai jatra", in which a baby female goat is thrown in to the pond, where the group of people from nine divisions of the village take part. whoever can take the female goat out of that pond wins the game. To watch this festival people come from different places, in this day specially if we get late then we will not find an spot from where we can watch. Suraj Ghimire Page 8
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] In the center is a three-storey temple, Shree Rudrayani, with a particularly wide main street, especially for a village of such small size. Khokana has been nominated to be listed as a Unesco World Heritage, representing a vernacular village and its mustard-oil seed industrial heritage. There is another amazing fact about the village.This village is not allowed to raise chickens.there is the reason behind this,and that reason is the main temple.In this temple sacrificing of chickens and even their eggs are forbidden, it is said that the goddess will not accept and will make her angry,so instead of getting blessing one could get cursed.This is the myth about the temple but people do not dare to test because the people of this village are very religious. The rich cultural heritage of Khokana can be vividly demonstrated by the following blog written by a foreigner who attended Khokana festival. “The small Newari village of Khokana is often upstaged by the bigger and better known, village of Bugamati . The last three days saw Khokana completely steal the spotlight. The Khokana festival was a flawless display of traditional Nepali living, with the ideal mix of entertainment and cultural information. The drive to Khokana perfectly set the scene. The slow roll out of Kathmandu and into the rural surround, through rice fields that seemed to struggle up the sides of surrounding mountains and demonstrate a tradition of lives spent working hard in the soil. On arrival tall red-brick houses with intricate wood carving dominate the village streets, forming a curling maze, perfect for stumbling across new cultural treasures. Dressed in Newari outfits, both young and old gathered in the streets, to prepare foods, play instruments and explain cultural exhibits to visitors. Residents and organizers should be proud, the last day of the festival saw the whole small communities mobilize to provide visitors with an exceptional experience. Demonstrations of Khokana’s distinctive mustard oil production were a welcome break from the cold winter wind. The warming scent of roasting mustard seeds and smoke wafts out of the workshops and fills town with the delicious atmosphere of a huge kitchen. The village is famous in Nepal for its traditional method squeezing seeds between a two large beams wood to release the oil. Newari weaving, paintings and carvings were also on display. A number of cultural dances captivated tourist and locals. The Thimi dance and Devi dance were particularly skilled; audiences blocked the whole street while the village stood to watch. The real star of the Khokana festival was the Newari food. The women, who sat around small fires and stoves, cheerfully preparing dishes, were eager to share their cooking knowledge. There was an I selected a Newar Pancake (Who), a sweat steamed snack bursting with golden syrup and sesame (Yomari) and strong Nepali wine (Yela). I have attended many cultural festivals in Nepal. The difference at Khokana was the festival felt vibrant and residents actually seemed excited to be sharing their traditions with visitors. It was a Suraj Ghimire Page 9
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] unique experience and the community really earned their reputation as a living museum. I hope organizers will consider turning the event into a yearly celebration.” STUDY OF THE CONDITION 4 AS OF TOURISM AT KHOKANA 1: A TTRACTION There is no central square, as in nearby village Bungamati but there‟s plenty of action in the main street, including women spinning wool. The main temple is a two tiered construction dedicated to Shekali Mai – a mother goddess. The temple of Rudrayani is the major religious site but ponds have also equally religious importance. Museum: There‟s a small museum maintained by a local person (Mr. Madan Krishna Maharjan) in, which he‟s put the typical jewellery sets and agriculture farming tools. This building was built 100 years ago and is the only house, which was not destroyed by the BS 1990. 2: ACCOMMODATION In terms of accommodation, Khokana offers more options than bungamti. Many Hometay facilities have started and Hotels in Khokana are more agreeable than in Bungmati. Just at the entry point of Khokana many resorts and lodges can be seen. These resorts and hotel provide all basic services and are cozy as well. But they lack the authentic flavor of typical Newari home. 3: ACCESSIBILITY      35-40 minutes from Kathmandu in local bus or a reserved taxi. 15-30 minutes‟ walk from Bungmati. 15-20 minutes ride from Patan. Private Tourist Car/ Van/ Coaster to or from Kathmandu and Pokhara are also arranged by the hotels or travel agencies. An individual can also make an excellent bike ride to here, but it is a really tough ride. 4: A MENITIES Khokana is well facilitated with all the necessary infra-structure like electricity, water, telecommunication, health facility etc. By a close analysis we can find that Khokana is more developed than Bungmati because it is more close to the urban centre. Still, Water shortage can be faced in dry season. A sub health post and police station is established there for the safety and wellbeing of the locals as well as the tourists. Suraj Ghimire Page 10
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] PROSPECTS OF AGRO TOURISM IN KHOKANA, BUNGMATI AND NEPAL AS A WHOLE Nepal is known as an agricultural country in the world. The statistic shows that more than 66% of its population involve in farming. However, the farmers are not able to get expected benefits due to lack of modern technology and ideas. Farming systems and crop production in Nepal vary across the agro-ecological regions of plain, hills and mountains. Rice-based cropping systems, with wheat or maize as a secondary crop, are predominant in the plain and hill regions, whereas in the high hill mountains maize, millet, barley and buckwheat are cultivated (Pandey and Nakagawa, 2008). Tea, cardamom, ginger and coffee are the important cash crops of the middle hills. Likewise, wide ranges of temperate fruits in the high mountains; citrus in the middle hills; tropical/subtropical fruits are also grown in the terai and middle hill valleys. Vegetable-growing in kitchen gardens is practiced at all elevations. In addition to this Livestock is an important component of the Nepalese farming system providing food for humans, manure for plants, and draft power for farms and cash income for farm families. Cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goat, pigs and poultry are the livestock species reared across different agricultural zones Agro-ecotourism, a combination of agro-tourism and ecotourism, plays a critical role in Nepal by using diversified resources, both natural and man-made, landscapes, biodiversity and cultural heritages. Agro-tourism can be used to motivate and encourage farming communities to raise their crops in an eco-friendly manner and to conserve the biodiversity of farms. Nepal has plenty of natural resources, which has helped to make agro-tourism more popular and fascinating among tourists. Agro tourism allows visitors to come in close contact with the inhabitants of small, rural villages and to be involved in traditional ways of agriculture still existing in this age. In agro-tourism, tourists can find the answers to their questions about different indigenous agricultural practices, such as how crops are harvested, graded and preserved, how vegetables can be grown organically, how freshly picked fruits are converted into delicious marmalades, and so on . Agro tourism allows close connection with the inhabitants of small rural villages who have been involved in traditional way of agriculture. Nepalese economy consists of agricultural business, eco-tourism, industry, hydro-electricity and information technology (IT) services with semi skilled human resources working abroad (GATS). Among these sectors, agriculture and ecotourism contribute 33% and 8% to the national GDP, respectively (NPC, 2007). However, the contribution of agricultural sector is decreasing, compared to tourism sector contributing about 16% to the national GDP. These last contributors have the potential for growth. Nepalese economy is now transitioning from agricultural to an early-stage industrial track. Nevertheless, there is no one sector that contributes significantly to the economy thus far, except agriculture. The per capita GDP increase in production per year averages only 3%. In comparison to the population growth rate (2.25%), the average annual economic growth rate is (2.8%) still low (MOF, 2009). Nepal has plenty of natural resources, which makes agro- tourism more popular and inviting for tourists. During the summer season tourists are exhilarated to see the farmers involved in rice Suraj Ghimire Page 11
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] planting. The techniques they follow for planting and harvesting differ from one region to another. Moreover, every season is rich with its agricultural products and provides the tourists with an once-in-a-lifetime experience. But for Nepal, agro tourism has different economic and socio cultural aims and paradigm. The basis of the program is the revitalization of the countryside and reversal of urbanization. It brings tourists to the countryside from over populated cities. Thus, there is an urgent need to explore alternative businesses which show multiplier effects on economic development while harnessing the agricultural sector. The tourism sector in Nepal received special focus only after eighth periodic Plan (1992- 1997); the Ninth Plan (1997-2002) envisaged establishing Nepal as a premier destination for world tourism, developing tourism as an important part of overall economic development and expanding its benefits down to the village level as its long term objectives (NPC, 2007). In addition, the Three-Year Interim Plan (2007-2010) reported that the progress of tourism‟s development grew rapidly after the 1990 political change. However, the tourism industry, which had been growing rapidly, began to slow after political conflicts in the country intensified (MOF, 2008). The prospect of Agro tourism is very high in Khokana. The soil is very fertile and cow dung and compost manure is in plenty from the local source. They still follow organic way of farming in many places. Just like wine tourism in France, we can promote the Oil tourism in the mustard farms of Khokana and Chilly tourism as well . The process and ceremonies of the traditional oil extraction is unique and can be of great amusement for the observers. Home stay program can add more fun to this process as the visitors can be more deeply intrigued within the local life. PRESENT SCENARIO OF TOURISM IN BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA We visited Bungmati and Khokana on January 12 2013, just before the day of Maghe Sankranti. At first we reached Bungamati and interviewed with the locals. We also observed the atmosphere and envirionment of the place. There is a big gate in the entry point of Bungmati adjusted with two ponds for good luck. We visited the Temple of Machhindranth and Bhairabh and basked in the sun for a while. We also enquired and asked question to the member of Bungmati foundation. We could see about 10-15 tourist at the time of our short stay of about 2 hours. According to the locals, on average 40-50 tourists visited the place in a single day. The occupation of the people is wood carving and other related works. Modern generation have not adopted the traditional way of living and are increaseingly showing interest in western fashion, music, food and even old houses are being demolished to construct concrete buildings. But the participation of youth in local festivals have not shown any decline. Some people are Suraj Ghimire Page 12
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] engaged in alternative source of income like making handicraft items and lockets. On our visit, we met a person who was making lockets of brass with hand and traditional die. He earned about 50 paisa per piece he made. We also interacted with some local artisans who were busy making woodcrafts of wood like chap, Saal, Sallo etc. After Bungmati, we visited Khokana. On the way to Khokana we also reached the temple of Karya Binayak. Khokana is more developed than Bungmati which can be attributed to its nearness to the urban centre. While on the way, we met with a crew of Television unit who were making a documentary of the places. The local people were celebrating their annual festival of the Guthi by making the offering of Sheep and Duck. Khokana was formed in the medieval era by Malla kings and the early settlement at river basin was later transferred to the high land because lower land was submerged by the river. Nepal Tourism Board should give importance to Agro Tourism with the aim of showcasing new areas and promoting and developing the life style and economy of indigenous people residing in rural area. Nepal is known as an agricultural country and more than eighteen percent of its people are involved in farming. The fact is to be considered that they toil hard but are not able to get expected benefit in lack of modern technology and techniques. Our company believes that agro tourism allows us to be in close contact with the inhabitants of small rural villages being involved in traditional way of agriculture in this century. We can find out how food grains are harvested, sorted and preserved, how vegetables can be grown organically, how freshly picked fruits are turned into delicious marmalades, how goats are milked, cheeses are made, and so on... Agro tourism has various different economic and socio cultural aims. The basis of the Agro tourism should be the revitalization of the countryside and reversal of urban trend. It brings tourists to the countryside instead of over populating cities. We can meet lovely and hard working people of rural area, share a meal with them, stay at their houses as family guests, taste their local drink and see them carry on with life graciously. In addition, to the heartwarming hospitality, we can also witness some of the most spectacular views of the mountain landscapes or heritage sites along the way. So, the only way to develop and improve the life style of the locals along with the conservation of the rich culture and heritage of Bungmati and Khokana is by adopting agro tourism in a broader spectrum. . Suraj Ghimire Page 13
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] PHOTOS IN THE ORDER WE TOOK IT 1. THE POND AT THE ENTRANCE OF KHOKANA 2. ANOTHER POND ADJACENT TO THE FIRST ONE Suraj Ghimire Page 14
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 3. ENTRANCE OF BUNGMATI WITH MY FRIEND SUNIL 4. AS WE ENTER BUNGMATI Suraj Ghimire Page 15
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 5 ARTISANS MAKING WOODEN WORK 6. ME INTERVIEWING WITH THE ARTISAN Suraj Ghimire Page 16
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 7. A CLOSE-UP OF AN ARTIST AT WORK 8. THE BHAIRABH Suraj Ghimire Page 17
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 9. AN ARTIST MAKING LOCKETS 10. A TRADITIIONAL "AKHI JHYAL", THE WOODEN BLIND Suraj Ghimire Page 18
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 11. DUCKS SWIMMING IN "DE POKHU", THE HOLY POND 12. THE BUNGMATI FOUNDATION Suraj Ghimire Page 19
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 13. A PORTER CARRYING EARTHEN WARES 14. AS THE PORTER DISAPPEARS IN THE HORIZON Suraj Ghimire Page 20
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 15. AN OLD WOMAN CARRYING “DOKO”, A WEAVED BASKET 16. BASKING UNDER THE SUN Suraj Ghimire Page 21
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 17. AN INTERVIEW WITH THE FOUNDER OF BUNGMATI FOUNDATION 18. PLAYING CARDS ... TIME PASS Suraj Ghimire Page 22
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 19. WEAVING CARPET OF HAY 20. THE MIGHTY MACHHINDRANATH TEMPLE Suraj Ghimire Page 23
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 21. PORTRAIT OF A TOURIST TAKING PHOTO 22. THE HANDICRAFTS Suraj Ghimire Page 24
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 23. THE TRADITIONAL PUPPETS, “THE KATHPUTALI” 24. A LADY MOPING UP THE FRONT-YARD WITH RED CLAY Suraj Ghimire Page 25
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 25. A MODEL OF KRISHNA TEMPLE Suraj Ghimire Page 26
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 26. READY FOR THE NEXT CULTIVATION 27. THE FARMLAND OF BUNGMATI Suraj Ghimire Page 27
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 28. PANORAMIC VIEW OF BUNGMATI FARMLAND 29. A BOARD THAT WELCOMES Suraj Ghimire Page 28
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 30. SHOOTING THAT WAS GOING ON WHEN WE ARRIVED KHOKANA 31. WHEN THE ACTORS EXCHANGE THE DIALOGUE Suraj Ghimire Page 29
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 32. THE RUDRAYANI TEMPLE OF KHOKANA 33. LET’S GET SOME VITAMIN D: TWO WHITE KIDS Suraj Ghimire Page 30
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 34. LOOKS LIKE SOMETHING WEIRD HAPPENING HERE 35. OH IT’S JUST A SHEEP AND DUCK BARBEQUE Suraj Ghimire Page 31
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 36. IN THE QUE TO BE BARBEQUED 37. WE HAVE LOT TO SHARE WITH YOU, FIRST TAKE OUR PHOTO Suraj Ghimire Page 32
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 38. THE KHOKANA AS WE SAW IT FROM THE STREET 39. A HOUSE WITH HOLY ENCHATATIONS Suraj Ghimire Page 33
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 40. ON THE WAY, WE WENT INSIDE KARYA BINAYAK 41. GANESHA, THE GOD WITH ELEPHANT HEAD Suraj Ghimire Page 34
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] 42. BUNGMATI SEEN FROM THE BHAISEPATI HEIGHT 43.THE LAST GLIMPSE OF KHOKANA Suraj Ghimire Page 35
  • [STATE OF TOURISM IN AND AROUND BUNGMATI AND KHOKANA] BIBLIOGRAPHY http://wikitravel.org/en/Bungmati http://www.sentientsapien.com/2011/06/bingmati.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bungamati http://www.nepal.com/central/bungamati/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khokana http://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/844/ http://www.trektrips.net/information/226/khokana.html http://travellinginnepal.com/nepal/tour-in-nepal/khokana-newari-culture-tour.html http://nepaltravelblogs.com/profiles/blogs/success-at-khokana-festival http://www.manang.com/khokana/index.php http://nepaltravelblogs.com/profiles/blogs/success-at-khokana-festival http://www.tripadvisor.com/GoListDetail-i32802-Visit_Bungamati_and_Khokana.html http://cbs.gov.np/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/VDC_Municipality.pdf www.moad.gov.np/geed/art8.pdf Suraj Ghimire Page 36