2013 e guidebook

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  • The focal point of the course is coaching the 9-12 year old developmental stage. This is often referred to as the “golden age of learning”. A portion of this course will be devoted to the physiological and cognitive stages of this developmental stage. The E Course establishes the foundation for our continuous coaching development pathway.
  • These are the coaching competencies that we will target for the E License. We will focus on planning and executing a high quality, single practice session. The content will reflect a range of ideas and best practices that are centered on the Basic Stage of player development (9-12 years- developmental age)
  • <Instructor Note> This schedule is intended to serve as a template that may be revised according to your specific facility and schedule demands. NO CHANGES OR DELECTIONS SHOULD BE MADE IN THE SPECIFIC ELEMENTS. ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE INCLUDED.
  • Why do we (coaches and technical leaders) sub-divide youth development stages? (Pause for discussion) What key variables separate the Basic stage from the Initial stage and the Intermediate stage? What are the specific, unique qualities of the Basic Stage? Cognitive= key time period for mylenization= accelerated neurological development. Pre to early-pubescence depending upon gender. “Golden Age of learning”
  • Discuss examples of the inter-relationships: (1) Provide an example of a simple tactic that may be related to passing? (2) Differentiate between the key physical elements that are important for a 6-8 year old relative to a 16 year old.
  • (Discuss & Engage) How does your organization accommodate or offer solutions to this fact? Team formation process? Flexibility in player placement?
  • (Discuss & Explain) The interpretation of the curve- what does it represent? Define PHV….relate it to the layman’s term “Tee Growth Spurt” Provide and general perspective of the “trainability windows. FOCUS SPECIFICALLY on the 9-12 year old “SKILLS” trainability window!
  • (DISCUSS & SET THE STAGE) Which skills? Define multi-lateral development (=the positive affects from participation in a variety of physical activities) What PHYSICAL aspects should we focus on? What is the psycho-social make-up of this age group? (DETAILS IN SUBSEQUENT SLIDES)
  • Discuss the Technical and Tactical components in detail. Review and provide examples of how to CONNECT these 2 components. “Give an example…”
  • Discuss the Psycho-social and Physical components in detail. Review and provide examples of how to CONNECT these 2 components. “Give an example…” Psychologically, what physical aspects of development are a 9 year old motivated to participate in?
  • (QUICK PRESENTATION)DEFINE LTAD= “an athlete development plan”HIGHLIGHT the focus of this course= Competency in planning a SINGLE training session as a stepping stone to prepare for a match (1/ week)
  • (ANALYZE and DISCUSS) the multi-colored grid representing…INTEGRATION of THE 4 COMPONENTS INTO A PRACTICE…Key Points:*Each component is included in each stage of the practice*The emphasis of each component varies depending on the age and the stage of the practice.(OBSERVE & DISCUSS)**TECHNIQUE….how much and when?**GAME…Why are all 4 components rated as “very high”
  • (DISCUSS and ANALYZE EACH OF THE 3 COMPONENTS)*PHYSICAL: Why is endurance in the middle of the 1 week cycle? (physiological recovery) Why is strength emphasized at the beginning of the week and speed at the end just prior to the match?*TECHNICAL:Why focus on unopposed at the beginning of the week and move toward opposed at the end of the week? (Demand is high- recovery is a concern. Opposed practices are more complex, move from simple to complex as the week progresses.)*TACTICAL:“Build” a group example of a simple practice and a more complex practice.
  • “Teaching” is a dynamic process of interactions (it is an engagement of thought between people)We are TEACHING KIDS…..the subject matter is soccer****OUR METHODOLOGY MUST BE ABOUT TEACHING KIDS****
  • “TEACHING” must include interactions between the teacher and the “learner”…..one of the most effective methods of sharing ideas, concepts and new content is through the use of questions.*What level of effective interaction and engagement can you create in your teaching environment? What types of questions do you ask? Do your questions stimulate though and problem-solving?
  • EXAMPLE OF 3 LEVELS OF ENGAGEMENT with an athlete…..SITUATION: The young athlete in the red jersey is defending an opponent that has just received a pass- SOCCER-PROBLEM= He arrives LATE and his approach is straight to the hip of the ball-carrier……
  • (KEY CONCEPT)The most skillful coach is able to use all of these tools and maintain an overall environment that is skewed toward the FLOW end of the continuum.
  • Being an expert with your time, your communication skills and your knowledge of the game will allow a “game-like” flow to your training environment.
  • USE ALL 3 METHODS TO DELIVER INFORMATION……delivering these simultaneously will make the process time-efficient. Example- Provide a physicaldemonstration at the same time that you are verbally describing the activity.
  • The most skillful coach is able to apply each of these methods at an appropriate time and still maintain an overall environment that is skewed toward the ATHLETE-CENTERED end of the continuum.
  • (GENERAL EMPHASIS)*Progression= planning a practice that PROGRESSIVELY INTRODUCES ELEMENTS OF THE GAME up to the last stage which IS the game itself.Examples: (1) Gradually introduce the element of opposition (2) Gradually introduce the rules and elements of game-relevant space(REQUIRED COMPONENTS PER STAGE)*Introduce some level of opposition by Stage II*Introduce a specific attacking and defending direction by Stage III*Introduce the un-restricted game environment by Stage IV (including goals + GK)
  • Use your own practice examples or “build” a practice by actively engaging the ideas and experiences of the course participants.
  • Use your own Stage II examples or “build” a practice by actively engaging the ideas and experiences of the course participants.
  • Use your own Stage III practice examples or “build” a practice by actively engaging the ideas and experiences of the course participants.
  • (PROBLEM-SOLVE with the candidates)*What dimensions and field shape would you use for this final “U10” 6v6 Game?*What would you use for goals?
  • (DISCUSION POINTS) These are “general” guidelines…*What is YOUR LOCAL standards for playing numbers?*What are the general parameters for the suggested formations? Why?(3 lines within each formation / at least 1 line has enough players to develop the concepts of wing play.)
  • ANIMATED EXAMPLE: GK Distributes – Fullback penetrates on the dribble – PRESSURE- penetrating PASS to forward.ALL PRINCIPLES ARE INTEGRATED…..(mobility + width + penetration)
  • ANIMATED EXAMPLE: GK Distributes – Fullback penetrates on the dribble – PRESSURE- penetrating PASS to forward.ALL PRINCIPLES ARE INTEGRATED…..(mobility + width + penetration)
  • Practical Example: Building the attack from the GK.
  • Practical Example: Building the attack from the back 4 and a #6 role supporting from central midfield. U12 Boys competition.
  • Practical Example: Building the attack from the GK.
  • Practical Example: Building the attack from the GK.
  • BALANCE: the ability to cover critical spaces that may be used in constructing the attack.Responsibility of players NOT engaged in pressing, covering, challenging or tracking.
  • BALANCE: the ability to cover critical spaces that may be used in constructing the attack.Responsibility of players NOT engaged in pressing, covering, challenging or tracking.
  • The following pages are RESOURCES for the candidate and Instructor- focused on completing Assignment “1” and the relevant TEAM MANAGEMNT discussion built into the course schedule.

Transcript

  • 1. 2013 “E” Course Guidebook
  • 2. U.S. SOCCER “E” COURSE U.S. Soccer National “E” Course 2013 Guidebook Contents by United States Soccer Federation © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 2
  • 3. U.S. SOCCER “E” COURSE The “E” Course manual contents are owned by the United States Soccer Federation. Any reproduction or other dissemination of Coaching Instructor’s Workbook without the express written consent of the United States Soccer Federation is strictly prohibited. © 2001-2013 United States Soccer Federation Revised 12/2012 © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 3
  • 4. U.S. SOCCER “E” COURSE Why is it important to teach players to “respect the game”? So they understand that the game is the best teacher. So they learn to respect the role of the referee; opponents; coaches; fans; their equipment; and nutrition. And to ensure future players continue playing, learning, and loving this game. – United States Soccer Federation © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 4
  • 5. U.S. SOCCER “E” COURSE FIFA – Soccer’s World Governing Body Founded in 1904 to provide unity among national soccer associations, the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) boasts 207 members, rivaling that of the United Nations, and is arguably the most prestigious sports organization in the world. As soccer’s ultimate administrative authority, FIFA governs all facets of the game: regulating the rules of play, overseeing the transfers of players internationally, organizing international competitions such as the FIFA World Cup, establishing standards for refereeing, coaching and sports medicine, and encouraging soccer’s development around the world. As a member of FIFA, U.S. Soccer’s Licensing Program is recognized as the official and only organization allowed to run and issue coaching licenses in the United States. © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 5
  • 6. U.S. SOCCER “E” COURSE Thousands of coaches have completed U.S. Soccer Federation coaching schools since they were first developed in 1970. We have all been participants in the growth of soccer’s popularity at the youth, amateur and professional level in the United States. Development of coaches should ideally lead and precede the growth of our sport. We are embarking on an ambitious pathway that will be focused on accelerating the development of our coaching community. It is logical that this coaching development initiative will be focused on transferring theory into practice – the development of players at all levels. The technical leaders of the Federation have studied, observed and participated in the game on a global scale. From this perspective, we acknowledge that there are many ways to teach the game of soccer. Through coaching education, we must provide the U.S. Soccer community with a coherent message, globally-relevant content and modern teaching methodology. All of these variables should be representative of our brand… the United States. As you proceed down the U.S. Soccer Coaching Development Pathway, we encourage you to integrate these important messages about our role as coaches: • INSPIRE: Be the emotional leader for the young athletes that you serve. Inspire the “play” in your players. • GUIDE: Apply the guidelines from the U.S. Soccer Curriculum to your specific coaching environment. • NURTURE: Perpetuate a passion for the game. This means a balance between structured and unstructured play. • INCORPORATE: Age-appropriate methods and best practices relative to the developmental age of your players. • TRAIN: Become a master coach – develop your craft – provide a quality training environment. • ENVIRONMENT: Develop the athlete and the person – do not sacrifice youth development for a result. U.S. Soccer’s primary goal is to provide positive, professional and continuous development programs for coaches at all levels of the soccer spectrum. Our future developmental pathway will continue to offer modern coaching methods, globallyrelevant content and practical applications to the game. Our mission is to support you as you grow our sport through the hearts and legs of the athletes that we coach. Ignite the “PLAY” in the player, Dave Chesler, Director of Coaching Development U.S. Soccer Federation © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 6
  • 7. TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1: “E” COURSE WORKBOOK • Course Focal Points • Expected Outcomes Section 2: METHODS OF COACHING (PART I) • Long-Term Athlete Development • The BASIC Stage (9-12) Section 3: METHODS OF COACHING (PART II) • Teaching in Shorts • Training Design and Planning Section 4: PRINCIPLES OF PLAY • Defending Principles • Attacking Principles • Style of Play Section 5: TEAM MANAGEMENT • The Coach as a Conductor © 2013 U.S. Soccer • Best Practices for a Safe Environment CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 7
  • 8. “I never teach my pupils; I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn.” – Albert Einstein “E” COURSE GUIDEBOOK
  • 9. CANDIDATE LEARNING OBJECTIVES: U.S. SOCCER “E” COURSE What is the “E” Course? • Develop the core coaching competencies necessary to effectively teach the 9-12 year old athlete and team • Understand the characteristics and needs of an athlete in the Basic Stage of our Athlete Development Model • Establish a foundation of knowledge and experience in order to proceed through the sequence of coaching development courses © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 9
  • 10. CANDIDATE LEARNING OBJECTIVES: U.S. SOCCER “E” COURSE What are the specific target outcomes of the course? • Understand and effectively apply the principles of Athlete Development • Demonstrate competency in planning an age-appropriate training session • Demonstrate the essential competencies to execute a team training session that is focused on a technical function of the game • Understand concepts and recognize the principles of attacking and defending in a small-sided game environment (3v3 to 9v9 adaptable to local competition structure) © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 10
  • 11. “E” COURSE SCHEDULE (Sample) Three-day Schedule © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 11
  • 12. METHODS OF COACHING I ATHLETE DEVELOPMENT MODEL
  • 13. METHODS OF COACHING I THE DEVELOPMENT STAGES OF A SOCCER ATHLETE... U6-U8 U9-U12 • INITIAL STAGE • BASIC STAGE U13-U14 • INTERMEDIATE STAGE U15-U18 • ADVANCED STAGE U19-U20 • SPECIFIC STAGE SENIOR • PERFORMANCE STAGE © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 13
  • 14. THE FOUR COMPONENTS... LONG-TERM ATHLETE DEVELOPMENT MODEL Four components must be CONNECTED and CORRELATED RELATIVE to the development stage of the athlete © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 14
  • 15. METHODS OF COACHING I DEBATE, DISCUSS, AND DEVELOP AN ACTION PLAN... “Chronological age is a poor guide to segregate adolescents for competitions.” (Sport4Life, Canada) Currently most youth sports programs are structured around chronological age. We should recognize that sport science confirms that athletes of the same age between ages 10 and 16 can be as much as 4-5 years in developmental separation. © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 15
  • 16. THE LONG-TERM ATHLETE DEVELOPMENT MODEL DEBATE, DISCUSS AND DEVELOP... AN ACTION PLAN How does this evidence influence a development plan? © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 16
  • 17. METHODS OF COACHING I THE DEVELOPMENT STAGES OF A SOCCER ATHLETE... Do you know WHO you are coaching? U9-U12 • INITIAL STAGE • (FUNdamentals) BASIC STAGE • SKILL DEVELOPMENT? • TACTICAL DEVELOPMENT? • PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT? • PSYCHO-SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT?  MULTI-LATERAL DEVELOPMENT? © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 17
  • 18. THE LONG TERM ATHLETE DEVELOPMENT MODEL BASIC STAGE: 9-12 YEARS TECHNICAL TACTICAL MAXIMIZE OPPORTUNITIES to develop individual technique and ball mastery • Position-related • Realism and relevance to a game function • Unopposed environment is balanced with opposed © 2013 U.S. Soccer GAME UNDERSTANDING and DECISIONMAKING through small-sided games and activities • 3v3 to 9v9 • Develop creativity and encourage problem-solving through free play CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 18
  • 19. THE LONG TERM ATHLETE DEVELOPMENT MODEL BASIC STAGE: 9-12 YEARS PSYCHOSOCIAL PHYSICAL At 9-12 years… • Self-confidence and motivation are highly influenced by peer attitudes and coach / adult interactions• Encourage unstructured play• Structure competition to address differences in training age and abilities © 2013 U.S. Soccer FUNDAMENTAL MOVEMENTS • Agility• Balance• Coordination • Speed CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 19
  • 20. THE LONG-TERM ATHLETE DEVELOPMENT MODEL PERIODIZATION: EFFECTIVE PLANNING © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 20
  • 21. METHODS OF COACHING SEASONAL PLANNING U9 © 2013 U.S. Soccer U10 U11 U12 CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 21
  • 22. METHODS OF COACHING I WEEKLY PLAN: MANAGING A SINGLE GAME PER WEEK © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 22
  • 23. METHODS OF COACHING II
  • 24. METHODS OF COACHING II THE SKILLS OF TEACHING Are you teaching soccer, or are you teaching kids? © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 24
  • 25. METHODS OF COACHING II COMMUNICATING: THE ART OF THE QUESTION Are you a presenter or a teacher? FACTUAL • Definitive, simple answers (Recall level) CONCEPTUAL • Requires higher levels of processing and thought (Compare, contrast, surmise...) PROVOCATIVE • Divergent thought, evaluative, requires complex reasoning (Similarities, differences, between 2 or more concepts) © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 25
  • 26. METHODS OF COACHING II COMMUNICATING: THE ART OF THE QUESTION Are you a presenter or a teacher? FACTUAL “Could you arrive at the same time as the ball?” CONCEPTUAL “What cues determine how close you can get to the opponent? PROVOCATIVE “How would your opponent react if you arrived at the same location and position as his receiving foot?” © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 26
  • 27. METHODS OF COACHING II MANAGING THE ENVIRONMENT The skillful coach constantly assesses and manipulates the environment, thus challenging and stimulating players to find creative solutions • STOP – FREEZE • NATURAL STOPPAGE • FLOW – CONTINUOUS ACTIVITY • INDIVIDUAL REFERENCE © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 27
  • 28. METHODS OF COACHING II PRESENTATION ESSENTIALS The skillful coach constantly assesses CONCISE and manipulates the environment, thus Simple, bite-size challenging packets and stimulating players to find creative solutions CORRECT Accurate information CONNECT 4 components of athlete development © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 28
  • 29. METHODS OF COACHING II TEACHING ESSENTIALS The skillful coach constantly assesses and manipulates the environment, thus I HEAR, challenging and I forget... and stimulating players to find creative solutions I SEE, and I remember... I DO, and I understand. (Chinese Proverb) © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 29
  • 30. METHODS OF COACHING II MANAGING THE ENVIRONMENT The skillful coach constantly challenges and stimulates players to find creative solutions. • COMMAND & DIRECT • QUESTION & ANSWER • GUIDED QUESTION • EXPERIMENTATION © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 30
  • 31. METHODS OF COACHING II CYCLE OF COACHING The “craft” of coaching is the ability to link a learning moment with an effective teaching method © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 31
  • 32. METHODS OF COACHING II TEACHING PROGRESSION (4 STAGES) The “craft” of coaching is the ability to link a learning moment with an effective teaching method © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 32
  • 33. METHODS OF COACHING II STAGE I: TECHNIQUE-SKILLS WARM-UP • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT • GAME/ACTIVITY RULES • OBJECTIVES OF THE TRAINING • DEVELOPMENT STAGE OF ATHLETES WARM-UP PHASE = TECHNICAL + PHYSICAL HOW DO EACH OF THESE 4 TOPICS INFLUENCE THE DESIGN OF STAGE I? A. RHYTHMIC THIGH TOUCHES B. THIGH VOLLEYS C. SIDE-SIDE VOLLEYS D. TWO-TOUCH VOLLEY SEQUENCES © 2013 U.S. Soccer E. TWO-TOUCH PAIRS COMPETITION 1. Server calls out two surfaces as ball leaves hands 2. Teammate must control the ball with the first surface 3. Teammate must RETURN the ball to the server’s hands with the 2nd surface 4. Example (diagram) “Chest-Foot” 5. Score 1 point for each successful return (Change on 1 minute intervals) CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 33
  • 34. METHODS OF COACHING II STAGE II: SMALL-SIDED ACTIVITY • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT • GAME/ACTIVITY RULES • OBJECTIVES OF THE TRAINING • DEVELOPMENT STAGE OF ATHLETES HOW DO EACH OF THESE 4 TOPICS INFLUENCE THE DESIGN OF STAGE II? FUNCTIONAL SMALL-SIDED GAMES: PAIRS DEFENDING LOSS OF POSSESSION: ONE PLAYER DROPS GAIN POSSESSION: 3rd PLAYER STEPS ON © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 34
  • 35. METHODS OF COACHING II STAGE III: EXPANDED SMALL-SIDED ACTIVITY • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT • GAME/ACTIVITY RULES • OBJECTIVES OF THE TRAINING • DEVELOPMENT STAGE OF ATHLETES HOW DO EACH OF THESE 4 TOPICS INFLUENCE THE DESIGN OF STAGE III? ATTACKING: 6v6 ZONES 2. 1. 1. Players are restricted to their specific attacking/defending half 2. Rotate players into the attacking zone on each goal or at specific time intervals 3. Exercise should progress to a stage where a player may follow the ball into the attacking half 4. The “Buffer” zone may be widened in order to emphasize passing and timing of runs © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 35
  • 36. METHODS OF COACHING II STAGE IV: THE GAME • PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT • GAME/ACTIVITY RULES • OBJECTIVES OF THE TRAINING • DEVELOPMENT STAGE OF ATHLETES HOW DO EACH OF THESE 4 TOPICS INFLUENCE THE DESIGN OF STAGE III? U10 MATCH CONDITIONS: 6v6 HOW WOULD YOU DETERMINE THE FIELD DIMENSIONS? © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 36
  • 37. SECTION 4: PRINCIPLES OF PLAY
  • 38. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY The Foundation of Team Play ATTACKING PRINCIPLES © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 38
  • 39. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY GENERAL STYLE OF PLAY MATCHES OFFENSIVE STYLE OF PLAY QUICK TRANSITION & FINISHING POSITION SPECIFIC © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 39
  • 40. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY GENERAL STYLE OF PLAY FORMATIONS (9-12 YEARS) 6v6: Recommended 2-1-2 Formation 7v7: Recommended 2-3-1 Formation 8v8: Recommended 3-3-1 Formation 9v9: Recommended 3-2-3 or 3-3-2 Formation 11v11: Recommended 4-3-3 or 4-4-2 Formation © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 40
  • 41. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKING PRINCIPLES PENETRATION = FORWARD PLAY ATTACKING EFFICIENCY FROM THE BACK THIRD © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 41
  • 42. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKING PRINCIPLES PENETRATION 3 5 6 10 1 4 9 8 2 METHODS DRIBBLEPASS SHOOT © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? 42
  • 43. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKING PRINCIPLES PENETRATION WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 43
  • 44. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKING PRINCIPLES SUPPORT = DEPTH RESTRICTED ZONES: 5v5 1. Each player restricted to own half 2. Ball may be transferred across and back over the half-line 3. Progression: Teammates may join from back half after the ball is played in to the striker KEY TACTICAL FOCUS: Mobility + Support of back three in order to keep possession KEY TECHNICAL FOCUS: Passing, quality, disguise, proper weight of pass © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 44
  • 45. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKING PRINCIPLES SUPPORT (a.k.a. depth) TWO ZONE GAME (5 v 5) 2 3 4 1 9 10 1 4 2 Timing of movement? Disguising movement? Risk v Safety? (#2?) © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? 45
  • 46. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKING PRINCIPLES SUPPORT (a.k.a. depth) WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 46
  • 47. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKING PRINCIPLES ATTACKING PATTERNS: FINAL THIRD 4v0 ... 4v3 MOBILITY = CREATING & USING SPACE (Diagonal runs, overlaps, switching positions) PROGRESSION: A. 4v0 B. 4v3 C. 7v7 (Two Zones) D. 7v7 © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 47
  • 48. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKING PRINCIPLES MOBILITY and WIDTH TWO ZONE GAME (5 v 5) 2 3 4 9 1 10 1 4 2 Timing of movement? Disguising movement? Risk v Safety? (#2?) © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? 48
  • 49. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKING PRINCIPLES MOBILITY and WIDTH WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 49
  • 50. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKING PRINCIPLES WIDTH EXPANDED SMALL-SIDED EXERCISE: 5v5 (+2) ORGANIZATION: • Each team places 4 field players inside the playing area (width of penalty area) • Each team places a flank player on each flank (shaded areas) • No restrictions for central players • Flank players are restricted to 1-touch play © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 50
  • 51. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY ATTACKING PRINCIPLES © 2013 U.S. Soccer IMPROVISATION CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 51
  • 52. DEFENDING PRINCIPLES
  • 53. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY DEFENDING PRINCIPLES DEFENDING PRINCIPLES © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval53
  • 54. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY DEFENDING PRINCIPLES PRESSURE – 1st DEFENDER INDIVIDUAL DEFENDING: DIRECTIONAL PRESSURE 1. Ball-carrier serves to a perimeter player and closes down 2. Attack objective is to penetrate across the opposite line 3. Defender objective is to redirect the ball carrier to one of the adjacent sidelines 4. If ball-carrier penetrates successfully then they deliver the ball to a new perimeter player 5. Unsuccessful defender must remain on to continue defending against the new opponent 6. Successful defender rotates out of the perimeter & serves as an attacking target © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 54
  • 55. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY DEFENDING PRINCIPLES PRESSURE= 1st DEFENDER(S) WHO? WHEN to move? WHEN to stop? 3 7 4 6 WHERE to start? WHERE to arrive? 10 CUES? 6 1 9 8 8 5 11 2 © 2012 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? 55
  • 56. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY DEFENDING PRINCIPLES PRESSURE= 1st DEFENDER(S) 8 8 WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 56
  • 57. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY DEFENDING PRINCIPLES SUPPORT = COVER – 2nd DEFENDER INDIVIDUAL & PAIRS: ATTACK AND DEFEND 1st STAGE: Two vs. One • Emphasis on defender isolating the ball-carrier 1v1 (eliminate passing angle) • Control pace and angle of ball-carrier 2nd STAGE: Two vs. Two • Pressing angle determines covering angle and distance • Evaluate and manage the decision to switch pressing and covering roles © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 57
  • 58. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY DEFENDING PRINCIPLES COVER= 2nd DEFENDERS(S) 3 3 7 7 4 4 6 6 10 10 6 1 9 9 8 8 8 8 5 5 11 2 © 2013 U.S. Soccer 6 WHO COVERS? WHEN to move? WHEN to stop? WHERE to start? WHERE to arrive? ANGLE? DISTANCE? 11 2 CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? 58
  • 59. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY DEFENDING PRINCIPLES COVER= 2nd DEFENDERS(S) 8 8 8 WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 59
  • 60. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY DEFENDING PRINCIPLES BALANCE = 3rd DEFENDER 4v4 GROUP DEFENDING 1. OBJECTIVE: Prevent opponent from penetrating across the line (dribble / pass to 3rd team) 2. ROTATION: Scoring team serves to the 3rd team, which begins a new attacking sequence V1: Use 3-4 balls, each placed on top of a marker cone, as scoring targets © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 60
  • 61. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY KEY DEFENDING CONCEPTS COMPACTNESS DEFENDING GOALKICK: TEAM STARTING SHAPE • Flank MF Pressing Zones • Combined pressure of MF + Strikers = predictability of serve © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 61
  • 62. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY KEY DEFENDING CONCEPTS BALANCE and COMPACTNESS= 3rd DEFENDERS(S) 7 3 10 6 4 6 1 9 5 8 8 11 2 © 2013 U.S. Soccer POSITION TO PROTECT SPACES? WHO? CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? 62
  • 63. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY KEY DEFENDING CONCEPTS BALANCE and COMPACTNESS= 3rd DEFENDERS(S) WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY? © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 63
  • 64. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY KEY DEFENDING CONCEPTS DELAY 2v2 TRANSITION 1. Attack/Defend 2 goals @ 2 yds. 2. Restart with 4 new players 3. Coach controls restart V1: Attacker may play back to supporting teammate V2: Score by rolling ball to teammate behind 1 goal V3: Opponent begins attack immediately on restart © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 64
  • 65. PRINCIPLES OF PLAY KEY DEFENDING CONCEPTS DELAY © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 65
  • 66. SECTION 5: TEAM MANAGEMENT
  • 67. TEAM MANAGEMENT DAY-OF-GAME TASKS • PRE-GAME: Player passes, field directions, uniform choice, players’ arrival time, etc. • HALF-TIME: Location, water, injuries, etc. • POST-GAME: Regeneration + water, injuries, announce ments • CONCISE: No Match Analysis © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 67
  • 68. TEAM MANAGEMENT STAFF CONSIDERATIONS • To provide proper instruction for the activity • Club to provide age appropriate coaching staff • To provide proper supervision for training and games © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 68
  • 69. TEAM MANAGEMENT “TOP 10” SAFETY GUIDELINES (1 THROUGH 5) 1. Proper use of equipment (shin guards, no jewelry, uniforms designed for climate) 2. Always SECURE GOALS and CHECK for STABILITY 3. Always have a 2nd adult present – Adults with a Member PASS 4. Proper fitting shoes, proper type of shoe for surface 5. Check field for glass, holes, sharp objects © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 69
  • 70. TEAM MANAGEMENT “TOP 10” SAFETY GUIDELINES (6 THROUGH 10) 6. Upkeep and monitoring of playing surfaces 7. Avoid scheduling training during the hottest periods of the day and when there is intense humidity 8. Ice, ice bags & water supply, frequent water breaks 9. Exercises that decrease repetition of dangerous encounters 10. Always carry a First Aid Kit, emergency info, and a phone © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 70
  • 71. “E” License Course Thank you for taking part in U.S. Soccer’s National “E” License course. Additional details, including pre-course assignments, can be found by visiting ussoccer.com or http://www.ussoccer.com/Coaches/Licenses/NationalE.aspx Following the course, please be sure to provide us feedback by taking our online survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2013ELicenseSurvey For additional questions, please be sure to contact U.S. Soccer at coaches@ussoccer.org or your local State Soccer Association. © 2013 U.S. Soccer CONFIDENTIAL: Not to be shared without U.S. Soccer Approval 71