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Rudolf dreikurs21

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  • 1. Rudolf Dreikurs By Dan Macdonald and Hannah Botsford
  • 2. BACKGROUND
    • Founder and the medical director of the Community Child Guidance Center of Chicago
    • 3. Consultant in public schools
    • 4. Influenced by social psychologist Alfred Adler
    • 5. All Humans want to belong and be accepted by others.
    • 6. All behavior, including misbehavior is orderly, purposeful and, directed toward achieving social approval
  • 7. Theory
    • Dreikurs suggested that a behavior is a result of a individual’s needs.
    • 8. He also believed that our behavior and our choices are the result of our own biased interpretations of the world in front of us.
    • 9. Human beings all have a need to belong and be accepted.
    • 10. When a student is unsuccessful in obtaining acceptance, a pattern of misbehavior begins.
    • 11. All misbehavior is the result of a child’s mistaken assumption about how to find a place and gain status.
  • 12. Four Goal Types That Motivate Misbehavior Attention getting Power and control Revenge Helplessness or inadequacy
  • 13. “ Attention Getting”
    • Most common goal for most children
    • 14. Annoying in class
    • 15. Distract their teachers
    • Only function appropriately through teacher approval
    • 19. When asked to stop, will comply but will start again later
  • 20. Giving Attention Increases Misbehavior Instead…
    • Ignore the behavior, give “the eye”
    • 21. Legitimizing the proper behavior: using another student with proper behavior, have the whole class join in the behavior
    • 22. Doing the unexpected: turning out the lights, changing the voice, playing a musical sound
    • 23. Distracting the student: ask a direct question
    • 24. Noticing appropriate behavior: thank the students, write well-behaved students’ names on the board
  • 25. “ Power and Control”
    • When children fail to gain all the attention they seek, they often engage in a power struggle with parents and teachers.
    • 26. Teachers never win
    • 27. Children win because society expects adults to behave in a responsible, moral way. However, children can cry, argue, contradict, lie, be stubborn, and disobedient.
    • 28. When asked to stop, they become defiant, and increase negative behavior and challenge the adult.
    • 29. Avoid putting pressure on children to make them behave appropriately
  • 30. “ Revenge”
    • Student feels unable to gain attention or power.
    • 31. Believes that others have deliberately tried to hurt them and attempts to get even.
    • 32. Convinced that nobody likes them
    • 33. “ If I’m hurting, then I have the right to hurt others. ”
      • physically or psychologically.
      • 34. Hits or kicks others
      • 35. Destroys property.
  • 36.
    • Refuse the fight
    • 37. Change the subject
    • 38. Use time out
    • 39. Establish consequences
    Teachers should…
  • 40. “ Helplessness or Inadequacy”
    • Child has given up on the possibility of being a member of the group
    • 41. This child wishes not to be seen
    • 42. Wants to be left alone
    • 43. Rejects social contact, refuses to try most educational demands
  • 44. To Help…
    • Provide tutoring
    • 45. Avoid criticism
    • 46. Stress that making mistakes is okay
    • 47. Build confidence
    • 48. Acknowledging effort
  • 49. How does a teacher understand the goal of the misbehaving child?
    • If the teacher feels annoyed, then the child’s goal is attention getting.
    • If the teacher feels beaten or intimidated, then the child’s goal is power.
    • If the teacher feels hurt, then the child’s goal is revenge.
    • If the teacher feels incapable, then the child’s goal is helplessness.
  • 50. PUNISHMENT
    • Dreikurs does not believe in the use of punishment, reinforcement or praise.
    • Natural and logical consequences
    • Encouragement
  • 51. Praise vs. Encouragement Encouragement
      • Corresponds to children’s goals.
      • 52. Focuses on effort rather than achievement
      • 53. Positive feedback
      • 54. Motivates them to continue trying
      • 55. Acknowledgement of effort
      • 56. Self
      • 57. Message between equals
      • 58. Stimulates cooperation
      • 59. Stimulates helpfulness
    Praise
      • Focuses on the level of achievement.
      • 60. Given for a completed achievement
      • 61. Tells students they have satisfied the demands of others
      • 62. Patronizing
      • 63. Creates a superior position.
      • 64. Stimulates competition
      • 65. Stimulates selfishness
  • 66. Tips for Teachers
    •   Always speak in positive terms, never be negative
    • 67.   Be democratic rather than autocratic or permissive
    • 68.   Encourage students to strive for improvement, not perfection
    • 69.   Emphasize student strengths while minimizing weaknesses.
    • 70.   Help students learn from mistakes, which are valuable in learning
    • 71. Encourage independence and the assumption of responsibility
    • 72.   Show faith in students, offer them help in overcoming the obstacles.
    • 73.   Encourage students to help each other
    • 74.   Be optimistic and enthusiastic a positive outlook is contagious.
    • 75.   Use encouraging remarks such as, “you have improved”, can I help you?”
  • 76. 3 TYPES OF TEACHERS
    • Autocratic
    • Permissive
    • Democratic
  • 77. 3 TYPES OF TEACHERS
    • Autocratic
    • Permissive
    • Democratic
  • 78. Autocratic
  • 79. Permissive
  • 80. Democratic
  • 81. PROS
    • Students and teachers can learn how to communicate constructively.
    • 82. Based largely on respect and learning about compromise and consequences
    • 83. Students learn to be independent
    • 84. They learn how to take responsibility for themselves and their actions
  • 85. CONS
    • Inexperienced teachers may have trouble identifying the different students and their motives
    • 86. In a large classroom of 20 or more students, teachers cannot always have the time to determine the objectives of each student
    • 87. Puts all the blame on the students.
    • 88. Some situations can be misleading and not have a clear natural or logical consequence.
  • 89. Questions or Comments?