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Analytical methods1

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  • Shows the interrelationship between form and content. Example is the Michael Wesch video. Subject matter (content) is web 2.0 and the changing nature of how we share, organize, generate information. Much of his commentary is done through screen capture of changes to HTML code: form and content, in this case, actually converge.
  • What is said, shown, sung, built, made, etc. as opposed to how it is done. The “what” is the Form; the “how” is the content.
  • How do we know about the Harry Potter ad? One reason would be the context: it's a successful book and film franchise so even if we're not J.K.'Rowling fans, we've likely seen it somewhere, heard people talking, etc. If we see the trademark eyeglasses and face of the actor playing HP, we have a clue. So you see that knowing the context allows us to decode the content. So what are some of the current contexts? What's the storyline of the series? (War on Terror, often expressed in good vs. evil terms.) What's at stake in the film? (Ask if anyone's seen it.) What happens if the Hogwarts lose to Lord Voldemort? What's at stake? What happens if the Autobots lose to the Decepticons? Do the movie makers intend for us to read all of this into a film? Does it matter or are we going to read these things in anyway?
  • What ends? How do you know? What cues are there in the photo?
  • What’s going on at the time we’re talking about.
  • Shows the interrelationship between form and content. Example is the Michael Wesch video. Subject matter (content) is web 2.0 and the changing nature of how we share, organize, generate information. Much of his commentary is done through screen capture of changes to HTML code: form and content, in this case, actually converge.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Ways of Analysis: Reading, thinking,seeing, and interpreting through a critical lens Hank Williams Summer 2012 SEEK Department, The City College of New York Summerseek.wordpress.com
    • 2. Habits of Mind2. What is the subject/ point?3. Who says so? (What perspective?)4. What evidence?5. What’s the relevance/ connection?6. So what? (Significance?)7. What if? (Alternatives?) Adapted from CCNY SEEK coursepack, 2011
    • 3. Form Content Context
    • 4. r e e nWhat do G typewemean by Form? y l e a t St r m f o
    • 5. Form 1.The style, type, or genre of a particular work. Genre refers to a recognizable sub category. 2.The structure or design of a particular workAdapted from The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (1990)
    • 6. Content The subject matter of a particular workAdapted from The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (1990)
    • 7. Context The biographical, cultural, social, historical, or political circumstances a particular work is created or set inAdapted from The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (1990)
    • 8. Connotation The further associations a word, image, sound, or sight makes us think of beyond the primary meaning.Adapted from The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (1990)
    • 9. Denotation The primary meaning or dictionary definition of a word, image, sound, or sight.Adapted from The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (1990)
    • 10. What are you looking at?
    • 11. Q: How did you know whatthose ads were for? A: Context!
    • 12. In other words:
    • 13. Some examples of context … Economic Political Biographical Social Artistic/ Aesthetic Temporal Cultural
    • 14. Biographical QuestionsWho is /are the author, designer, artist,musician/composer, actor(s), director? (and what do weknow about his/her/their work)?How does it relate to other work they’ve done? Does itrepresent a shift in artistic direction?Does the artist have a personal view of creative work?Does this conform to that view or challenge it?
    • 15. Temporal QuestionsWhere is/are the setting(s)?How do they relate to the storyline, design, or style ofthe work?Is the work consistent with the time period or are thereanachronisms (things that don’t fit the time)? Are theanachronisms deliberate or do they represent a lack ofattention to detail?
    • 16. Political QuestionsIs there obvious commentary on political/ social issues ?What issues are they?Does the commentary or does it seem too harsh?Does it avoid or ignore obvious political issues?
    • 17. Artistic/Aesthetic QuestionsWhat style(s)/ genres are represented? Is it a sub-genre?How does the work compare to other works of a similarstyle/ genre/ movement? Does it conform to the “type” orlook/ sound/ feel different? (And is this a deliberatechoice?)How well are specific artistic aspects done? (Example:do critics think the writing, directing, design, etc. isgood? Why or why not--and do you agree?)
    • 18. Social QuestionsWhat is going on in society at the time and what effectmight it have on the work?Who does the work show/ talk about and in how are theypresented? Does it reinforce or challenge stereotypes?Are the representations of people/ places valid?How does it present differences in race, gender,sexuality, or class status?Whose point of view does the work come from?
    • 19. Economic QuestionsWhat are the book/ CD sales like or what are the filmearnings??Is the work seen as commercially successful?Are artistic compromises made for the sake of sales?Is the work an important creative statement even if itdoesn’t have great commercial success?
    • 20. Cultural QuestionsAre there wider cultural connections?How does it show/ critique/ comment on the widercultural picture or use cultural elements?Does the artist have a personal view of creative work?Does this conform to that view or challenge it?
    • 21. Research ideasA few thoughts to get you started…Find interviews/ profiles of author/ director/ actors/musicians/ designers, etc.Find articles or books on the time periodFind articles or books on the social or societal issuesFind articles or books on the styles/genres or artisticmethods usedFind articles or statistics on the sales or box officeFind articles or books examining cultural issues raised
    • 22. Revised June, 2012 Some rights reservedThis work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 UnportedLicense. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California,94041, USA. Questions? Compliments? hewilliams [at] ccny [dot] cuny [dot] edu