Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Presentation

170

Published on

Published in: Business, Sports
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
170
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Matthew Hamilton - Kraft Youth Services Manager
  • 2.
    • A self motivated, community conscious and goal driven youth population.
    • Comprehensive and integrated service delivery.
    • Increased success on contract deliverables.
    • Quicker response to community need.
    • Decreased cost.
  • 3.
    • Completely asset based.
    • Approximately 325 youth served per day plus 100 families receiving case management services.
    • Partnerships with 66% of county school districts that represents 75% of the school aged population.
    • Continually flexible based on community need and youth input.
    • Mix of local, state, federal and corporate funding.
  • 4.
    • Residential Services – High Risk
    • Youth Education Services – Moderate Risk
    • Community Linkage Services – Low Risk
  • 5. School Pizza? C’mon, We Just Profited $280
  • 6.
    • The finishing touches on a report about The Hundred Year War happens after school.
    • This kid taught COI staff that it actually lasted for 116 years.
  • 7.
    • 1. Strategies for Comprehensive Integration
    • 2. Defining Services Based on Risk
    • 3. Developing Measurements and Data (Quantifying Soft Skills Through Application)
    • 4. Path to Systems Change (Moving Youth From Customers to Practitioners)
    • 5. Evaluate Cost
  • 8. Where Do We Begin?
    • Let’s Start by Breaking Down
    • Youth Entrepreneurialism…
  • 9. What Do You Think of When You Hear the Term Entrepreneur? Small Business Owner Employer Micro-Enterprise Cottage Industry
  • 10. What About These?
    • Interactive connection to Math/Language
    • Community investment
    • through service
    • Verbal communication/ negotiation skills
    • Leadership
    • Civic understanding/current events
    • Written communication/ planning skills
  • 11. There is a difference even in the traditional definition of a “Small Business Owner” and the term “Entrepreneur”! It is that difference that capitalizes on the youth spirit.
  • 12. Consider These Differences…
    • Small Business Owner
    • Entrepreneur
    • Day to Day Work of Business
    • Accounting
    • Marketing
    • Facility/Software Maintenance
    • Keep Up the Niche
    • Takes Risks/Adventurous
    • Hungry for Recognition
    • Community Leaders
    • Vision of Upward Mobility – Non - Static
    • Impact Others to Increase Personal Impact
  • 13. What do our youth have that make them pre-disposed to the life of the entrepreneur.
    • IS THIS BOY A FUTURE ENTREPRENEUR?
    Looking at Those Basic Differences…..
  • 14. Just look at some of the things that many of us are funded to do.
    • Decrease Risk Behaviors
    • Community Service
    • Positive Life Skills
    • Mentoring
    • Drop Out Prevention
    • Creative Solutions
    • to Engagement
    • Community Connectivity to Necessary Services
  • 15. Let’s Compare Again…
    • Entrepreneur
    • Youth Funding Focus
    • Takes Risks/Adventurous
    • Hungry for Recognition
    • Community Leaders
    • Vision of Upward Mobility - Non Static
    • Impact Others to Increase Personal Impact
    • Decrease Risk Behaviors
    • Community Service
    • Positive Life Skills
    • Mentoring
    • Drop Out Prevention
    • Creative Solutions to Engagement
    • Community Connectivity to Necessary Services
  • 16. And… Community Action Has A Responsibility to Grow Leaders
    • Why…? Two Reasons!
  • 17.
    • Most Children have an innate need to be leaders and to be recognized for responsibility, but they are discouraged…
    • It creates an apathetic constituency.
  • 18. So…This is a nice philosophy. How does the philosophy translate to service provision?
  • 19. 1. Strategies for Integration
    • The majority of all funding for serving youth is focused on 4 areas.
      • 1. School Drop Out Prevention
      • 2. Employment/Employment Preparation
      • 3. Physical and Mental Health/Safety
      • 4. Legal Intervention and Diversion
  • 20. Interactive Task #1
    • Instructions: You’ll Need a Preferred Writing Utensil.
    • On page 2 in your training packet, take 3 minutes to discuss your current services or programs for youth and families with a peer. Place that service into one of the 4 categories provided that the service or program most appropriately fits… GO!
  • 21. Where Do Your Services Fall? School Drop Out Prevention Employment/ Employment Preparation Physical and Mental Health and Safety Legal Intervention/ Diversion
  • 22. Interactive Task #2
    • Instructions: You’ll still need that writing utensil.
    • Now on page 3 in your training packet, take 3 minutes to discuss where you placed each of your services or programs a moment ago… This time, write the name of those contracts, programs or services in the space provided and check any and all of the 4 areas that it may fit into based on service activity and/or performance target… GO!
  • 23. Where Do Your Services Meet? Chart Key School Drop Out Prevention (DOP) Employment and Employment Prep (EEP) Physical and Mental Health/ Safety (MHS) Legal Issues and Diversion (LID) Contract/Service/Program DOP EEP MHS LID
  • 24.  
  • 25. ?
  • 26. Overall Benefits to Integration
    • Increased Youth Success
    • Flexible Response to Need
    • Highest Reporting Impact
    • Ultimate Contractual Compliance
    • Reduction in Cost of Delivering Services
    • Increase in Services Provided With Current Resources
  • 27. The Benefits of Integration are Also Interdependently Connected !
  • 28. Why a Map?
    • The challenge now becomes to develop a service map to keep all of these services and benefits in line while they drive you forward to where you want to go.
  • 29. For Example…
    • YOU ALL CAME FROM DIFFERENT PARTS OF NEW YORK TO GET HERE…
  • 30. The purpose of a map is to get you from one location to another as efficiently as possible until you reach your final destination.
  • 31. Compare The Trip
    • Hampton Bays, NY
    • Syracuse, NY
    • 8 Hrs 42 min drive time
    • 494 miles x 20 mpg
    • $2.59 per gallon
      • $64 dollars
    • $20 for food
    • Total $84
    • 2 hrs 47 min drive time
    • 164 miles x 20mpg
    • $2.39 per gallon
      • $19
    • $2 for a drink
    • Total $21
  • 32. COI Uses ROMA To Create Service Funnels That Serve as “The Map” On page 4 of your training packet, you will see a copy of the COI Youth Services Comprehensive Work Plan.
  • 33. A Closer Look….Establishing Risk Page 5 in your training packet is the top section of the map.
  • 34. 2. Risk Levels
    • Defining Risk Levels
    • Provides a concrete basis for intensity and longevity of service.
    • Allows for more effective communication between customer and services staff.
    • Increases potential for the most appropriate goal setting.
  • 35. Other Key Benefits
    • Provides a consistent way to project #’s served vs. #’s completed.
    • Allows objective monitoring of services’ staff performance and output.
    • Allows you to see where gaps and breakdowns in services exist.
    • Provides a cost analysis at each level of service.
    • Increases long term engagement.
  • 36. 3. Measurement and Data
    • Our Initial Question: How do we take the risk to invest time trying to measure what has always been the most difficult to quantify?
  • 37. 1.All measurement tools must be connected and integrated just like the services. 2. We had to find a way to quantify soft skills. 3. The only measurable elements were to be application of skills. 4. Youth must be a lead in the assessment process . WE CAME UP WITH FOUR ANSWERS
  • 38. The Tools
    • The basis of our services assessment is the Chautauqua Opportunities, Inc. Self Sufficiency Continuum ©
  • 39. The Continuum
    • The Self Sufficiency Continuum is on pages 6-10 of your training packets.
    • The Specific Youth Continuum can be found on Page 11 in your training packets.
    Niagara Falls
  • 40. Integrated Assessments Connected to the Continuum
    • Choosing Tools
      • Based on Compliance
      • Based on Initiative
      • Adding Tools
      • Connecting Tools
      • The Matrix
        • On Pages 12 – 15 in your training packets .
  • 41. BASELINES!
  • 42. The Continuum is the overall picture… Each assessment tool represents an individual piece in a kid’s life.
  • 43. Moving From The Baseline
    • We Shifted from counting educational or counseling contacts and activities to application of skills.
      • In other words: Outcomes based on doing, not being.
    • Identification of 10 asset based categories that impact low income kids based on lack of opportunity.
      • Connected those categories to objective, research based milestones.
      • Created a rubrics based system that is fueled by youth self assessment and community incentive.
  • 44. The Categories
    • Community Service Learning
    • Speech and Debate
    • Small Business Development
    • Civic Responsibility
    • Financial Literacy
    • Mealtime etiquette
    • Physical Fitness
    • Arts and Culture
    • Science and Technology
    • Community Gardening
  • 45. What Do The Rubrics Quantify
    • Exposure to new things
    • Tolerance to new ideas
    • Opportunities to connect seemingly unlike subjects
    • Personal impact of enrichment
    • Self esteem
    • Actions based on introduction of global concepts
    • And….
  • 46. Response to once again being asked to stand at the front of the line !
  • 47. Sample rubric on Page 16 of your training packet.
  • 48. Connect Back to the Map and Risk Levels
    • Projects based on Risk/Milestone attainment
    • Self actualized incremental progress increases self esteem and engagement
    • Catalyst for youth driven peer recruitment and youth developed services.
    • Reportable data on soft skills as compared to the overall continuum progress
    • Youth are part of the assessment process and see the specific areas of strength and weakness.
  • 49. Number of Youth Scored on These Two Rubrics
  • 50. Number of Youth Increased Rubric Score
  • 51. And Because of COI Central Intake 125 – 200% of poverty 37% Below 125% of poverty 53% Been suspended from school 20% Part time employed 33% Pregnant or parenting 7% Youth that has failed 20% Live in a single parent home 67% Previously Jailed 7% Probation 27% Homeless 20% Other 6% College Level 13% Drop out 13% 9-12 21% 6-8 53% K-5 27% Total Scored 245
  • 52. 4. Systems Change
    • On page 16 of your training packet, you will find the enlarged bottom piece of the service map.
  • 53. Continuum Progress Example By the end of 90 Days we can show progress and report that 2 kids progressed into new risk areas.
  • 54. Keys To Youth Taking Control
    • Engagement
    • Choice
    • Mobile and Active Service Development
    • They see their impact
      • Personal
      • Community
    • Genuine Leadership Opportunities
      • Youth World
      • Adult World
  • 55. As youth begin to understand and grasp choice and leadership… The Hidden Entrepreneurial Spirit Emerges .
  • 56. How does the Entrepreneurial Spirit Convert?
    • At Risk Youth Attributes
    • Previously Stated Attributes of the Entrepreneur
    • At Risk Behaviors
    • Isolation
    • Disconnected from Community
    • Transient
    • Guarded - Self preserving
    • Calculated Risks to try new things
    • Hungry to be recognized for ideas/progress
    • Community Conscious - knows needs
    • Upwardly mobile
    • Impacting others as a means of personal growth
  • 57. Once This Occurs…
    • Youth drive your services.
    • Decreased one on one, increased group and project based service equals reduced operational cost.
    • Easier to develop relationships with community partners.
    • Peer impact gives stronger deliverables on younger customers.
  • 58. 5. Cost Has Been Covered
  • 59.  
  • 60. 1. Patience. 2. Willingness to make the strictest contractual compliances/targets required of all you do. 3. Comprehensive communication systems between staff and supervisors of different areas.
  • 61. 4. Comprehensive monitoring systems. 5. Staff excited about a powerful youth voice. 6. A comprehensive transition plan and timelines for youth movement.
  • 62. 7. Partnerships with school districts. 8. A comprehensive system to create services that fill identified gaps. 9. Ongoing gaps analysis, data analysis and strategic planning.
  • 63. ?
  • 64. FYI-The Chautauqua County Safe House
    • Technical Assistance
    •  
    • Matthew Hamilton-Kraft
    • Laughlin Community Action Center
    • 402 Chandler St, Jamestown, NY 14701
    • (716) 661-9430; mkraft@chautopp.org

×