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Final presentation
Final presentation
Final presentation
Final presentation
Final presentation
Final presentation
Final presentation
Final presentation
Final presentation
Final presentation
Final presentation
Final presentation
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Final presentation
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Final presentation

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  • 1. Diversity of Cetaceans inPakistan studied throughRemains collected duringbeach surveys along Sindhand Balochistan coastsPERVAIZ IQBAL, PIRZADA JAMAL A. SIDDIQUI,SHOAIB KIANICenter of Excellence in Marine Biology,University of Karachi[pvza_mb@hotmail.com]
  • 2. What are Cetaceans?Cetaceans are marine mammals(whales, dolphins, porpoises)PorpoiseDolphinWhale
  • 3. Ceatceans - MarineMammals• Warm blooded• Have blow-holes andbreathe air• Give birth• Have hairs on their body atleast on some stage of theirlife• Cows are their closestancestors
  • 4. CetaceansBaleen (Only whales have baleen)Toothed (Whales and dolphins)
  • 5. Why Cetacean?• Natural indicators of the environmental health• Bioaccumulate contaminants present in the water.Therefore, monitoring the levels of contaminants incetaceans will help understand the level ofpollution• Eco-tourism – A multibillion dollar industry• More than 10 million people now enjoy watchingcetaceans each yearData on cetacean is required for developingstrategies and management plans
  • 6. Indian Ocean SanctuaryInformation onmarine mammals inPakistani waters notreadily availableMost cetaceanspecies occurring inPakistani waters aredata deficient
  • 7. • Very little or no research on marine cetaceans• Pilleri & Gihr,1972 (about inshore small cetaceans mainly inIndus delta region)• Mikhalev, 1997 (Oil exploration studies and illegal Sovietwhaling in Pakistani EEZ in early 60s)• T. J. Roberts “Mammals of Pakistan” (a tentative catalogueof marine cetaceans in Pakistan based on interview and fewstrandings)• No dedicated effort for marine cetaceans research alongwhole coast of Pakistan except Darwin initiative project2005-2008Background information
  • 8. Cetacean Research MethodsBeach and Boat surveys• Beach Surveys• Boat Surveys
  • 9. Boat Surveys (Darwin Initiative Project)DEFRA UK funded project Center of Excellence in MarineBiologyUniversity (of London) MarineBiological Station
  • 10. Sindh01234567sightingHumback dolphinBottle nosedolphinFinlessporpoiseunknown Dolphinsp.SpeciesAbundance(perhour)Balochistan0246810121416SightingHumbackdolphinBottlenosedolphinFinlessporpoiseSpeciesAbundance(perhour)Average number of cetacean groups sighted and number of speciesper time spent surveying inshore Sindh and Balochistan coasts(Darwin first year report, 2006)Boat survey results
  • 11. Beach surveys Sindh coast
  • 12. Beach surveys Balochistan
  • 13. Beach surveys and remainsSampling tissue fromstranded dolphinWorking on skullsStranded dolphinBeach surveyWhale bonecollectedWhale vertebrae
  • 14. Skulls (Whale, dolphin)
  • 15. Surveys showing remains in Sindh coastNo. Date Rout from Rout endLat /long(Start)Lat/Long(End)Breaks From Transects / Comments1 02/12/05 Hawks Bay Sandspit24 51.694066 51.03124 50.623066 53.97702 06/12/05 Hawks BayParadisePoint24 51.687066 50.96324 50.879066 45.98003 30/06/06KhobarcreekGizriwalacreek24 08.73467 20.65824 09.950067 20.521Dolphin skull found3 30/06/06KhobarcreekGizriwalacreek24 08.734067 20.65824 09.950067 20.521remains of dolphin, 6ft2incheslong3 30/06/06KhobarcreekGizriwalacreek24 08.734067 20.65824 09.950067 20.521Dolphin skull, 2410191, 67204333 30/06/06KhobarcreekGizriwalacreek24 08.734067 20.65824 09.950067 20.521 decomposed body of dolphin4 06/12/06 SandspitWetlandCentre24 50.613066 53.85824 51.252066 52.70205 11/12/06 SandspitWetlandCentre24 50.613066 53.85824 51.252066 52.70206 31/05/07 Gocca Turshian24 04.789067 22.59624 04.122067 23.921 07 31/05/07 Gocca Hajamro24 05.307067 23.92124 07.249067 21.741 0
  • 16. Surveys showing remains in BalochistanNo. Date Rout from Rout endLat and long(Start)Lat and long(End)Remains1 18/12/05MubarakVillageMubarakVillage24 50.358066 39.61024 50.908066 39.570 02 18/12/05 Hub RiverMubarakVillage24 52.849066 42.29324 50.849066 41.119Huge skeleton of sperm whale at24 52.784; 066 41.45123 13/02/06 Hud village Hud village24 16.637064 39.33024 17.846064 40.817 Three sightings were observed4 16/02/06 Zarrien Juddi25 12.649063 29.52125 13.197063 29.917 Dolphin sightings5 17/04/06 Jiwani Bandri25 02.766061 44.40125 05.083061 45.770 06 16/02/07 Astola Astola25 07.261063 49.58925 07.359063 50.256 07 24/02/07 Astola Astola25 07.584063 50.92825 07.557063 51.876 Vertebral bone of cetacean7 24/02/07 Astola Astola25 07.584063 50.92825 07.557063 51.876Whale vertebrae, 25.07.597,063.52.3487 24/02/07 Astola Astola25 07.584063 50.92825 07.557063 51.876Cetacean bone found at25.07.606, 063.51.7107 24/02/07 Astola Astola25 07.584063 50.92825 07.557063 51.876Skin of cetacean, Skull ofcetacean
  • 17. Status of Cetacean(IUCN red list)English name Scientific name Status in the region IUCN Red ListDesignationLong-beaked commondolphinDelphinus capensistropicalisRestricted to waters relatively close to shore.Continental shelf and slopeData DeficientBottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncates Widespread and abundant in shelf and shelf edgewaters.Data DeficientCuviers beakedwhaleZiphius cavirostris Common and widespread in deep pelagic waters,particularly along the shelf edgeData DeficientIndo-PacificHumpbackdolphinSousa chinensis Coastal tropical and subtropical waters,preferring areas that are less than 20 metresdeepNearThreatenedSpinner dolphin Stenella longirostris Tropical high seas species, but it also inhabitsshallow reef areas, coastal areas, andsubtropical and warm temperate watersData DeficientHumpback whale MegapteranovaeangliaeScarce vagrant to deep pelagic and shelfwaters.VulnerableSperm whale PhysetermacrocephalusSeasonally regular in deep pelagic watersduringMay-November.VulnerableFinless porpoise Neophocaenaphocaenoidesshallow (usually <50 m deep) coastal waters Vulnerable
  • 18. Comparison of species identifiedthrough Beach and Boat surveysNo. CetaceansBeachsurveysBoatsurveys1 Long-beaked common dolphin + -2 Bottlenose dolphin + +3 Indo-Pacific Humpback dolphin + +4 Spinner dolphin + +5 Risso’s dolphin - +6 Humpback whale + +7 Cuviers beaked whale + -8 Sperm whale + -9 Killer whale - +10 Bryde’s whale + -11 Fin whale - Reported12 Finless porpoise + +
  • 19. Global Perspective: Overexploitation
  • 20. Thank You

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