• Like
Beauty Salon
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

Published

 

Published in Lifestyle , Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
2,904
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
91
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Business Etiquette Corporate Training Materials Instructor Guide
  • 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS Preface ..............................................................................................................................................1 What is Courseware? ................................................................................................................................ 1 How Do I Customize My Course? .............................................................................................................. 1 Materials Required ................................................................................................................................... 5 Maximizing Your Training Power .............................................................................................................. 6 Module One: Getting Started .............................................................................................................7 Icebreaker: Friends Indeed........................................................................................................................ 8 Housekeeping Items.................................................................................................................................. 9 Pre-Assignment Review .......................................................................................................................... 10 Workshop Objectives .............................................................................................................................. 11 Action Plans and Evaluations.................................................................................................................. 12 Module Two: Understanding Etiquette ............................................................................................. 13 Etiquette Defined .................................................................................................................................... 13 The Importance of Business Etiquette .................................................................................................... 14 Module Three: Networking for Success ............................................................................................. 15 Creating an Effective Introduction .......................................................................................................... 15 Making a Great First Impression ............................................................................................................ 17 Minimizing Nervousness ......................................................................................................................... 19 Using Business Cards Effectively ............................................................................................................. 21 Remembering Names ............................................................................................................................. 23 Module Four: The Meet and Greet ................................................................................................... 25 The Three-Step Process ........................................................................................................................... 26 The Four Levels of Conversation ............................................................................................................. 28
  • 3. Case Study............................................................................................................................................... 31 Module Five: The Dining in Style....................................................................................................... 32 Understanding Your Place Setting .......................................................................................................... 33 Using Your Napkin .................................................................................................................................. 35 Eating Your Meal .................................................................................................................................... 36 Sticky Situations and Possible Solutions ................................................................................................. 38 Module Six: Eating Out..................................................................................................................... 40 Ordering in a Restaurant ........................................................................................................................ 40 About Alcoholic Beverages ..................................................................................................................... 42 Paying the Bill ......................................................................................................................................... 43 Tipping .................................................................................................................................................... 44 Module Seven: Business Email Etiquette........................................................................................... 45 Addressing Your Message ....................................................................................................................... 46 Grammar and Acronyms......................................................................................................................... 48 Top 5 Technology Tips ............................................................................................................................ 49 Module Eight: Telephone Etiquette .................................................................................................. 51 Developing an Appropriate Greeting ...................................................................................................... 51 Dealing with Voicemail ........................................................................................................................... 53 Cellphone Do’s and Don’ts ...................................................................................................................... 55 Module Nine: The Written Letter...................................................................................................... 57 Thank You Notes ..................................................................................................................................... 58 Formal Letters ......................................................................................................................................... 60 Informal Letters ...................................................................................................................................... 62 Module Ten: Dressing for Success ..................................................................................................... 63 The Meaning of Colors ............................................................................................................................ 63 Interpreting Common Dress Codes ......................................................................................................... 65
  • 4. Deciding What to Wear .......................................................................................................................... 67 Module Eleven: International Etiquette ............................................................................................ 69 General Rules .......................................................................................................................................... 69 Important Points ..................................................................................................................................... 71 Preparation Tips...................................................................................................................................... 73 Module Twelve: Wrapping Up .......................................................................................................... 75 Words from the Wise .............................................................................................................................. 75 Parking Lot .............................................................................................................................................. 76 Action Plans and Evaluations.................................................................................................................. 76 Pre-Assignment ....................................................................................................................................... 77 Worksheet One: Conversation Case Study.............................................................................................. 78 WORKSHEET ONE, PART 1 ANSWERS: ............................................................................................................ 81 Worksheet Two: Email Case Study ......................................................................................................... 82 Worksheet 3: How Well Do You Use the Cellphone? .............................................................................. 84 MODULE TWO QUESTIONS ........................................................................................................................... 85 MODULE FIVE ANSWERS .............................................................................................................................. 86 MODULE SEVEN ANSWERS ........................................................................................................................... 87 Disclosed Email Addresses ...................................................................................................................... 87 Undisclosed Email Addresses .................................................................................................................. 87 Direct Recipient....................................................................................................................................... 87 ‘To’ Field.................................................................................................................................................. 87 ‘Bcc’ Field ................................................................................................................................................ 87 Indirect Recipient .................................................................................................................................... 87 ‘Cc’ Field .................................................................................................................................................. 87 ‘Bcc’ Field ................................................................................................................................................ 87 Action Plan .............................................................................................................................................. 88
  • 5. Evaluation Form...................................................................................................................................... 90 Recommended Reading List.................................................................................................................... 91
  • 6. Learning is a treasure that will follow its owner everywhere. Chinese Proverb Preface What is Courseware? Welcome to Corporate Training Materials, a whole new training experience! Our courseware packages offer you top-quality training materials that are customizable, user-friendly, educational, and fun. We provide your materials, materials for the student, your PowerPoint slides, and a take-home reference sheet for the student. You simply need to prepare and train! Best of all, our courseware packages are created in Microsoft Office and can be opened using any version of Word and PowerPoint, from 97 to 2007. (Most other word processing and presentation programs support these formats, too.) This means that you can customize the content, add your logo, change the color scheme, and easily print and e-mail training materials. How Do I Customize My Course? Customizing your course is easy. To edit text, just click and type as you would with any document. This is particularly convenient if you want to add customized statistics for your region, special examples for your participants’ industry, or additional information. You can, of course, also use all of your word processor’s other features, including text formatting and editing tools (such as cutting and pasting). Page 1
  • 7. To remove modules, simply select the text and press Delete on your keyboard. Then, navigate to the Table of Contents, right-click, and click Update Field. You may see a dialog box; if so, click “Update entire table” and press OK. (You will also want to perform this step if you add modules or move them around.) If you want to change the way text looks, you can format any piece of text any way you want. However, to make it easy, we’ve used styles so that you can update all the text at once. If you’re using Word 97 to 2003, start by clicking the Format menu followed by Styles and Formatting. In Word 2007, click the option button in the Styles group. Now, right-click on your chosen style and click Modify. Page 2
  • 8. For example, if we wanted to change our Heading 1 style, used for Module Titles, this is what we would do: Page 3
  • 9. Now, we can change our formatting and it will be applied to all the headings in the document. For more information on making Word work for you, please refer to Word 2007 Essentials by Global Courseware. Page 4
  • 10. Materials Required All of our courses use flip chart paper and markers extensively. (If you prefer, you can use a whiteboard or chalkboard instead.) We recommend that each participant have a copy of the Student Training Guide, and that you review each module before training to ensure you have any special materials required. We include worksheets in the Appendix at the end of this manual that can be reproduced and used where indicated. If you would like to save paper, these worksheets can often be transferred to flip chart paper, instead of having individual worksheets. We recommend these additional materials for all workshops:  Laptop with projector, for PowerPoint slides  Tips and Tricks Tutorial for students to take home  Timer or watch (separate from your laptop)  Masking tape  Blank paper Page 5
  • 11. Maximizing Your Training Power We have just one more thing for you before you get started. Our company is built for trainers, by trainers, so we thought we would share some of our tips with you, to help you create an engaging, unforgettable experience for your participants.  MAKE IT CUSTOMIZED. By tailoring each course to your participants, you will find that your results will increase a thousandfold. o Use examples, case studies, and stories that are relevant to the group. o Identify whether your participants are strangers or whether they work together. Tailor your approach appropriately. o Different people learn in different ways, so use different types of activities to balance it all out. (For example, some people learn by reading, while others learn by talking about it, while still others need a hands-on approach. For more information, we suggest Experiential Learning by David Kolb.)  MAKE IT FUN AND INTERACTIVE. Most people do not enjoy sitting and listening to someone else talk for hours at a time. Make use of the tips in this book and your own experience to keep your participants engaged. Mix up the activities to include individual work, small group work, large group discussions, and mini-lectures.  MAKE IT RELEVANT. Participants are much more receptive to learning if they understand why they are learning it and how they can apply it in their daily lives. Most importantly, they want to know how it will benefit them and make their lives easier. Take every opportunity to tie what you are teaching back to real life.  KEEP AN OPEN MIND. Many trainers find that they learn something each time they teach a workshop. If you go into a training session with that attitude, you will find that there can be an amazing two-way flow of information between the trainer and trainees. Enjoy it, learn from it, and make the most of it in your workshops. And now, time for the training! Page 6
  • 12. Manners are more important than laws. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us… Edmund Burke Module One: Getting Started Welcome to the Business Etiquette workshop. Success in any industry relies on relationships, whether with co-workers, clients, suppliers or investors. When you’re well-mannered and considerate in dealing with others, you create engaging, productive and long term business relationships. As such, it is important to learn, not just the technical side of a business, but how to conduct one’s self in the company of others. This is where business etiquette comes in. This workshop will introduce participants to business etiquette, as well as provide guidelines for the practice of business etiquette across different situations. Page 7
  • 13. Icebreaker: Friends Indeed PURPOSE To get participants moving around and introduced to each other. MATERIALS REQUIRED  Name card for each person  Markers PREPARATION Have participants fill out their name card. Then, ask participants to stand in a circle, shoulder to shoulder. They should place their name card at their feet. Then they can take a step back. You as the facilitator should take the place in the center of the circle. ACTIVITY Explain that there is one less place than people in the group, as you are in the middle and will be participating. You will call out a statement that applies to you, and anyone to whom that statement applies must find another place in the circle. Examples:  Friends who have cats at home  Friends who are wearing blue  Friends who don’t like ice cream The odd person out must stand in the center and make a statement. The rules:  You cannot move immediately to your left or right, or back to your place.  Let’s be adults: no kicking, punching, body-checking, etc. Play a few rounds until everyone has had a chance to move around. Page 8
  • 14. Housekeeping Items Take a few moments to cover basic housekeeping items.  Let participants know where they can find washrooms, break facilities, and fire exits.  Ask participants to turn off their cell phones or at least turn them to vibrate. If they must take a call, request that they do it outside.  Take this time to encourage the group to ask questions and make this an interactive workshop.  Tape a sheet of flip chart paper to the wall and mark it “Parking Lot.” Explain that any questions that can’t be answered, or that are more appropriate for a post-workshop explanation, will be placed here and dealt with at the end of the day.  Write the words Respect, Confidentiality, and Practice on a piece of flip chart paper and tape it to the wall. Explain to participants that in order to get the most out of this workshop, we must all work together, listen to each other, explore new ideas, and make mistakes. After all, that’s how we learn! Page 9
  • 15. Pre-Assignment Review The purpose of the Pre-Assignment is to get participants thinking about etiquette principles they are already practicing, and situations where they could use greater awareness/ practice of business etiquette. As a pre-assignment, we asked participants to think of 3 business activities they conducted in the past 7 days. Focus on activities where there’s interaction with other people. It doesn’t have to be big activity; it may be routine work like meeting with a client or replying to queries online. After coming up with 3 activities, we asked participants to write for a way in which they had practiced good manners/ professional courtesy for each activity. As much as possible, express the response in behavioral terms. Lastly, we asked participants to come up with what else they could have done in that situation to express good manners and professional courtesy. The following table could be of help for this activity: 3 Business Activities I Did in the How I showed good manners/ What else I could have done to Last Week professional courtesy in this have expressed good manners/ situation professional courtesy. Have participants take a moment now to look at their responses and reflect on what it says about their current practice of business etiquette. Ask them to keep their responses in mind during the day as they provide the context for the etiquette guidelines that will be discussed later on. Page 10
  • 16. Workshop Objectives Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning that the learning occurs more easily and rapidly. With that in mind, let’s review our goals for today. By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:  Define etiquette and provide an example of how etiquette can be of value to a company or organization.  Understand the guidelines on how to make effective introductions.  Identify the 3 C’s of a good impression.  Identify at least one way to minimize nervousness while in social situations.  Understand how to use a business card effectively.  Identify and practice at least one way to remember names.  Identify the 3 steps in giving a handshake.  Enumerate the four levels of conversation and provide an example for each.  Understand place settings, napkin etiquette and basic table manners.  Understand the protocol in ordering in a restaurant, handling alcohol in a business meal, paying the bill and tipping.  Understand basic guidelines when it comes to the proper form of address, grammar standards and use of acronyms in e-mails.  Understand basic guidelines in the use of the telephone, voicemail and cellphone.  State the difference between a formal and an informal letter.  Create an effective ‘Thank You’ note.  Understand the meaning of colors in dressing for success.  Differentiate among the dressy casual, semi-formal, formal and black tie dress code.  Understand basic guidelines in international etiquette. Page 11
  • 17. Action Plans and Evaluations Pass out the participant action plans and evaluations, available in the appendix of this manual. Ask participants to fill these out throughout the day as they learn new things and have ideas on how to incorporate the things we discuss into their lives. Page 12
  • 18. Good manners can open doors that the best education cannot. Clarence Thomas Module Two: Understanding Etiquette Before we look at etiquette rules across multiple business-related scenarios, it’s best to level off everyone on what etiquette means. We would also look at the many ways business etiquette can improve a company or organization’s bottom line. Etiquette Defined Estimated Time 10 minutes Topic Objective To give etiquette a definition. Etiquette means ‘conventional rules of polite behavior.’ They are guidelines Topic Summary on how to behave befitting good manners while in the company of other people.  Flip chart paper Materials Required  Marker Ask the participants what’s the first thing that comes to their mind when Recommended Activity they hear the word ‘etiquette’. You can create a concept map for etiquette using the flip chart paper and Delivery Tips market using the participants’ responses. Josy Roberts, author of ‘Business Etiquette: Your Questions and Answers’, defines etiquette as ‘conventional rules of polite behavior.’ They are guidelines on how to behave befitting good manners while in the company of other people. They show sensitivity to the needs and feelings of the person/ people you are with. Page 13
  • 19. Etiquette covers most aspects of social interaction, including self-presentation, communication, courtesy and hospitality. Business etiquette, in particular, covers expectations in the interaction between co-workers, the company and their clients, as well as the company and their stakeholders. Etiquette guidelines are many and can be quite complicated. In this workshop we will only focus on basic etiquette guidelines for situations typically found in most business settings. The Importance of Business Etiquette Estimated Time 10 minutes Topic Objective To list ways business etiquette can be of value to a company or organization. Business etiquette contributes positively in the areas of branding, customer Topic Summary care, employee engagement and team synergy.  Pre-Assignment Worksheet 1 (see Appendix Section) Materials Required  Module 1 Questions (see Appendix Section) Refer to the worksheet used in the Pre-Assignment and answer this question: What do you think are the positive effects of your practice of good Recommended Activity manners/ professional courtesy the last week on your company’s bottom line? July 12, 2009 article in The Economist, titled “Manners maketh the businessman” states that businesses today have become more cordial and Stories to Share polite, in an attempt to stay afloat in the economic crisis. “Civility is the new rule in an uncertain world.” Etiquette can help businesses improve the following areas:  Branding. Everything we do reflect on our company and our products. By acting professionally, we send the message that our business is credible and trustworthy. Personalized care may very well be your edge against the competition.  Customer Care. The best way to show customers that their patronage is valued is to treat them with respect and consideration. This in turn can inspire customer loyalty and positive feedback.  Employee Engagement. Good manners help improve employee/ team morale and confidence.  Team Synergy. Good manners help establish smooth working relationships within a team, which contributes to greater productivity. Page 14
  • 20. You’ve only got one chance to make a good first impression! Anonymous Module Three: Networking for Success When you’re networking, it’s important to make the best of the first meeting. In this module, we’ll discuss how to create an effective introduction, make a good impression, minimize nervousness, use business cards effectively and remember names. Creating an Effective Introduction Estimated Time 15 minutes Topic Objective To define what makes an effective introduction. When introducing yourself, it is important to (1) project warmth and confidence, (2) state both your first and last name, and (3) repeat the other person’s name when given to you. Topic Summary When introducing others, it is important to (1) introduce people based on their seniority in a company, (2) introduce strangers first, and (3) use formal titles unless invited otherwise.  Flipchart paper Materials Required  Markers Facilitator divides the group into triads to practice effective introductions. Since this activity is short, participants are recommended to choose their nearest seatmates as their co-triad. In the first part, Person A introduces himself to the Person B using the steps Recommended Activity shared in the presentation. In the second part, Person B introduces Person C to Person A using the guidelines provided. Encourage them to give feedback to one another. Page 15
  • 21. Delivery Tips Model each tip. Give plenty of examples. Three steps to introducing yourself effectively: 1. Project warmth and confidence. Many people size you up even before you say a word, which is why it’s important to mind your body language. When introducing yourself, stand up straight, relax and establish eye contact. 2. State your first name and your last name. Depending on the situation, you may also state your affiliation and/ or your position in the company. Example: “Hello. I’m Jacqueline Smith. I’m the Quality Control Officer.” 3. When the other person has given their name, repeat it in acknowledgment. “It’s nice to meet you, Mr. Andrews.” or “It’s nice to meet you, Joseph.” Repeating their name is an acknowledgment that you heard their introduction. Networking is not just about presenting yourself. You may also find yourself introducing two strangers to one another. Here are three guidelines to introducing others: 1. Take note of the pecking order. In business, introductions are made based on a person’s seniority in a company. This is regardless of age and gender. When you present, present a person with the lesser status to the person with the higher status. Mention the name of the person with the higher status first. Example: “President Andrews, I would like you to meet Caroline Daniels. She’s the head of the Public Relations Department. Caroline, this is President Mike Andrews.” 2. Introduce strangers first! If you are introducing two persons of equal rank to one another, start with the person that you don’t know. This way you can use the introduction to make the newcomer feel welcome. 3. Mind titles. Unless invited otherwise, stick to using formal address such as “Mr. Gallagher” or “Attorney Louis Harris”. Page 16
  • 22. Making a Great First Impression Estimated Time 10 minutes Topic Objective To present the elements of a good first impression. A good first impression is one that successfully communicates the 3 C’s  Confidence Topic Summary  Competence  Credibility  Flip chart paper Materials Required  Markers Ask the group to think of a person who has made a great first impression on Recommended Activity them. Ask them what exactly gave their first meeting impact. Stick to the observable e.g. what they saw and what they heard from this person. Share a personal story about someone who has made a positive impact upon Delivery Tips first meeting. For contrast, you may also share (without mentioning names) about someone who has made a bad first impression on you. Give one C that must be communicated during first impressions and an Review Questions example of how to do so. If you want to make a good impression, know that you need to project 3 C’s:  Confidence  Competence  Credibility You can project confidence by: a. Having a straight but relaxed posture. Hold your head high and steady. Don’t slouch or slump. b. Moving in a natural, unaffected manner. c. Maintaining eye contact with the people you are talking to. Page 17
  • 23. You can project competence by: a. Exhibiting knowledge of your craft. Know your way around the agenda. Being prepared for the meeting. Bring supportive materials to emphasize your points. b. Answering questions in a clear and professional manner, avoiding the use of slang or technical jargon. c. Asking relevant questions. You can project credibility by: a. Arriving on time b. Being presentable (well-groomed and mindful of dress codes. c. Keeping true to your word. Page 18
  • 24. Minimizing Nervousness Estimated Time 10 minutes Topic Objective To be able to list ways on how to overcome nervousness. You can minimize nervousness by  being informed  practicing social skills Topic Summary  doing relaxation techniques  gaining awareness of personal triggers to nervousness and  believing in what you have to offer. Brainstorming ways of overcoming nervousness that the participants have Recommended Activity found effective in the past. Stories to Share Facilitators can share personal stories of overcoming nervousness. If the facilitator feels confident in doing so, he or she can make the Delivery Tips relaxation techniques an experiential activity. Guided meditation and breathing exercises are effective group activities that don’t take time. Review Questions Give one way of minimizing nervousness while in a social situation. Meeting people can be anxiety-provoking. The need to impress another person can be a lot of pressure. Here are some ways to minimize nervousness while in a social situation: 1. Be informed. If possible, take time to research about the people you’re going to meet: their work, values and preferences. Knowing ahead what is expected from you can prepare adequately. Nervousness is amplified by going to a situation blind. 2. Practice! Practice! Practice! Networking is a skill, which means that you can develop it with practice. Practice your introduction in front of a mirror and note what you need to improve. You can also practice with peers. Get feedback from others about the kind of impression you give. Page 19
  • 25. And try to meet as many people as you can! The more you do it, the easier it gets! 3. Learn relaxation techniques. There are many activities that can help relax a nervous person. These activities include a) Meditation b) Self-talk c) Visualization d) Breathing exercises e) Listening to music. 4. Identify your triggers, If nervousness is a real problem for you, it is recommended that you identify what triggers your nervousness. Is it lack of confidence? Is it fear of authoritative people? Awareness can help you catch yourself in time and respond accordingly. 5. Believe in what you have to offer! It’s easy to get intimidated by how successful or famous the other person is. But remember, they’re people--- just like you! They would be willing to listen to someone who can offer them something that they want or need. Have faith in your business. Have faith in your personal worth. Adopt the mindset that you are doing them a service, and it’s your duty to not let them miss the opportunity of meeting you! Page 20
  • 26. Using Business Cards Effectively Estimated Time 10 minutes Topic Objective To be able to give tips on how to use business cards effectively. You can use your business card effectively in many ways. These ways include Topic Summary always being prepared with one’s business card, showing respect when receiving a business card and timing the presentation of your card.  Flip chart paper  Markers Materials Required  Handouts  Pens Prepare handouts on ‘Tips on Using Business Cards Effectively’ for each Planning Checklist participant. Provide each participant with a hand-out copy of the ‘Tips on Using Business Cards Effectively.’ Give them time to read through each one. Afterwards, you Recommended Activity can ask the participants to tick practices that they do and practices that they don’t do. Review Questions Give one way of using business cards effectively. Networking is not complete without receiving or giving a business card. The business card is a way for you to follow up on the people you have met. Likewise, it is a way for them to contact you for further meetings. More than that, your business card is a way to brand yourself. Professional-looking business cards send the message that you’re professional. Adding your company motto or tagline in your business advertises you and what you’re all about. 5 Tips on Using Business Cards Effectively: 1. Never be without your business cards! (Make sure there’s always a stack in your office desk, and in your wallet. You’ll never know; even a trip to the grocery story can present an opportunity to network. Page 21
  • 27. 2. Follow the protocol on hierarchy. Cards should not be given to senior executives that you meet, unless they’ve asked for one. 3. Time the presentation of your card. Don’t just hand over your business card at any random moment. Handing a business card in the middle of a discussion can be an interruption, as parties would need to take a moment to give it a look. You also want to make sure that your card is perused at point when the other person can give it his or her full attention. The best moments to hand a card is when you’re asked for one, when you’re asked to repeat your name, or when someone offers to send you something. If the two organizations that you represent are well-known to each other, although you haven’t met your host before, offering your card is probably best left to the end of the meeting. If your host is unfamiliar with your company, offering your card at the beginning of the meeting is good practice. 4. Accompany your business card with an explanation of what you can offer them. When you hand another person your card, give a brief ‘action recommendation.’ This can increase the likelihood of them contacting you again. For instance you may say: “I think I can help with your PR concerns, Mr. Johnston. Here is my card.” You may also ask for referrals. Invite the other person to send your contact details to anyone they know who can use your services or products. 5. When receiving a business card, show the other person that you value their card. Look at the business card for a few seconds. Comment about the card. Let them see that you take care in storing their card as well, instead of just jamming it in your pocket. Page 22
  • 28. Remembering Names Estimated Time 20 minutes To give tips and techniques on how to better remember names. Topic Objective To practice a technique on remembering names. You can remember names by:  Repetition  Use of mental imagery Topic Summary  Documenting names on paper  Crafting creative sentences  Genuine interest  Flip chart paper Materials Required  Markers This activity may require a large space for the participants to mingle. Check if Planning Checklist the venue is appropriate for the activity and make adjustments if necessary. Prepare illustrations for the mental imagery technique. Divide the participants into groups of 5-8 members. Give them time to introduce themselves to one another. If the group already knows one another, have each participant make up a new name and profession. If the group doesn’t know one another yet, then they can use their own names and profession. Recommended Activity When all have been introduced, let each member recite each of the names of each member of their group. Encourage them to use name recall aids discussed. In the plenary, ask the participants what was name recall technique worked for them. The facilitator can share techniques in remembering names that have Stories to Share worked for him/ her in the past. Facilitator may also solicit from the participants techniques that are not covered in the material. Delivery Tips Present illustrations as an example of mental imagery technique. Page 23
  • 29. Remembering names may be difficult for some people, but it’s not impossible. It’s a skill: something that you can improve with constant application. Here are some ways to remember names: 1. Repeat. When someone is introduced to you, repeat their name. “It’s a pleasure to meet you, Mark.” This can help reinforce your memory of the name. You may also introduce them to someone else so that you can create an opportunity to use their name. 2. Use mental imagery. We think in pictures, therefore associating an image with a name can help in assisting recall. For example, after meeting Bill the plumber, imagine the word Bill spelled with pipes. If Jason Smith is marathon runner, imagine Jason running on a treadmill in a gym called Jason’s. Or just imagine a person’s name written on their forehead. Pick an imagery that works for you. The more striking or exaggerated your mental picture, the bigger are the chances of recall. 3. Put it on paper. Write the name down as soon as you can. Or write their details on the business card they give you so that you would remember them the next time you see them around. (Just make sure you don’t let the person see you writing on their business card.) 4. Use their name in creative sentences. Mentally construct sentences that are fun and a bit frivolous, to make name recall less stressful. Alliterations, or repeating consonant sounds in succession, are a great way to remember names. For example, to remember Jane who sells kitchen ware, you can repeat in your head: Jane makes jam and juice in January. 5. Be genuinely interested. Remembering names begin with attitude. If you are sincerely interested in a person, then they would make an impact on you. If you adapt the attitude that everyone is interesting, and are a potential ally in business, then remembering names would come as second nature. Page 24
  • 30. Ideal conversation must be an exchange of thought, and not, as many of those who worry about their shortcomings believe, an eloquent exhibition of wit or oratory. Emily Post Module Four: The Meet and Greet An introduction is almost always accompanied by a handshake and conversation. In this module, we would discuss the three steps that make an effective handshake and the four levels of conversation. Page 25
  • 31. The Three-Step Process Estimated Time 15 minutes Topic Objective To explain the three steps needed for an effective handshake. An effective handshake involved projecting the right facial expression, giving Topic Summary the appropriate hand shake and a sincere greeting.  Flip charts Materials Required  Markers Decide ahead of time how to assign each pair an improper way of shaking Planning Checklist hands. Divide the group into pairs. Each pair will be assigned an ‘improper way’ to make a handshake that one person in the pair would have to play. Afterwards, participants would be asked for feedback on the impression they got. These improper ways include:  No eye contact/ no smiles Recommended Activity  A limp handshake  An overpowering handshake  A handshake without a greeting When all have role played an ineffective handshake, they would now role play the recommended three steps in this module. Feedback will also be solicited. Review Questions What are the three steps involved in an effective handshake? A handshake is a part of many social interactions. It’s a way to introduce one’s self, offer congratulations and even a way to conclude a business deal. A handshake is a gesture of goodwill. The Three-Step Process to Handshake: Step 1: Facial Expression Page 26
  • 32. Start non-verbals that show openness and sincerity. Maintain eye contact. Smile. Step 2: Shake Hands Your handshake gives an impression. If your grip is too lax, you send the message that you’re hesitant and possibly indecisive. If your grip is too tight, you might come across as too brash, even intimidating. Go for a grip that’s in between. It sends the message that you’re confident. For most occasions, two or three pumps of the hand are appropriate. Longer handshakes can make some people, especially women, uncomfortable. But there are people who do prefer longer handshakes. If uncertain, go with the flow, and follow the lead of the other person. If you feel that it’s time to let go, just relax your hand to signal the other person. Step 3: Greet the Person Talk to the person whose hand you are shaking. A simple ‘hello’ or ‘how do you do” is appropriate. Page 27
  • 33. The Four Levels of Conversation Estimated Time 15 minutes Topic Objective To differentiate among the 4 levels of conversation. There are four levels of conversation: (1) small talk, (2) fact disclosure, (3) viewpoints and opinions and (4) personal feelings. Small talk involves exchanging pleasantries and talking superficially about generic topics of interest to everyone. Topic Summary Fact disclosure is revealing information about yourself to assist in establishing common ground. Viewpoints and opinions mean sharing your take on an issue. The last is the most intimate stage, where in you share personal feelings with the other person. Divide each group into groups of 4-5 members. Project the following statements on the board. Give the groups 2-3 minutes to sort the statements into the right category: small talk, fact disclosure, viewpoints and opinions and personal feelings. The answers are in the appendix section. 1. “I work in the Newport branch.” Recommended Activity 2. “I’ve always wanted to work in the country. The fast-paced lifestyle here feels like a pressure cooker sometimes.” 3. “I think Beckham made a mistake joining the L.A. Galaxy.” 4. “Hi. Great service here, isn’t it? Am Marissa.” Prepare a post of the 4 statements beforehand. It can be part of a Planning Checklist PowerPoint slide or written on a flip chart paper. Provide plenty of examples. You may even play a short video clip from a Delivery Tips popular movie or reality show. The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right place, but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at tempting moment. It requires sensitivity to the stage of a relationship, the context of the conversation and the comfort level of the person you are talking to. There are 4 levels of conversation based on the degree and amount of personal disclosure. They are: Page 28
  • 34. 1. Small Talk This is commonly referred to as the ‘exchange of pleasantries’ stage. In this level, you talk only about generic topics, subjects that almost everyone is comfortable discussing. These subjects include the weather, the location you’re both in and current events. The small talk stage establishes rapport; it makes a person feel at ease with you. It’s also a safe and neutral avenue for people to subtly ‘size up’ one another, and explore if it’s a conversation or relationship that they’d want to invest in. If the small talk goes well, you can proceed into the next level: fact disclosure. 2. Fact Disclosure In this stage, you tell the other person some facts about you such as your job, your area of residence and your interests. This is a ‘getting-to-know’ stage, and it aims to see if you have something in common with the other person. It’s also a signal that you are opening up a little bit to the other person while still staying on neutral topics. If the fact disclosure stage goes well, you can proceed to sharing viewpoints and opinions. 3. Viewpoints and Opinions In this stage of the conversation, you can offer what you think about various topics like politics, the new business model ---or even the latest blockbuster. It helps then to read and be curious about many things, from politics to entertainment to current events. Sharing viewpoints and opinions require the ‘buffering effect’ of the first two stages for two reasons: First, a person needs rapport with another before they can discuss potentially contentious statements, even if they’re having a healthy debate. Second, sharing viewpoints and opinions opens a person to the scrutiny of another, and this requires that there is some level of safety and trust in a relationship. The controversial, and therefore potentially offensive, nature of an opinion exists in a range; make sure that you remain within the ‘safe’ zone in the early stages of your relationship. 4. Personal Feelings Page 29
  • 35. The fourth stage is disclosure and acknowledgment of personal feelings. For instance you can share about your excitement for the new project, or your worry about your son’s upcoming piano recital. Depending on the context and the level of the friendship, you can disclose more personal subjects. This stage requires trust, rapport, and even a genuine friendship, because of the intimate nature of the subject. Different people have different comfort levels when it comes to disclosing feelings, and there are cases when you’d need several conversations before they would trust enough to open themselves. In some cases, you never get to this stage. Just make sure to be sensitive and test the other person’s readiness before opening an intimate topic. Listening is vital in all stages of the conversation but especially so in this fourth stage. Listen with empathy and understanding to acknowledge that you heard the feeling that they have shared. Page 30
  • 36. Case Study Estimated Time 20 minutes To identify the four stages of conversation in a written case study. Topic Objective To identify how following the four stages help make a conversationalist more effective.  A copy of worksheet 1 per person Materials Required  Flip chart paper  Markers Accomplish Worksheet 1 (See Appendix Section) Recommended Activity Divide each group into groups of 4-5 members. Give them around 10-15 minutes to accomplish Worksheet 1 as a group. Discuss responses in the large group. Planning Checklist Prepare the worksheets beforehand. Delivery Tips Facilitator has the option to let groups just read the case study or act it out. Refer to the Appendix Section for a copy of the case study. Page 31