Social Media Guidelines for Employees

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Presented by Heather Schoegler and Tamarah Brownlee of Parkview Health. Covers content including: …

Presented by Heather Schoegler and Tamarah Brownlee of Parkview Health. Covers content including:

- Guidelines or Policy or Both?
- Crafting your Policy and Guidelines
- NLRB Insights
- Implementation Plan
- Employee Social Media Examples
- Future Issues
- Your Next Steps

More in: Business , Career
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  • Heather
  • Heather
  • Tamarah
  • Heather
  • Tamarah With guidance from our Compliance department and our own research, we only included items in the Policy that were enforceable according to HR and other laws.   HEATHER: We didn’t feel like a “don’t do this” approach was the right way to do social media though. We really wanted to let the coworkers know we were here to partner with them to make them successful in their social media use personally. That’s why we shared best practice through the guidelines. They take a more “do this” approach, and while they are not legal enforceable, they do outline standards we expect to be maintained – for their sake and ours.
  • Tamarah Explain what “both” would look like ( PH policy is both) a set of guidelines within a policy Points to specific policies already established outside of the set of guidelines being described Guidelines are not mandatory Policies can be mandatory
  • Tamarah Have some examples from the NLRB documents of dos and don’t re policies Other guidance that is appropriate Via Advisory Board “Employers can discipline employees for violating social media policies, but those policies have to be narrowly construed. Employers must proceed with caution before disciplining. For example, if your policy prohibits using social media to post inappropriate or disparaging remarks about the company or the supervisor, the Board is taking the position that those policies are too broad. You need to make sure your policy is narrowly drafted, so that if you're going to proceed with discipline, you can do so without risking an unfair labor charge being filed against your company.”
  • Tamarah Unprotected activities can be enforced under policy
  • Tamara
  • Tamara
  • Heather What ideas do you have to allow coworkers to promote their own social media use?
  • Heather What ideas do you have to allow coworkers to promote their own social media use?
  • Heather What ideas do you have to allow coworkers to promote their own social media use?
  • Heather What ideas do you have to allow coworkers to promote their own social media use?
  • Heather What ideas do you have to allow coworkers to promote their own social media use?
  • Tamarah then Heather
  • Heather and then Tamarah You need to make sure your policy is specific and narrow. Second, employers should confer with their counsel before disciplining any employee for social media issues. It's better to take 20 minutes to have a conversation than spend a year in litigation.

Transcript

  • 1. Social Media Guidelines for Employees
  • 2. Heather Schoegler serves Parkview Health as the Director of Community Engagement where she focuses on strategies to fulfill Parkview’s mission throughout the communities they serve. She holds a B.A. in Media and Public Communications from IPFW and M.S. in Organizational Leadership from Indiana Tech. Heather was honored as IPFW’s Outstanding Young Alumni in 2011; an ATHENA Award Nominee in 2011; Indiana’s Nicest Social Media Peep in 2011; 40 Under 40 recipient in 2010; and a Future 40 Award recipient in 2008. She is a wife, mother of two and community volunteer. Tamarah Brownlee is currently the Human Resources Manager for Parkview Regional Medical Center and Corporate offices. She has 10 years of experience working in the field of Human Resources in various industries such as Retail, Moving Services/ Relocation and Healthcare. She has a natural passion for coaching, training and development. Tamarah received her Master’s degree from Indiana University-Bloomington, is the mother of four children and an aspiring published author. Who we are…. @HSchoegler
  • 3. Who we are not…. We are not Lawyers!
  • 4. What We’ll Discuss • Guidelines or Policy or Both? • Policy Guidelines • NLRB Insights • Implementation Plan • Employee Social Media Examples • Future Issues • Your Next Steps
  • 5. Why Social Media? • It’s a hot topic in business. • Conversations are happening online – with or without you. • Employees are ambassadors. • Positive ROI.
  • 6. Guidelines vs. Policy (or both)? • Understanding the difference • Guidelines- • Documents that seek to simplify a set of processes with regard to an established habit or practice • Merely serve as a guide Read more: Difference Between Guideline and Policy | Difference Between | Guideline vs Policy http://www.differencebetween.net/miscellaneous/difference-between-guideline-and-policy/#ixzz2bss5ZMTH
  • 7. Guidelines vs. Policy (or both)? • Understanding the difference • Policies- • Intentional map of actions that serves to guide an organization or group in decision making or in attaining positive results. • Can be violated by the people. • Enforceable; the enforcer would require the people to follow them. Read more: Difference Between Guideline and Policy | Difference Between | Guideline vs Policy http://www.differencebetween.net/miscellaneous/difference-between-guideline-and-policy/#ixzz2bss5ZMTH
  • 8. Policy and General Guidance • Policies • Should not be so sweeping that they prohibit the kind of activity protected by federal labor law • Protected = discussion of wages or working conditions • Comments on social media are generally not protected if they are mere gripes not made in relation to group activity among employees
  • 9. National Labor Relations Board • The NLRB has taken the position that: • The employees are engaging in 'protected concerted activity' under the National Labor Relations Act. • Therefore, if employers have disciplined anyone for engaging in that activity, that discipline should be overturned, according to the Board. Read more: Advisory Board Q&A with Evan Rosen from Epstein Becker & Green, http://www.advisory.com/Research/Human-Resources-Investment-Center/Expert-Insights/2012/Social- media-policy
  • 10. National Labor Relations Board • Under section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act: • Employees have the right to engage in protected concerted activity for mutual aid or protection regarding their wages, hours, or working conditions. →If employees as a group wanted to complain their salary wasn't high enough, their boss was treating them unfairly, or they disliked some policy, they have the ability to air those grievances—even if the facility is non-union. Read more: Advisory Board Q&A with Evan Rosen from Epstein Becker & Green, http://www.advisory.com/Research/Human-Resources-Investment-Center/Expert-Insights/2012/Social- media-policy
  • 11. Policy Enforcement Scope • Unprotected activities • Reckless or malicious behavior • Sabotaging equipment • Threatening violence • Spreading lies about a product or service • Revealing trade secrets • Violating other company policies – privacy, safety, etc. Can be addressed under a corrective action policy.
  • 12. Implementation Plan • Assemble all knowledge experts: • HR, Legal, Marketing, IT, etc. • Create and Implement Guidelines/Policies. • Communicate Guidelines/Policies across the organization. • Educate and Train all co-workers. • Monitor. • Be consistent, fair, and keep it legal.
  • 13. Communicating Across the Org http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjocDhlicJs
  • 14. Communicating Across the Org • Encourage employee’s safe use of social media: • Intranet • Email Signatures • Business Cards • Other
  • 15. Communicating Across the Org • Intranet
  • 16. Communicating Across the Org • Intranet
  • 17. Communicating Across the Org • Encourage employee’s safe use of social media: • Intranet • Email Signatures • Business Cards • Other
  • 18. Communicating Across the Org • Encourage employee’s safe use of social media: • Intranet • Email Signatures • Business Cards • Other
  • 19. Employee Education These guidelines apply to employees who create or contribute to blogs, wikis, social networks, virtual worlds, or any other kind of social media. Whether you log into Twitter, Wikipedia, MySpace or Facebook pages, or comment on online media stories — these guidelines are for you. Please keep in mind our overall goal is simple: to participate online in a respectful, relevant way that protects our reputation and of course follows the letter and spirit of the law. General tips: 1.Be smart about protecting yourself and your privacy. What you publish is widely accessible and will be around for a long time, so consider the content carefully. 2.Familiarize yourself with the privacy settings (if applicable) for networking sites you choose to use. These allow you to choose who you want to share your information with. Note that these can change often. 3.Safety experts recommend avoiding posts and status updates that may announce to readers that you are not at home, as they believe this can increase risk of thefts.
  • 20. Employee Education - Comments An area where there has been increased participation is commenting on on-line news stories related to Parkview. Some tips for participating: •Be transparent and state that you work at Parkview. Your honesty will be noted in the social media environment. •Know your facts before commenting. Never represent yourself or Parkview in a false or misleading way. All statements must be true and not misleading; all claims must be substantiated. •Post meaningful, respectful comments — in other words, avoid remarks that are off-topic or offensive. •When disagreeing with others' opinions, keep it appropriate and polite.
  • 21. Monitoring and Responding • How do you monitor? • How do you respond?
  • 22. Monitoring and Responding • How do you monitor? • Topsy Alerts • SocialMention.com • “Small World” and Technology Features • Because the Parkview Health Facebook page is a business page, we can click on the person’s name and go to their page if it’s not set as private, but we are unable to post on their page.
  • 23. Monitoring and Responding • How do you respond? • Most often, we choose to opt out of the conversation. • If there is a potential violation, it is handled like all other HR issues either through Compliance or through HR and Department Leaders.
  • 24. Pass or Fail
  • 25. Pass or Fail
  • 26. Pass or Fail
  • 27. Pass or Fail
  • 28. Pass or Fail
  • 29. Forward Thinking • References (and endorsements) via social media. • Vendor recommendations (and endorsements) on LinkedIn. • Your current issues are tomorrow’s problems.
  • 30. Your Next Steps 1. Review your employee handbook looking specifically at policy for lawfulness and scope. 2. Identify Social Media Managers. 3. Monitor – real-time for key accounts. 4. Know and understand the difference between concerted and non-concerted activity, protected concerted activity and unprotected concerted activity. 5. Discuss with your general counsel (or seek counsel) before disciplining any employee for social media related issue.
  • 31. Questions
  • 32. Downloads Social Media Policy: http://db.tt/ZlDI6CUk Internet Use Policy: http://db.tt/2qenfzhT