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Writing Effective Introductions and Abstracts
 

Writing Effective Introductions and Abstracts

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Session Three of Scientific Writing Series

Session Three of Scientific Writing Series

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    Writing Effective Introductions and Abstracts Writing Effective Introductions and Abstracts Presentation Transcript

    • Writing Effective Introductions and Abstracts Presented by: Wayne Loftus, MLS, Bio-Medical Library Mary Knatterud, PhD, Department of Surgery April 27, 2007 Office of Clinical Research
      • I will not discuss off label use and/or investigational use in my presentation.
      • I have no financial relationships to disclose.
      Office of Clinical Research Brenda Hudson Disclosure Information April 27, 2007
      • Key terms Wayne Loftus
      • Overview Mary Knatterud
      • Hands-on exercise Mary Knatterud
      • Q&A
      Office of Clinical Research Agenda
      • I will not discuss off label use and/or investigational use in my presentation.
      • I have no financial relationships to disclose.
      Office of Clinical Research Wayne Loftus Disclosure Information April 27, 2007
      • Information that’s hard to find will
      • remain information that’s hardly found.
      • - Peter Morville
      • find·a·bil·i·ty n
      a. The quality of being locatable or navigable. c. The degree to which a system or environment supports navigation and retrieval. b. The degree to which a particular object is easy to discover or locate.
    •  
    •  
      • I will not discuss off label use and/or investigational use in my presentation.
      • I have no financial relationships to disclose.
      Office of Clinical Research Mary Knatterud Disclosure Information April 27, 2007
      • I will not discuss off label use and/or investigational use in my presentation.
      • I have no financial relationships to disclose.
      Office of Clinical Research Mary Knatterud Disclosure Information April 27, 2007
      • I will not discuss off label use and/or investigational use in my presentation.
      • I have no financial relationships to disclose.
      Office of Clinical Research Mary Knatterud Disclosure Information April 27, 2007
      • I will not discuss off label use and/or investigational use in my presentation.
      • I have no financial relationships to disclose.
      Office of Clinical Research Mary Knatterud Disclosure Information April 27, 2007
      • I will not discuss off label use and/or investigational use in my presentation.
      • I have no financial relationships to disclose.
      Office of Clinical Research Mary Knatterud Disclosure Information April 27, 2007
      • I will not discuss off label use and/or investigational use in my presentation.
      • I have no financial relationships to disclose.
      Office of Clinical Research Mary Knatterud Disclosure Information April 27, 2007
      • Useful format:
      • Background
      • Methods
      • Results
      • Conclusions
      Office of Clinical Research Abstract
      • Use active voice End background section with hypothesis Cover the high points of your results Conclude with 1 or 2 sentences
      Office of Clinical Research Abstract
      • Three Paragraphs: 1 st : state the general problem 2 nd : outline the specific problem 3 rd : state the type of study it was and the hypothesis
      Office of Clinical Research Introduction