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Making it Personal for Everyone by Steve Scown and Helen Sanderson
 

Making it Personal for Everyone by Steve Scown and Helen Sanderson

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The slides from Steve and Helen's presentation on their book about developing Individual Service Funds in residential care. There is also a short version with a voice over available - contact ...

The slides from Steve and Helen's presentation on their book about developing Individual Service Funds in residential care. There is also a short version with a voice over available - contact claire@helensandersonassociates.co.uk if you want a copy or to have a download of this presentation.

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Making it Personal for Everyone by Steve Scown and Helen Sanderson Making it Personal for Everyone by Steve Scown and Helen Sanderson Presentation Transcript

  • “ The fundamental flaw in residential services: the people we support in these services have not chosen who they live with and, because the team on duty supports everyone, they have a limited choice about who supports them and ” how their time is spent. the fundamental flaw: the people we support in these services have not chosen who they live with and, because the team on duty supports everyone, they have a limited choice about who supports them and how their time is spent.
  • What did we hope to achieve from Anne Marie’s perspective?
  • What did we hope to achieve from the staff team’s perspective?
  • Identify each person‟s share of the funding wereceive based upon their individual needs(individual allocation)Identify what support and costs is necessary asa result of the service being shared(core support) and (shared costs)Identify ways of enabling each person tomaximise the control they have over whatresource they have once they have paid theirshare of the shared costs(in my personal control)
  • “ In a word, Planning Live was fantastic! It really felt like the start of the journey for us all. My staff and I spent two whole days listening - and that‟s it, just listening to the people we support. We gleaned so much information over those two days and enabled the people we support to think more about how their life was for them and their families. So much was covered in Planning Live. Carolynn ”
  • Perfect week/month1. Relationships2. What does Anne-Marie want to do? Where? When? Cost?3. Anne Marie‟s outcomes
  • Choosing staff
  • Supporting the changesPerson centred teamsPositive and productive meetingsPerson centred supervisionCommunity connecting
  • Changes for Anne MarieNew people in her relationship mapNew placesBusier week - out and about
  • What does this mean for staff?• Thinking differently about power and accountability• A different purpose - focus on relationships• New skills - community connecting• A greater degree of flexibility - personalisated rota• Bringing the „whole person‟ to work -sharing hobbies and interests
  • What does this mean for front-linemanagers?Positive and Productive Meetings and Person Centredsupervision must happen on a regular basis“Making person centred thinking and practices a habitwithin the team shifts the manager‟s accountability to theindividuals supported, not just the senior management”.
  • Top tips• Develop your own views as to how you would allocate a budget, what should constitute core services and what people can have under their own personal control.• Agree the Individual Service Funds before tackling any other issues.• Provide people with clear information about the principles of personalisation, individual budgets and Individual Service Funds at the outset.
  • Top tips• Develop your organisational response to dealing with a member of staff whom nobody wants to support them.• Help your staff understand they must have their own personal offer for the people they are supporting. If they haven’t got one, help them to develop one.• Develop an approach to rota planning that puts the people you are supporting at the centre. Use the Matching Tool to match the right staff member for each activity - and make sure this support happens consistently.
  • Top tips• The manager and the team should be familiar with person-centred thinking tools and should work towards becoming ‘fluent’ in them. Managers can use Progress for Providers to self-assess their level of competence and what support they need to improve.• Positive and productive meetings must be held on a regular basis.• Person-centred supervision must be used on a regular basis. Having the feedback of people being supported as an explicit component of individual staff supervision and appraisal is very beneficial.
  • Top tips• Be prepared to provide higher levels of support, training, independent challenge and coaching than you think necessary.• Don’t under-estimate the impact of broader organisational change upon local services and their attempts to improve how they provide support.• Develop your understanding of your position on paid work for the people you support and if it is ‘passive’ explore why it is so.
  • Top tips• Recognise and feel comfortable with accepting you will discover some things that must change.• Approach these issues openly and resist the temptation to accord blame and fault. You’ll learn much more and achieve positive change more quickly by clarifying your expectations and engaging in honest and open dialogue.
  • Top tips• Establish your criteria for success at the outset, based on what you want to achieve for the people you support and for your organisation.• Be realistic about your progress and achievements. Major change to working practices takes courage, determination - and time.