Developing Employee & Organizational Performance June 2010

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This is a presentation I delivered to the AMA Professional Day seminar in June 2010. Critical themes include Performance Assessment and Effective Coaching Strategies.

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Developing Employee & Organizational Performance June 2010

  1. 1. PATRICK HARTLING, CHRP Developing Employee & Organizational Performance   June 2010 AMA Professional Development Day
  2. 2. Purpose of this Session <ul><li>This session is designed to link the two most powerful tools available to a manager or an HR staff-person to improve performance, and coincidentally, employee satisfaction and retention. </li></ul><ul><li>First : Assessment of past performance, with a view to establishing desired future performance </li></ul><ul><li>Second : The development of effective and consistent coaching practices that are linked to and supportive of the appraisal and targets of each employee. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Our Six Main Themes Today... <ul><li>We have complimentary presentations and will cover the following 6 points: </li></ul><ul><li>Why Bother? </li></ul><ul><li>Preparing for the Organizational Program </li></ul><ul><li>Developing Strong Team Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Employee Focus </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching and Feedback: critical skills </li></ul><ul><li>Reviews and Program Assessment </li></ul>
  4. 4. Learning Objectives <ul><li>Identify the key elements of a performance appraisal/development system that will support coaching, </li></ul><ul><li>Examine the coaching system and practice that will support and sustain performance improvements, </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the performance development cycle, </li></ul><ul><li>Consider barriers and obstacles regarding the performance development cycle, </li></ul>
  5. 5. Learning Objectives <ul><li>Review top tips for developing a performance culture </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the resources necessary to create and sustain both initiatives, </li></ul><ul><li>Consider Developing a Performance/ Coaching Culture </li></ul><ul><li>Identify Change Management Strategies that will support your development and introduction, </li></ul><ul><li>Consider how the Employee Survey and Feedback will support your Performance Development Strategy </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP IS PUTTING FIRST THINGS FIRST. EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT IS DISCIPLINE, CARRYING IT OUT. </li></ul><ul><li>STEPHEN COVEY </li></ul>1. Why Bother?
  7. 7. <ul><li>The process of performance development enables each staff person to understand their true value-added to the organization. They do so when they understand how their job and the requested outcomes from their contribution &quot;fit&quot; inside your department or work unit's overall goals, and when you provide them the necessary tools and supports. </li></ul><ul><li>The performance development program is further advanced when the skills of coaching and feedback are employed by supervisors and staff. </li></ul>
  8. 8. WHY BOTHER: Performance Management <ul><li>Ongoing and New pressures to develop performance </li></ul><ul><li>Inadequate manager focus </li></ul><ul><li>Insufficient manager skills </li></ul><ul><li>Narrowly defined ownership of assessment and development </li></ul><ul><li>Disconnection with Organizational and Team Strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Failure to execute effectively – consistently </li></ul>
  9. 9. Jack Welch on Leadership <ul><li>From Winning , p. 61: </li></ul>06/11/10 SPL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, INC. Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others.
  10. 10. <ul><li>A LEADER TAKES PEOPLE WHERE THEY WANT TO GO. A GREAT LEADER TAKES PEOPLE WHERE THEY DON'T NECESSARILY WANT TO GO, BUT OUGHT TO BE. </li></ul><ul><li>ROSALYNN CARTER </li></ul>2: Organizational Perspective
  11. 11. Performance Planning Dialogue between manager and staff to establish clear, specific performance expectations at the beginning of the performance cycle. Preparing the Organization for Performance Management (PM) is a Continuous Process – The Organizational View Ongoing Coaching Two-way discussion which focuses on recognizing the staffs excellence & areas for improvement & learning, as well as identifying barriers to performance. Multiple Sources of Feedback Process which provides staff with performance information to supplement manager feedback; may includes feedback from sources such as self, Manager, peers, other clients. Performance Review Two-way discussion & written document focusing on staff performance, areas of excellence, goals for improvement & development needs. Performance Criteria Information that provides the foundation for performance; competencies, standards of performance, job description (expectation) & goals.
  12. 12. Partnerships With Managers And Employees <ul><li>Focus on Employees Behaviour and Performance (observable) </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on Future </li></ul><ul><li>Look at Immediate and Timely Feedback Regards Correction </li></ul><ul><li>Think about Supporting Employee Excellence </li></ul>
  13. 13. HR Organizational Development Strategy <ul><li>Maintain a Forward Focus </li></ul><ul><li>Gather Information on, and Understand, Business Requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Diagnose Desired Culture and Style </li></ul><ul><li>Envision New Tools and Systems as well as Future Needs </li></ul><ul><li>Identify Obstacles, Readiness for Change </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate Vision and Forgetting about HR </li></ul><ul><li>Adjust System for Buy in and Engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Link to Other Systems (i.e. Change Management & Training) </li></ul>
  14. 14. Org. Culture and the New Focus No Organizational Focus on Continuing and Persistent Improvement A Retrospective, Backward Focus Re Performance Keep a focus on the shifts in Skills that are needed for employees to succeed Build a System that Builds Performance to meet Organizational Needs Typical Org. Current State: Desired Future State:
  15. 15. <ul><li>ROSEMARY BROWN UNTIL ALL OF US HAVE MADE IT, NONE OF US HAVE MADE IT. </li></ul>3: Teams and Performance
  16. 16. Org. Culture and the New Focus There is a tendency to Isolation and ‘not sharing’ Managers are ‘Not Listening’ Mgrs. Transactional and Busy/Busy/Busy Lack of Skills Communication + Engagement = Pride Active Hearing/ Nothing is too Trivial to Address Demonstrate the link to Making their Job Easier Prioritize and Deliver Practical Learning & Tools Listening Skills + Regular Employee Surveys No Connection By Management to Employees Typical Org. Current State: Desired Future State:
  17. 17. Barriers and Obstacles in Teams <ul><li>Some Barriers... </li></ul><ul><li>No Forward Focus on Employee Development </li></ul><ul><li>Managers not taking the time to ‘do it ... Well’ </li></ul><ul><li>No Constructive Feedback Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Poor Listening Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Each Organization and System will Have Its Own Barriers </li></ul>
  18. 18. <ul><li>BLAINE LEE THE GREAT LEADERS ARE LIKE THE BEST CONDUCTORS - THEY REACH BEYOND THE NOTES TO REACH THE MAGIC IN THE PLAYERS. </li></ul>4: Individuals and Performance Development
  19. 19. Performance and the Employee <ul><li>By: </li></ul>CAO and Council Performance Planning Dialogue to establish clear, specific performance expectations at the beginning of the performance cycle. Translation to Senior Team+ Organizational Performance Objectives Senior Team sets a Plan to establish performance objectives that will integrate the organizational excellence & areas for improvement & learning, as well as identifying barriers . Front Line Management and Performance Development Process which provides staff with performance information by manager feedback; may includes feedback from sources such as self, Manager, peers, other clients. All feedback linked to Organizational Performance Objectives Organizational Employee Engagement Survey Focusing on staff performance, areas of excellence, goals for improvement & development to meet staff needs and build engagement Capability Dictionary Information that provides the foundation for performance in core competencies, standards of performance
  20. 20. Building a High-Performance Workforce <ul><li>Ensure each employee understands performance standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Create performance standards that are perceived as fair and linked to organizational success and strategy. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide feedback to employees from multiple sources. </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding, Connection, and Fairness are more important than system design and structure per se– because they Build Engagement and Drive Individual and Organizational Performance </li></ul>
  21. 21. Role of Leadership During Organizational Change <ul><li>At all levels, each individual is responsible for completing critical activities and taking specific actions to support change </li></ul><ul><li>Initiate the cause </li></ul><ul><li>Convey a single, clear vision (incl. rationale) </li></ul><ul><li>Commit to goals </li></ul><ul><li>Form Guiding Team </li></ul><ul><li>Reward successful change leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize strong performance </li></ul>Leaders Change Agent <ul><li>“ Project manage” change </li></ul><ul><li>Meet milestones </li></ul><ul><li>Manage the Human Change Process </li></ul><ul><li>Get frontline input </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor commitment levels </li></ul><ul><li>Create and retain advocates </li></ul><ul><li>Celebrate successes </li></ul>Managers Change Enabler <ul><li>Stay open to new ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Be honest about own progress through Human Change Process </li></ul><ul><li>Stay positive </li></ul><ul><li>Express concerns without making it personal </li></ul><ul><li>Balance the needs of the organization with personal needs </li></ul>Staff/Self Change Participant
  22. 22. The Principles of Change Leadership <ul><li>There are several fundamental principles and common misconceptions about change </li></ul><ul><li>Principles of Change </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Change is a process, not an event, and is often difficult to sustain </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Change process is same no matter the type; includes performance drop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Individuals do not resist change, resist disruption in expectations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Impact of change defined by each person’s reference point </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organizations/individuals can only absorb so much change </li></ul></ul><ul><li> Change Misconceptions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Change happens quickly and time takes care of everything </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Change drivers will be seen in a rational manner </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leadership behaviour is invisible to rest of organization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Weak people are ones who leave; survivors are glad they have a job </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If the communication is done “right” the first time, it is enough </li></ul></ul>
  23. 23. <ul><li>PETER DRUCKER SAID: LEADERSHIP IS NOT MAGNETIC PERSONALITY - THAT CAN JUST AS WELL BE A GLIB TONGUE. IT IS NOT &quot;MAKING FRIENDS AND INFLUENCING PEOPLE&quot; - THAT IS FLATTERY. LEADERSHIP IS LIFTING A PERSON'S VISION TO HIGH SIGHTS, THE RAISING OF A PERSON'S PERFORMANCE TO A HIGHER STANDARD, THE BUILDING OF A PERSONALITY BEYOND ITS NORMAL LIMITATIONS. </li></ul>5: Coaching and Feedback
  24. 24. What is coaching? Coaching is an everyday, automatic, and ongoing process to provide performance feedback and encourage continued staff growth and development Coaches encourage people to develop themselves
  25. 25. Why coach? Benefits of Coaching Clear, Mutual Expectations Self-Reliant vs. Boss-Reliant Performance Improvement Increased Job Satisfaction
  26. 26. Managing vs. Coaching Reacting Delegating Tasks Controlling Conducting an annual performance review Goal-setting and planning Assigning responsibility Affirming and Supporting Observing and providing feedback on a regular basis Communicating clearly and frequently, and asking the right questions Communicating infrequently, often failing to use clarifying questions The Role of a “Traditional” Manager Includes: The Role of a Coach Involves:
  27. 27. Feedback is the essence of coaching Feedback is essential to staff Development. It not only helps staff correct mistakes before they become habits, but it also: Reinforces positive behaviours Encourages the development of desirable work habits Helps staff achieve their goals Focuses all on the forward correctable skills and habits
  28. 28. Key Elements of Coaching <ul><li>F.R.A.M.E Coaching Model </li></ul><ul><li>F – Focus on each interaction </li></ul><ul><li>R – React non judgementally </li></ul><ul><li>A – Ask thought provoking questions </li></ul><ul><li>M – Monitor progress and learning </li></ul><ul><li>E – Encourage continued growth </li></ul>
  29. 29. Tips for providing positive and constructive feedback <ul><li>Describe the behavior you are recognizing, such as meeting a deadline, surpassing productivity projections, or participating more fully in a meeting. </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasize the impact of behavior so that the person can clearly see why you believe it is important. You can talk about the impact on you, the job, the Firm the team, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Let the staff member know exactly what behaviors to continue, and what behaviors not to continue. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a habit of looking for and commending specific positive behaviors; such reinforcement will increase the incident of those behaviors. </li></ul><ul><li>Respect the staff member’s need for privacy. Your reaction to a staff member’s behavior or performance should be between you and the staff member. </li></ul>
  30. 30. Tips for providing positive and constructive feedback <ul><li>Give feedback that is specific and behavioral, rather than general and judgmental. Focus on the work, not the person. </li></ul><ul><li>Express your observations calmly. </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid overwhelming the staff member with too much feedback all at once. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on the future and, through your discussion, identify the specific behavioral change that is required. </li></ul><ul><li>Clearly identify the payoff or positive outcome of a desired behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide the appropriate balance of positive and negative feedback. </li></ul>
  31. 31. Building a High-Performance Workforce <ul><li>Create a culture with free flow of information, innovation, openness and flexibility. </li></ul><ul><li>Differentially treating strong and weak performers is vital, but its ultimate impact on employee performance is limited. </li></ul><ul><li>Building a high-performance workforce is not a one-year process. </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous improvement efforts are critical to the ongoing success of your program. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Top Ten Tips - Shift to a Performance Development and Coaching Culture <ul><li>Business Objectives Clear and Priority 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Communications Listening Skills Key </li></ul><ul><li>Set Realistic Program Priorities </li></ul><ul><li>Think about Change Early and Often </li></ul><ul><li>Forget HR needs – Focus on the Business </li></ul>
  33. 33. More of the Top Ten <ul><li>6. Always Adapt the Program to The Culture </li></ul><ul><li>7. Training and Building Skill essential to success </li></ul><ul><li>8. Cultural Change Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>9. Seek continuous improvement vs. Leaping </li></ul><ul><li>10. Measure Outcomes/impact and business results not just how many completed </li></ul>
  34. 34. Thanks for your Attendance and Interest! <ul><li>Patrick Hartling </li></ul><ul><ul><li>902 489 4615 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SPL Development Services Inc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.hrimpactsorg.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A division of SPL Development Services Inc. </li></ul></ul>

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