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Tb2374 alegre kimura-implementing virtual application networks_final
 

Tb2374 alegre kimura-implementing virtual application networks_final

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  • Let’s focus on the amount of time it takes to connect an application to the network. Let’s start with the tools that a server administrator uses. He uses tools that allow him to manage with policy. He has very sophisticated tools and when he needs to connect to the network, that’s where the delay comes in and it takes weeks. Just look at the questions that a network administrator asks the server admin. These are much lower level questions. Because he isn’t using advanced policy-based tools. He is using 40-year-old technology comprising command-line interface and scripts. As a matter of fact, in an interview with a CEO, he told his team, “If you’re using the CLIN scripts, you’ve already lost the battle for cloud. “ In a typical data center, according to Cindy Borovick from IDC, you could have 500 servers with all of them running a hypervisor, each carrying about 20 virtualized workloads. Well, there are 10,000 workloads with each one requiring, on an average, five network attributes and there are 50,000 network attributes that you have to configure on a port-by-port basis across dozens of switches—possibly 250,000 command line entries across those dozens of switches. Even if you have a really good IT organization, those network administrators are bound to make a mistake.  Talking to Joe Skorupa from Gartner and his comment was, even if they are really good, they might make one mistake out of a thousand, that’s is still 250 errors and you’ve got to go find them—that’s the real tough part. This process is not only slow, but it presents a reliability problem.
  • So, the problem is pretty clear, that there is a speed issue in terms of deploying new applications in the data center as well as a reliability one. It is not just about connectivity of applications in the data center, it is about delivering them to users, in the campuses and branch locations of the network. Our virtual application network vision looks at the entire end-to-end process of delivering applications to the users. Key points to deliver about legacy networks include the fact that they are applications-indifferent. It is impossible for legacy networks to identify specific applications in the packets that traverse switches and routers and be able to perform different functionality based on the necessary user behavior requirements and meet those service-level expectations.  Legacy networks are rigid and physical. They are built for one type of tenant, one type of user, one type of location with very device-dependent provisioning. It’s like roads that got built between the city and the suburbs. As people moved further away, traffic congestion occurred as businesses moved the city to the suburb, the roads didn’t change, they weren’t able to adapt to the different needs and traffic patterns that are caused—same is true with cloud. The management as we pointed out is very manual, device by device, and very slow to respond to new requirements and hampered by manual errors. Forrester research shows that a majority of network outages are caused by human error in the process of performing configuration changes on networking equipment.
  •  Our vision with the virtual application networks is a game changer. But it is one that people are going to feel very comfortable with because it is a little familiar. What we are doing with this end-to-end control plane to make the network itself programmable and multi-tenant, and align to applications is very similar to what server administrators have seen with the hypervisor allowing the servers to be themselves programmable, serve multiple tenants, supporting multiple virtual machines, multiple virtual application workloads on a single physical plane. This is going to change the industry because we are going to allow network administrators to manage with policy rather than the CLIN scripts, managing device by device. This is going to create a brand new operating model. When someone asks you how are you going to compete with Cisco, this is your answer. You are changing the game. You are declaring that the death of the CLI starts now. You are giving the network administrators a brand new set of tools that are going to make his life easier, save him time, and increase the reliability of deploying new applications in the cloud environment.
  • So, the problem is pretty clear, that there is a speed issue in terms of deploying new applications in the data center as well as a reliability one. It is not just about connectivity of applications in the data center, it is about delivering them to users, in the campuses and branch locations of the network. Our virtual application network vision looks at the entire end-to-end process of delivering applications to the users. Key points to deliver about legacy networks include the fact that they are applications-indifferent. It is impossible for legacy networks to identify specific applications in the packets that traverse switches and routers and be able to perform different functionality based on the necessary user behavior requirements and meet those service-level expectations.  Legacy networks are rigid and physical. They are built for one type of tenant, one type of user, one type of location with very device-dependent provisioning. It’s like roads that got built between the city and the suburbs. As people moved further away, traffic congestion occurred as businesses moved the city to the suburb, the roads didn’t change, they weren’t able to adapt to the different needs and traffic patterns that are caused—same is true with cloud. The management as we pointed out is very manual, device by device, and very slow to respond to new requirements and hampered by manual errors. Forrester research shows that a majority of network outages are caused by human error in the process of performing configuration changes on networking equipment.
  • Let’s focus on the amount of time it takes to connect an application to the network. Let’s start with the tools that a server administrator uses. He uses tools that allow him to manage with policy. He has very sophisticated tools and when he needs to connect to the network, that’s where the delay comes in and it takes weeks. Just look at the questions that a network administrator asks the server admin. These are much lower level questions. Because he isn’t using advanced policy-based tools. He is using 40-year-old technology comprising command-line interface and scripts. As a matter of fact, in an interview with a CEO, he told his team, “If you’re using the CLIN scripts, you’ve already lost the battle for cloud. “ In a typical data center, according to Cindy Borovick from IDC, you could have 500 servers with all of them running a hypervisor, each carrying about 20 virtualized workloads. Well, there are 10,000 workloads with each one requiring, on an average, five network attributes and there are 50,000 network attributes that you have to configure on a port-by-port basis across dozens of switches—possibly 250,000 command line entries across those dozens of switches. Even if you have a really good IT organization, those network administrators are bound to make a mistake.  Talking to Joe Skorupa from Gartner and his comment was, even if they are really good, they might make one mistake out of a thousand, that’s is still 250 errors and you’ve got to go find them—that’s the real tough part. This process is not only slow, but it presents a reliability problem.
  • Virtual application networks enable the cloud. They allow us to deliver new applications in minutes, rather than weeks. They allow us to tune the network to the delivery requirements of the application, virtualize the network end to end, make it programmable, allow it to be multi-tenant, allow it to move the applications from the data center to the users. It allows IT to manage network with policy rather than with CLIN scripts. This is beginning of the end of the CLI. We defined a new operating model for the network administrator and we’ve done that on top of a single pane of glass network management for both the physical and the virtual network – the Intelligent Management Center. We continue to ensure choice and flexibility using open standards approaches in the FlexNetwork architecture, the blue print for delivering virtual application networks.

Tb2374 alegre kimura-implementing virtual application networks_final Tb2374 alegre kimura-implementing virtual application networks_final Presentation Transcript

  • © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • Virtual Application NetworksSpeed cloud application deployment with automated policy-basedconfiguration from application-to-network-to-userSession TB2374© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • Legacy Networks Slow Application DeploymentSystem admin ready! Deploying an Rack 3 VLAN Subnet 10M CIR Priority exchange VM IP TOS Are you ready yet? server 5 10 .16.31 20M PIR 4 Time in months 250,000+ … CLI entries Which Which Which How much QoS QoS Ok, starting for typical server? VLAN? subnets? bandwidth? Priority? Method? switch config data center With 500 ServersNetwork admin3 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • Today’s Networks Can’t Meet Cloud Expectations Impossible to identify applications and meetApplication indifferent diverse service levels Architected for one tenant, user type & locationRigid physical networks - lacking programmability Slow to respond to new app requirementsManual management & hampered by manual errors4 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • Virtual Application NetworksNew operating model delivers agility needed for cloud VM VM VM VM Hypervisor Server CPUs5 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • Today’s Networks Can’t Meet Cloud Expectations Create consistency, reliability and repeatabilityApplication characterization across the entire network infrastructure Create multitenant, on-demand, topology &Network virtualization device-independent provisioning Orchestrate using templates, user SLAsAutomated orchestration and policy for dynamic app delivery6 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • Virtual Application Networks Benefits• Saves quantifiable time by reducing the manpower and operational cost of administering cloud networks• Supports multiple hypervisors, ensuring customers have flexibility and choice• Removes the need for costly hypervisor and vSwitch licenses; only cost is the license for IMC and IMC VAN Manager• Supports heterogeneous networks through IMC’s multi-vendor device support• Integrates virtual application networks operations into E2E orchestration solutions with IMC VAN specific extended APIs7 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • New Reality – Deploy Applications in Minutes System admin Virtualize Deploying an vCenter Virtualizing Wow! That exchange VM Plug-in 2 was fast! … ready! Choose profile App Minutes deployed Characterize Orchestrate IMC VAN IMC VAN 1 Manager Manager 3 VM Network admin8 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • Deploy Cloud Application in Minutes, Not MonthsAutomating policy-based configuration from application-to-network-to-user Virtual Focus less on managing Application infrastructure… Networks Manager …and more on connecting users to applications9 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • Tools to Help Our Clients• Read about the FlexNetwork Architecture• Learn about Virtual Application Networks• Discover Intelligent Management Center• Read more on FlexFabric• See more about FlexCampus BYOD for education and healthcare• Learn how to simplify communication with FlexBranch• View the HPN Portfolio Matrix Guide• Learn about networking services from HP Technical Services• Learn about networking career certifications from HP ExpertONE10 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • Q&AGladys Alegre-Kimura Dan Montesanto Les StuartGlobal Product Marketing Global Product Line Global Product LineManager Manager ManagerHP Networking HP Networking HP Networking11 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • Thank you© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.