Network World QuickPulse: SDN Migration Accelerating

  • 306 views
Uploaded on

Most IT organizations see software-defined networking on their horizon. Organizations are feeling a growing sense of urgency to modernize their networks with software-defined networking (SDN) …

Most IT organizations see software-defined networking on their horizon. Organizations are feeling a growing sense of urgency to modernize their networks with software-defined networking (SDN) technology, according to a new study of IT leaders involved in the purchase of networking gear. Going against conventional wisdom that SDN implementation is several years away, about half of those surveyed say their evaluation timeframe is two years or less.

More in: Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
306
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Network World QuickPulse * SDN Migration Accelerating SDN Migration Accelerating Most IT organizations see software-defined networking on their horizon Custom Solutions Group Organizations are feeling a growing sense of urgency to modernize their networks with software-defined networking (SDN) technology, according to a new study of IT leaders involved in the purchase of networking gear. Going against conventional wisdom that SDN implementation is several years away, about half of those surveyed say their evaluation timeframe is two years or less. IDG Research polled more than 80 decision-makers involved in network technology purchases to gauge current perceptions of SDN, the widely anticipated technology expected to transform networking as dramatically as virtualization has transformed servers and storage. Going Mainstream Sponsored by: More than half (56 percent) of respondents to the IDG Research survey indicated they are already evaluating SDN or plan to do so. With one-in-five already in the evaluation or implementation stage, it seems no longer an issue of if enterprises will migrate, but rather when they will have sufficient information to make investment decisions. “We need to evaluate and research this type of solution to fully understand how it works and how it will help and benefit our organization in the long term,” one survey respondent notes. Conceptually, at least, SDN seems to have made it into the mainstream of IT thinking. Market researcher IDC, in a report late last year forecasting rapid growth through 2016, declared that “SDN is a rapidly emerging set of scalable, flexible technologies that have networking vendors, cloud service providers, enterprise IT and industry pundits all sitting up and taking notice.”1 Indeed, just 11 percent of respondents in the IDG Research survey indicate they were not familiar with SDN technology prior to the survey. Most are eager for knowledge to justify implementation decisions, including a better understanding of how SDN will simplify networking for administrators and how it will lower total cost of ownership. Availability of compelling use cases is high on the list of information desires. “I think there needs to be more examples of how and when to deploy, as well as specific benefits,” observes one decision maker. Broad Recognition of SDN Benefits Enterprise network design and architectures have remained largely unchanged over the past decade, whereas applications and systems have evolved. “Networks today are managed very much on a device-by-device basis, relying on manual intervention and what we like to call human middleware,” says Steve Brar, manager of global product marketing with HP Networking. “The sooner organizations move to an SDN architecture the sooner they’ll be able to move away from that static device-bydevice environment to a more agile, dynamic, programmable network.” SDN architecture builds networks from three abstractions, or layers. First, the infrastructure layer encompasses both physical and virtual network devices that utilize a standards-based method of implementing traffic forwarding rules. The second, or control layer, is a centralized control plane decoupled from the underlying infrastructure to provide a single centralized view of the entire network. The third (application) layer consists of network services, orchestration tools and business applications that interact with the control layer. With SDN, IT can orchestrate network services and automate control of the network according to high-level policies, rather than low-level network device configurations. By eliminating manual device-by-device configuration, IT resources can be optimized to lower costs and increase competitiveness. One of the key solutions that SDN can
  • 2. Network World QuickPulse * SDN Migration Accelerating What is your organization’s timeframe for evaluating software defined networking (SDN)? Have already implemented/in the process of implementing 2% In the process of evalutating 18% Will evaluate in the next 12 months 13% Will evaluate 12-24 months from now 16% Will evaluate more than 24 months from now I am familiar with the technology, but we have no plans to evaluate in the foreseeable future I was not familiar with this technology prior to this survey 7% 32% 11% Source: IDG Research Services, July 2013 deliver is network virtualization, which can relieve the demands of server virtualization and workload mobility that many networks cannot accommodate. “As virtual machines are moved and provisioned, the administrator in a traditional network would have to log into each router or switch or device and issue a series of commands via command line interface, which is very error prone and time consuming,” Brar says. Cloud services companies, he points out, may have thousands of such operations on a daily basis, making SDN essential. Organizations Eager to Leverage SDN For more information go to www.hp.com/sdn Increasingly, network decision-makers are eager to take advantage of SDN benefits. In the survey, 48 percent indicate that a top benefit is SDN’s ability to enable greater customization or flexibility of network services. That was closely followed by improved visibility into network assets and reduced complexity of service delivery. Many recognize the potential of offloading routine manual tasks so IT can add more value to their business. “Ultimately these folks are going to be able to deliver a lot more value to their organizations because they can spend more time innovating and doing more to help the network align to business objectives, rather than programming to the command line,” says Brar. 1   Making the Transition Despite the growing awareness of SDN’s potential, decision-makers still have many questions and concerns. A majority of those surveyed view integration with existing technology as the top challenge. But, says Brar, that’s a common misperception. HP, according to Brar, is implementing the Open Network Foundation’s OpenFlow protocol—an increasingly accepted enabler of SDN architecture—into existing switch platforms so organizations can “make the transition without having to rip and replace” existing equipment. That was a factor that 38 percent of survey respondents indicated would encourage them to adopt SDN more rapidly. Others are worried about staff resources, the length of time required to achieve the return on investment, as well as potential disruption during a transition. Brar says HP’s customers will be able to download free software to activate OpenFlow and he expects vendors will be ready with many SDN applications so enterprises don’t have to worry about creating their own on Day One. Brar says HP already has SDN applications in beta testing or proof of concept implementation. One is the Sentinel security application that can automate threat detection and protection across the network. Another is a unified communications and collaboration application that automates policy deployment across the network for business applications; with Microsoft Lync, for example, the application dynamically provisions QoS policies and traffic routing to optimize delivery of voice, video and application sharing data. Adapting to the Future Legacy network architecture is too rigid and cumbersome to adapt to changing business requirements. Most organizations are already evaluating SDN or planning to— sooner than previously thought, as increasingly tangible benefits and the opportunity to enable business agility arise. The research demonstrates that the move to SDN is nearer than many thought. IDC, SDN Shakes Up the Status Quo in Datacenter Networking, December 2012.