Ivan Jascur – BB1692 - Flexible data center

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HP Expert: Ivan Jascur, presentation deck from HP Discover 2012 Frankfurt “Flexible data center"

HP Expert: Ivan Jascur, presentation deck from HP Discover 2012 Frankfurt “Flexible data center"

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  • Here’s what we’ll cover with you today. I’ll spend a few minutes up front talking about the different approaches to data centers today and the client needs – your needs that are driving the market to change. Then we can talk about the new HP Flexible DC, introduce you to the four quad concept, do a deeper dive into the mechanical, cooling and electrical systems and then share a lifecycle cost comparison analysis. We can then look at a summary of benefits
  • Just a couple of slide here to look at what we already know – where we’re coming from to this point. Data center design trends based on business models, and the steady re-emergence of Greenfield data center projects
  • As you all know, historically data centers have been and continue to be monolithically designed. But more recently, we have seen three different types emerge, with different criteria, depending on their usage and the business model they support:Enterprise Data Centers need high reliability, are customized, have average workload density and are typically tier three or four;Internet based companies’ data centers are very vanilla, don’t need high reliability, and tend to be homogenous for standardized expansion, and are tier 1or 2;Co-location companies also tend to provide heterogeneous environments for their clients, and have higher tier ratings than internet companies, but typically their requirements are lower than those for enterprise data centers.This diversity of approach has also helped drive adoption of a more modular topology and we’ve led the adoption of modularity with the introduction of Multi-tiered Hybrid Design in early 2009, which took multi-level tiering into the single data center. HP Flexible DC continues that trend. At the same time we’ve also seen a significant increase in power requirements. A few years ago anything up to 5MW was large, but today we are now designing data centers beyond 150MW. Regardless of the type of model, we have seen a significant increase in costs, both capital and operations, driven by increases in build costs supporting traditional designs coupled with the higher energy demand trends.Combine that with the fact that there are a number of industry issues making data centers top of mind for CIOs and facilities managersIn spite of the upwards price pressure, the deteriorating condition of legacy data centers has created a pressing requirement, which needs to be addressed. Here are some numbers from a web-survey by Campos Research and Analysis (for DRT) of 300 IT decision makers at large corporations in North America with annual revenues of at least $1.0 billion and/or at least 5000 employees. All survey participants were senior level executives directly involved in the process of managing, expanding and implementing new or expanded data centers. The survey was published in April 2010. 83% planning data center expansion within 1-2 years 73% plan to add 2 or more facilities as part of their expansionOf these, 70% plan projects of at least 15,000 sqft or 2 MW+ The economic turndown hasn’t reduced this pent up demand; it’s made it even more a bottleneck due to the difficulty in getting capital project approval, now clearly being releasedPreviously this deterioration of data center condition or capacity meant building a new data center. Today customers have to consider more strategic choices, and the decision has become one of build vs retrofit vs lease, the latter two potentially being a reaction to the capital cost of building new and not having enough time to wait for the whole construction process. Let’s take a quick look at the drivers behind the pent up demand….
  • As we briefly saw just now, although data centers have been designed and built with monolithic topologies for years now, users, depending on what they need are driving new thinking in the industry. Modularity and flexibility are the new buzz words and help with driving down costs is a real bonusLet’s look
  • Briefly here are some of the issues behind the pent-up demand, which are now exacerbated by a lack of ability to get capital projects passed through finance. We see a combination of pressures coming from: growth in computing demand the age of the facility is increasing risk the data centers ability to provide the right environment to accommodate technology innovation and capital-inefficient and outmoded design approaches continuing to be applied “because that’s the way it’s done”Given all this, what factors should you, the client consider in their decision-making?
  • Data centers have 20 year life-cycles, so planning them with a lack of vision is not an easy task. In addition to the build/retrofit/lease decision there are other fundamental questions, including: How long do my capacity projections give me? Have I got time to build? How disruptive would a retro-fit be? Green-field makes sense, but getting CAPEX approval? Energy needs to be central to the design criteria, how is power rating-based design incorporated What will be the life-time operating costs How is cost-effective flexibility for growth accounted for, both known and unknown?So, let’s assume you have a decision to make, and you’ve made the decision to build… what then?
  • Now they must consider the where, what, how, why questions and what they’re aiming to achieve within their design criteria What topology is required? How large does it need to be, both in square footage terms and power requirements? Where is the best location to build it? How does it designed to be at optimal efficiency? what strategic and project approach is to be taken? And how to address cost and environmental considerationsAll these points need to meet the aims of the data center’s remaining current for future innovation cycles within its own lifecycle and providing sufficient flexibility to accommodate corporate growth requirements and availability standards.All of which is a lead into what HP Flexible DC brings ….
  • Taking the principals behind multi-tiered hybrid design and applying them to the data center as a whole rather than the data center’s zones or pods, the rationale behind Flexible DC is to provide a solution for greenfield data center requirements that:Reduces capital costs and operating costs, not incrementally, but significantlyImproves scalability and flexibility through “Lego-like” modularityShortens operational time-to-market to within a yearAvoids planning for future unknowns, nowIt takes an industrialized approach to the design and build of a data center. This industrialization is seen through the mechanical and electrical component options, pre-selected and fabricated build materials and control over the supply chain to push labor costs back into material production, and not on the data center construction site.A state of the art legacy data center’s shell is typically built with concrete reinforced walls. All of the cooling and electrical systems are located in the same shell. Traditional legacy data center cooling systems entail the use of large central chiller pants and vast piping networks and pumps to deliver cooling air handlers located in the IT spaces. Electrical distribution systems typically are dual ended static UPS system with good reliability but low efficiencies due to part loading conditions. PUE for a traditional data center with tier ratings of III and above are between 1.9 and 1.5 With FlexDC the reliability of the system is set as Tier 3, block redundant. The total critical power available to the facility is 6 mega watts. The building is metal, standard to the metal building industry. The electrical distribution system is a block redundant scheme based on a fly wheel UPS system located in prefabricated self contained housings. The standby generators are located on the exterior of the facility in prefabricated self contained housing with belly tank fuel storage below.  The mechanical cooling systems are prefabricated self contained air handlers with air to air heat exchangers based with DX refrigerant cooling to assist during periods of the year that the local environment is not capable of providing the total cooling for the data center IT space. The IT white space is a non raised floor environment. The IT equipment racks are arranged in a hot aisle containment arrangement. The hot return air is directed into the drop ceiling above and return to the air handlers by the drop ceiling plenum.
  • The design layout has been optimized for simplicity, industrialization, supply chain management, speed to market and cost.. Core design elements include: prefabricated buildingsIntegrated securityNo Mechanical chiller plantsHigh efficiency UPS systemNo raised floorScalability one quadrant at a time Low PUE’s The buildings that comprise the facility include four quadrants and a central support area. The core support space is configured to house various operations, security, shipping and receiving, telecommunications and network conductivity. The power and cooling system comprises of the following: PCM (Power Conditioning Module), CM (Cooling Module) and GM (Generator Module). Each wing consists of two quadrants, Each quadrant has a total critical load capacity of 500kW, 750kW, 900kW or 1500kW, which is slated for majority IT and some network communications equipment. When four quadrants are constructed and fitted out the combined capacity of the facility is up to 6 MW of critical IT power.
  • Now we’ve been introduced to HP Flexible DC let’s peel the cover back and look more deeply at the mechanical and electrical systems
  • FlexDC takes advantage of expanded environmental standards within the data center, utilizing cooling applications typically seen in industrial applications and adapting them to the data center environment. This adaptation of industrial cooling approaches includes the following cooling technologies: direct evaporation with DX assist indirect evaporation with DX assistdirect evaporation and heat transfer wheel with DX assist. air to air heat exchangers with direct evaporation and DX assistOn the next slide we can see further detail on the cooling options
  • Here we can look at each of the optionsEach of these technologies utilizes the environment to its maximum ability and presents the highest known efficiencies. These technologies are able to maintain an environment in the data center that is within recommended limits. Also, they limit or eliminate the potential to bring environmental contaminatesinto the data center, which can occur with typical outdoor air economizers. The Dx system will be sized as needed, and pre-determined whether it is sized to carry the entire data center cooling load. Air handlers are located on the exterior walls in industrial, prefabricated, weatherproof packages. The cooling system(s) become more efficient when the exterior environmental conditions are below 70°F-21°C for extended periods of the time. Locations that normally experience high humidity can still fully utilize these cooling systems because heat is transferred across an air to air heat exchanger which provides isolation between the data center space and the local environment. This eliminates typical concerns with high humidity.To obtain the maximum use of the environment, supply air temperature set points needs to set at the highest temperature possible and still remain within the warranty requirement range of the IT equipment. The next critical component is to control the temperature difference between the supply and return air streams to a minimum range of 25°F. This minimizes the amount of air needed to cool the data center, thus reducing fan energy. The configuration of the data center in general must follow certain criteria in order to receive the maximum benefits available through the use of these cooling designs, as follows: Server racks configured in a hot aisle containment configuration. No raised floor air distribution. The air handlers distributed across a common header on the exterior of the building for even air distribution. Supply air diffusers located in the exterior wall, connected to the distribution duct. These diffusers to line up the with the cold aisle rows. The room becomes a flooded cold aisle. The hot aisle is ducted to a plenum, normally created through the use of a drop ceiling. The hot air shall be returned via the drop ceiling plenum back to the air handlers. Server racks thoroughly sealed to minimize the recirculation of waste heat back into the inlets of nearby servers. Server layout is such that the rows of racks are optimized in length to allow the flooded cold aisle to efficiently supply air to the furthest rack. The control for the air handlers shall maintain the maximum temperature difference between the supply and return air distribution streams. The supply air temperature is controlled to a determined set point while the air amount is altered to maintain the desired temperature difference, by controlling the recirculation rate in the servers.
  • Now let’s turn to the electrical systemsThe electrical configuration developed for Flexible DC accommodates various needs with regard to reliability levels and size of the data center. The combinations of electrical topologies are:N Single Utility Source N+1 UPS2N UPSDistributed RedundantBlock RedundantLowering utility and distribution costs for the electrical systems means using more efficient equipment and especially the uninterruptable power supply (UPS) systems.
  • Traditional data center electrical distribution systems have been based on double conversion UPS and battery systems with standby generator systems.  There are several UPS technologies offered within Flexible DC, which expand on the traditional options:Rotary UPS – 94 to 95 % energy efficientFlywheel - 95% energy efficientDelta Conversion UPS - 97% energy efficientDouble Conversion UPS – 94.5% to 97% energy efficient Offline UPS– Low voltage version for the 750 kW blocks, about 98% energy efficientLowering construction costs and speed of implementation goes hand in hand with proper electric equipment selection as follows: Close coupling of electrical equipment to shorten feeders and to lower losses. Use of outdoor equipment – The goal is to preserve indoor space for IT equipment. The containers will be connected up to the building as to avoid underground construction and for quicker deployment. The sizes of the main equipment, mainly the UPS and standby generators have been selected to be the most cost effective in terms of Cost/kW, size optimization and delivery. The generators are sized to a maximum PUE demand of 1.5.There will be an option to utilize either remote power panel (RPP) at the ends of the server racks or an overhead bus. Utilize best practices for energy efficiency during equipment selection and sizing based on the sweet spots for cost and equipment availability
  • As we briefly saw just now, although data centers have been designed and built with monolithic topologies for years now, users, depending on what they need are driving new thinking in the industry. Modularity and flexibility are the new buzz words and help with driving down costs is a real bonusLet’s look
  • And so, in conclusion, while Flexible DC is a specific solution, should clients require some of the benefits found in Flexible DC, but don’t have a situation where they would require the full Flexible DC facility layout, we can take the design criteria and work it into their specific circumstances and still realize economic gains without any trade off on reliabilityFlexible DC has the potential to revolutionize how data centers are purchased and constructed. Through standardization and incorporation of cost effective approaches into one product the very time consuming and often painful task normally associated with an owner-builder concept (remember, building a data center is not a regular occurrence) will no longer be a main consideration for the owner. It will become far simpler to purchase a completed product, working with HP, than for them to go through the process themselves and having to maintain a staff of trained individuals to get the work done.The recent evolutionary approaches to modularity and warehouse-type data centers are all packaged together in one product offering, FlexDC, which provides businesses: a very cost effective data center to build and own a much quicker time-to-market to commission the unit the highest levels of flexibility and appropriate availability. This disruptive innovation will enable a more in-sync partnership with the needs of the business not found in the methods used in the past. Flexible DC is an optimized solution built on standard building blocks forged from strategies developed by HP engineers and designers to enable a new wave approach to a meet your and the data center communities’ demand for more IT.
  • The design layout has been optimized for simplicity, industrialization, supply chain management, speed to market and cost.. Core design elements include: prefabricated buildingsIntegrated securityNo Mechanical chiller plantsHigh efficiency UPS systemNo raised floorScalability one quadrant at a time Low PUE’s The buildings that comprise the facility include four quadrants and a central support area. The core support space is configured to house various operations, security, shipping and receiving, telecommunications and network conductivity. The power and cooling system comprises of the following: PCM (Power Conditioning Module), CM (Cooling Module) and GM (Generator Module). Each wing consists of two quadrants, Each quadrant has a total critical load capacity of 500kW, 750kW, 900kW or 1500kW, which is slated for majority IT and some network communications equipment. When four quadrants are constructed and fitted out the combined capacity of the facility is up to 6 MW of critical IT power.

Transcript

  • 1. BB1692Flexible data center© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 2. Flexible data centerModular IT capacity to match business growthIvan Jascur, EMEA Strategy & Business Development Critical Facilities Services, Dir.Brian Whelan, WW Critical Facilities Services, Dir.HP Enterprise Group, Data Center ConsultingDecember 2012© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 3. Agenda1. Data center approaches and drivers2. Design trends3. Datacenter considerations4. HP Flexible DC5. Mechanical, cooling, and electrical systems6. Summary3 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 4. Data centerapproaches and drivers© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 5. Data centers todayEnterprise Internet Co-location• High reliability • Low reliability • Average reliability• Heterogeneous • Homogeneous • Heterogeneous• Average density • High density • Average density• Customized • Standardized • Standardized• Tier 3–4 • Tier 1–2 • Tier 2–3• Cloud • Distributed5 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 6. Design trends© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 7. Data center issues Capacity Suitability to host limitations— newer technologies out of power (e.g., cloud services) Costs of monolithic Availability—risk design and lack of from aging facilities modularity not sustainable7 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 8. What are the considerations?• Build, retrofit, or lease? Plan/Scope• How long does my capacity projection 1–2 years give me?• Greenfield makes sense, but getting End of life Design 6 months – CAPEX approval? 2 years 1 year• Incorporating growth of power-rating design• Lifetime operating costs Operate Build• Flexibility for growth—known and 15–20 years 2 years unknown8 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 9. If the decision is to buildBasics Considerations• What to build? • Design criteria requires current costs• To what size? accommodate future innovation• Where to build? • Flexibility to be optimal throughout the DC lifecycle to optimize capacity and• How do we optimize? availability• What approach? • Custom data center• Environmental• First cost vs. TCO9 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 10. Considering business & IT needs Typical PUE of 1.2 – 1.8 PUE as low as 1.20 PUE as low as <1.20 (new build usually allow lower PUE (load dependant) (load dependant) design than retrofit) Typical 1.6kW/m2 Av. 3-4 kW/m2 Up to 9kW/m2 (highest flexibility in low-to-mid (per module flexibility and best $/kW (max density shows best $/kW) kW/m2 coverage and best $/sqm for and $/m2 for mid-to-high density) low density) ~1 to 2 years to ~6-12 months Build & shipped within design & build from design to build a few months Max Security Max Redundancy Power density Speed of deployment IT Flexibility Energy Efficiency Geographic Flexibility from fully custom to industrialized and standardised solutions Traditional Brick & Mortar Hybrid & Modular Containerized HP NGDC HP Flexible DC HP POD Series Custom Design & Build Containerized P&C10 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 11. HP Modular Data Centers – industrialized or traditional Containerized Modular Custom11 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 12. Introducing HP Flexible DCFrom HP Critical Facilities Services (CFS)12 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 13. What is HP Flexible DC?• An innovative solution that challenges conventional data center design• An industrialized approach to the mechanical and electrical infrastructure• A means to move construction labor from the field to the factory• Energy efficient through hot-aisle containment, pre- fabricated air handlers with air-to-air heat exchangers, and highly efficient UPS systems• Consists of modular quads, built when needed—not now• Emphasis shifting to supply chain management from the traditional custom design and construct13 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 14. Inside HP Flexible DC14 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 15. Elements of HP Flexible DCInnovative, modular technology that challenges conventional data center designAll the elements of a custom datacenter in a modular solution• Consists of core unit with 1–4 modular quadrants – “Core” is central support unit with facility entrance, offices, storage, loading dock, etc. – “Quadrants” are data halls for servers and storage, with externally mounted electrical & mechanical components for this hardware – Optionally, IT infrastructure (HW, SW, 1 quadrant = 500, 750, 900, or 1,500 kW critical load capacity. Max data center storage, networking) can be integrated capacity = 6 MW.* into the solution *Illustration shows 4-quadrant data center, each quad 1,500 kW capacity15 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 16. Elements of HP Flexible DC2 Quad Setup16 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 17. Inside a quadrant17 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 18. Inside the core building18 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 19. Design considerations • Each quad has net critical load capacity of 500, 750, 900, or 1500 kW • Each quadrant is approximately 500 square meters • Core is about 450 square meters • Multiple levels of redundancy based on the customer requirement • One quadrant can house approximately 200 racks • Customized Tier and floor options at quad level19 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 20. HP Flexible DC - a complete packageTurnkey solution, with everything included, ready for your IT infrastructure• Quads and core• Electrical plant• Mechanical plant• Fire detection and suppression• Security• Remote monitoring• Building management/automation system (BMS/BAS)• Telecom/networking infrastructure• Building infrastructureFrom HP, a world leader in largeturnkey solutions20 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 21. Mechanical andelectrical systems© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 22. About the mechanical and electrical systems22 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 23. Mechanically efficientScalable, modular design saves space and energy• Multiple cooling methods – Adaptable to different climate zones – Tuned to local environment – Provide highest efficiency for a particular location – Use external cooling in most climates, reducing power and water consumption• External containers – Easier installation, maintenance, upgrade – Protection for critical IT equipment – Add containers to conform to increased IT loads23 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 24. Airflow advantagesEasier construction and lower utility costs• No raised floor air distribution (RAF  available as an option)• Even air distribution• Hot spots minimized• Reduced recirculation of waste heat back into inlets of nearby servers• Maximum cooling system efficiency because of maximum temperature difference between supply and return air24 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 25. Mechanical systemsAir-flow design strategy• Air enters the sidewalls of the facility, flows through the racks, exits via a hot- aisle containment assembly• Modular• Exterior air handlers with DX backup• Saving costly space• Multiple cooling methods available• Scalable to meet IT loads• Tuned to local environment• N+125 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 26. Cooling options DX + direct DX + indirect Overhead convection Air-to-air heat evaporative cooling evaporative cooling cooling exchanger with DX • Consists of a supply fan, • Consists of a supply fan, • Consists of cooling coils • Consists of multiple filters, direct filters, indirect with associated chilled supply and exhaust fans, evaporative media, and evaporative media, and or condenser water filters, heat transfer direct expansion cooling direct expansion cooling cooled mechanical wheel, and direct assembly assembly system expansion cooling • Most efficient in cold to • Provides separation • No air side supply fan assembly moderate temperature between environments system required; • Provides isolation of the environments with low with high levels of air provides isolation from outdoor air streams, to moderate humidity pollution due to 100% outdoor environment reducing data center levels recirculation, allowing contamination the unit to run a closed air circuit26 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 27. Electrically optimalWith design features that complement modularity• Designed to meet energy standards and best practices• Supports concurrent maintainability• Eliminates conversions and transformations in power supply chain (where applicable)• Vendor neutral27 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 28. Electrical systemsAvailability strategyFlexible DC’s electrical configurationaccommodates various needs ofreliability levels and size of the datacenter• Equipment, conversions, and transformations in the power supply chain eliminated where applicable• Designed to meet energy standards and best practices• N, N+1, 2N• Distributed or block redundant• Concurrent maintainability28 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 29. Power options Distributed dual conversion Flywheel UPS Line interactive UPS static UPS LV (low-voltage) UPS Flywheel UPS module with Line interactive or delta- modules with standby LV standby LV generator conversion LV UPS system generator • Overhead busways or RPPs • PDUs or transformerless distribution where applicable • Multiple UPS options (double- conversion, delta-conversion, economy mode, etc.) • Vendor neutral • Ladder tray or conduit29 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 30. Value proposition© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 31. HP Flexible DC – a complete data center• Industrialized approach creates lower cost solution• Modular architecture provides limitless scalability and flexibility• Start with 1 quad and expand to 4 quads and more…• Multi-tier, Multi-use, Multi-design flexibility• Agile and responsive to business needs• Efficient service and maintenance provisions• Innovative cooling technology provides greater energy efficiency• Supply chain management shortens project length, significantly reducing the go-live schedule• Menu-based design options make it suitable for all climate zones• HP Critical Facilities Services (CFS) know-how31 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. 31 HP Confidential 2/7/2013
  • 32. Q&A©32Copyright 2012 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company,The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. © Copyright Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 33. Thank you© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 34. Backup© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
  • 35. Elements of HP Flexible DC – 4 Quad Setup35 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.