Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Bb2370 nielsen cloud network innovations-final

476

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
476
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
82
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • The cloud promises a lot to businesses. The cloud promises the ability to deploy applications in minutesThe cloud promises to deliver applications and information to any user on any deviceThe cloud promises to simplify management. Click #1: Well, we aren’t there yet. This is what I call the “promise and reality dividing line.”Click #2: The realities is it takes months deploy new applications. Click #3: According to a recent report by the SANS institute, 60% of enterprises with a BYOD policy are unsure which mobile devices are on their networks. This represents a critical risk to businesses and Government organizations.Click #4: And over 70 of network downtime is caused by CLI misconfiguration
  • Let’s focus on the amount of time it takes to connect an application to the network. A system administrator uses tools that allow him to manage with policies rather than command lines. His policy-based tools enable speed, consistency and reliability. But, when he needs to connect to the network, it’s a very different story for the network administrator. Legacy network administrators are forced to use a command line interface, which is based on 40-year old technology. Rather than managing with policies, he has to ask the system admin a series of low-level questions before he even begins configuring the network with the CLI. In a recent meeting with a CIO, he told me he believes “If you’re using the CLI and scripts, you’ve already lost the battle for cloud.“According to analyst data, a typical data center may have 500 servers with each of them running 20 virtualized workloads. That’s 10,000 workloads! Each workload requires at least 6 network attributes. The network admin has to use over 250,000 command line entries to configure these 60,000 network attributes on a port-by-port basis across dozens of switches! Imagine, even if someone is a really good typist, they are probably bound to make a mistake once every few thousand entries. That’s is still 250 errors AND you have to find them! That’s what makes this manual processlong, inconsistent and unreliable. 
  • Application IndifferentSo, the problem is pretty clear. Deploying applications in the data center takes too long, is inconsistent and the use of a command line interface makes the process unreliable. It is not just about connectivity of applications in the data center, it is also about delivering applications to users, in the campuses and branch locations of the network. Our virtual application network vision delivers a whole solution from deploying applications in the data center to connecting users to applications across the network. Legacy networks are application indifferent. Legacy switches and routers forward thousands of packets every second in exactly the same manner without any awareness or knowledge of the applications carried within them. As a result, these legacy networks are unable to meet specific service levels when delivering applications to users. Rigid Physical InfrastructureLegacy networks are also rigid and physical. They were built for one type of tenant – the company. Today we need to connect suppliers, partners or customers.They were built for one type of user – using a PC. Now they use a smart phone and a tablet.They were built for one location – the company’s offices. Now most employees don’t work in corporate locations.Provisioning applications and users on legacy network is device-dependent – the company-owned servers and company-issued PCs and mobile phones. Cloud is changing everything like the Internet did 20 years ago. Legacy networks are like the roads that were built between cities and suburbs fifty years ago. Where and how people live and work has changed, but the roads haven’t. Like old roadways, legacy networks lack programmability necessary for the cloud. Manual ManagementLegacy networks requiring manual management with only a command line interface will be as useful as green-screen monitors are in the Internet era of rich media. Managing with the command line interface prevents the network administrator from responding quickly to business changes.In addition, the command line interface and its manual errors causing 70% of network outages must to be replaced with policy-based automation to create reliability. Only this will enable businesses to run at Cloud speed.
  • HP’s Virtual Application Networks are our vision for Software Defined Networks. Virtual Application Networks enable businesses to spend less time managing infrastructure and more on connecting users to applications.
  • Separate Logical from Physical Management Making the Network ProgrammableBuilt on FlexNetwork ArchitectureEnd-to-end control plane - Already done this with IRFOpenFlow support in our switches delivers programmability
  • Programmability allows for creation of virtual networks Virtual networks tailored to application requirementsExamples: Polycom rich media MSFT Lync Unified Communications SAP ERP Exchange
  •  Virtual Application Networks are built on our FlexNetwork architecture – our unified architecture across the data center campus and branch. Across the FlexNetwork architecture, we will create an end-to-end control plane to make the network programmable. This end-to-end control plane will enable businesses to respond rapidly to business change, create a multi-tenant environment and tailor the network to deliver applications from a cloud data center to the user.We have done this already with technologies like the Intelligent Resilient Framework (IRF). IRF creates a single control plane across multiple switches so they can be programmed and managed as a single device. In addition, OpenFlow support in our switches also delivers programmability that will enable us to deliver our vision of an end-to-end control plane for Virtual Application Networks using industry standards. The programmability created by the end-to-end control plane allows virtual networks to be created across the entire FlexNetwork architecture which are tailored to the delivery requirements of applications, or classes of applications. Examples of an application are Polycom rich media communications, MSFT Lync Unified Communications, SAP ERP or messaging applications like Exchange. Virtual Application Networks is a game changer. It is one you will feel comfortable with because it is similar to server virtualization.HP Virtual Application Networks will transform the networking industry the way hypervisors transformed the server industry.The end-to-end control plane is similar to a hypervisor. And Virtual Application Networks are similar to Virtual Machines (VMs).  
  • Application CharacterizationVirtual Application Networks deliver Application characterization. Using preconfigured templates, IT can characterize the delivery requirements of an application from the data center to the user. These templates ensure applications or a class of applications is deployed consistently and repeatedly every time across the entire network. Network VirtualizationVirtual Application Networks deliver Network Virtualization.By virtualizing the network with an end-to-end control plane, we create a multi-tenant network that is programmable, delivering on-demand topology and device-independent provisioning allowing businesses to move a Cloud speed. Automated OrchestrationVirtual Application Networks deliver Automated Orchestration.Policy-based templates fully automate network configuration and provisioning to deliver expected service levels, increase speed, consistency and reliability.
  • You understand our vision for virtual application networks. Well, this is how it all comes together. We start with the blueprint FlexNetwork architecture, with the solutions for the data center FlexFabric, FlexCampus and FlexBranch to connect the users. We are going to virtualize that entire infrastructure symbolized by these three blue ribbons that come into the center discs. And here, once we virtualize the network, we can use tools built on top of IMC to characterize applications using preconfigured templates. So that we can take advantage of virtualized, end-to-end network infrastructure to deliver applications from a cloud data center to a user in a way where the network is tuned to the delivery requirements of that class of applications whether it is video in multiple forms, conferencing, playback, training, or communications like Lync, real time business applications or messaging applications. You can have hundreds of applications falling into several classes requiring maybe 12 different virtual application networks. Most importantly, as these applications move from the private cloud into the public cloud, the policy for virtual application network can follow it as the users move and we will follow them as well providing for a dynamic environment, one where the applications are deployed rapidly. You can have speed without compromise and it is built on open standards, providing the choice, the flexibility as well as the confidence to have a proven path to the cloud.
  • Let’s go back to our original example of deploying an exchange instance and its virtual machines. Click #1: With Virtual Application Networks, the first step is to characterize the application delivery requirements for Exchange in the IMC VAN Manager Module. Click #2: Here, we build a connection profile from a preconfigured template. Click #3: The second step is to virtualize the server to network connectivity in VMware vCenter with a plug-in that comes with the IMC VAN Manager module. Click #4: Here, the sys admin simply chooses the connection profile for Exchange. Every time a new Exchange instance is deployed, the same profile is selected, ensuring speed, consistency and reliability. Click #5: The third step is to orchestrate the network with the IMC VAN Manager module where the Exchange VMs are visible after selecting the connection profile. Click #6: By simply “powering them on,” IMC will automatically configure the switches based on the connection profile. Click #7: The application is deployed in three easy steps! And I never had to touch the command line interface!
  • IMC has earned bragging rights; it supports 5,786 devices from more than 150 manufacturers, of which 1400+ are from Cisco!I’ve heard clients say, although I can’t say who – that IMC manages Cisco better than Cisco can! - 1000+Reduce recovery timeAuto-discover virtual machines and virtual switches to manage a heterogeneous topologyAutomatic synchronization of network policies with vMotion streamlines recovery and simplify fault toleranceFederates network management & server orchestrationAutomated synchronization of network management and Virtual ConnectConverged infrastructure resource management
  • Let’s go back to our original example of deploying an exchange instance and its virtual machines. Click #1: With Virtual Application Networks, the first step is to characterize the application delivery requirements for Exchange in the IMC VAN Manager Module. Click #2: Here, we build a connection profile from a preconfigured template. Click #3: The second step is to virtualize the server to network connectivity in VMware vCenter with a plug-in that comes with the IMC VAN Manager module. Click #4: Here, the sys admin simply chooses the connection profile for Exchange. Every time a new Exchange instance is deployed, the same profile is selected, ensuring speed, consistency and reliability. Click #5: The third step is to orchestrate the network with the IMC VAN Manager module where the Exchange VMs are visible after selecting the connection profile. Click #6: By simply “powering them on,” IMC will automatically configure the switches based on the connection profile. Click #7: The application is deployed in three easy steps! And I never had to touch the command line interface!
  • The need to identify and securely connect usersIT is facing a phenomenon called BYOD (bring your own device) that allows the use of personally owned laptops, smartphones and tablets by employees. Besides that, IT needs to give access to give internet access to the guest users and to apply a health check policy on devices used by employees and guest users to mitigate the risk to the business.Network Access Control solutions is the key component for BYOD ,guest users and health checkbecause it provides the flexibility that enterprises need in a BYOD environment, while providing the controls that enable network and security managers to keep control over the network.Gartner expects that, by 2016, 60% of large enterprises will implement limited access network zones to limit the connectivity of personally owned mobile devices and they estimate that the size of the NAC market in 2012 will reach $226 million.
  • HP offers a comprehensive BYOD solution that includes:Secure user authentication AND advanced device profilingEnable seamless policy enforcement based on user and/or deviceCustomizable analysis and reporting of BYOD trafficSolution Availability:Fall 2012 (October 2012)HP Advantages:Universal policy for all devices on both wired and wireless network;Comprehensive BYOD traffic and user behavior analysis and reporting;Single Pane-of-Glass Future enhancements:Time and location aware onboarding;Live BYOD traffic quarantine to keep malware infected nodes off the network; (Tippingpoint integration)Device level application control for enhanced resource access security. (F5 integration)
  • The need to identify and securely connect usersIT is facing a phenomenon called BYOD (bring your own device) that allows the use of personally owned laptops, smartphones and tablets by employees. Besides that, IT needs to give access to give internet access to the guest users and to apply a health check policy on devices used by employees and guest users to mitigate the risk to the business.Network Access Control solutions is the key component for BYOD ,guest users and health checkbecause it provides the flexibility that enterprises need in a BYOD environment, while providing the controls that enable network and security managers to keep control over the network.Gartner expects that, by 2016, 60% of large enterprises will implement limited access network zones to limit the connectivity of personally owned mobile devices and they estimate that the size of the NAC market in 2012 will reach $226 million.
  • DVPN operation:DVPN uses the client/server model. DVPN supports two tunnel encapsulation modes: UDP and GRE. A DVPN domain consists of at least one VAM server and multiple VAM clients (at least one hub and one spoke). Each client registers the mapping of its private address and public address with the server. After a client registers its address mapping with the server, other clients can get the public address of this client from the server. This mechanism helps with DVPN tunnel establishment between clients. Each client uses the VAM protocol to communicate with the server and uses the DVPN tunneling protocol to establish, maintain, and remove tunnels to other clients. Whenever there is a change in the topology, the server will be notified automatically.Supports up to 10 DVPN domains per hardware component, meaning per Router, you could have a parallel implementation with another10 domains.
  • Transcript

    • 1. © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 2. HP FlexNetworkArchitecture CloudInnovationsTransforming Delivery of Applications to UsersBB2370Mike Nielsen, HP Networking© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 3. Promise of the Cloud for Business Deploy apps Simplify in minutes management Over Over 3 months 70% To deploy a new Of downtime is application from data caused by CLI center to user misconfiguration
    • 4. Cloud Application Delivery Expectations Over Just Over 50% 1% 3 months Workloads will be Of smartphones To deploy a new virtualized by the consume 50% of application from data end of 2012 mobile data center to user PRIVATE, PUBLIC DYNAMIC AND COMPLEXITY OF AND INDEPENDENT MOBILE SERVICE THE CLOUDS CONSUMPTION INFRASTRUCTURE4 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 5. Legacy Networks Slow Application Deployment System Admin Deploying Rack 3 VLAN Subnet 10M CIR Priority Are you ready Exchange IP TOS Server 5 10 .16.31 20M PIR 4 yet? …VMs ready! Time in Months … Which 250,000+ Which Which How much QoS QoS Ok, starting CLI entries VLAN server? subnets? bandwidth? Priority? Method? switch config for typical ? data center Network Admin5 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 6. Legacy Networks Can’t Meet Cloud Expectations Application Impossible to identify applications and Indifferent meet diverse service levels Rigid Physical Architected for one tenant, user type and Networks location - lacking programmability Manual Slow to respond to new application requirements Management and hampered by manual errors6 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 7. HP’s Vision for Software Defined NetworksHP Virtual Application Networks Focus less on managing infrastructure… …and more on connecting users to applications7 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 8. Virtual Application NetworksSeparate Logical from Physical Management, Making the NetworkProgrammable End-to-End Control Plane FlexFabric FlexCampus FlexBranch Routing Core Access Routing Core Access Routing Switching Wireless FlexManagement FlexNetwork Architecture8 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 9. Create Virtual Networks for SpecificApplicationsTunes the Virtual Network for Application Delivery Requirements Virtual Application Network Virtual Application Network Virtual Application Network Virtual Application Network End-to-End Control Plane FlexFabric FlexCampus FlexBranch Routing Core Access Routing Core Access Routing Switching Wireless FlexManagement FlexNetwork Architecture9 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 10. Deploy Virtual Application NetworksNew Operating Model Delivers Agility Needed for Cloud Virtual Application Network Virtual Application Network Virtual Application Network Virtual Application Network VM VM VM VM End-to-End Control Plane Hypervisor FlexFabric FlexCampus FlexBranch Routing Core Access Routing Core Access Routing Switching Wireless Server CPUs FlexManagement FlexNetwork Architecture10 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 11. Virtual Application Networks Deliver Application Create consistency, reliability and repeatability Characterization across the entire network infrastructure Network Create multitenant, on-demand, topology and Virtualization device-independent provisioning Automated Use templates to ensure user service level and Orchestration policy for dynamic application delivery11 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 12. 12 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 13. Virtual ApplicationNetworks in Action Deploy new applications in minutes in the data center Rapidly onboard users and their devices Securely interconnect Virtual Application Networks© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 14. Delivering Virtual Application Networks TodayVirtual Application Network Manager Module Hypervisor Intelligent Management Center Management • Characterize app using template VAN VAN • Program virtual network resources VAN vSwitch VAN Policy API plug-in Manager Designer Engine • Orchestrate network resources VM vSwitch/HP open VAN Access Switch SW HPN VAN Manager Components vSwitch VM NIC Data Center HPN Core HPN Access HPN Core IMC Enterprise/Standard Components Fabric Switch Switch Router VM Server14 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 15. Virtual Application Networks Deploy Apps inMinutes System Admin Virtualize Choose Deploying vCenter Virtualizing connection Wow! Exchange profile Plug-in That was VMs … ready! fast! 2 Application Minutes deployed 1 Characteriz 3 Orchestrat in 3 steps Build eprofile Power on e IMC IMC with VAN template virtual VAN Manager VM machines Manager s Network Admin15 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 16. Virtual Application Network Components Key Components vSwitch Existing IMC function used to set/monitor virtual switch features in the virtual machine Manager manager VAN Assured interoperability with Cloud orchestration through RESTful APIs, enabling external API access to VAN functions from cloud and network orchestration frameworks VAN Rapid provisioning and error-free configuration to manage the connection between VMs Policy Engine and the required physical and virtual network policies VAN Repeatability to design connections based on virtual machine and application Designer requirements, including QoS policies, ACLs, and virtual network configuration details VAN Hypervisor integration (currently VMware) enabling system administrators to map Plug in connection types to virtual machines vSwitch/ Virtual Switch which communicates with vSwitch Manager and VAN plug-in to coordinate HP open vSwitch policy enforcement16 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 17. HP IMC and F5 Management Integration • Characterize Instantly identify all converged infrastructure requirements • Virtualize Virtualize application, network, and server resources • Orchestrate Rapidly deploy application, network, and system configurations HP Intelligent Management Center17 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 18. Deploying Applications in Minutes System Admin Virtualize Choose Deploying vCenter Virtualizing connection Wow! Exchange profile Plug-in That was VMs … ready! fast! 2 Application Minutes deployed 1 Characteriz 3 Orchestrat in 3 steps e Power on e Build profile IMC VAN IMC Manager virtual VAN w/ F5 iApp VM machines Manager Select iApp s Network Admin18 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 19. Challenges of BYOD on Legacy Networks • Device-dependent Legacy architectures rely on company-issued devices to deliver secure access to applications • Inconsistent management Separate management for wired and wireless devices are disaggregated, have separate policies • Separate management for devices, applications Lack of visibility into user behaviors, access, and usage19 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 20. Virtual Application Networks in the CampusUser, Network, Security and Application Policy Management with BYOD • Secure network access for user-owned On-boarding devices • Highly secure client control • Self registration for client-owned Provisioning • Unified wired and wireless management • Consistent Device policy management • Network policy mapped to user profiles Monitoring • Unified monitoring and application access • User and traffic analysis • Application access control20 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 21. BYOD Solution ArchitectureOrchestrating User-to-Network-to-Application Onboarding Provisioning Monitoring User registration Policy enforcement Traffic and User Device profiling based on level of trust Behavior Analysis Authentication Authorization Audit Network Device Agnostic Agnostic Employee Guest Location Time Aware Aware User Security Traffic User User Check Monitoring Behavior Self-Service21 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 22. Challenges of Legacy Hub & Spoke WANConnectivity Campus • Complex Encryption configuration is manually intensive & error-prone • Vulnerable Carrier service offerings limit flexibility & security Branch Branch Data • Constrained Center Legacy architectures limit performance of rich media applications (e.g., video conferencing) Branch Branch22 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 23. Virtual Application Networks in the Branch“Zero-touch” deployment of routers across the enterprise with DVPN Campus • Simple • Automated zero-touch deployment with IMC • Reduces configuration steps IMC-BIMS • Secure • Standards-based IPsec Internet • Flexible support for any WAN technology & Internet • Scalable • Site-to-site performance for rich media Secure Data • Scales to over 30,000 sites Tunnel 93% reduction in 900% more configuration steps scalable Branch Branch23 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 24. DVPN Solution ArchitectureVirtualizing the WAN and connecting Virtual App Networks HQ AAA Server Hub Hub VAM Server (primary) (primary) (secondary) Server Public IP Client Public IP Address Address (static) IP Network (manually configured or dynamically assigned) VAM Server (secondary) DVPN configured Spoke Client Private IP Address on single tunnel interface (statically configured) Branch24 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 25. DVPN Solution ArchitectureVirtualizing the WAN and connecting Virtual App Networks Hub (primary) (secondary) AAA Server Employs client/server model VAM Server (primary) • Supports up to 10 DVPN domains per router VAM Server (secondary) • Supports 2 tunnel encapsulations: UDP Internet and GRE • Each client registers mapping of its private and public IP addresses with server using DVPN control protocol Secure Data Tunnel (VAM) Branch Branch • Managed under IMC w/IVM and BIMS25 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. • Interoperable with standard IPsec
    • 26. Enable Cloud with Virtual Application NetworksDelivering New Applications in Minutes versus Weeks Tune network to the application delivery requirements Virtualize the network end-to-end, from application to user Enable IT to manage the network with policies rather than CLI, scripts Single pane-of-glass management for the physical and virtual network Ensure choice with open, standards-based approach26 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 27. Tools to Help Our Clients• Learn about Virtual Application Networks• Download a copy of Virtual Application Networks Whitepaper• Read about the FlexNetwork Architecture• Get the analyst perspective from ESG on Virtual Application Networks• Learn more about Dynamic VPN• Understand HP’s BYOD strategy• Load the trial license of the Intelligent Management Center27 © Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.
    • 28. Thank you© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.The information contained herein is subject to change without notice.

    ×