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4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg
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4. d2 platform google stephany van willigenburg

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  • 5 bn mobile phones are in service, Total world population of 7 bn, 70% of the world‘s population, Source: Yankee Group, ITU, etc.BTW: About 1/3 of all American households have cut the cord on their landline phones in 2010
  • Eric speech:1 out of 5 people have a smart phone (Humbold)1 in 5 people have mobile internet access! Check – cannot be!May be 1 out o 5 mobile phone users have a smart phonehttp://mobithinking.com/mobile-marketing-tools/latest-mobile-statsMore than half of all new internet connections are now coming from mobile phones!
  • Smart Phone Penetration:UK 2010: 26M /62M = 42%2015: 49M /64M = 77%DE 2010: 20M / 82M = 24%2015: 46M / 82M = 56%ES 2010: 14M / 47M = 30%2015: 30M / 49M = 61%FR 2010: 16M / 63M = 25%2015: 36M / 65M = 55%NL2010: 6M / 17M = 35%2015: 12M / 17M = 71%IT2010: 15M / 60M = 25%2015: 38M / 62M = 61%3G penetration rapidly rises in most geographies over the next four years. The sweet spot will be achieved this year, according to Morgan Stanley. The financial analyst firm predicts that by 2014, 3G penetration will be: 100 percent in Japan, 92 percent in Western Europe, 74 percent in North America, 40 percent in Eastern Europe, 37 percent in Asia Pacific, 35 percent in Middle East and Africa, and 17 percent in Central and South America. Morgan Stanley predicts global 3G penetration will be 43 percent, or 2.78 billion users, by 2014. The analysts are clear: "3G is key to success of the mobile Internet."
  • Although this is mobile vs desktop searches, you can use this as a proxy for broader mobile vs desktop activity – if users are searching, they’re invariable browsing content either as a result of or before searchingLeft chart: desktop searches peak in morning, mobile searches peak more in eveningRight chart: desktop searches peak during workweeks, mobile searches peak during weekendsDesktop searches more subject to extreme fluctuations – mobile more steady
  • Although this is mobile vs desktop searches, you can use this as a proxy for broader mobile vs desktop activity – if users are searching, they’re invariable browsing content either as a result of or before searchingLeft chart: desktop searches peak in morning, mobile searches peak more in eveningRight chart: desktop searches peak during workweeks, mobile searches peak during weekendsDesktop searches more subject to extreme fluctuations – mobile more steady
  • YouTube now exceeds 200m views a day on mobile, 3x increase in 2010 (VEVO catalogue addition blog post)You Tube Desktop vs Mobile:In The UK: 1.5 Million Impressions Daily on YouTube Mobile 12.5 Million Impressions Daily on YouTube Desktop2009 – 3% Now 2010 Mobile accounts for 12% of the volume of impressions already – this does not even include impressions on Homepage from the YouTube App.
  • Global Mobile Phone Subscribers1990 – 12.5 Million Mobile Subscribers2000 – 750 Million Mobile Subscribers (5984% increase in 10 years)2010 – 5 Billion Mobile Subscribers (568% increase in next 10 years)Source: International Telecommunication UnionTechnology 2G Networks:In the 1990’s, the 'second generation' (2G) mobile phone systems emerged, primarily using the GSM standard. These 2G phone systems used digital transmission instead of analog transmission of 1G. The rise in mobile phone usage as a result of 2G was explosive and this era also saw the advent of prepaid mobile phones.2G introduced SMS text messaging, initially on GSM networks and eventually on all digital networks. The first machine-generated SMS message was sent in the UK on 3 December 1992 followed in 1993 by the first person-to-person SMS sent in Finland. The advent of pre-paid mobile phones in the late 1990's soon made SMS the communication method of choice amongst the young, a trend which spread across all ages.Coinciding with 2G systems was a trend away from the larger "brickle" phones toward tiny 100–200g hand-held devices. This change was possible not only through technological improvements such as more advanced batteries and more energy-efficient electronics, but also related to the higher density of cellular sites needed because of increasing usage. The latter meant that the average distance transmission from phone to handset shortened. Both factors led to increased battery life for customers whilst on the move.3G Networks3G is a generation of standards for mobile phones fulfilling specifications by the International Telecommunication Union.  Application services include wide-area wireless voice telephone, mobile internet access, video calls and mobile TV, all in a mobile environment. Compared to the older 2G and 2.5G standards, a 3G system must provide peak data rates of at least 200 kbit/s according to the IMT-2000 specification. 3G was first offered in 2001, standardized by 3GPP used primarily in Europe, Japan, China (however with a different radio interface) and other regions predominated by GSM 2G system infrastructure. The cell phones are typically UMTS and GSM hybrids. Several radio interfaces are offered, sharing the same infrastructure:A new generation of cellular standards has appeared approximately every tenth year since 1G systems were introduced in 1981/1982. Each generation is characterized by new frequency bands, higher data rates and non backwards compatible transmission technology. The first release of the 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE) standard does not completely fulfill the ITU 4G requirements called IMT-Advanced. First release LTE is not backwards compatible with 3G, but is a pre-4G or 3.9G technology, however sometimes branded "4G" by the service providers. WiMAX is another technology verging on or marketed as 4G.
  • Global Mobile Phone Subscribers1990 – 12.5 Million Mobile Subscribers2000 – 750 Million Mobile Subscribers (5984% increase in 10 years)2010 – 5 Billion Mobile Subscribers (568% increase in next 10 years)Source: International Telecommunication UnionTechnology 2G Networks:In the 1990’s, the 'second generation' (2G) mobile phone systems emerged, primarily using the GSM standard. These 2G phone systems used digital transmission instead of analog transmission of 1G. The rise in mobile phone usage as a result of 2G was explosive and this era also saw the advent of prepaid mobile phones.2G introduced SMS text messaging, initially on GSM networks and eventually on all digital networks. The first machine-generated SMS message was sent in the UK on 3 December 1992 followed in 1993 by the first person-to-person SMS sent in Finland. The advent of pre-paid mobile phones in the late 1990's soon made SMS the communication method of choice amongst the young, a trend which spread across all ages.Coinciding with 2G systems was a trend away from the larger "brickle" phones toward tiny 100–200g hand-held devices. This change was possible not only through technological improvements such as more advanced batteries and more energy-efficient electronics, but also related to the higher density of cellular sites needed because of increasing usage. The latter meant that the average distance transmission from phone to handset shortened. Both factors led to increased battery life for customers whilst on the move.3G Networks3G is a generation of standards for mobile phones fulfilling specifications by the International Telecommunication Union.  Application services include wide-area wireless voice telephone, mobile internet access, video calls and mobile TV, all in a mobile environment. Compared to the older 2G and 2.5G standards, a 3G system must provide peak data rates of at least 200 kbit/s according to the IMT-2000 specification. 3G was first offered in 2001, standardized by 3GPP used primarily in Europe, Japan, China (however with a different radio interface) and other regions predominated by GSM 2G system infrastructure. The cell phones are typically UMTS and GSM hybrids. Several radio interfaces are offered, sharing the same infrastructure:A new generation of cellular standards has appeared approximately every tenth year since 1G systems were introduced in 1981/1982. Each generation is characterized by new frequency bands, higher data rates and non backwards compatible transmission technology. The first release of the 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE) standard does not completely fulfill the ITU 4G requirements called IMT-Advanced. First release LTE is not backwards compatible with 3G, but is a pre-4G or 3.9G technology, however sometimes branded "4G" by the service providers. WiMAX is another technology verging on or marketed as 4G.
  • We will hear later in the case studies about how well mobile peforms for some advertisers..........do you know well it peforms for you.............for potnetially around 5% of your online salesWe recmmned advertisers to sperate out their mobile campaaings: Why.........
  • If you arrived at an airport sttraight off your EasyJet flight and needed to book a room in a hurry which of these two would you rather book it on.Highlight the obvious:Large ButtonsAll the major things you want to do on the website in first 3 optionsOptions to Call Can go to Full Website if you choose to see more options
  • Remember the Rule of Thumb – Everything we need to do on a mobile device, needs to be possible to do with the thumb.Think about what content your audience is likely to use their mobile device to access. Mobile users want things to be quick and any actions they need to complete should be easy to accomplish on a small device. If you have a particular action you want your users to take, make it the main focus of the site. Travel sites are more likely to be used for research and should consist of bullet point detail on destinations. Retail sites are more likely to involve sales and completing a purchase should be painless, particularly with forms – all fields unnecessary for a purchase should be removed (including marketing questions) Prioritize your content to meet the needs of your mobile user.Mobile devices get that cluttered feeling really quickly. Rather than trying to squeeze that little screen full of information, use white space to give your site a cleaner and more intuitive feel. Touch screens can be scrolled really easily with the fingers & thumb so it’s OK if pages are long but it’s harder to use the same fingers for precision clicking so leave plenty of space between buttons.Big buttons are the mobile users friend – navigation is done using the thumb or fingers. Avoid using text links and try not to place buttons on top of one another. A frustrated user who knows where they want to go but can’t get there will leave your site rather than try to make it work.It should be really easy to convert on a mobile device. This will mean making the conversion funnel as simple as possible and may even mean adapting conversions to meet the needs of mobile users and possibly even to support interim conversions that will be completed from a desktop or by other means.While there have been great strides taken with Android and Flash, there are still a lot of mobile devices which cannot access the technology. This includes all Apple iOS based devices and pre Android 2.2 phones, as well as most experience phones. A user who can’t access your site, can’t convert either.
  • Geo Products: Arrive in Berlin and want to visit the site of the "Berlin Mauer" at PotsdamerPlatz. Do a voice search on Google Maps for PotsdamerPlatz. Zoom into the place. Show Maps 5. Switch to Satellite View, Switch to Places, Click on the Street View Man, have a closer look, decide to go there and click on Navigation-> We need one intro slide to (see slide before as an example)-> We need 1-3 backup slides to show the story on slides in case the demo does not work
  • Take me to the trainstationMitvergnugenHow long does it take?10 minutenHow much does it cost? Ungefaehr 15 Euro
  • Take me to the trainstationMit vergnugenHow long does it take?10 minutenHow much does it cost? Ungefaehr 15 Euro
  • Mobile users rarely browse for the fun of it. Mobile is about fast access to information and services. Users are on the go and need answers fast. When prioritising content for mobile it is important to keep these factors in mind – whatever tasks can be completed by your service quickly and on the go will be the target features for mobile users. When choosing mobile website content, focus on features which are local, mobile and easy to complete. Take a look at your desktop website analytics and see what features are commonly accessed on your site and are easy to complete. Create an advanced segment for mobile traffic to see how mobile users have been using your site.We know that quick conversions are important to mobile users and latency is not tolerated. If a site is taking a while to load, attention will quickly move to something else. Mobile optimised sites are stripped of extraneous content as well as most advertising, videos, pictures and banners. Flash should be avoided. Mobile download and streaming speeds are much slower than most home/office broadband connections. By prioritising content and building for smaller screens, it is also possible to make websites accessible to users quickly.Search should be prominent. With mobile devices there is little room for navigation bars and drop down menus. Mobile users are in a hurry so they may seek to search rather than navigate. The search box should be big and obvious, near the top of the page. Make the box large enough that a user can easily tap it using their thumb. Results should be easily filtered.Mobile users scroll through content. Users will still scan but they will do so from top to bottom, scrolling with their thumbs to access more information. This has now become a convention of mobile. If your site layout obviously follows this convention, users will not think twice about scrolling. As with a desktop site, prioritise your content so that the most important features are seen first. Also put important features at the bottom of the screen for when users scroll quickly. Some things, like search, should always be above the fold.Use tabs rather than links for access to most popular products/services. Tabs should be large and obvious. Allowing users to effortlessly move using tabs reduces the chances of latency interfering with the mobile experience – assuming the content on the tabs loads with the rest of the page.Mobile users are multi-tasking. If you have a bricks and mortar store, mobile users will access their handsets to improve their offline experience. Store location & directions, product availability and reservation, creating shopping lists and finding vouchers are all things that the mobile user will want to be able to access easily on your site.
  • With mobile devices we are using much smaller screens than a desktop. These screens get cluttered quickly so use of white space helps users to find things more easily on your site. Prioritised content combined with effective use of white space leads to a better mobile experience.Pictures and videos increase latency, drain data plans and take up lots of space. Pictures should be kept to a minimum though not eliminated as they can help to break up the monotony of a text heavy site. Tasteful use of pictures combined with plenty of white space is best. A picture can save us 1,000 words. Banners & videos should be kept to a minimum unless necessary for a conversion. Similarly, large bands of text should be replaced by headlines and bullet points.Copy should be minimal and only where necessary. Mobile users often read at arm’s length so it also needs to be large. High contrast between background and text helps. Black on a white background is an example of this. Light grey on white is not a good user experience. If it is necessary to use bands of text, it should be possible for mobile users to hide or expand the text themselves or to click on clearly labelled tabs for more detail. See wikipedia.org for a good example of this.Backgrounds should be light and content should contrast strongly with them. White space doesn’t have to be white, it can be any colour that is light and which contrasts well with the other elements of the page. White is generally best though. Using a picture as a background may look slick but as a mobile experience it is often poor.Mobile devices come in many shapes and sizes. By optimising your site to fit multiple resolutions, you can avoid experiences where white space is lost or websites look stretched to fit. Tablets with a large enough screen like an Apple iPad or MotorolaXoom represent an entirely different experience and lie somewhere between the fully mobile site and the fully desktop site. That’s for another slide.
  • Big buttons are the way forward for mobile devices. Most touch screen phones do not use a stylus or a mouse. The point of touch screen is that we use our hands. While many users will use their fingers, still more will use their thumbs. The thumb is not a precision instrument when using a 3 inch screen. Add to that the fact that mobile users are, well, mobile it means that they are likely moving and performing actions at the same time. Think about the way mobile users behave when designing buttons. Many will use their devices one handed and they will use the thumb for button pressing. Thus buttons need to be large enough for thumb use. There is a lot of discussion on this but Apple are recommending 44px x 44px. Other say at least 59px. Test your buttons before publishing your website and allow for different sized thumbs (err towards bigger).Buttons should be isolated. Leaving space around buttons reduces the risk of unintentional clicks which can lead to frustration and site abandonment. There is also the issue of light. Many mobile screens perform poorly in daylight or bright light environments – big buttons make it easier to perform tasks while visibility is low.Much like the desktop, button colour should help users to distinguish which actions are most important. If you have a distinct call to action which is the only conversion, try to only have a button for this. Where you use multiple buttons, make the most important ones the most striking.Important buttons should also be made to look three dimensional. Use of shadows and 3D helps encourage users to click a button.Text on buttons should explain what the button does. Try to limit to short expressions but make those expressions descriptive. Terms like ‘Go’ and ‘Click Here’ are not as useful as ‘Order Now’ or ‘Get Quote’.Text based links should be avoided and only used for less important links. If your conversion is m-commerce based, then links like ‘read more’ can be text based as they will only add to conversion time. It is important that users can still see these links but they are not as important as the call to action button. Where text links are used there should be sufficient white space around them that it is easy to click them with the thumb.
  • Conversion should be quick and easy on mobile devices. Anything the advertiser can do to make it easy to convert will help them to increase the conversion rate on mobile devices. Speed is important to mobile users, so speed facilitation must be paramount with mobile websites. Some mobile users will buy on impulse but impulse buying is only possible where buying is easy and the conversion funnel is simple. Other mobile users will not wish to complete a purchase so it may be necessary to adjust or add conversions to suit the habits and needs of your target user.Mobile users don’t handle forms as well as desktop users. Smartphones are improving but there are still certain conventions that make it harder, the obvious ones being that many mobile devices have poor text entry through virtual keyboards and scrolling is performed by the thumb. Forms should be short and ask only for the most necessary details. The same convention should be used for desktops but mobile dropout rates are more punishing as speed is important. Market research should be done later, once the conversion is complete.Use check boxes lists and scroll menus to replace text entry. Limiting choice also helps with decision making. Where the number of options is large make sure it’s possible to scroll the list of options without having to keep a finger on the screen permanently. Lists and menus which disappear as soon as the user lifts their finger represent a very negative experience for mobile users.Data entry should be limited given the lack of physical keyboards. Typing on a mobile device is time-consuming.Use top aligned labels for fields rather than side alignment more commonly favoured on desktop. Many mobile users will zoom in when filling in data. This usually results in field descriptions to the left or right of the data field being pushed out of sight. Labels within the field which disappear upon entry can also be used but these are less useful when the mobile user becomes confused about where they are in the form.Using HTML5 for specific input types helps the user when completing forms. If the form involves a phone number, using <input type=“number”> will notify the phone that this field will require numeric data entry and the keyboard will default to number mode.Test how your form looks when the phone’s orientation is altered. Most modern smartphones use accelerometers enabling the user to view your site horizontally or vertically. Make sure your form is easy to use regardless of orientation.Allowing users to login to an account they created on their desktop is one way of greatly reducing the time to buy on a mobile device. Account login should be easy to complete.Allowing users to add to a cart or wish list without creating a full account is another way of using the mobile experience to drive desktop conversions. Use the tools that mobile devices have for better experiences. For example, allowing a user to create a wish list/basket by only providing their phone number and their name, means that you can now use SMS to send them a reminder that they have a list/basket and how to complete the conversion. Upon reaching the site on a desktop computer, allow them to enter their name and phone number to retrieve their wish list/basket and proceed with the conversion. This method will also help to track mobile to desktop conversions.Enable click-to-call for phone numbers. Make sure that phone numbers on your site are clearly tagged as such so that users can easily click on the number to make a call directly to your sales/ support team.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Demystifying Mobile
      Stephany van Willigenburg
      Business Development Manager – Mobile
      Stephany@google.com
      Hill and Knowlton D2 Conference
      April 14th 2011
      1
    • 2. has ears & listens to you
      microphone
      has eyes & can see you
      camera
      has skin & can feel you
      touch screen
      has voice & can talk to you
      speaker
      knows where you are
      GPS chip
      2
    • 3. 5+ bn
      mobile subscribers globally
      Sources:  International Telecommunication Union (October 2010)
      3
    • 4. 1 in 5
      people have mobile internet access
      Sources:  International Telecommunication Union (October 2010)
      4
    • 5. 1 out of 4
      Internet minutes
      is on a mobile phone
      Sources: IDC 2010
      5
    • 6. 2012: Smartphone sales overtake PC sales
      Source: Morgan Stanley Nov, 2010
    • 7. 77%
      71%
      smart phone
      penetration
      across Europe
      by 2015
      55%
      56%
      61%
      61%
      Sources: StrategyAnalytics.com.
      7
    • 8. Mobile Complements Desktop & Is Always On
      Daily ViewDesktop Clicks & Searches vs. Mobile
      Source: Citi Investment Research and Analysis; iCrossing MobileU.S. Google Internal Data, 2010
    • 9. Mobile Complements Desktop on Weekends
      Weekly View Desktop Searches vs. Mobile Searches
      Source: Citi Investment Research and Analysis; iCrossing MobileU.S. Google Internal Data, 2010
    • 10. 10
      40%
      of all tweets are mobile
      Sources: Twitter
      10
    • 11. Mobile users are driven to YouTube via social website feeds and status updates
      11
    • 12. Better handsets and improved infrastructure has changed mobile consumer behavior…
      Global Mobile Subscriptions
      2011
      2012
      2013
      2014
      1G
      4G
      3G
      2G
      Analog
      1 Mbit/s
      14 Mbit/s
      100 Mbit/s
    • 13. Life Critical
      …Mobiles have developed beyond just a form of communication.
      Commerce
      Global Mobile Subscriptions
      Entertainment
      Communication
      2011
      2012
      2013
      2014
      1G
      4G
      3G
      2G
      Analog
      1 Mbit/s
      14 Mbit/s
      100 Mbit/s
    • 14. Technology, Infrastructure and Mobile users
      Communication
      Entertainment
      Commerce
      Life Critical
    • 15. Driving visitors to your website Mobile Search Ad Formats offer greater user interaction
      Site-Links
      Click-to-call
      Hyperlocal
      Click-to-download
    • 16. Separate campaigns
      Create campaigns for AdWords targeting desktop and mobile separately
      16
    • 17. Mobile Sites: 1:1
    • 18. 18
    • 19. Which site would you rather book a flight on?
      19
    • 20. General Mobile Website Best Practices
      2
      1
      White
      Space
      Prioritise Content
      4
      3
      Big Buttons
      20
      Easy to
      Convert
    • 21. Demo: Geo Products
      Maps
      Places
      Street View
    • 22.
    • 23. Demo: Google Goggles
    • 24.
    • 25.
    • 26. Demo: Google Translate –
      Conversation Mode
    • 27.
    • 28. Demo: Ad Formats & Branding on Mobile
    • 29. Download the “Google Mobile Ads’ Application from Android Market
    • 30. So what‘snext? Wheretobegin...
      1
      Identifyyour mobile objectivesandgoals, develop a solutionacross all platforms, don‘tlet back-end systems block innovation.
      2
      Usedatatodevelopyourstrategy- but be flexible andacceptchanges & newtrends.
      3
      The mobile experience should offer a unilateral solution for all your brands GLOBALY!
      4
      Your mobile presence needs to sync up with multi-channel expectations, and buying behavior. When running ads, create a message for mobile.
      5
      Start Now!
      30
    • 31. it’s Not Too Late
      to Be Early
    • 32. Prioritise Content
      32
      • Be task oriented - Mobile users browse with purpose
      • 33. Local, popular & on-the-go features
      • 34. Build for speed
      • 35. Strip all unnecessary content
      • 36. Latency is a conversion killer on mobile
      • 37. Make search prominent
      • 38. Less space & time for navigation menus
      • 39. Search results should be clean and easily filtered
      • 40. Design for low attention span
      • 41. Layout content for scrolling
      • 42. Use bullet points and information snippets for maximum impact
      • 43. Use tabs to access popular products/services
      • 44. Satisfy offline needs
      • 45. Store locators, shopping lists, product reservation, vouchers
    • White Space
      33
      • Reduce clutter
      • 46. Less of banners, videos, pictures, copy
      • 47. More of headlines, bullet points, white space, buttons
      • 48. Use clear and concise headlines
      • 49. Text needs to be readable at arm’s length
      • 50. Tabs and expanded fields can be used for additional details
      • 51. Have a plain light background
      • 52. Lighter colours create a feeling of space
      • 53. Dark, contrasting text is easier to read
      • 54. Pictures make poor mobile backgrounds
      • 55. Optimise for multiple screen resolutions
      • 56. Bigger tablets can load desktop like sites
      • 57. Smaller tablets are like mobile phones
      • 58. Tablets are still touch screen so allow for thumb navigation
    • Big Buttons
      34
      • Build for handheld devices
      • 59. Devices are often held in one hand
      • 60. Thumbs are not precision instruments – Rule of Thumb!
      • 61. Users are moving
      • 62. Buttons should be isolated
      • 63. Space around buttons reduces unintentional clicks
      • 64. Visibility is a problem in some environments, i.e. daylight
      • 65. Use colour & size to prioritise
      • 66. Distinctly coloured buttons stand out
      • 67. Conversion buttons should be larger
      • 68. 3D elements & shadowing make buttons easier to see
      • 69. Use descriptive text
      • 70. ‘Add to basket’ manages expectation, ‘Click here’ does not
    • Easy to Convert
      35
      • Make conversions easy
      • 71. Calls to action need to be clear
      • 72. Conversion funnels should be simple
      • 73. Keep forms short
      • 74. Remove unnecessary fields
      • 75. Leave out market research questions
      • 76. Play to mobile strengths
      • 77. Use check boxes, lists, scroll menus
      • 78. Limit text data entry
      • 79. Use top aligned labels
      • 80. Use HTML5 for specific input types
      • 81. Allow for phone orientation changes
      • 82. Make account access & creation easy
      • 83. Quick login & saved details = faster conversions
      • 84. Make it easy to create mobile accounts/baskets/wish lists
      • 85. Use click-to-call for phone conversions
    • Additional Resources
      36
      Learn more about (mobile) website optimisation
      http://www.conversionroom.blogspot.com
      Track visits to your mobile website with
      http://www.google.com/analytics
      Test changes to your mobile site with
      http://www.google.com/websiteoptimizer
      Use the Android SDK to view your mobile website on your desktop
      http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html
      Conversion Room Blog
      Website Optimiser
      Track traffic from devices that do not support JavaScript
      http://code.google.com/mobile/analytics/docs/web/

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