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A Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based wireless sensor device for drug compliance measurement
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A Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based wireless sensor device for drug compliance measurement

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Dave Parry

Dave Parry
School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, Auckland University of Technology
(4/11/10, Square, 10.30)

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    A Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based wireless sensor device for drug compliance measurement A Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based wireless sensor device for drug compliance measurement Presentation Transcript

    • A Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based wireless sensor device for drug compliance measurement Alan Montefiore, Anne Philpott, Dave Parry AURA Laboratory and School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland [email_address]
    • Agenda
      • Why measure compliance ?
      • Technical requirements
      • Designs
      • Results
    • Compliance with drug therapy
      • 30%-50% of patients fail to comply completely with treatment , and this is a significant clinical issue.
      • “ Secondary” non-compliance in this case, Patients have the medication, but don’t take it
      • Compliance a particular problem in the elderly, and there is no “magic bullet”
    • Technical requirements
      • Reliably detect dispensing
        • No false positive from gross movements
        • No undercounting
        • Not operator dependent
        • Distinguish between different containers
      • Small impact on routine lifestyle
      • Cheap
    • The Intel WISP
      • Wireless Identification and Sensing platform
    • WISP technology
      • Communicates via standard EPC Gen2 protocol -UHF frequency
      • Includes temperature sensors, accelerometer, voltage sensor and microprocessor
      • Not yet commercially available, accessed via “WISP Challenge”
    • Approach to design
      • Rapid application development
      • Prototype, test, refine
      • Software running on WISP microprocessor, RFID reader and host computer.
      • Agile development for software.
    • Testing
      • Initial testing of different designs
      • Reliability measured in terms of accuracy of identifying dispensing, relibility of dispensing and lack of false positives
    • Prototypes Forcing recognizable movements to identify dispensing
    • Final Design
      • Two WISPS on dispenser.
      • One rotating when dispensing one not.
      • Based on “smint” dispenser
    • Results
      • 5 Users – 100% reliability of detection
      • Mechanical system does limit dispensing
    • Problems and issues
      • WISP not fully mature – processing while out of range hard to implement
      • Copyright/ Patent issues with this design ?
      • Increased robustness required.
      • Still can be fooled – dispense and flush
    • Conclusions
      • Simple mechanical systems can be used to control dispensing.
      • RFID- based devices can be used to record activity accurately and cheaply
      • Expensive infrastructure can be used for multiple purposes
    • Future work
      • Investigate methods of recording syringe-based drug delivery
      • Improve software to allow recording outside RFID reader detection area
      • Identify methods to improve reporting to user and others.
      • Develop more robust and reusable approach for production version