Getting HIV Research into Use: A Refelection

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HEARD's executive director, Professor Whiteside completed his fractional appointment with the British Department for International Development (DFID) at the end of 2012. In January 2013 he gave a lunch time presentation Getting HIV Research into use: A Reflection to the staff at the head quarters in London. DFID is a major funder of research so these concepts are vital and central to their work. HEARD is an applied research unit and the reflections are based on the organisation’s experience. His presentation provides recommendations, considerations and success examples in making HIV research usable and provides strategies for the dissemination of information. The discussion following the presentation looked at the differences between achieving policy influence by lobbying for uptake of particular results and supporting evidence-informed policy making. Click here for the presentation.

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Getting HIV Research into Use: A Refelection

  1. 1. Getting HIV research into use: A reflection Professor Alan Whiteside HEARD DFID 7 January 2013
  2. 2. Outline• The history of the HIV and AIDS epidemic• Researching HIV and AIDS• Practical experiences from HEARD• Examples of success (remembering contestation)
  3. 3. Three challenges Numbers Prevention Impacts A2 A1A Care & TreatmentB B1 T1 T2 Time Source: Barnett, T. & Whiteside, A. (2006) AIDS in the Twenty-First Century. Palgrave MacMillan
  4. 4. Swazi antenatal clinic HIV prevalence
  5. 5. DHS HIV prevalence Swaziland 2006
  6. 6. HIV prevalence & no of HIV+ people countries with >1% of SSA HIV+ population HIV prevalence and number of HIV positive people in countries with 1% or more of the total Sub-Saharan African HIV positive population. Data from: UNAIDS (http://www.unaids.org/en/dataanalysis/epi demiology/
  7. 7. What we know• HIV is new, only 30 years old• It varies geographically• No cure, treatment still expensive• Most impact is still to come• We still don’t know what AIDS means
  8. 8. ResearchType Timing Quality ApplicationEpidemiology Early Excellent MixedScience Early Excellent Rapid in west slow LDCsSocial science Slow Mixed MixedEconomics Late Mixed Ignored to 2012
  9. 9. Outline• The history of the HIV and AIDS epidemic• Researching HIV and AIDS• Practical experiences from HEARD• Examples of success (remembering contestation)
  10. 10. Incidence by modes of HIV transmission (sexual) 100 80Percent 60newinfections 40 20 0 Uganda Mozambique Swaziland Lesotho Zambia Kenya Other Partners of clients of female sex workers Clients of female sex workers Injecting drug users Men having sex with men Casual heterosexual sex Partners (Casual heterosexual sex) Long Term cohabitating monogamous heterosexual sex (low risk heterosexual sex) Sources: Results from Know your Epidemic project in Southern and East Africa . Reports available http://www.unaidsrstesa.org/hiv-prevention-modes-of-transmission
  11. 11. Demographics: population growth rate
  12. 12. 2007 DHS and 2011 SHIMS HIV prevalence inSwaziland (ages 18-49) Men: Prevalence by Age Women: Prevalence by Age
  13. 13. What happened in Zimbabwe (Halperin et al, 2011) 10 40 Prevalence and AIDS deaths Prevalence AIDS deaths 8 (%) (per 1000) 30 Incidence 6 Incidence 20 (per 100pyar) 4B 10 2 0 0 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Year
  14. 14. What happened in Zimbabwe and why (Halerin et al 2011) 80 Late 1990s 60 Early/Mid 2000s 40 % 20 0 15-19s men 15-19s women Men with Men paid for Men with Men with Men using had sex [DHS] had sex [DHS] extra-marital sex last year multiple casual condom at last partners [DHS] [DHS] concurrent partners in last casual sex partners month [DHS] [Manicaland] [Manicaland] Starting sex Multiple partnerships Condom use
  15. 15. Demographic and epidemiological module E. Lule M. HaackerBased on:• Projections of scaling-up of access to ART, including numbers of those 1st and 2nd line treatment as per the NSF
  16. 16. Economics is about choice• Economic• Political• Human rights• Short term or long term There are no easy answers.
  17. 17. Outline• The history of the HIV and AIDS epidemic• Researching HIV and AIDS• Practical experiences from HEARD• Examples of success (remembering contestation)
  18. 18. • Staff buy-in (part of strategy)• Support (communications staff)• Tools – Website – HEARD alerts – HEARD news – Annual report – Briefs and news including multi media – Community feedback
  19. 19. Policy Brief (4 pages)
  20. 20. News and PressBy Defeating the Generic-drugs Bill, Ottawa has Endangered Millions ofLives: The Globe and Mail Editorial by HEARDs Executive Director AlanWhiteside and UKZN Fulbright Scholar Jamie Cohen
  21. 21. Inclusivity
  22. 22. Social Media and Press• Facebook www.facebook.com/HEARDUKZN• Twitter: www.twitter.com/HEARD_UKZN• Website www.heard.org.za• Multimedia: films and slide show• Brochure• Stands at key conferences• Champions But ……
  23. 23. It must be based on good researchWell designed projectsFits into strategy and plan… (and researchers interest and agendas)Each project has internal and external reviewFunded2012 output from HEARD: 36 peer reviewed articles and chapters from10 researchers
  24. 24. Outline• The history of the HIV and AIDS epidemic• Researching HIV and AIDS• Practical experiences from HEARD• Examples of success (remembering contestation)
  25. 25. Success• The red country Swaziland• Gender NSPs• ACHWRP child tracking tools• Alumni• Influence
  26. 26. The commercialHEARD: an applied research unit in South Africa working regionallyWe welcome visitors • PhD research • Post Docs • People wanting a place to locate for a while • FellowsOur rules • Apply (with support from your institution) • Bring resources: we offer space and a work environment • Be prepared to give as well as get • Spend at least 4 months in Durban www.heard.org.za

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