• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Anglo Saxons
 

Anglo Saxons

on

  • 9,339 views

Some information of the AS.

Some information of the AS.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
9,339
Views on SlideShare
9,337
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
190
Comments
1

1 Embed 2

http://www.slideshare.net 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • The graphics were good but there were spelling and grammar errors
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Anglo Saxons Anglo Saxons Presentation Transcript

  • The Anglo, Saxons and Jutes in Britain Was there any resistance to the Anglo Saxons advance? By: Dennis Delgado and Carlos Gonzales, Brigitte Zambrano, Lourdes Menezes, Claudia Loyola, Lucciana Gonzales, Romina Ávila, Luz Alejandra Llano, Natalia Larraín, Carolina Vargas.
  • Was there any resistance against the Anglo Saxons?
  • In the case of the Jutes there was a big resistance from the Britons to the Jutes, because the jutes takes part of it land and they wanted again. Like in when Northumbria's dominance began to develop . It was hastened by the defeat and death of Ecgfrid in 685. After Penda's defeat, his successor Wulfhere turned south to concentrate his efforts on fighting against Wessex where strong rulers prevented any Mercian domination.
    • T he resistance of the Britons to the Anglo-Saxon advance was often brave and sometimes temporarily successful. Early in the sixth century, for example, they won at Mount Badon in the south a great victory, later connected in tradition with the legendary name of King Arthur .
    There were times that the Britons didn’t want the Anglo and Saxon to advance and also there was sometimes leaders that arise and stopped the Anglo and Saxons for a short times like king Arthur, but when the leaders died they advance. Some Britons didn’t want to leave their homes for the barbarians to stay there, but the Anglo and Saxons always were savage warriors and they forced them to leave.
  • Was there any resistance to the Anglo Saxon advance?
    • There were times that the Britons didn’t want the Anglo and Saxon to advance and also there was sometimes leaders that arise and stopped the Anglo and Saxons for a short times like king Arthur, but when the leaders died they advance.
    Moss Peter “History Alive” Britain, 1977 Page 3, 4
  • Was there any resistance to the Anglo Saxon advance?
    • There were also times couldn’t advance to the next city because some Britons didn’t want to leave their homes for the barbarians to stay there, but the Anglo and Saxons always were savage warriors and they forced them to leave.
    Moss Peter “History Alive” Britain, 1977 Page 3, 4
    • The Anglo-Saxons took control of most of Britain, although they never conquered Scotland, Wales and Cornwall. They divided the country into kingdoms, each with its own royal family. The stronger kingdoms often took control of the weaker kingdoms.
    • To collect stones to build their huts on
    • To use the better soil to grow crops
    • Lands were often flooded
    • The land was warmer
    • To have theprecious objects and gold
    • The rivers gave easy routes in land
  •  
  • They conquered a lot of land & settle there.
    • The Anglo Saxons took control of most of England although they never conquered Scotland , Wales and Cornwall.
    • They settled in England in places near to rivers or the sea, which could be easily reached by boat.
    • The Roman army left Britain in AD 407 — the men were needed to help defend Rome against invasion by the Goths from northern Europe. The Roman empire was crumbling and Britain was abandoned.
  • Towns & villages they settled down.
    • The first Anglo Saxon villages were often named after their chieftain (leader of village).
  • The Romans Leave ... Why did they come? The Romans ruled Britain for over 350 years, from AD 250 onwards, the Romans began to have problems keeping Britain safe. Worst of all were the angles and Saxons who came from across the north sea to destroy and steal. Their empire was huge: it needed an army of at least 500 000 men too guard it. By the end of 4 th century, over half of the soldiers were barbarians, not Roman. As time passed, more and more soldiers from far corners of the empire were called home to help keep these attackers out. Life became more dangerous so the rich stayed in their country villas, the towns began to crumble. It was the troubles elsewhere which finally ended Roman rule in Britain. One cold night, in December AD 460, 15 000 barbarians walked across the frozen river Rhine into Gaul . The year was AD 410 and, in that year, Rome itself was attacked. No one defended it. People simply fled to the hills.
  • ... and the Anglo-Saxons arrive The Anglo-Saxons arrive (tribes called angles and Saxons) to Rome to conquer and stay but they also come in roman times to raid. The Romans called them Barbarians because they look them as savages. The Anglo-Saxons were farming folk and thought that the Romans towns must have been built by giants, so they usually rowed past and made their homes on rich farmland in the valleys, where they could grow their crops. The Anglo-Saxons were good warriors, most of the time they won the battle they fight, they controlled most of England. Anglo-Saxon is the term usually used to describe the peoples living in the south and east of Great Britain from the early 5 th century AD to the Norman conquest of 1066.
  • The history of Anglo-Saxon England broadly covers early medieval England from the end of Roman rule and the establishment of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in the 5th century until the Conquest by the Normans in 1066. The history of Anglo-Saxon England
    • -Men were usually about 180 cm tall anad women were usually about 168 cm. 
    • -Most Saxon men were big and strong and they were also very active everyday.
    • Saxon’s teeth have lots of plaque on them, so this usually shows they didn't own toothbrushes. Their teeth were really known as been very yellow and horrible.
    • Conical handles for little brushes have been found in the graves of Saxon women. These might have been used for putting on make-up, like eye shadow or blusher.
    • Combs made of bone were often found in women's graves. This shows they kept their hair neat and tidy.
  • Women Clothing
    • Some women had metal clasps at the wrists to fasten the sleeves of a simple blouse. Other women had worn short-sleeves.
    • They used to wear brooches at the shoulders pinned two sides of a tubular dress together.
    • Lots of beads were often found across the chest. Strings of beads were very pretty. They were usually made of brightly coloured glass.
    Saxon women had other useful items hanging from a belt around the waist. The belts rotted away, but buckles survived. Simple blouse brooches dress Metal clasps belt
  • Men Clothing - Apart from a skeleton, there was usually only a buckle. The belt had rotted away. They sometimes find weaponds too. - Men used to wear tunics.
    • Old Saxon bodies have been dug up in bogs. Bogs were very wet.
    - Saxon’s men used to wear baggy trousers and 'bandages' wound round their legs. - Saxon men also used to wear cloaks. belt knife shield tunic
  •