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Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27
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Marketing 521 Team Marketing Plan Final Draft_2012-11-27

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This is a Mock Marketing plan that myself and my Team in my Marketing 521 MBA Program wrote.

This is a Mock Marketing plan that myself and my Team in my Marketing 521 MBA Program wrote.

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  • 1. By Kristen Keeth, Anthony Lee, Edward Locke, & Albert Maina In Partial Fulfillment of The Requirements for MKT 521 December 3, 2012
  • 2. P a g e | 2 Contents 1. Executive Summary........................................................................................................ 4 Management Team Summary............................................................................................. 4 Company Overview ............................................................................................................ 4 Services Offered ................................................................................................................. 5 Market Opportunity ........................................................................................................... 6 Financial Overview ............................................................................................................ 7 Conclusion ......................................................................................................................... 7 2 Situation Analysis ............................................................................................................ 9 2.1 Marketing Analysis....................................................................................................... 9 2.1.1 Market Demographics................................................................................................ 9 2.1.2 Industry Analysis ..................................................................................................... 12 2.1.3 Market Trends.......................................................................................................... 13 2.1.4 Positioning Statement: ............................................................................................. 14 2.2 SWOT Analysis .......................................................................................................... 15 2.2.1 Strengths .................................................................................................................. 15 2.2.2 Weaknesses.............................................................................................................. 16 2.2.3 Opportunities............................................................................................................ 17 2.2.4 Threats...................................................................................................................... 18
  • 3. P a g e | 3 2.3 Competition................................................................................................................. 18 2.4 Environmental Factors................................................................................................ 21 3.0 Objectives ................................................................................................................... 22 3.1 Mission........................................................................................................................ 22 3.2 Marketing Objectives.................................................................................................. 22 3.3 Financial Objectives.................................................................................................... 24 4. Marketing Mix .............................................................................................................. 25 4.1 Product/Services ......................................................................................................... 26 4.2 Price ............................................................................................................................ 27 4.4 Place:........................................................................................................................... 28 5. Information Sources and Control.................................................................................. 29 6. Contingencies................................................................................................................ 32 7. Budget........................................................................................................................... 33 8. Implementation ............................................................................................................. 35 9. Conclusion .................................................................................................................... 36 Appendix A – First Year Budget ...................................................................................... 37 Appendix B – Break Even Analysis ................................................................................. 40 Appendix C – Example Brochure..................................................................................... 41 References......................................................................................................................... 43
  • 4. P a g e | 4 1. Executive Summary Management Team Summary: (qualifications exaggerated or fictitious for the purpose of the assignment) The executive management team of Recovery Bound will consist of: Chief Operating Officer: Kristen Keeth Experienced operations manager at two separate Dallas outpatient treatment facilities with over 10 years or relevant experience in substance abuse outpatient treatment. Kristen holds an MBA with a concentration in Operations Management from TAMU-C. Chief Marketing Officer: Anthony Lee Mr. Lee has over 10 years of experience with several established and startup commercial and retail sales operations in the Dallas area. Anthony holds an MBA with a concentration in Marketing from TAMU-C. Chief Financial Officer: Ed Locke Mr. Locke has over 20 years of experience in management in a variety firms globally, ranging from manufacturing to service organizations. Ed holds an MBA with a concentration in Finance from TAMU-C. Director of Referral and Intake: Albert Maina Mr. Maina has over 10 years of experience in customer management in a variety of service firms globally. Albert holds an MBA from TAMU-C. Company Overview: Recovery Bound will be a nonprofit agency providing substance abuse outpatient programs for adolescents and adults in the Greater Dallas area. The program will create coalitions with local school districts, the adult and juvenile court systems, and area hospitals to
  • 5. P a g e | 5 establish a network of referrals and outreach training opportunities. The goal of Recovery Bound is to foster a commitment to adolescents and adults that will reduce substance abuse, educate on causality and avoidance, promote safety and quality of life, promote pro-social friendships, establish interpersonal skills, and instill hope in the future. Through these personal relationships and a sense of individual responsibility and accountability, we will empower them to live a life free of substance abuse and criminal justice involvement and promote a sense of pride and accomplishment. (Sway’s Foundation, 2012) By providing the tools to break the cycle of substance abuse, our clients will be afforded the opportunity to live productive lives free of substance abuse and involvement in criminal justice systems. Recovery Bound is a program that is in direct response to the increasing number of youth and adults who have been affected by substance abuse or who are already entangled with the criminal justice system. The aforementioned goals of the program offer positive support systems enabling them to “avoid the pitfalls that can derail their lives.” (Fortress Academy, 2012) The two targeted groups will be approached slightly differently, but the goal remains the same: Empower our clients to live productive lives free of substance abuse and involvement in the criminal justice system. Services Offered: The services of Recovery Bound includes a comprehensive assessment to determine the extent of the problem, individualized treatment planning, group counseling, individual and family counseling, and parent education seminars. 1. Screening and Assessment – to qualify the exact needs of the client and tailor an approach to treatment and aid
  • 6. P a g e | 6 2. Drug Education – to reduce substance abuse and educate on the medical implications of substance abuse 3. Life Skills – to provide tools to manage emotions, develop and function in society, and promote safety and quality of life 4. Anger Management – to supply a curriculum that helps the clients identify their feelings and use consequential thinking and manage aggression 5. Trauma - PTSD and Seeking Safety - to be sensitive to traumatic issues that our clients have experienced or are currently facing 6. Relapse Prevention – to help identify situations that can result in relapse and teach coping skills and alternatives to use of substances In addition, promotion of the programs and educational services will be offered through various outreach services and educational seminars. Market Opportunity: With 8.9% of the US population suffering from substance abuse problems and approximately 20% of those individuals seeking treatment for this condition (Mark, Levit, Warren-Vanivort, Buck, & Coffey, 2011), The Dallas-Fort Worth area population of 4.3 million (Dallas Region, 2012) provides for a service market of over 76,000 individuals. With the current difficult economic climate, the market is growing (Ritter, 2011) while many non-profit treatment facilities are raising fees or closing. (Petaschnick, 2009) A growing market and reduced competition yields a business opportunity to attract and maintain market share in the Dallas area.
  • 7. P a g e | 7 Financial Overview: Recovery Bound will be a non-profit corporation, with financial goals of meeting the costs associated with providing the targeted service levels, repayment of startup debt, and securing enough residual capital to ensure financial health through varying economic climates. Recovery Bound will be funded by a mix of governmental grants, public and private donations, insurance, and client contributions. We will actively apply for governmental grants with the expectation to have 30% of the necessary funding provided by grants by year 2 ($195,000/yr.). Public and private donations will be solicited and will provide an additional 20% of the required funding by the third quarter of year 2 ($130,000). A specialist will effectively process insurance claim requests to provide another 30% of required funding, beginning in the first month of operation ($190,000/yr.) 20% of the funding will be provided on an adjusted and sliding scale basis by the clients, beginning in the first month of operation ($125,000/yr). Additional fund raising projects will occur throughout the first five years to repay the loans required until these funding programs reach their target levels. Conclusion: The management team assembled possesses the skills, professional contacts, and credentials to effectively manage a solution to a growing need in the Dallas area. Recovery Bound will be a non-profit outpatient substance abuse treatment facility serving clients within 75 miles of their facility and actively seeking referrals in the immediate area. This market is seeing a growth in need and a decline in services, which opens the door for an effective solution- oriented firm. They will offer training, tools, and counseling to break the cycle of substance abuse and will achieve results far better than the statistical averages, while offering outreach
  • 8. P a g e | 8 training and seminars to aid in prevention. Funding will come from several sources, to include governmental grants, donations, insurance, and client fees.
  • 9. P a g e | 9 2.0 Situation Analysis Recovery bound is a start-up nonprofit company that will be opening in January of 2014. The agency will offer substance abuse education and counseling, life skills, anger management, and relapse prevention in the form of outpatient services. The primary market need is to provide clients with excellent services that allow them to lead normal productive lives independent of substance abuse and the criminal justice system. Mission: Recovery Bound is dedicated to protecting and supporting individuals, families, and communities influenced by dependency and substance abuse. 2.1 Marketing Analysis We have extensive information regarding our market and we understand the primary characteristics of our client base. We will exploit this information to better serve our customers’ needs and how we can effectively reach them. 2.1.1 Market Demographics 2.1.1.1 Geographics Our primary geographic market is the Dallas-Ft. Worth area, with an estimated population of 4,265,829 (Dallas Region, 2012). A 75 mile radius of geographic area will be the primary location of clients in need of our services. 2.1.1.2 Demographics In 2008 it has been determined that 22. 2 million or 8.9% of the population age twelve and over in the United States have substance abuse and dependency problems. Of this number of
  • 10. P a g e | 10 people approximately 4 million of them received treatment for their substance abuse problem (Mark, Levit, Warren-Vanivort, Buck, & Coffey, 2011). In the Dallas area of those that received treatment 55% were male and 45% were female. The breakdown of those receiving treatment by age and ethnicity are illustrated in the following two graphs (States in Brief City Reports, 2008). The target market will be these men and women 12 and over in the target geographical area. (States in Brief City Reports, 2008) 19.00% 17.00% 26.00% 21.00% 17.00% Treatment Admission by age: Dallas: TEDS 2008 Under 18 18-24 25-34 35-44 45 & Older
  • 11. P a g e | 11 (States in Brief City Reports, 2008) 2.1.1.3 Referral Base Characteristics Recovery Bound’s primary channel for new client acquisition is through strategic partnerships and alliances with three main sources of referrals. These three sources are the criminal justice system, community organizations and substance abuse providers (inpatient facilities). These three strategic channels constitute 83% of the market for substance abuse treatment referrals. The criminal justice system will be comprised of both the adult and juvenile departments. 59.00%20.00% 20.00% 1.00% Treatment admissions by Race/Ethnicity White Non-Hispanic Hispanic Non-Hispanic Black Other
  • 12. P a g e | 12 (States in Brief City Reports, 2008) 2.1.2 Industry Analysis In the Dallas/Fort Worth/Arlington region there are 78 Substance Abuse facilities with estimated sales of $64.8 million in annual sales and 1,209 employees. Of the 78 firms in the market 52 firms provide outpatient services. In 2012 estimated average sales per establishment is $1.52 million. The majority of the firms are fairly small in terms of employees with 64.10% having nine employees or less. There are only 6 firms with 50 or more employees. The numbers of new entrants into the market are relatively small. In Texas the number of treatment facilities reached an all-time high of 556 in 2003 and a low of 518 in 2005. 30.00% 27.00% 26.00% 12.00% 3.00% 2.00% Source of referrals for Treatment: Dallas TEDS 2008 Substance abuse Providers Criminal Justice Communiy Organizations Individual Self Health Care Providers
  • 13. P a g e | 13 2.1.3 Market Trends The projected growth rate for the industry in the area for 2012 is 3.7% and in 2013 3.4%. Sales in Millions/Establishment and % Change Year Year Year Year Year % chg. % chg. % chg. % chg. Industry Averages 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13 Sales($M)/Estab 1.38 1.43 1.46 1.52 1.57 3.5% 2.2% 3.7% 3.4% (Barnes Reports: U.S. Mental Heath and Substance Abuse Centers Industry (NAICS 62142), 2012) Spending for substance abuse treatment has grown at an average rate of 5% since 2002. The largest funding source comes from state and local government agencies (non-Medicaid) and account for 36% of funding. Medicaid is second with 21% and Federal is third with 16%. The trend of increased public funding has remained constant due to the decrease in funding provided by private insurance. Currently private insurance only provides 12% of the funding and has stabilized at this current rate since 2005 (Mark, Levit, Warren-Vanivort, Buck, & Coffey, 2011). 32 18 13 2 6 6 Number of Employees per Firm 1-4 5-9 10-19 20-49 50-99 Uknown
  • 14. P a g e | 14 In 2006 57% of all providers in the state of Texas received some type of public funding from state, county, local, and federal (States in Brief City Reports, 2008). 2.1.4 Positioning Statement: Recovery Bound will serve an area of Dallas 150 miles in diameter, and will focus primarily on youth and adults that are referred from the criminal justice system, community organizations, and healthcare/inpatient treatment facilities. These clients will be seeking to break their substance abuse issues and will be motivated to participate in our programs. They will actively pursue this in an outpatient format based on the referrals from the sources noted.
  • 15. P a g e | 15 2.2 SWOT Analysis The SWOT Analysis identifies the primary strengths and weaknesses of Recovery Bound and characterizes the opportunities and threats that will affront Recovery Bound. 2.2.1 Strengths Strong leadership in management High level of competence High level of competitive skill We are ahead on the experience curve Excellent recruitment of industry leaders Industry leaders have strong relationships with referral channels Excellent location procured that is in a central location to our desired market Excellent access to startup capital Access to additional capital if needed (Seitz, 2006) 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 Competence Competitive Skill Experience Curve Financial Resources Reputation Market Leadership Organizational Design Economies of ScaleCompetititve Pressure Proprietary Technology Marketing Effectiveness Product Development Management Technical Skills Cost/Price Strength Rating
  • 16. P a g e | 16 2.2.2 Weaknesses Our cost structure is higher because we are a startup New entrant to the market No established market image No name recognition (Seitz, 2006) 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 Strategy Facilities Management Key Competencies Strategy Implementation Internal Operations R&DProduct/Service Line Market Image Marketing Skills Financial Resources Cost Structure Profitability Weakness Rating
  • 17. P a g e | 17 2.2.3 Opportunities Population growth in specific Dallas areas provide locations for future branch operations New treatment methods being developed provides for areas of expansion Related complimentary services provide an area for portfolio growth Rivals are somewhat complacent Affordable Care Act should increase funding and increase outpatient programs (Seitz, 2006) 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 Prospects Markets Product/Service Enhancement Product Line Expansion Vertical IntegrationPolitcal enviroment Rival Complacency Market Growth Regulatory Overhead Opportunity Rating
  • 18. P a g e | 18 2.2.4 Threats The potential for substitute services are high Market growth has not been strong Increasing regulatory requirements Currently the economy is in a recession (Seitz, 2006) 2.3 Competition Competition in the area of Substance abuse centers comes from two main sources, larger firms that offer both residential and outpatient services and small to medium sized firms that offer outpatient only. 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 Foreign Competition Substitute Services Market Growth Regulatory Overhead Business Cycle/Climate Buyer/Supplier Power Market Requirements Demographics Entry Barriers Technology Threat Rating
  • 19. P a g e | 19 Current local competitors: Dallas Challenge: They are a primary competitor due to the fact they are the leader in a market we are targeting. In the juvenile criminal justice market in Dallas County, currently Dallas Challenge is a primary contract provider to Dallas County Juvenile Department. Dallas Challenge has been in business since 1984 and has served over 147,000 youth and their families. They have a location in Oak Cliff and Dallas and a separate Truancy enforcement location in Dallas. They are currently a market leader in the Dallas market (Dallas Challenge Inc., 2009). Phoenix House: They are a primary competitor since they are a market leader in the markets we are targeting. Phoenix House was founded in 1967 and has been in Texas since 1995. They accept private insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, private pay, State and County Funding. They offer inpatient and outpatient services for both adults and teenagers and serve more than 15,000 people each year. In Dallas outpatient services their business is comprised of 75% juvenile and 25% adult (M. O’Neill, personal communication, November 12, 2012). They have very strong ties with the Dallas County Justice department both in juvenile and adult jurisdictions. They operate the Dallas County Judicial Treatment Center in Wilmer just outside of Dallas. This is an alternative to incarceration and is mainly inpatient but does have a six month outpatient program as well. Their other location is located on Northwest Highway in Dallas (Phoenix House Texas, 2012). Pricing Structure: Their pricing structure is different for each funding source, e.g. Private insurance or Medicaid.
  • 20. P a g e | 20 Self-Pay Pricing: Screening and Assessments - $175/each Individual Sessions - $150/session Intensive Outpatient (IOP) – Individual -$2,700. This can be broken down to $150 per day - 3 times per week (3 hours per session) for 6 weeks for adults (M. O’Neill, personal communication, November 12, 2012). Homeward Bound: Is a primary competitor since they have strong connections with the Dallas County Justice departments. Homeward Bound offers both inpatient and outpatient treatment and has been in Dallas since 1980 and they serve over 6,000 people per year. They accept private insurance, Value Options (Texas Northstar) and have funding for those that cannot pay. They are centrally located near Methodist Hospital (Homeward Bound Inc. About Us, 2006). First Step Counseling: Is a primary competitor since they operate in the same target markets and have the same referral sources that will be our primary referral sources. They have been in operation since 1991 and since inception they have provided services to over 20,000 people. They are an outpatient treatment center only and work with the justice systems and community based organizations. First Step has location in Dallas, Plano and Oak Cliff (First Step Counseling, 2009). Nexxus: Is a primary competitor since they operate in the same target market and have some of the same target referral sources. They have been in Dallas since 1971. They only treat adult and adolescent women. They offer inpatient and outpatient care. Their outpatient care consists of They feature Intensive outpatient and Supportive outpatient care. They have two facilities in Dallas for outpatient
  • 21. P a g e | 21 care. They accept most private insurance, Medicaid and Northstar (Nexus Recovery Center About Us, 2012). Self-Pay pricing for medically indigent: 1) Detox-$150 per day 2) Outpatient $125 per week or $450 per month Innovation 360: They are located in the Dallas area and have recently added outpatient services to their portfolio. They primarily work with self-pay and private insurance so they are a secondary competitor (Innovation 360, 2010). Enterhealth Outpatient Center of Excellence: Their Dallas location is outpatient only. They primarily work with self-pay and private insurance so they are a secondary competitor (About Enterhealth, 2010). Note: Due to budget and time constraints this is the best information available on the competition. 2.4 Environmental Factors Texas by far has the most people on probation with 418,678 with 94,535 of them being DWI probations (Probation And Parole In The United States, 2010, 2011). Texas took a huge step toward rehabilitation instead of incarceration with the passing of House Bill 2335 in 1991 that allowed for the development of a statewide network of corrections based substance abuse facilities. The political landscape in Dallas is shifting toward rehabilitation rather than incarceration. Dallas has several specialty courts including DWI Court for both misdemeanor and felony offenses and Drug Court for adults and juveniles (Community Supervision & Corrections Department, 2012). These special
  • 22. P a g e | 22 courts have a rehabilitation aspect attached to them with Intensive Outpatient treatment a tool for rehabilitation and relapse prevention. With the implementation of the affordable care act the substance abuse sectors of healthcare will most likely be combined into mainstream health care. It is expected that there will be more funding for treatment and there will be a shift away from residential treatment to more outpatient programs (Buck, 2011). Meanwhile, substance abuse is increasing within the currently difficult economic conditions (Ritter, 2011), while service are decreasing with both rate increases and facility closings (Petaschnick, 2009). 3.0 Objectives Our Marketing Strategy is grounded in becoming the premier resource for outpatient substance abuse treatment in the Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex and surrounding areas. Our Marketing Strategy is predicated in the superior execution of the following services: Drug Education Life Skills Anger Management Relapse Prevention 3.1 Mission Recovery Bound is dedicated to protecting and supporting individuals, families, and communities influenced by dependency and substance abuse. 3.2 Marketing Objectives Partnerships / Referral Base - Grow a base of schools, courts, and hospitals (including inpatient treatment facilities) that actively refer clients into our program. The potential referral sites will be prioritized geographically, starting with the facilities closest to our treatment center. We will establish a partnership with 3 school districts, 2 court facilities,
  • 23. P a g e | 23 and 2 hospital/inpatient treatment facilities in the first six months of operation, and an additional 2 school districts, 1 court facility, and 1 hospital/inpatient treatment facility in the next 6 months. In the second year of operation we will increase these counts by 50%, and in the third year we will increase these counts by another 25%. This may be accomplished by education of referral authorities, since twice as many adolescents with substance abuse problems are referred to mental health treatment than to substance abuse treatment due to familiarity with the mental health system and unfamiliarity with the substance abuse treatment system. (Scott, 2004) Drug Education – Provide 2 outreach seminars per month, starting in the 2nd quarter of operation, to total 18 seminars in the first year of operation. This outreach will be expanded to 3 per month in the second year of operation. The focus of these seminars will be to reduce Substance Abuse and educate on the medical implications of substance abuse. These seminars will be presented at schools, hospitals, and correction facilities. This education is important, since “Knowledge is the prerequisite for any behavior change”. (Sharma, 2005) Life Skills – Collateral and training programs will be developed to provide tools to manage emotions, develop skills to function in society, and promote safety and quality of life. Adolescents will be provided counseling and support programs to increase school attendance to at least 95% in at least 80% of the treated population. Adults will be provided similar tools to increase employment to 75% and days at work to 90% of the employed segment in the treated population. This training is critical in the prevention of relapse, as individuals must learn or re-learn ways of living. (Parrish, Springer, & Rubin, 2009) Anger Management – We will develop curricula that help the clients identify their feelings and use consequential thinking and manage aggression in the first quarter of operation. The
  • 24. P a g e | 24 success of these curricula in adolescents will be measured by a decrease in the amount of disciplinary referrals and/or suspensions in the school environment by 75% after 3 months of outpatient service, to be monitored quarterly. Adult program success will be measured by the reduction of criminal justice interactions by 75% after 3 months of service, to be measured quarterly. Anger management is a key component in achieving and maintaining abstinence in substance abusers. (Reilly & Shopshire, 2000) Relapse Prevention Engagement – Establish aftercare services to help identify situations that can result in relapse and to teach coping skills and alternatives to use of substances. Success will be measured by a 95% attendance at the voluntary aftercare services for the first six months and a 90% attendance at the aftercare services for the next year after that. Relapse occurrence will be monitored and the program relapse rate will be 20% less than statistical averages. Active continuing care has a significant effect in decreasing the relapse rate for treated substance abuse clients. (McCay. et. al., 2010) 3.3 Financial Objectives Funding – Recovery Bound will be funded by a mix of governmental grants, public and private donations, insurance, and client contributions. We will actively apply for governmental grants with the expectation to have 30% of the necessary funding provided by grants by year 2 ($195,000/yr.). The bulk of these funds are expected to come from the Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment (SAPT) Block Grant program. (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 2006) Public and private donations will be solicited and will provide an additional 20% of the required funding by the third quarter of operation ($130,000). Developing relationships with
  • 25. P a g e | 25 area foundations, local charities, community groups, and businesses will yield the revenue. (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 2006) A specialist will effectively process insurance claim requests to provide another 30% of required funding, beginning in the first month of operation ($190,000/yr.) 20% of the funding will be provided on an adjusted and sliding scale basis by the clients, beginning in the first month of operation ($125,000/yr.). This will come from Medicaid and private insurance. Medicaid has been reported to account for 20% of substance abuse treatment funding overall (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 2006), and private insurance is expected to fulfill any shortages. Additional fund raising projects will occur throughout the first five years to repay the loans required until these funding programs reach their target levels. Many avenues are open that supply funds to institutions providing treatment. (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 2006) 4. Marketing Mix The target market for Recovery Bound is adolescents ages 13 to 17 and adults who have been affected by substance abuse or who are already entangled in the criminal justice system. Recovery Bound will be a client-focused outpatient treatment and prevention program. It is in direct response to the vast number of people that are trapped in dependency or caught up in the criminal justice system. Recovery Bound will offer both youth and adults the opportunity to confront addiction and achieve and sustain recovery. The program is designed to be accessible to adolescents ages 13 to 17 and adults. Our adolescent programs will offer an array of services ranging from early intervention to long-term aftercare. For adults, we will offer a comprehensive array of programs based on evidence based, clinical best practices. (Minkoff, 2001) Our
  • 26. P a g e | 26 programs will provide substance abuse treatment in a safe and supportive environment with a continuum of care that is tailored to meet the needs of each client. The goals of the program will be to safeguard youth, strengthen families, and enable those trapped in dependency to confront addiction and to achieve and sustain recovery. 4.1 Product/Services 1. Screening and Assessment – Level of care assessment and utilization management (Minkoff, 2001). 2. Drug Education – Outreach seminars will be offered. The focus of these seminars will be to reduce substance abuse while educating on the medical implications involved. These seminars will be presented at schools, hospitals, and correctional facilities. This service will address substance abuse issues at the source, helping potential victims to avoid the pitfalls before they occur. (Wells, Lemak, and D’Aunno, 2006) 3. Life Skills – Collateral and training programs will be developed to provide tools to manage emotions, develop skills to function in society, and promote safety and quality of life. Adolescents will be provided counseling and support programs to increase school attendance. Adults will be provided similar tools to increase employment. (Miller and Hendrie, 2007) 4. Anger Management – We will develop curricula that help the clients identify their feelings and use consequential thinking and manage aggression. (Reilly and Shopshire, 2002) The success of these curricula in adolescents will be measured by a decrease in the amount of disciplinary referrals and/or suspensions in the school environment. Adult program success will be measured by the reduction of criminal justice interactions.
  • 27. P a g e | 27 5. Relapse Prevention Engagement – Establish aftercare services to help identify situations that can result in relapse and to teach coping skills and alternatives to use of substances. (Wells, Lemak, and D’Aunno, 2006) Success will be measured by attendance at the voluntary aftercare services. 4.2 Price Pricing will be market based and will be targeted between +/- 10% of similar programs offered in the area. (See “Competitors” for competitive pricing references.) 1. Screening and Assessments - $175/each 2. Individual Sessions - $150/session 3. Intensive Outpatient (IOP) – Individual -$125 per session; Group - $50 per session (intensive treatment 4 times per week for 4 weeks) 4. Supportive Outpatient (SOP) - Individual – $80 per session; Group - $35 per session (supportive treatment 2 times per week for 10 weeks) 5. Family Counseling - $100 per session 6. Aftercare (group sessions) - $25 per session (1 time per week for as long as needed) 7. Parenting Groups - $30 per session We anticipate the following payment structure, 47% of clients will pay with public funding from Medicare and/or Medicaid, or other public payment. Of the remaining 53% of clients, we anticipate one in five to have private health insurance and the remaining will be self-pay. (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 2006) 4.3 Promotion: Recovery Bound has a number of market focuses that are key to the program's success. These include the following:
  • 28. P a g e | 28 1. Clients who are overcoming stressors in their lives, such as addictions, criminal justice involvement, abusive situations, and issues in their scholastic life represent the main marketing concentration for Recovery Bound. We foster positive changes through substance abuse education, goal setting, self-discipline, and skill development. 2. Ultimately, Recovery Bound is marketed to Dallas County as a critical support system for substance abuse and criminal justice clients. The marketing promotion strategy will be to successfully sell our services to the criminal justice system, area schools, and healthcare facilities. This will be accomplished by securing contacts within the DFW area and maintaining this network. These contacts will serve as our referral sources for the program (Lee, Reif, Ritter, Levine and Horgan, 2001). The Program Director and Marketing Manager will make presentations and create linkages with the Dallas County Juvenile and Adult Probation Departments, area schools, area churches, area hospitals, and other substance abuse providers. In order to advertise and market the program to participants and referral sources, brochures will be developed that showcase the services offered. (See example in Appendix C.) The Program Director will maintain an open line of communication and provide progress reports for the referring partners. The goal will be to build and maintain a successful marketing program based on the accomplishments of our clients and serving the needs of the greater Dallas County. 4.4 Place: The program will focus on an area near North Dallas and will serve clients within an approximate 75 mile radius. Referrals will be actively sought from institutions and referring bodies within a 20 mile radius of the facility. Operations will consist of site-based outpatient
  • 29. P a g e | 29 primary services and outreach services at the target locations within the 20 mile radius, or as otherwise contracted. Distribution will be through two channels. Outpatient services will be focused on activities at the facility operated by Recovery Bound, and will be offered to those that come into that facility primarily through referrals from other agencies. The outreach activities will be taken to various sites in the area and will service clients via education on substance abuse and information on how to access the outpatient services (Freeborn, McManus, and Cohen, 2009). 5. Information Sources and Control The Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) will monitor all relevant information sources on an ongoing basis and report quarterly to the senior management team. Sales and expense data will be collected and passed to the CMO by the Chief Financial Officer (CFO), who has responsibility for all Finance and Accounting functions. The metrics and controls as listed previously will be monitored as follows: Metric Information Source Data Obtained Responsible Control Drug Education Outreach services log Number of seminars each month CMO If less than 2 per month after 2nd quarter of operation, or 3 per month in the second year of operation, increase promotion and offering to serviced area Life Skills Attendance reporting from clients’ schools and workplaces School attendance percentage, work attendance percentage, overall employment percentage COO If less than 95% school attendance, 90% work attendance, or 75% employment, modify Life Skills curricula to address on a quarterly basis Anger Discipline reports from schools and Number of incidents COO If after 3 months of service, if the client base incident rate does not drop by 75%, modify
  • 30. P a g e | 30 Management criminal justice interaction tracking Anger Management curricula to address on a quarterly basis Relapse Prevention Attendance at voluntary aftercare Rate of attendance COO If clients do not maintain a 95% attendance rate in voluntary aftercare for the first 6 months after services rendered, and/or 90% attendance for the next year. Affected clients will be contacted and surveyed to determine causation. Program changes will be implemented to address this causation on a semi-annual basis. Grant Tracking Finance and Rolling Budget reports Dollars received from Governmental grants CFO A forecast and project plane will be in place to ensure $150K/year is obtained from government grants by year 2. If the quarterly review of this plan indicates slippage, additional resources will be applied as needed to ensure the target is met. If it is determined that it will not be met within this timeframe, a special committee will be formed to restructure the budget and/or trigger contingency plans to mitigate the financial impact. Donation Tracking Finance and Rolling Budget reports Dollars received from donations CFO A donation solicitation committee will develop a plan and forecast to achieve donations at the rate of $100K/year. If by the second quarter the plan is not on track to deliver $25K per quarter by the third quarter, the committee will recommend corrective action. If by the third quarter there is no confidence that the funding will be achieved a special committee will be formed to restructure the budget and/or trigger contingency plans to mitigate the financial impact. Insurance Claim Finance and Rolling Budget Dollars received from insurance CFO & COO If by the second month of operation there is no evidence
  • 31. P a g e | 31 Revenue reports claims (collected, receivables, and past due), intake rate reports that insurance claims will provide a revenue stream amounting to $150K/yr, intake rates will be reviewed and a determination made as to whether intakes are too low or insurance collection is a problem. If intake is too low, a special committee will be formed to increase promotional activities headed by the CMO. If collections are an issue, the CFO will work with the collections specialist to collect the delinquent insurance revenue. Client Receivables Finance and Rolling Budget reports Dollars received from clients (collected, receivables, and past due), intake rates CFO & COO If by the second month of operation there is no evidence that clients will provide a revenue stream amounting to $100K/yr, intake rates will be reviewed and a determination made as to whether intakes are too low or client collection is a problem. If intake is too low, a special committee will be formed to increase promotional activities headed by the CMO. If collections are an issue, the CFO will work with the collections specialist to collect the delinquent insurance revenue. If the sliding scale client charge rate is not allowing sufficient revenue to cover the budgeted income, the policy will be reviewed on a semi-annual basis and adjustments made to either the sliding scale policy or the budget. Fund Raising Projects Finance and Rolling Budget reports Dollars received from Debt Reduction Fund Raising Projects CFO Debt reduction and its associated fund raising projects will be detailed in the budget for both current and 5-year financial planning. Goals will be set for each quarter, and performance to these goals will be presented to the management team. Should the
  • 32. P a g e | 32 goals fail to be met in two consecutive quarters, a response plan will be initiated to address the shortfall and determine the best way to achieve the debt reduction initiative. 6. Contingencies The controls and metrics include items that relate back to the budget (discussed in the next section). Various contingencies are outlined to address variances from plan that would have a significant impact on the health and growth initiatives of the company. Should client intake fall short of expectations, and escalating response plan may be implemented to address the shortfall. The budget contains provisions for significant debt repayment. This debt retirement could be slowed to retain revenue within the organization while efforts are enacted to increase client intake. Should the average active client base drop below 911, further medium-term actions will be required to reduce costs, such as workforce reduction or program suspension (primarily non-revenue generating programs such as educational outreach – within the scope allowed by current grant agreements). After a period of 2 quarters, if the client intake has not allowed the active client base to climb above 911, longer term actions may be required, such as vacating portions of the building and sub-leasing. If client intake greatly exceeds Recovery Bound’s capacity, a list of remote-site properties will be maintained for quick adaptation and expansion. Active recruiting and relationships with local agencies and educational institutions will provide quick access to personnel to expand the workforce. The metrics and triggers for this action will include tracking of hours worked by existing personnel and utilization of available property. Should the average workweek remain above 50 hrs/week and/or the facility space necessitate the postponement of 2
  • 33. P a g e | 33 or more scheduled program sessions, the management team will meet immediately to assess whether to implement this contingency. If a new competitor enters the market and there exists a significant possibility for it to threaten the financial health of Recovery Bound, the competitor will be contacted to explore the possibility of joint-venture outreach and possibly co-managing outpatient services. If governmental climate changes and funds no longer be as accessible, the management team will attempt to fill the funding void through increased donation solicitation. If this proves to not be sufficient after 2 quarters, further cost reduction activities will be enacted as described in the first contingency mentioned (client short fall). The metrics and trigger for this will be the monthly monitoring of the budget and specifically the Government Grant and Client Based Revenue income streams. 7. Budget A first year budget is presented in Appendix A. Assumptions made include: Facility space required will be 10,000 sq-ft. This is based on the size of the Phoenix House facility in Dallas located at 2345 Reagan St., Dallas, TX. This location was referenced on Google Maps and the square footage estimated using the supplied scale. (Phoenix House Map, 2012) Rental/lease cost of office space estimated at $10/sq-ft/yr. (Backpage, 2012) Fit-out cost of office space estimated at $40/sq-ft. (Office Space Guys, 2012) Office space will be built out throughout the first 3 quarters of operation at a rate of 50% up front, 25% more by the start of the second quarter, and remaining 25% in the third quarter.
  • 34. P a g e | 34 Average revenue per client, target government funding, collection rate of insurance, and target funding drive revenue based on personal experience of similar activities of the management team. This is influenced by the pricing structure as identified in Section 4.2 – Pricing, which is market priced based on competitive offerings (see “Competitors”). Average client based revenue of $700/client/year includes all client-based revenue sources, such as client out-of-pocket, personal insurance, government per-client funds, Medicaid, etc. (Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 2006) The break-even analysis appears in Appendix B, and identifies a need for an average running client enrollment of 911 clients to break even with these projections. Considering these calculations, it is projected that the company will be self-supporting by the third quarter of operations and will enter Year 2 with a cash reserve of $149,567 and will have retired $120,000 of the start-up financing of $350,000. Based on the break-even analysis, the client intake could drop to an average of 911 (78% of the budgeted average of 1,175) and the business would remain self-supporting. The CFO is tasked with tracking financial performance to the budget and reporting monthly to the management team. Key measures include performance of revenue streams and client engagement levels. Based on significant deviations of either from the budget expectations, corrective actions will be launched and/or the budget refined. The budget contains significant working capital to allow variances mid-year without adverse affects on business health.
  • 35. P a g e | 35 8. Implementation The table below illustrates the major tasks required for the roll out of the Marketing Plan. The tasks are grouped by major functional area, and the various executive officers (COO, CFO, and CMO) are charged with their specific are and successful completion of the assigned tasks. Major Tasks Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Operations Seek office space Sign contract on office space Search for build-out GC Sign contract for office space Recruit Employees Finance Secure Bank Loans Secure Governmental Grants Establish Business (Legal) Solicit Donations Fundraiser Drive #1 Fundraiser Drive #2 Marketing Contact Initial Referral Sites Hire MarCom Company for Brochures Distribute Brochures Secure Additional Referral Sites Collect Testimonials Print/Distribute 2nd Brochure (with Testimonials) Collect Successes for 3rd Brochure 2013 2014
  • 36. P a g e | 36 9. Conclusion A strong management team with backgrounds in Operations, Finance, and Marketing have assembled and identified a need for a new outpatient Substance Abuse treatment facility in the Dallas area. The market is well documented, and although there are several strong competitors the economic climate has both increased the need and decreased the availability of treatment centers. (Ritter, 2011) (Petaschnick, 2009) A funding model has been presented and detailed budget for the first year of operation as well. The plan calls for significant retirement of initial start-up debt and healthy cash reserves by the end of the first year of operation. A break-even analysis has also been performed and illustrates the significant financial safety built into the plan, ensuring the health of the operation even if the initial estimates of revenue prove to be substantially in error. A series of operational and financial metrics, feedback, and controls have been presented to monitor and adjust this plan over time. In the event of significant events that would threaten the viability of the enterprise, several contingencies are outlines and triggers identified to mitigate or eliminate these risks. Based on this healthy business plan and marketing initiative, a case is made to provide these life-changing services to the people of the Dallas area. Satisfying this imminent and significant need in the community while maintaining stable and self-sufficient operations qualify this effort as necessary, socially conscious, and extremely achievable.
  • 37. P a g e | 37 Appendix A – First Year Budget Schedule 1 – Revenue 1 2 3 4 Year Clients 700 1,000 1,500 1,500 1,175 Revenue per Client (Average) 175 175 175 175 700 Client Fee Revenue 122,500 175,000 262,500 262,500 822,500 Government Grant Revenue 30,000 30,000 45,000 45,000 150,000 Donations 10,000 20,000 25,000 25,000 80,000 Fundraising Projects 20,000 20,000 40,000 Total Revenue 162,500 245,000 332,500 352,500 1,092,500 Percentage of sales collected in period 66% Percentage of sales collected in the following period 34% Accounts Receivable Beginning Balance(1) First Quarter Sales - Collections 107,250 55,250 162,500 Second Quarter Sales - Collections 161,700 83,300 245,000 Third Quarter Sales - Collections 219,450 113,050 332,500 Fourth Quarter Sales - Collections (2) 232,650 232,650 Total Cash Collections 107,250 216,950 302,750 345,700 972,650 (2) Uncollected fourth quarter sales will appear as beginning accounts receivable in 2015 Recovery Bound Revenue Budget For the year ending 12/31/2014 Quarter Schedule of Expected Cash Collections (1) First year of operation - no beginning balance Schedule 2 – Direct Materials 1 2 3 4 Year Clients 700 1,000 1,500 1,500 $ Materials per client 1.92 1.92 1.92 1.92 Cost of Materials to be Purchased 1,344 1,920 2,880 2,880 9,024 (All direct materials paid for in cash.) Recovery Bound Direct Materials Budget For the year ending 12/31/2014 Quarter
  • 38. P a g e | 38 Schedule 3 – Direct Labor 1 2 3 4 Year Full Time Staff 15 17 20 20 Hours/person/quarter 520 520 520 520 Average Salary/hour 12 12 12 12 Total Direct Labor Cost 93,600 106,080 124,800 124,800 449,280 Direct Labor Budget For the year ending 12/31/2014 Quarter Recovery Bound Schedule 4 – Overhead 1 2 3 4 Year Sq Ft Office 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 Real Estate Cost (@ $10/sq-ft/year) 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 Office Fit-out (@ $40/sq-ft/yr) - incremental over year 200,000 100,000 100,000 Total Overhead Cost 225,000 125,000 125,000 25,000 500,000 Less Depreciation 0 0 0 0 0 Cash Disbursements for Overhead 225,000 125,000 125,000 25,000 500,000 Total Overhead 500,000 Budgeted Clients 4,700 Predetermined Overhead Rate per Client per Quarter 106 Recovery Bound Overhead Budget For the year ending 12/31/2014 Quarter Schedule 5 – Selling and Administrative 1 2 3 4 Year Budgeted Customers 700 1,000 1,500 1,500 1,175 Variable Selling and Administrative Expense per Customer 2 2 2 2 Variable Selling and Administrative Expense 1,400 2,000 3,000 3,000 9,400 Fixed Selling and Adminstrative Expense Advertising 500 500 750 1,000 2,750 Insurance/Bonding 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 10,000 Total Fixed Selling and Administrative Expense 3,000 3,000 3,250 3,500 12,750 Total Selling and Administrative Expense (Cash Disbursements) 4,400 5,000 6,250 6,500 22,150 For the year ending 12/31/2014 Quarter Recovery Bound Selling and Administrative Budget
  • 39. P a g e | 39 Schedule 6 – Cash Budget Schedule 1 2 3 4 Year Cash Balance - Beginning 0 31,077 34,027 70,447 0 Add Receipts Collections from Customers 1 107,250 216,950 302,750 345,700 972,650 Total Cash Available 107,250 248,027 336,777 416,147 972,650 Less Disbursements Direct Materials 2 1,344 1,920 2,880 2,880 9,024 Direct Labor 3 93,600 106,080 124,800 124,800 449,280 Overhead 4 225,000 125,000 125,000 25,000 500,000 Selling and Administrative 5 4,400 5,000 6,250 6,500 22,150 Equipment Purchases 51,829 0 0 0 51,829 Total Disbursements 376,173 238,000 258,930 159,180 1,032,283 Excess (Definciency) of Cash (268,923) 10,027 77,847 256,967 (59,633) Financing Borrowing (at beginning of period) 300,000 50,000 0 350,000 Repayments (at end of period) (20,000) (100,000) (120,000) Interest (@ 8% annual) 0 (6,000) (7,400) (7,400) (20,800) Total Financing 300,000 24,000 (7,400) (107,400) 209,200 Cash Balance Ending 31,077 34,027 70,447 149,567 149,567 Recovery Bound Cash Budget For the year ending 12/31/2014 Quarter
  • 40. P a g e | 40 Appendix B – Break Even Analysis Cost Description Fixed Costs ($) Inventory or Materials 9,024$ Salaries (includes payroll taxes) 449,280 Advertising 2,750 Rent 100,000 Insurance 10,000 Interest 26,300 Principal portion of debt payment 40,000 Total Fixed Expenses $ 637,354 Total Variable Expenses Breakeven Sales level = $ 637,354 Revenue/client/quarter 175$ Revenue/client/year 700$ Required clients for breakeven 911
  • 41. P a g e | 41 Appendix C – Example Brochure
  • 42. P a g e | 42
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