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Compromise

Compromise

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    Compromise Compromise Presentation Transcript

    • Galapagos Adaptations Exploring how species have adapted to their island environments over time.
    • Galapagos Animal Gallery
      • The paired photographs you will see depict similar animals of the same size.
      • Compare these images carefully.
      • List any differences you notice, no matter how small.
      • Briefly describe each animal’s habitat and diet.
    • Marine Iguana Land Iguana (2006). Darwin & the Galapagos Islands. Retrieved January 4, 2007, from Go Visit Galapagos Web site: http://www.govisitgalapagos.com/darwin/default.asp National Science Teachers Association, NSTA Galapagos. Retrieved January 4, 2007, from Classroom Investigations: Galapagos Adaptations Web site: http://pubs.nsta.org/galapagos/activities/gallery/gallery2.html
    • Marine Iguana Land Iguana (Jan 3, 2007). Photos/Mixed Selection. Retrieved January 9, 2007, from www.CQJ.dk Travelling, Sports Fishing & Photography Web site: http://www.cqj.dk/mix-photo-eng.htm (2007). Galapagos Pictures, Galapagos Wildlife. Retrieved January 9, 2007, from in-quito.com Galapagos Pictures Web site: http://www.in-quito.com/galapagos/pictures-2.htm
    • Saddleback Tortoise Domed Tortoise National Science Teachers Association, NSTA Galapagos. Retrieved January 4, 2007, from Classroom Investigations: Galapagos Adaptations Web site: http://pubs.nsta.org/galapagos/activities/gallery/gallery2.html National Science Teachers Association, NSTA Galapagos. Retrieved January 4, 2007, from Classroom Investigations: Galapagos Adaptations Web site: http://pubs.nsta.org/galapagos/activities/gallery/gallery2.html
    • Saddleback Tortoise Domed Tortoise (2007). Galapagos Islands Guided Tour. Retrieved January 9, 2007, from AGalapagos Islands Guided Tour - Isla Santa Cruz, Ecuador Web site: http:// www.discovergalapagos.com/santacru.html (2006). Tortoise T-Shirts. Retrieved January 9, 2007, from JungleWalk.com Gifts for Animal Lovers Web site: http://www.junglewalk.com/shop/Tortoise-t-shirts.htm
    • Flightless Cormorant Cormorant National Science Teachers Association, NSTA Galapagos. Retrieved January 4, 2007, from Classroom Investigations: Galapagos Adaptations Web site: http://pubs.nsta.org/galapagos/activities/gallery/gallery2.html National Science Teachers Association, NSTA Galapagos. Retrieved January 4, 2007, from Classroom Investigations: Galapagos Adaptations Web site: http://pubs.nsta.org/galapagos/activities/gallery/gallery2.html
    • Flightless Cormorant Cormorant (2007). Cormorant Showing Off Photo. Retrieved January 9, 2007, from TrekNature Web site: http://www.treknature.com/gallery/North_America/Canada/photo45462.htm (2007). Flightless Cormorant. Retrieved January 9, 2007, from ARKive: Images of Life on Earth Web site: http:// www.arkive.org/species/GES/birds/Phalacrocorax_harrisi /
      • Is the only sea-going iguana in the world
      • Flat tail
      • Square nose
      • Dark coloration
      • Partially webbed feet
      • Coloration camouflages them in the dark lava on which they live
        • Enables iguanas of all ages to absorb more heat from the sun
      Marine Iguana
      • A large relative of the South American and Caribbean terrestrial iguana
      • Round tail
      • Pointed nose
      • Brownish-red in color on top
      • Yellow-orange underneath
      • Eats grass and other ground plants, especially the large prickly-pear cactus.
      Land Iguana
    • Marine Iguana
      • Lives near the water
      • Lives in dry regions on land
      Land Iguana vs.
      • Dark color
      • Short snout
      • Long claws for gripping rocks
      • Light color
      • Long snout
      • Short claws
      National Science Teachers Association, NSTA Galapagos. Retrieved January 4, 2007, from Classroom Investigations: Galapagos Adaptations Web site: http://pubs.nsta.org/galapagos/activities/gallery/gallery2.html (2006). Darwin & the Galapagos Islands. Retrieved January 4, 2007, from Go Visit Galapagos Web site: http://www.govisitgalapagos.com/darwin/default.asp
      • One of the major groups of giant tortoises in the Galapagos Islands
      • Arched carapace (shell) in the front
      • Long legs
      • Long snout
      • Long neck that allows it to reach for its food high above the ground
      • Found in the dry areas of Espanola, Pinzon, Pinta, and Fernandina Islands
      Saddleback Tortoise
      • One of the major groups of giant tortoises in the Galapagos Islands
      • Rounded shell
      • Blunt snout
      • Shorter neck
      • Found on islands with rich vegetation (like Santa Cruz and Isabela)
      • Larger and heavier
      • Rounded shell allows it to move through the thick vegetation more easily than the saddleback tortoise
      Domed Tortoise
      • Lives in dry region
      vs.
      • Lives in an area of thick vegetation
      Saddleback Tortoise Domed Tortoise
      • Eats leaves high in trees
      • Highly arched shell opening
      • Long neck
      • Long legs
      • Eats grasses and leaves close to ground
      • Low, rounded shell opening
      • Short neck
      • Short legs
      National Science Teachers Association, NSTA Galapagos. Retrieved January 4, 2007, from Classroom Investigations: Galapagos Adaptations Web site: http://pubs.nsta.org/galapagos/activities/gallery/gallery2.html National Science Teachers Association, NSTA Galapagos. Retrieved January 4, 2007, from Classroom Investigations: Galapagos Adaptations Web site: http://pubs.nsta.org/galapagos/activities/gallery/gallery2.html
      • Found only in the Galapagos
      • Dark with black coloration above and brown underneath
      • Streamlined body
      • Strong legs
      • Sparsely feathered vestigial wings
        • The wings are small and useless for flight
      • Webbed feet
      • Uses its strong legs and webbed feet to swim and capture fish, eels, and octopuses
      Flightless Cormorant
      • 28 other living species of cormorants, all of which use their wings for flight
      • Well-developed wing muscles, making their bodies thicker than the flightless cormorant
      • Legs are much more refined because they do not use them for swimming that much
      • Eat mainly fish
      Cormorant
    • Flightless Cormorant
      • Found only in the Galapagos
      • Not found in the Galapagos
      vs. Cormorant
      • Thick, strong legs for swimming
      • Small, vestigial wings
      • Streamlined body for swimming
      • Long, well-developed wings
      • Slender Legs
      • Heavier body
      National Science Teachers Association, NSTA Galapagos. Retrieved January 4, 2007, from Classroom Investigations: Galapagos Adaptations Web site: http://pubs.nsta.org/galapagos/activities/gallery/gallery2.html National Science Teachers Association, NSTA Galapagos. Retrieved January 4, 2007, from Classroom Investigations: Galapagos Adaptations Web site: http://pubs.nsta.org/galapagos/activities/gallery/gallery2.html
    • Looking at Habitat Adaptations
      • Choose one animal from each pair.
      • Explain how the traits you observed may help the animal survive or thrive in its habitat.
      • Give at least three examples of different traits and explain each one.
      • How have isolation and the unique conditions of the Galapagos Islands given rise to the unusual features of Galapagos animals?
      • Would they survive if they were introduced into similar ecosystems elsewhere in the world?
      • What kind of adaptations would allow existing Galapagos animals to survive in other habitats around the world? (Remember, organisms can’t adapt because they want to or need to.)
      Final Questions