HBSC – significance of findings to WHO     Launch of the international HBSC                  report                2 May 2...
Vision of Health 2020  “… a WHO European Region where all people  are enabled and supported in achieving their  full healt...
Health 2020 • Health and health equity are important to the   development of a country. • Addressing the social determinan...
WHO European review on social determinants andthe health divide  •   Provide evidence on the nature and magnitude of healt...
Health 2020- task group on early years, education and family  Case studies from WHO/HBSC forum sessions   addressing:  • s...
Europe: a global leader in NCD’s        Problem   Ranking among                  WHO regions
Child and adolescent health strategy –the goal      To enable children and adolescents in Europe to      reach their full ...
Four guiding principles  • Life-course approach – from prenatal life to    adolescence  • Equity – account explicitly for ...
WHO tools for adolescents                            All topics in the series                                Young people’...
WHO information on health and well-beingof children and adolescentsWHO has                      WHO needsMortality data (p...
HBSC key findings: country comparisonsAre some countries doing better at that others in nurturinghealth of young people?•C...
Emerging issues Social determinants of adolescent health and well-being: •‘Healthy and connected’: social and material ass...
Final word - repeatedHBSC provides a rich source of data that can betranslated into useful intelligence:   • to inform and...
Thank you!
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HBSC Survey: Significance of findings to WHO

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World Health Organization response to findings from the HBSC survey. Presented at the HBSC/WHO International report launch by Vivian Barnekow, May 2nd 2012.

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HBSC Survey: Significance of findings to WHO

  1. 1. HBSC – significance of findings to WHO Launch of the international HBSC report 2 May 2012, Edinburgh Vivian Barnekow Programme Manager Child and Adolescent Health WHO, Regional office for Europe
  2. 2. Vision of Health 2020 “… a WHO European Region where all people are enabled and supported in achieving their full health potential and well-being and in which countries, individually and jointly, work towards reducing inequalities in health within the Region and beyond.”
  3. 3. Health 2020 • Health and health equity are important to the development of a country. • Addressing the social determinants of health and the reduction of related health inequities are centre stage in Health 2020. • Health is a fundamental human right and an essential resource for sustainable economic, social and human development. • Addressing the social determinants of health and tackling health inequities requires a systematic, whole-of-government approach.
  4. 4. WHO European review on social determinants andthe health divide • Provide evidence on the nature and magnitude of health inequities across the Region and their relationship to social determinants • Investigate gaps in capacity and knowledge to improve health through action on social determinants • Synthesize evidence on the most promising policy options and interventions for addressing social determinants and reducing health inequities in diverse country contexts
  5. 5. Health 2020- task group on early years, education and family Case studies from WHO/HBSC forum sessions addressing: • socioeconomic determinants of healthy eating and physical activity • social cohesion for mental well-being • socio-environmentally determined health inequities Case studies from Schools for Health in Europe network
  6. 6. Europe: a global leader in NCD’s Problem Ranking among WHO regions
  7. 7. Child and adolescent health strategy –the goal To enable children and adolescents in Europe to reach their full potential for health and development and to reduce the burden of avoidable disease and mortality
  8. 8. Four guiding principles • Life-course approach – from prenatal life to adolescence • Equity – account explicitly for needs of the most disadvantaged • Intersectoral action • Participation of public and young people
  9. 9. WHO tools for adolescents All topics in the series Young people’s health as a whole- of-society response. Evidence for gender responsive actions: • Mental health • Overweight and obesity • Violence • Injuries and substance abuse • Well-being • Chronic conditions GENDER ISSUES • Adolescent pregnancy • HIV/AIDS and STIs
  10. 10. WHO information on health and well-beingof children and adolescentsWHO has WHO needsMortality data (partly) Adolescent health dataMorbidity data (partly) • Age disaggregatedHealth behaviours data • Sex disaggregated (adults only) • Health behavioursOverweight and obesity • Social determinants (some Countries) • Well-beingMisc reports on injuries, violence, mental health…
  11. 11. HBSC key findings: country comparisonsAre some countries doing better at that others in nurturinghealth of young people?•Caution: Rankings of countries sometimes are based on very small percentage differences•Also we see now that it is not only average ranking but extent of inequalities that is important•Countries can do well in one area but not so well in another•To comprehensively compare, countries would need to do a complex analysis of prevalences,rankings, absolute and relative improvements over time, extent of inequalities and how these areimproving or not•Countries who participate in regular HBSC surveys can make this assessment which will give policymakers a clear steer on issues they should be tackling in their country
  12. 12. Emerging issues Social determinants of adolescent health and well-being: •‘Healthy and connected’: social and material assets influence health •‘Gender differences and gender equalization’: gendered patterns of health, wellbeing and risk •‘Ages and stages’: critical changes in health and social conditions among girls and boys Efforts need to be made to focus on the social determinants influencing health of young people. Girls’ health and behavior appears to be more susceptible to changes with age and effects of affluence. We need to use this knowledge in designing programs and policies for girls’ health improvement
  13. 13. Final word - repeatedHBSC provides a rich source of data that can betranslated into useful intelligence: • to inform and guide policy and practice • to improve the health of all young people • to limit the impact of social inequalities • and invest sufficiently to build on early years
  14. 14. Thank you!

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