Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé
• Traduction simultanéeSimultaneous translation• Français / French : canal 2• Anglais / English : canal 3  Ensemble, améli...
Allocutions d’ouverture                     Jean-Paul Delevoye,                     président, Conseil économique,        ...
Première session Les choix en santé :qui choisit, pour qui ?                   Modérateur                   Alain Cordier,...
Liste des intervenantsYves Daudigny, rapporteur général, commission des affairessociales, SénatAlexander Eggermont, direct...
Erik Schokkaert                            Professeur d’économie publique,                            KU Leuven (Belgique)...
Les apportsde la justice sociale Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ?   7
Introduction       Should an economist        talk about ethics, i.e.     about justice and solidarity           in health...
1. Increasing health care expendituresStrong concern about the budgetary consequences ofsharply increasing health care in ...
A welfare criterionQUESTION: “From a social welfare standpoint, howmuch should the nation spend on health care, and whatis...
Argument 1: "as we get older and richer, which is morevaluable: a third car, yet another television, moreclothing – or an ...
2. The challenge of solidarityWillingness-to-pay for social insurance is not evident:• limited transparency of collective ...
A double challengeIf we fall back on private financing, huge inequalities willemerge.Necessary to “mobilize” willingness t...
3. Solidarity: general principles?Argument: "life and health are priceless". Leads tounacceptable policy prescriptions:• S...
Some general principles1. Health care is only important as an input in health:• certainly for the low SES-groups other pol...
2. Health is only important as one dimension of well-   being:• how to trade off the different dimensions of life against ...
3. Not everything is possible. Choices within health care   system should be guided by effect on well-being,   taking into...
Need for transparencyNot being explicit about priorities leads to grossinjustices:• better organized patient groups are be...
Transparency and taboo trade-offsPsychological research has pointed to the distinctionbetween so-called "sacred values“ an...
Psychological and social mechanisms to avoid explicittaboo trade-offs:• smoke screens and “secret” committees;• presentati...
4. Implications for priority-settingExplicit priority setting is needed to answer two(linked!) questions:a. What share of ...
1. Role of the medical profession?TWO DIFFERENT ROLES:Global decision making• Medical specialists are obviously indispensa...
An example•"How much will Herceptin really cost?"                                                           Bron: Barrett ...
2. Role of the patient groups?Patient groups should be represented in the process ofdecision-making.Two functions:• Provid...
3. Role of the economists?Collection of information on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is essential for a thorough ev...
QuestionsThe two crucial questions are not adequately tackledwith the presently used techniques:• what is the optimal size...
4. Role of the political decision-makers?Organize an open debate on (the limits of) solidarity withwell-defined and transp...
ConclusionThe main challenge for the future is solidarity.In a context with increasing pressure on governmentbudgets, prot...
Table rondeLes choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ?   29
Liste des intervenantsYves Daudigny, rapporteur général, commission des affairessociales, SénatAlexander Eggermont, direct...
Alain Cordier                  Modérateur                  membre du Collège,                  Haute Autorité de SantéEnse...
Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé
• Traduction simultanéeSimultaneous translation• Français / French : canal 2• Anglais / English : canal 3  Ensemble, améli...
Deuxième session         Comment choisir ?La place de l’évaluation économique                          Modérateur         ...
Liste des intervenantsLuc Baumstark, conseiller scientifique, Commission QUINET, Centred’analyse stratégique – économiste,...
Josep Figueras(représenté par Peter Smith)                           Coordinateur, Observatoire européen                  ...
Choix en santé :exemples dans les systèmes    de santé européens     Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique...
Financial Crisis in the EU:The Health Systems Response/The Good, the Bad & the Ugly                            “Ladies and...
The options1.   Raise extra statutory revenues ...2.   Ration coverage: Shifting to private expenditure?3.   Improve perfo...
Health budget Health Impact on Economic Productivity                Health SystemsDemonstrate performance!!!              ...
Rationing Health ServicesCoverage dimensions        •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique   41
User Charges Impact on Costs & Health Lusardi et al. 2010 “Reductions in routine care today might lead to undetected illne...
Improving purchasingSupply side reforms have more scope for cutting costsand increasing efficiency than demand side polici...
Improving purchasing 2More difficult reforms to implement:Rationalising hospital services, stronger PHC• closures, mergers...
Improve performanceRestructuring care delivery• Hospital closures, mergers,.. DK, GR, LT, PT, SI• Shifting to outpatient s...
Improve performance (2)Reduced / freeze professional salaries & pensions• CY, FR, GR, IE, LT, ROM• EN, PT, SI• Hospital cl...
ConcludingThe Good: contain costs & enhance performance•   Countercyclical spending•   Pharmaceutical policies (prices, pr...
Concluding …The Bad: contain costs but undermine performance• User charges• Ration coverage• Public health reductionsThe U...
Conclusion       Short-term solutions during crisis, but….      Aim for sustainable efficiency gains      Crisis unprecede...
Peter Smith                          Professeur de politiques de la santé,                          Imperial College Londo...
Principes économiquespour l’élaboration des choix          en santé     Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économi...
Why efficiency matters in health careConventional market disciplines are weak in healthcareWithout attention to efficiency...
Efficiency: some preliminary issuesEfficiency as a ratio of valued outputs to costly inputsInefficiency often considered a...
Future healthcare spendingThe US Congressional Budget Office (2007) estimatesthat – with no policy change – total spending...
OECD RankingsDeterminants of life expectancy•   Health care spending•   Education•   GDP•   Pollution•   Alcohol•   Tobacc...
Country-specific effects (life years)Joumard et al (2008)                                                                I...
Two fundamental challengesEx ante assessment of priorities. What will be providedfrom the statutory package of health care...
Assessing prioritiesThere will always be excess demand for health servicesthat are free (or low cost) at the point of deli...
Is cost-effectiveness analysis ‘the only showin town’?Coherent and robust approach to setting priorities and limitinggrowt...
Interest groups includeGeographical interestsAge groupsSocial groups (income, ethnicity)TaxpayersVotersPatient groupsClini...
Cost-effectiveness analysis as a ‘referee’Sets explicit ‘rules of the game’, for delegation to aregulator (NICE etc)Remove...
Impact on practiceMost direct impact                        Little direct impact•   Israel                                ...
Purchasing wisely: most promisingmechanisms?National level• Best practice guidelines• Quality standards, information and p...
How can the biggest efficiency gains besecured? Some tentative thoughts.Reconfiguration of services• New service delivery ...
Some concluding observationsHealth care priority setting an intensely political processNumerous interest groups (and subgr...
Mark Sculpher                          Professeur au centre d’économie                          de la santé, Université de...
Méthodes d’évaluation :enjeux de la médecine    personnalisée   Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique   67
The challenge of health care decisions                               Resource                              constrained New...
Measuring costs – Reflux example        •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique   69
Measuring costs – Reflux example        •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique   70
Assessing benefitsPain   Physical function     Mental wellbeing Social function Life expectancy                           ...
Assessing benefits – example of primaryangioplasty        •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique   72
Assessing benefits – example of primaryangioplasty (average patients)                                                 Incr...
Assessing benefits – example of primaryangioplasty (patient sub-groups)        •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation...
Cost effectiveness and personalisation –management of angina        •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique...
Cost effectiveness and personalisation –management of angina        •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique...
Estimating the cost effectiveness thresholdhttp://www.york.ac.uk/che/research/teehta/methodological-research/#tab-4       ...
Results from draft report                  1.00    Probability                  0.80                  0.60                ...
SummaryCost effectiveness analysis widely used internationallyto inform funding/reimbursement decisionsCritical review of ...
mark.sculpher@york.ac.ukhttp://www.york.ac.uk/che/staff/research/mark-sculpher/             •Comment choisir ? La place de...
Luc Baumstark                          Doyen de la faculté de sciences                          économiques et de gestion,...
Calcul économique public :    donner une valeur à ce qui n’a pas de prix    Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation éco...
Une histoire ancienne          « Comment mesurer l’utilité publique,          tel sera l’objet de nos recherches »“ Des en...
D’une intuition simple   à un outil de calcul opératoire complexeUne mesure dans l’incertain        -   Calcul probabilist...
Les malentendus et l’ambitionLes malentendus « entretenus »• Un calcul financier, un calcul privé, un calcul technocratiqu...
Donner une valeur à ce qui n’a pas de prix :élaboration d’un référentielDes valeurs scientifiquement fondées…• Caractérise...
Donner une valeur à ce qui n’a pas de prix :élaboration d’un référentiel… en phase avec la hiérarchie des valeurs de la so...
Donner une valeur à ce qui n’a pas de prix :élaboration d’un référentiel… appropriable par les acteurs publics et privés• ...
La production « séquentielle » de référentiels    méthodologiques et de valeurs tutélaires     Travail mené au Commissaria...
La valeur statistique de la vie humainePréoccupation dans le secteur des transports :Insécurité routière : risque décèsImp...
Table rondeComment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique   91
Liste des intervenantsLuc Baumstark, conseiller scientifique, Commission QUINET, Centred’analyse stratégique – économiste,...
Lise Rochaix                  Modérateur                  membre du Collège,                  Haute Autorité de SantéEnsem...
Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé
Conclusion                  Jean-Luc Harousseau,                  président, Haute Autorité de SantéEnsemble, améliorons l...
Chacun des intervenants a déclaré ses liens d’intérêtavec les industries de santé en rapport avec le thème de           la...
La Haute Autorité de Santé vous remercie     d’avoir participé à ce colloque             www.has-sante.fr       Ensemble, ...
Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Colloque HAS - L'évaluation économique en santé

1,056 views

Published on

La Haute Autorité de Santé a organisé le 22 novembre 2012 au Palais d'Iéna, Paris un Colloque dédié à l'évaluation économique en santé et en particulier à la thématique : économie, éthique et choix en santé. Le diaporama de cette manifestation est désormais disponible. Les actes seront mis en ligne vers la mi-décembre.

Consulter notre page dédiée : http://www.has-sante.fr/portail/jcms/c_1332723/colloque-has-paris-22-novembre-2012?xtmc=&xtcr=3

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,056
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Colloque HAS - L'évaluation économique en santé

  1. 1. Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé
  2. 2. • Traduction simultanéeSimultaneous translation• Français / French : canal 2• Anglais / English : canal 3 Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé 2
  3. 3. Allocutions d’ouverture Jean-Paul Delevoye, président, Conseil économique, social et environnemental Jean-Luc Harousseau, président, Haute Autorité de Santé Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé 3
  4. 4. Première session Les choix en santé :qui choisit, pour qui ? Modérateur Alain Cordier, membre du Collège, Haute Autorité de Santé Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé 4
  5. 5. Liste des intervenantsYves Daudigny, rapporteur général, commission des affairessociales, SénatAlexander Eggermont, directeur, Institut Gustave RoussyHervé Gisserot, président, LIRChristian Saout, président, Collectif interassociatif sur la santéErik Schokkaert, Professeur d’économie publique,Ku Leuven (Belgique) Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 5
  6. 6. Erik Schokkaert Professeur d’économie publique, KU Leuven (Belgique)Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 6
  7. 7. Les apportsde la justice sociale Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 7
  8. 8. Introduction Should an economist talk about ethics, i.e. about justice and solidarity in health care? •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 8
  9. 9. 1. Increasing health care expendituresStrong concern about the budgetary consequences ofsharply increasing health care in collectively financedhealth care systems.Innovation is the main cause of the strong increase inhealth care expenditures (>50%).Cutting expenditures not necessarily welfare-optimal.Obvious that one should compare costs and benefits. •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 9
  10. 10. A welfare criterionQUESTION: “From a social welfare standpoint, howmuch should the nation spend on health care, and whatis the time path of optimal health spending?”Trade-off between health (care) expenditures and otheruses of the available resources.“Willingness to pay” as a criterion (but be aware ofdistributional consequences!) •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 10
  11. 11. Argument 1: "as we get older and richer, which is morevaluable: a third car, yet another television, moreclothing – or an extra year of life?" (Hall and Jones,Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2007).Argument 2: complementarity – "Improvements in lifeexpectancy raise willingness to pay for further healthimprovements by increasing the value of remaining life.This means that advances against one disease, sayheart disease, raise the value of progress against otherage-related ailments such as cancer or Alzheimers"(Murphy and Topel, Journal of Political Economy, 2006). •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 11
  12. 12. 2. The challenge of solidarityWillingness-to-pay for social insurance is not evident:• limited transparency of collective financing: insurance element not always sufficiently clear.• compulsory systems of health care financing impose a degree of solidarity that goes well beyond “enlightened” self-interest. •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 12
  13. 13. A double challengeIf we fall back on private financing, huge inequalities willemerge.Necessary to “mobilize” willingness to pay of thecitizens:• emphasize the insurance aspect.• increase the efficiency of the system.• strengthen solidarity and make it more transparent: explicit priority- setting is necessary to safeguard solidarity. •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 13
  14. 14. 3. Solidarity: general principles?Argument: "life and health are priceless". Leads tounacceptable policy prescriptions:• Should we really spend all available resources on health care until the last Euro would buy no gain in health (or life expectancy) at all?Some general principles? •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 14
  15. 15. Some general principles1. Health care is only important as an input in health:• certainly for the low SES-groups other policy domains might be more important: education, housing, environment.• even from a health perspective, it may therefore be optimal to slow down innovation (e.g. in medicines). •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 15
  16. 16. 2. Health is only important as one dimension of well- being:• how to trade off the different dimensions of life against each other?• preferences of individuals (and of nations) have to be respected.• the relative importance of material consumption will be larger for poorer individuals/societies. •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 16
  17. 17. 3. Not everything is possible. Choices within health care system should be guided by effect on well-being, taking into account distributional issues. Solidarity implies that a larger weight is given to the poor. •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 17
  18. 18. Need for transparencyNot being explicit about priorities leads to grossinjustices:• better organized patient groups are better treated;• short run political considerations (media influence) play an important role in the decisions;• emotional arguments supersede informed ethical choices.Secrecy makes the “solidarity” concept less crediblefor the citizens. •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 18
  19. 19. Transparency and taboo trade-offsPsychological research has pointed to the distinctionbetween so-called "sacred values“ and “vulgar values”:• routine trade-offs• tragic trade-offs• taboo trade-offs"Opportunity costs be damned, some trade-offs should never beproposed, some statistical truths never used, and some lines ofcausal/counterfactual inquiry never pursued" (Tetlock, 2003). •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 19
  20. 20. Psychological and social mechanisms to avoid explicittaboo trade-offs:• smoke screens and “secret” committees;• presentation of difficult ethical choices as if they are technical (cost- effectiveness analysis and economic evaluation);• rhetorical tricks to transform taboo trade-offs in one of the other forms;• introduction of a strict distinction between “economic” and “ethical” issues. •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 20
  21. 21. 4. Implications for priority-settingExplicit priority setting is needed to answer two(linked!) questions:a. What share of GDP should go to collective health insurance?b. Which treatments should be included in the collective insurance package?Solidarity requires that we reason within a coherentframework, specifying different weights for differentgroups of people (larger weights for the poor and forthe severely ill). •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 21
  22. 22. 1. Role of the medical profession?TWO DIFFERENT ROLES:Global decision making• Medical specialists are obviously indispensable to judge the effectiveness of different treatments.• Yet, these evaluations should be integrated in a global context: available means are not unlimited.Individual provider-patient relationship• Ideally, individual providers should NOT be confronted with “rationing” decisions. •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 22
  23. 23. An example•"How much will Herceptin really cost?" Bron: Barrett et al., BMJ, 2006 •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 23
  24. 24. 2. Role of the patient groups?Patient groups should be represented in the process ofdecision-making.Two functions:• Provide information about their real-life situation: presence of patients essential to go beyond “accounting” decisions.• Take reimbursement decisions:  Balanced representation necessary. Unequal lobbying powers may lead to gross inequities.  One-sided decisions should be avoided: other agents (payers) are equally important. •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 24
  25. 25. 3. Role of the economists?Collection of information on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is essential for a thorough evaluation ofnew medicines.Yet, the present methodology of cost-effectivenesscalculations is deeply unsatisfactory (despite the factthat cost-effectiveness studies have become a smallindustry). Too soon for codification! •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 25
  26. 26. QuestionsThe two crucial questions are not adequately tackledwith the presently used techniques:• what is the optimal size of the health care budget?• how to integrate equity considerations into the analysis?Priority setting is not a technical, but an ethical andpolitical issue. •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 26
  27. 27. 4. Role of the political decision-makers?Organize an open debate on (the limits of) solidarity withwell-defined and transparant procedures.“Accountability for reasonableness” (Norman Daniels):• Decisions and their rationales must be publicly acessible.• There must be opportunities for challenge and opportunities for revision of policies in the light of new evidence.• Rationales for priority-setting should aim to provide a reasonable explanation, i.e. an explanation appealing to evidence, reasons and principles accepted as relevant by fair-minded people.• There must be public regulation of the process to ensure that the other conditions are met. •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 27
  28. 28. ConclusionThe main challenge for the future is solidarity.In a context with increasing pressure on governmentbudgets, protecting solidarity implies making ittransparent.In a civilized society, there should be an open debate:all players should try to be as explicit as possible abouttheir understanding of the concept of solidarity(no smoke screens).Policies should be transparent, and techniques shouldbe developed which aim at coherency and at theremoval of ad-hocery. •Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 28
  29. 29. Table rondeLes choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 29
  30. 30. Liste des intervenantsYves Daudigny, rapporteur général, commission des affairessociales, SénatAlexander Eggermont, directeur, Institut Gustave RoussyHervé Gisserot, président, LIRChristian Saout, président, Collectif interassociatif sur la santéErik Schokkaert, Professeur d’économie publique,Ku Leuven (Belgique) Les choix en santé : qui choisit, pour qui ? 30
  31. 31. Alain Cordier Modérateur membre du Collège, Haute Autorité de SantéEnsemble, améliorons la qualité en santé 31
  32. 32. Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé
  33. 33. • Traduction simultanéeSimultaneous translation• Français / French : canal 2• Anglais / English : canal 3 Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé 33
  34. 34. Deuxième session Comment choisir ?La place de l’évaluation économique Modérateur Lise Rochaix, membre du Collège, Haute Autorité de Santé Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé 34
  35. 35. Liste des intervenantsLuc Baumstark, conseiller scientifique, Commission QUINET, Centred’analyse stratégique – économiste, Université de LyonJosep Figueras (représenté par Peter Smith), coordinateur,Observatoire européen des systèmes et des politiques de santé, OMSGilles Johanet, procureur général, Cour des comptesMark Sculpher, professeur au centre d’économie de la santé, Universitéde York (UK)Peter Smith, professeur de politiques de la santé,Imperial College London (UK)Jérôme Wittwer, professeur, Laboratoire d’Économie de Dauphine –Laboratoire d’Économie et de Gestion des Organisations de Santé Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 35
  36. 36. Josep Figueras(représenté par Peter Smith) Coordinateur, Observatoire européen des systèmes et des politiques de santé, OMS Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 36
  37. 37. Choix en santé :exemples dans les systèmes de santé européens Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 37
  38. 38. Financial Crisis in the EU:The Health Systems Response/The Good, the Bad & the Ugly “Ladies and Gentlemen we have no money! Now we need to think!“ •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 38
  39. 39. The options1. Raise extra statutory revenues ...2. Ration coverage: Shifting to private expenditure?3. Improve performance: Squeeze efficiency?4. Protect the health budget: Health & Wealth?5. Act on health determinants: Health in All Policies?6. Concluding: the Good, the Bad & the Ugly •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 39
  40. 40. Health budget Health Impact on Economic Productivity Health SystemsDemonstrate performance!!! Direct contribution Societal to the economy Well-being Health Wealth Effects of ill health on economic growth Figueras J, McKee M 2011 •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 40
  41. 41. Rationing Health ServicesCoverage dimensions •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 41
  42. 42. User Charges Impact on Costs & Health Lusardi et al. 2010 “Reductions in routine care today might lead to undetected illness tomorrow and reduced individual health and well-being in the more distant future.” •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 42
  43. 43. Improving purchasingSupply side reforms have more scope for cutting costsand increasing efficiency than demand side policiesMany EURO strengthened policies to reduce the pricesof medical goods or improve the rational use of drugs• Austria, Belgium, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, the Czech Republic, France, Estonia, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, FYR Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Turkey• Wide variety of measures  generic substitution  Improve quality of prescribing  claw-back mechanisms  negotiations on prices •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 43
  44. 44. Improving purchasing 2More difficult reforms to implement:Rationalising hospital services, stronger PHC• closures, mergers and centralisation (Denmark, Greece, Latvia, Portugal, Slovenia)• shift towards outpatient care (Belarus, Ireland, Greece, Lithuania)• Increased shift from inpatient to ambulatory and/or primary care (Ireland, Greece, Hungary, Lithuania, Netherlands)• Improve coordination with or investment in primary care (Lithuania, Netherlands)Reforms in purchasing & payment systems• Introduce case mix / payment for performance e.g. Austria, Hungary, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Moldova• Reduce/freeze prices paid to providers, reduction of salaries of health professionals e.g. Cyprus, France, Greece, Ireland, Lithuania, Romania, England, Portugal, Slovenia •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 44
  45. 45. Improve performanceRestructuring care delivery• Hospital closures, mergers,.. DK, GR, LT, PT, SI• Shifting to outpatient settings IR,GR, LT• Strengthen primary care LT,NLRestructuring Admin. SHI & MoH - 8 countriesPharmaceuticals & medical devices -18 countries• Price reduction, procurement reforms• Strengthening prescribing, promoting generics• Positive lists, public awareness campaigns Mladovsky P. Thomson S. Evetovits T. Cylus J. Karanikolos M. McKee M. Figueras J. 2012 •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 45
  46. 46. Improve performance (2)Reduced / freeze professional salaries & pensions• CY, FR, GR, IE, LT, ROM• EN, PT, SI• Hospital closures, mergers,.. DK, GR, LT, PT, SIReform provider payment methods• Reduce price for services EE, IE, RO, SI• Introduce DRGs in BG, CZ• Pay for Performance & Capitation in PHC Mladovsky P. Thomson S. Evetovits T. Cylus J. Karanikolos M. McKee M. Figueras J. 2012 •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 46
  47. 47. ConcludingThe Good: contain costs & enhance performance• Countercyclical spending• Pharmaceutical policies (prices, prescribing guidelines,..)• Provider payment systems• Health worker remuneration BUT migration & low moral• Prioritizing PHC• Restructuring hospital sector BUT savings not immediateThe Good – but missing.....• Protecting the budget (argue for Health & Wealth)• Strengthening Public Health •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 47
  48. 48. Concluding …The Bad: contain costs but undermine performance• User charges• Ration coverage• Public health reductionsThe Ugly: lowers health and efficiency• Large budget cuts regardless of effects  The Troika & Self imposed austerity• Large coverage reductions• Target cost cutting to vulnerable groups •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 48
  49. 49. Conclusion Short-term solutions during crisis, but…. Aim for sustainable efficiency gains Crisis unprecedented opportunity for change Preparedness, political vision & leadership The political economy / implementation •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 49
  50. 50. Peter Smith Professeur de politiques de la santé, Imperial College London (UK)Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 50
  51. 51. Principes économiquespour l’élaboration des choix en santé Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 51
  52. 52. Why efficiency matters in health careConventional market disciplines are weak in healthcareWithout attention to efficiency, producers have fewconstraints on pricingExcessive spending places a possibly unsustainableburden on public finances (social insurance, taxation)Intergenerational equity (will young people enjoy thebenefits that older people currently enjoy?) •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 52
  53. 53. Efficiency: some preliminary issuesEfficiency as a ratio of valued outputs to costly inputsInefficiency often considered a ‘residual’ after all otherlegitimate explanations of variation have been takenaccount ofNeed to distinguish between efficiency and expenditurecontrol• Improved efficiency can arise from higher levels of attainment at the same cost, as well as lower expenditure for the same attainment.Often a need to adjust for uncontrollable constraints onbetter attainment• E.g. diet; smoking; geography •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 53
  54. 54. Future healthcare spendingThe US Congressional Budget Office (2007) estimatesthat – with no policy change – total spending on healthcare will rise from 16 percent of the US economy in 2007to• 25 percent in 2025• 37 percent in 2050• 49 percent in 2082.Congressional Budget Office. 2007. The Long-Term Outlook for Health CareSpending. Washington DC: Congress of the United States. •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 54
  55. 55. OECD RankingsDeterminants of life expectancy• Health care spending• Education• GDP• Pollution• Alcohol• Tobacco• DietResidual is health system efficiencyJoumard, I., C. Andre, C. Nicq and O. Chatal (2008) Health status determinants:lifestyle, environment, health care resources and efficiency. Economics DepartmentWorkingPaper 627. Paris: OECD. •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 55
  56. 56. Country-specific effects (life years)Joumard et al (2008) Iceland Australia New Zealand Korea Greece Canada Finland Poland Sweden France Belgium Ireland United Kingdom Czech Republic Netherlands Switzerland Austria Germany Turkey Denmark Norway Hungary United States -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 56
  57. 57. Two fundamental challengesEx ante assessment of priorities. What will be providedfrom the statutory package of health care?• What services are covered?• What limitations are placed (appropriateness)?• Are there any copayments?Ex post assessment of appropriateness, quality andcost-effectiveness. •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 57
  58. 58. Assessing prioritiesThere will always be excess demand for health servicesthat are free (or low cost) at the point of delivery:Natural tendency of patients to demand more care whenthey do not bear the full costNatural tendency of providers to offer more care whenincome depends on volume of treatmentSo mechanisms are needed to curb expenditure growthand inefficiencyMethods need to ensure that limited funds are spent tomaximum effect •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 58
  59. 59. Is cost-effectiveness analysis ‘the only showin town’?Coherent and robust approach to setting priorities and limitinggrowth in utilization of health services and healthcare costsAssumes objective of the health system is to• maximize production of health;• and (possibly) address health disparities.Can act as a guide to:• Selection of the ‘health basket’• Creation of treatment guidelines• Setting appropriateness rules (who gets treatment)• Setting copayment ratesReflected in national health technology assessment agenciesin Australia, England, Germany, Sweden, etc. •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 59
  60. 60. Interest groups includeGeographical interestsAge groupsSocial groups (income, ethnicity)TaxpayersVotersPatient groupsClinical professionalsProvider organizationsPharmaceutical companiesGovernments •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 60
  61. 61. Cost-effectiveness analysis as a ‘referee’Sets explicit ‘rules of the game’, for delegation to aregulator (NICE etc)Removes politicians or managers from involvement incase-by-case decisionsAllows pursuit of health system objectives• Effectiveness (maximizing health gain)• Equity (equal access for those in equal need)• Politics (resolves the resource allocation debate)• Cost containment (limits size of the health basket) •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 61
  62. 62. Impact on practiceMost direct impact Little direct impact• Israel • Denmark• New technology assessment • Netherlands• Oregon • Sweden• Continuing processes for the • Norway Medicaid ‘health basket’ • Emphasis on principles rather• New Zealand than detail• ‘Best example of effective • Reluctance to confront ‘hard’ review and evaluation’ issues• United Kingdom• NICE for new technologies Sabik, L. M. and Lie, R. K. (2008), “Priority setting in health care: lessons from the experience in eight countries”, International Journal for Equity in Health, 7(4), doi:10.1186/1475-9276-7-4 •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 62
  63. 63. Purchasing wisely: most promisingmechanisms?National level• Best practice guidelines• Quality standards, information and public reporting• Payment mechanismsLocal level• Better purchasing of health care• ‘Nudging’ clinicians (eg IT expert systems)Patients and caregivers• Better information• User charges and financial incentives• Personal healthcare budgets •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 63
  64. 64. How can the biggest efficiency gains besecured? Some tentative thoughts.Reconfiguration of services• New service delivery models, especially for chronic disease• Coordination of care, including social careInformation• Better guidelines• Comparative performance dataFunding mechanisms• Provider payment – P4P?• Bundling services – eg ‘year of care’Health-related behaviour• Lifestyle• Use of health servicesCompetition• Especially in ambulatory services •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 64
  65. 65. Some concluding observationsHealth care priority setting an intensely political processNumerous interest groups (and subgroups)Health systems need a systematic method of reconcilingcompeting claimsCost-effectiveness analysis currently the ‘best’ tool forthe processBut some major challenges remain! •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 65
  66. 66. Mark Sculpher Professeur au centre d’économie de la santé, Université de York (UK)Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 66
  67. 67. Méthodes d’évaluation :enjeux de la médecine personnalisée Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 67
  68. 68. The challenge of health care decisions Resource constrained New technologies health care Displaced services - Benefits gained - Benefits forgone system - Additional Cost - Resources released • Therapeutics • Diagnostics • Care • Service and deliveryIs the benefit gain from the new treatment greater than the benefit foregone through displacement? •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 68
  69. 69. Measuring costs – Reflux example •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 69
  70. 70. Measuring costs – Reflux example •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 70
  71. 71. Assessing benefitsPain Physical function Mental wellbeing Social function Life expectancy Preferences A generic measure of health gain Decision makingSurgery Care of the elderly Paediatrics O&G General practice Oncology •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 71
  72. 72. Assessing benefits – example of primaryangioplasty •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 72
  73. 73. Assessing benefits – example of primaryangioplasty (average patients) Incremental cost effectiveness ratio •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 73
  74. 74. Assessing benefits – example of primaryangioplasty (patient sub-groups) •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 74
  75. 75. Cost effectiveness and personalisation –management of angina •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 75
  76. 76. Cost effectiveness and personalisation –management of angina •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 76
  77. 77. Estimating the cost effectiveness thresholdhttp://www.york.ac.uk/che/research/teehta/methodological-research/#tab-4 •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 77
  78. 78. Results from draft report 1.00 Probability 0.80 0.60 11 PBCs 0.40 23 PBCs 0.20 0.00 £0 £10,000 £20,000 £30,000 £40,000 Cost per QALY threshold • Central ‘best’ estimate: £18,317 per QALY • 0.64 probability that threshold is less £20,000 per QALY • 0.92 probability that threshold is less £30,000 per QALY • Major structural uncertainties •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 78
  79. 79. SummaryCost effectiveness analysis widely used internationallyto inform funding/reimbursement decisionsCritical review of clinical and economic evidence stillessentialGeneric measure of benefit key element• QALY imperfect but the best on offerExtensive methods research to extend the QALYDeliberation to reflect range of scientific and genericvalue judgments inevitably needed for evidence-baseddecision making •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 79
  80. 80. mark.sculpher@york.ac.ukhttp://www.york.ac.uk/che/staff/research/mark-sculpher/ •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 80
  81. 81. Luc Baumstark Doyen de la faculté de sciences économiques et de gestion, Université de Lyon Conseiller scientifique, Centre Analyse StratégiqueComment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 81
  82. 82. Calcul économique public : donner une valeur à ce qui n’a pas de prix Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 82
  83. 83. Une histoire ancienne « Comment mesurer l’utilité publique, tel sera l’objet de nos recherches »“ Des enquêtes plus ou moins multipliées, des lois, des ordonnances ne ferontpas quune route, un chemin de fer, un canal soient utiles, sils ne le sont pasréellement. La loi ne devrait, pour ainsi dire, que consacrer les faits démontréspar léconomie politique. Comment doit se faire cette démonstration ? Surquelles données, sur quelle formule repose-t-elle ? Comment, en un mot, doitse mesurer lutilité publique ? Tel sera lobjet de nos recherches ”Jules Dupuit, De la mesure de lutilité publique, Annales des Ponts etChaussées, N°116, 1844 •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 83
  84. 84. D’une intuition simple à un outil de calcul opératoire complexeUne mesure dans l’incertain - Calcul probabiliste et face à l’imprévisible - Prime de risques - Valeurs d’option Risques et Incertitudes - etc Avantages et coûts sociaux Les avantages Les coûts n At  Ct VAN   I 0   La valeur sociale créée 1  a  t est-elle positive t 1 Les investissements initiaux Le taux d’actualisation Prendre en compte le temps •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 84
  85. 85. Les malentendus et l’ambitionLes malentendus « entretenus »• Un calcul financier, un calcul privé, un calcul technocratique qui se substitue aux débats et à la décision• Faire un calcul insoutenable : comment choisir entre 0 et l’infiniL’ambition : une aide à la décision• Eclairer et motiver la décision publique dans un cadre de défaillances des marchés• Calibrer et définir les niveaux optimum d’interventions (normes, réglementations, fiscalité, dédommagements)• Discriminer entre les différents investissements en intégrant les contraintes du développement durable• Montrer (ex ante, ex post) l’utilité des dépenses publiques qui créent de la valeur sociale• Assurer un minimum de cohérence dans les différents arbitrages• Optimiser l’utilisation de la ressource publique qui devient rare •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 85
  86. 86. Donner une valeur à ce qui n’a pas de prix :élaboration d’un référentielDes valeurs scientifiquement fondées…• Caractériser le phénomène (pollution, effet de serre, congestion, effets de coupure…)• Définir les impacts (dommages par exemple)• Donner une valeur économique (différents outils)• Considérer les études (plus ou moins homogènes)• Analyser les pratiques des autres administrations• Engager une négociation dans un cercle restreint• Passer de plusieurs valeurs à un référentiel reconnu et accepté (validation) •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 86
  87. 87. Donner une valeur à ce qui n’a pas de prix :élaboration d’un référentiel… en phase avec la hiérarchie des valeurs de la société ?• Un référentiel en relation avec ce que révèlent les comportements (individuel, collectif)• Un référentiel normé et contrôlé mais contestable et évolutif. (processus concertés, organisation d’un compromis le plus ouvert possible, commande et validation politique)• Un référentiel fondé sur un processus de production légitime.• Un référentiel indépendant des décisions du moment (neutralité du processus par rapport aux projets, continuité du processus de production)• Un référentiel à faible coût d’usage : Des valeurs simples et opératoires (mode d’emploi)• Un référentiel ouvert aux problématiques d’équité, d’équilibre du territoire, environnement durable •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 87
  88. 88. Donner une valeur à ce qui n’a pas de prix :élaboration d’un référentiel… appropriable par les acteurs publics et privés• Culture à diffuser : Mieux maîtriser et mieux comprendre le calcul économique (formation, diffusion de la culture du calcul économique)• Calcul intersectoriel (transport, énergie, mais aussi santé, défense, recherche, etc.)• Calcul à décliner sur les territoires : collectivités territoriales (Région)• Calcul alimenter par la recherche : Se donner les moyens de l’enrichissement du calcul économique (recherche : production de données (consentement à payer), construction de modèles, veille)• Calcul qui doit s’inscrire dans le processus de décision (règles claires à établir secteur par secteur : élaboration guidelines…)• Renforcer ou créer les dispositifs de contre-expertise (évaluation des études, renforcement des évaluations ex post) •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 88
  89. 89. La production « séquentielle » de référentiels méthodologiques et de valeurs tutélaires Travail mené au Commissariat Général du Plan puis au Centre Analyse Stratégique- Travaux de prospective « Transport 2010 » 1992- Les coûts des nuisances : M. Boiteux (1994; 2001)- La révision du taux d’actualisation : D. Lebègue (2005)- Un référentiel carbone : A. Quinet (2008)- La valeur de la biodiversité : B. Chevassus-au-Louis (2009)- Introduction systématique du risque: C. Gollier (2011)- Refonte des outils d’analyse socio-économiques des dépenses publiques (E. Quinet en cours) Instruction Cadre relative aux méthodes d’évaluation économique des grands projets d’infrastructures de transport, 25 Mars 2004 mise à jour le 27 mai 2005, Ministère des Transports de l’Equipement, du Tourisme et de la Mer. •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 89
  90. 90. La valeur statistique de la vie humainePréoccupation dans le secteur des transports :Insécurité routière : risque décèsImpact de la pollution/bruit sur la santé : dégradation de la qualité de vie Le prix de la vie humaine Le prix, le coût du mort La valeur de la vie humaine Valeur Statistique de la Vie … L’effort que la collectivité est prête à consentir pour réduire un risque morbi-mortalité Revue Metropolis, N° 108/109, Mars 2002 •Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 90
  91. 91. Table rondeComment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 91
  92. 92. Liste des intervenantsLuc Baumstark, conseiller scientifique, Commission QUINET, Centred’analyse stratégique – économiste, Université de LyonGilles Johanet, procureur général, Cour des comptesMark Sculpher, professeur au centre d’économie de la santé, Universitéde York (UK)Peter Smith, professeur de politiques de la santé,Imperial College London (UK)Jérôme Wittwer, professeur, Laboratoire d’Économie de Dauphine –Laboratoire d’Économie et de Gestion des Organisations de Santé Comment choisir ? La place de l’évaluation économique 92
  93. 93. Lise Rochaix Modérateur membre du Collège, Haute Autorité de SantéEnsemble, améliorons la qualité en santé 93
  94. 94. Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé
  95. 95. Conclusion Jean-Luc Harousseau, président, Haute Autorité de SantéEnsemble, améliorons la qualité en santé 95
  96. 96. Chacun des intervenants a déclaré ses liens d’intérêtavec les industries de santé en rapport avec le thème de la présentation (loi du 4 mars 2002) Retrouvez ces déclarations sur le site Internet de la HAS, espace Colloque HAS www.has-sante.fr Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé 96
  97. 97. La Haute Autorité de Santé vous remercie d’avoir participé à ce colloque www.has-sante.fr Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé 97
  98. 98. Ensemble, améliorons la qualité en santé

×