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Lev V'Yad Tzedaka Holocaust MemoryTwinning program
Lev V'Yad Tzedaka Holocaust MemoryTwinning program
Lev V'Yad Tzedaka Holocaust MemoryTwinning program
Lev V'Yad Tzedaka Holocaust MemoryTwinning program
Lev V'Yad Tzedaka Holocaust MemoryTwinning program
Lev V'Yad Tzedaka Holocaust MemoryTwinning program
Lev V'Yad Tzedaka Holocaust MemoryTwinning program
Lev V'Yad Tzedaka Holocaust MemoryTwinning program
Lev V'Yad Tzedaka Holocaust MemoryTwinning program
Lev V'Yad Tzedaka Holocaust MemoryTwinning program
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Lev V'Yad Tzedaka Holocaust MemoryTwinning program

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The Lev V'Yad (Heart & Hand) Tzedkah project pushes back the timeline for Bnei/Bnot Mitzvah Holocaust-era victims twinning projects to engage young families in dedicating their tzedekah activities in …

The Lev V'Yad (Heart & Hand) Tzedkah project pushes back the timeline for Bnei/Bnot Mitzvah Holocaust-era victims twinning projects to engage young families in dedicating their tzedekah activities in memory - on behalf of - one of the 1.5 million children killed in the Holocaust.


According to tradition…those who have died can no longer perform good deeds (mitzvots) on their own and as such must rely on the living to perform acts of kindness (chesed) and charity (tzedakah) on their behalf. The Lev V'Yad program is a directed action to perform these kinds of charitable acts on their behalf and in so doing help elevate their souls (neshamot) in their journeys through the next world.

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  • 1. Heart & Hand Tzedakah Twinning program If you don’t remember them then who will? A Unique Mitzvah Twinning Program Designed to Engage Young Families in Doing Tzedakah on Behalf of Holocaust Victims
  • 2. A Unique Mitzvah Twinning Program Designed to Engage Young Families in Doing Tzdekah on Behalf of Holocaust Victims designed for families with children, ages 5-13 Blending a Beautiful Tradition With Powerful Acts of Charity and KindnessThe Lev VYad (Heart & Hand) Tzedkah project pushes back the timeline for Bnei/Bnot MitzvahHolocaust-era victims twinning projects to engage young families in dedicating their tzedekahactivities in memory - on behalf of one of the 1.5 million children killed in the Holocaust. Why on behalf of…According to tradition, because those who have died can no longer perform good deeds (mitzvots) on their own they must rely on the living to perform acts of kindness (chesed) and charity (tzedakah) on their behalf. Our actions on their behalf help elevate their souls (neshamot) in their journeys through the next world.
  • 3. Connecting The Past To The Present...With just a penny a day, a quarter a week, the practice ofgiving charity becomes embedded both in school and athome. Over time, children learn by doing and by theexample set by their parents.The Early Years. Parents of children, ages 5-10, are COURTESY OF AREL MISHORYprovided with the name of a young person who waskilled in the Holocaust, along with a short biography and photo. For families with a directconnection to the Holocaust, the memories of their relatives would be honored through theLev V’Yad Tzedakah program.These precious pieces of history are kept with the family’s tzedakah box. Handmadetzedakah boxes made from recycled materials will be available for purchase, though familiesmay choose to create their own Tzedakah box or use one crafted by the child in school usingrecycled materials to impart another important lesson in Tikkun Olam. While the family’s charitable giving is done on behalf of their Holocaust-era twin, during the pre-school and elementary school years the details of the young Holocaust victims life are known only to the parents.
  • 4. Giving from the Heart Doing with Your Hands Throughout the early childhood and elementary school years students become involved in fundraising drives, collecting pennies, coats, toys and canned food through their schools, student council and parent groups. Each opportunity for doing tzedakah helps to further embed these important lessons in "doing for others" as part of their Jewish identity. As children grow they participate more fully in giving and doing, helping in the donation decision- making process and taking leadership roles in fundraising projects at home, and at school.These early entrepreneurial expressions represent an important transformationas children come to better understand the needs of others.
  • 5. oscar schindlermaria florek Tzedakah & Tzedek - A Common Root A Common Path to Righteousness and Justice School curriculum and independent reading projects routinely introduceirena sendler higmet zima students in grades 4+ to the heroic and courageous acts of the "Righteous sister alfonsja Among the Nations" (Chassidey Umot HaOlam). According to Yad Vashem, more than 24,000 men and women from 45 different countries (not including individuals from various resistance groups) risked their lives, and often times that of their families, to help rescue Jews during the Holocaust. jerzy radwanek True beacons of hope amidst one of Mankind’s darkest periods... Finding meaningful entries to learning about the Holocaust can be challenging,chiune sugihara but by juxtaposing the moral courage of the Righteous in saving lives to the deaths of 6 million Jewish men, women and children Holocaust offers each of us dimitar peshev hope and an embedded call to action to stand up for others. Why learn about the Righteous? In the ritual practice of giving, of doingraoul wallenberg righteous acts we find a common root for the Hebrew words: righteous, alice shiffer justice and charity. If we are to find role models, past or present, there are perhaps none more deserving of our respect and behavior modeling than the "Righteous among the Nations" - the brave men and women who risked their lives to help others during the Holocaust. pastor andre trocme ona urbanos ella lingens feng shan ho aristedes de sousa mendes
  • 6. Preserving 1,500,000 Memories One Child - One Family at a TimeOver time, and as deemed developmentally-appropriate, the Holocaust-era child is"introduced" to the whole family, the details of their life and death shared, and the beautifulmitzvah the family has undertaken on behalf of the child explained.The connection to the past is brought forward to the present in the Bnei/Bnot Mitzvah yearsas celebrants honor the memory of their Holocaust twin by sharing their good fortune withothers less fortunate. In so doing, the name of one of the 1.5 million children killed in theHolocaust is remembered and tzedakah given on their behalf.Lev V’Yad...with an open heart and hand, celebrants can also extend their twinning toinclude the names of victims of other genocides or to twin with an orphan or abused childwhose young life has been touched by pain or tragedy. Families and Bar/Bat celebrantscan join the Lev V’Yad program at any time, including during the year spent preparing fortheir Bar/Bat Mitzvahs. Why a Family Twinning project? To help embed the memory of the Holocaust for all generations, and through these efforts honor the memory of each of the 1.5 million children killed in the Holocaust so that they will never be forgotten.
  • 7. Nathan Touwia Fruma Hana Moshe Eva Severin Irma Josef Haia Jean Pierre Lambert Frania Antoinette Bar & Bat Mitzvah Twinning Preserving Their Memory Jean Pierre Lambert was born in Paris on December 19, 1935 to Joseph (Claude) and Marianne. Prior to WWII he lived in Paris, France. During the war he was in Paris. Jean was deported on November 20, 1943 and murdered on November 25, 1943 in Auschwitz. Jean’s parents Claude and Marianne, along with his brother Gerard and sister Francine were also killed.Hana Borensztejn was born in Warszawa in 1923 to Moshe and Lea. She was a pupil. During the war she was in the Warsawghetto. Hana was murdered in 1942 in Treblinka, Poland at the age of 19.Haia Faer was born in Beltz in October 1935 to Haim and Ruhlea. Prior to WWII she lived in Falesti, Romania. During the war she wasin Litvinov (Kolkhoz), Russia (USSR). Haia was murdered in November 1943.Nathan Lustman was born in Lodz in 1934 to Simha and Hana. Prior to WWII he lived in Lodz, Poland. During the war he was in Lodz,Poland. Nathan was murdered in 1944 in Auschwitz, Camp.Eva Weksberg was born in Moravska Ostrava in 1934 to Bubi and Iuli. Prior to WWII she lived in Moravska Ostrava, Czechoslovakia.Eva was murdered in the Shoah.Frania (Felicie) Rajter was born in Villerupt, France on December 31, 1931 to Majlech (Simon) and Mania. Prior to WWII she lived inVillerupt. During the war she was in the Drancy internment camp. Frania was murdered on September 16, 1942 in Germany.Touwia Polinowski was born in Paris in 1928 to Soil and Vera (nee Nudel). Prior to WWII he lived in Livry Gargan, France. Touwia wasmurdered 11/11/1942 in Auschwitz, Poland. This information is based on Pages of Testimony submitted by his brother MendelPolinowski and father Shaul (Soil).Severin Regenweter was born in Lodz on January 16, 1934 to Heniek and Zelda. He was a child. Prior to WWII he lived in Lodz, Poland.Severin was murdered in the Shoah.Moshe Drajer was born in Warsaw in January 1926 to Avraham and Pesa. Prior to WWII he lived in Warsaw, Poland. Moshe wasmurdered in 1943 in the Warsaw ghetto.Josef Weissler was born in Nikolai in 1937 to Alfred and Alice. Prior to WWII he lived in Nikolai, Poland. During the war he was inAuschwitz Camp. Josef was murdered in the Shoah.Fruma Katz was born to Barukh Khana in 1935 in Kazan Tatarskaya Assr, Russia. During the war she was in Telenesti, Romania.Fruma was murdered in the Shoah.Antoinette Denneboom was born in Harbrinkhoek on January 10, 1937 to Elie and Frederika. Prior to WWII she lived in Harbrinkhoek,Netherlands. During the war she was in Amsterdam. Antoinette was murdered in Auschwitz.Irma Grin was born in Poland in 1936 to Hersh and Sara. Prior to WWII she lived in Sosnowic, Poland. Irma was murdered in Sosnowic.
  • 8. Nathan Touwia Fruma Hana Moshe Eva Severin Irma Josef Haia Jean Pierre Lambert Frania Antoinette Remembering the Past Acting on the PresentAs part of their Bar/Bat Mitzvah preparation, young people participating in the Lev VYadTzedekah project would create a tribute piece to honor the memory, the life of theirHolocaust-era twin, telling their story while at the same time reflecting on contemporaryissues of discrimination, hate, bigotry and genocide. Whenever possible (and for as long as itis possible), the program would pair Bar/Bat Mitzvah celebrants with a local survivor mentor. Projects can on take many creative forms...a brochure, poster, video, artwork, essay, play or poem which is used to convey their thoughts and reflections on their "twin." All projects would be placed in an online gallery as part of the YIZKOR projects ongoing Holocaust remembrance program, "Remembering the Past - Acting on the Present." Culminating Ceremony. Within a given year, the cohort of Bnei/Bnot Mitzvah would also participate in their communitys Yom HaShoah program, sharing the names of the young people whose memory they and their family have honored over the years.
  • 9. “The Bat Mitzvah twinning project gave Alie a meaningful entre to the Holocaust - aperspective that encompassed both History and people by being able to twin both with asurvivor and a young victim.” - Sarah Goldblatt (Alie’s mother)The Lev V’Yad program was inspired by AlieGoldblatt who twinned not only with EvaDublon, a young Holocaust victim, but alsowith Holocaust survivor mentor Dr. RudyJacobson for her Bat Mitzvah.Like Dr. Jacobson, Eva had been a passengeron board the ill-fated S.S. St. Louis where,they along with over 900 other passengers,were denied refuge by Cuba, the UnitedStates and Canada. The ship was forced toreturn to Europe, where the refugees weresent to four different countries. Rudy andhis family were sent to Holland; their quotanumber came up and were able to escape.Eva and her family were sent to Belgium. OnJanuary 8, 1944 Eva, her sister Lore andmother Erna were rounded up and deportedfrom the Mechelen Transit Camp toAuschwitz-Birkenau. Convoy #23 arrived inAuschwitz on January 17, 1944. Only 12people from the Convoy #23 survived - Evaand her family were not among them.(Alie worked on the project with the assistance ofArde Wandel, and under the auspices of the Sarahand Chaim Neuberger Holocaust EducationCentre, UJA Federation of Greater Toronto)
  • 10. Remembering those we lost...honoring those who survived through community service, education and remembrancethe YIZKOR projectLev VYad Tzedekah program 198 S. Holly Street Denver, Colorado 80246 phone: 720.560.0271 website: www.theYIZKORproject.org email: tami@theYIZKORproject.org the YIZKOR project is a registered Colorado-based 501(c)3 non-profit organization Contributions to the organization are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law

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