Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
 Poncz
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Poncz

356

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
356
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. issue No. 5 III 2012; hidden
  • 2. cover by: Jon RafmanPoncz Magazine EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Maja Dabrowska (maja@ponczmagazine.com) DEPUTY EDITOR Piotr Winiewicz (piiter@ponczmagazine.com) www.ponczmagazine.com www.ponczblog.com
  • 3. hidden
  • 4. Sixteen Google Street Views The images are captured by the roving Google vehicle, depict solitary individuals in a variety of con-temporary landscapes. Despite Walter Benjamin’s argument that photography’s ability to repro- duce stripseven the unique of its uniqueness, I chose these images precisely because they assert their uniqueness and re-sist categorization. I invite you to consider with me, through these words and the images themselves, how theartist and photography itself can point a way out of this paradox. Street View photography presents a different perspective on the individual’s relation to his externalworld than the art of previous historical periods. For example, when the Romantics portrayed solitary figu-res within landscapes, the framework was often an encounter with the sublime. In these land- scapes, man feltboth in awe of nature but also transcendent over it. The encounter with the sublime, however, also pointed to-wards the individual’s inner powers and towards his freedom. In Street View photography, Google cars, mounted with nine cameras, roam the earth recording auto-matically whatever comes within their purview. The detached gaze of their cameras witness but do not act inhistory. Street View photography, artless and indifferent, without human intention, ascribes no particular si-gnificance to any event or person. Bereft of context, history or meaning, the only glue holding the Street Viewimages together is geospatial contiguity. Such a perspective does not easily contain the sublime. Unlike the landscapes of the Romantics, the landscapes of this Street View collection are neither rawnor savage. They are often vast or suggest interminable progression. Empty roadsides, urban projects, and go-vernment institutions, social and economic contexts that constrain inner powers and freedom, are the settingsin which our subjects are thrust. And yet the very instruments that alienate us can also inform us about the nature of our alienation.Does not Google’s mode of recording the world make manifest how we already structure our perception? Ourown experience often parallels this detached, indifferent mode of recording with consequent questions aboutour own significance. By becoming aware of Street View’s way of conceptualizing our experience, however, al-ternative perceptions become possible. The artist, in the act of framing the images, undoes familiar conventions and alters our vision of theworld. Despite the often-impersonal nature of these settings, the subjects in these images resist becoming pu-rely objects of the robotic gaze of an automated camera. For in the act of framing, the artist reasserts the im-portance of the individual. This altering of our vision challenges the loss of autonomy and in the transforma-tion of our perceptions, a new possibility for freedom is created.Jon Rafman, 2009
  • 5. Jon Rafman
  • 6. Jon Rafman
  • 7. Jon Rafman
  • 8. Jon Rafman
  • 9. Jon Rafman
  • 10. Jon Rafman
  • 11. Jon Rafman
  • 12. Jon Rafman
  • 13. Jon Rafman
  • 14. Jon Rafman
  • 15. Jon Rafman
  • 16. Jon Rafman
  • 17. Jon Rafman
  • 18. Jon Rafman
  • 19. Jon Rafman
  • 20. The Park [Yoshiyuki it’s a pseudonym - his real name is still unknown].In the early seventies, Mr. Yoshiyuki prowled around the parks of Tokyo looking for loversgroping in the bushes. The Shinjuku, Yoyogi and Aoyama parks were notorious meetingsgrounds where young Japanese couples came together for nightly public rendezvous as well asthe numerous spectators hiding in the bushes who liked to watch. In these black-and-whiteshots there is a little nudity, hands reaching under uplifted skirts, spectators crawling to seecouples. With their raw, snapshot-like quality, these images not only uncover the hiddensexual exploits of their subjects, but also serve as a chronicle of a Japan we rarely see; asMartin Parr writes in The Photobook: A History, Volume II, The Park is “a brilliant pie-ce of social documentation, capturing perfectly the loneliness, sadness, and despera-tion that so often accompany human relationships in a big, hard metropolis like Tokyo.”
  • 21. Kohei YoshiyukiUntitled, 1971From the series The ParkGelatin Silver Print© Kohei Yoshiyuki, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York
  • 22. Kohei YoshiyukiUntitled, 1971From the series The ParkGelatin Silver Print© Kohei Yoshiyuki, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York
  • 23. Kohei YoshiyukiUntitled, 1972From the series The ParkGelatin Silver Print© Kohei Yoshiyuki, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York
  • 24. Kohei YoshiyukiUntitled, 1971From the series The ParkGelatin Silver Print© Kohei Yoshiyuki, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York
  • 25. Kohei YoshiyukiUntitled, 1972From the series The ParkGelatin Silver Print© Kohei Yoshiyuki, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York
  • 26. Kohei YoshiyukiUntitled, 1973From the series The ParkGelatin Silver Print© Kohei Yoshiyuki, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York
  • 27. Kohei YoshiyukiUntitled, 1971From the series The ParkGelatin Silver Print© Kohei Yoshiyuki, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York
  • 28. Kohei YoshiyukiUntitled, 1971From the series The ParkGelatin Silver Print© Kohei Yoshiyuki, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York
  • 29. Kohei YoshiyukiUntitled, 1979From the series The ParkGelatin Silver Print© Kohei Yoshiyuki, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York
  • 30. A contract of mutual self-delusion exists between the caller andphone sex operator. The caller imagines he is speaking to his mostsecret fantasy-and the operator willingly plays the part.A phone sex operator must be able understand the caller’s wants.But more importantly, they must be able to decrypt the unspokendesires. Those things that are too preposterous, too scandalous, orhumiliating to articulate.From a few mumbled words, a phone sex operator must weave andfinely detailed fantasy encounter. It requires a vivid imagination, ac-ting ability, and above all, a deep understanding of the human ap-petite. What do we crave? What words have the maximum yield?What tone will most effectively reach into a man’s trousers?Phone-sex is theatre. An artificial passion-play in real-time, directedby a skilled verbal fantasist, with only one possible conclusion.2008-2009Published by Twin Palms Press in 2009To see more of the project, please go towww.phonesexthebook.comv
  • 31. Phillip Toledano
  • 32. Phillip Toledano
  • 33. To the caller, when I first answer, I am the inanimate Barbie.They do not know what I look like, who I am, how I am feeling, orhow I feel. They can only imagine. It is my job to indulge theirfantasies, to convince them that I am not a doll. I am their dreamturned real.If they ask if I am blonde, I become a blonde. If they ask how wet Iam, I tell them that my panties are drenched. I respond to everysound the caller makes with an affirmation, I encourage them, Ibreathe life into the fantasy, I carve the doll out of flesh.
  • 34. Phillip Toledano
  • 35. My first night was on a Saturday at midnight.It was a gentleman who I believe called himself Bob.He told me about his first experience with a glory hole.He explained that he had no-one he felt comfortable telling this to,and I felt a strange intimacy between us, though it was rooted in afantasy.I think it’s easier to release repressed desires to a non-judgmental,fictional person, because there are no consequences in the outsideworld.
  • 36. Phillip Toledano
  • 37. I have a naturally high voice. I’m also immature and submissive. Thevoice I use on the phone is somewhat a representation of thosequalities.There’s one specific voice tone I use when pretending to besexually aroused.Imagine a catholic school girl getting de-virginized by her historyteacher. “Oh, oh, Mr. Johnson, it’s so big! You’re gonna hurt me!”
  • 38. Phillip Toledano
  • 39. Phillip Toledano
  • 40. I got into phone-sex because I thought: ‘Why not get paid fortalking dirty, instead of doing it for free?”It brings up my self-esteem up so much, knowing guys are lookingat my pics and wanting to talk to me.
  • 41. Phillip Toledano
  • 42. I am a straight male who speaks to women.They want me.They want me to talk to them, and to take them to another world.I’m good at it. I’m a pro. A ladies man.I speak to younger women. I speak to older women. I speak bothspanish and english. I have been thrown offers left and right.They want me to meet up and have my way with them, but I keep itonly to phone conversations.
  • 43. Phillip Toledano
  • 44. Just last night I received possibly the most disturbing phone-sex callI’d had in a long time.A caller shot himself with me on the phone.The unmistakable sound of a gun-shot followed by the heavy andwet sound of a body falling with a thud to the floor.Things like this always scare me.My current track record stands at one confession of incestuoussexual abuse, being asked to perform fellatio on my younger brother,and two other suicides.
  • 45. Phillip Toledano
  • 46. Phillip Toledano
  • 47. I never thought I would work in the phone sex industry.All those years doing customer service, my customers wouldcomment on my sexy voice.I thought I was being professional, not sexy.This work is customer service. It’s just your customers leave withmore than a smile.
  • 48. Phillip Toledano
  • 49. I’m 60 years old, have a BA in Cultural Anthropology fromColumbia University, and married for 25 years.Men call me for an infinity of reasons.Of course, they call to masterbate. I call it “Executive Stress Relief ”.It’s not sex; it’s a cocktail of testosterone, fueled by addiction topornography, loneliness, and the need to hear a woman’s voice.I make twice the money I made in the corporate world. I work fromhome, the money transfers into my bank account daily.
  • 50. Limit TelephotographyA number of classified military bases and installations are located in some of the remotest parts of the UnitedStates, hidden deep in western deserts and buffered by dozens of miles of restricted land. Many of these sitesare so remote, in fact, that there is nowhere on Earth where a civilian might be able to see them with an una-ided eye. In order to produce images of these remote and hidden landscapes, therefore, some unorthodox vie-wing and imaging techniques are required.Limit-telephotography involves photographing landscapes that cannot be seen with the unaided eye. The tech-nique employs high powered telescopes whose focal lengths range between 1300mm and 7000mm. At this le-vel of magnification, hidden aspects of the landscape become apparent.Limit-telephotography most closely resembles astrophotography, a technique that astronomers use to photo-graph objects that might be trillions of miles from Earth. In some ways, however, it is easier to photograph thedepths of the solar system than it is to photograph the recesses of the military industrial complex. BetweenEarth and Jupiter (500 million miles away), for example, there are about five miles of thick, breathable atmo-sphere. In contrast, there are upwards of forty miles of thick atmosphere between an observer and thesites depicted in this series.
  • 51. Trevor Paglen (courtesy Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne /Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco)
  • 52. Trevor Paglen (courtesy Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne /Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco)
  • 53. Trevor Paglen (courtesy Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne /Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco)
  • 54. Trevor Paglen (courtesy Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne /Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco)
  • 55. Trevor Paglen (courtesy Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne /Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco)
  • 56. hidden 2
  • 57. “why?”Some book, on some page, let’s say few years ago, by some writer. While the author is dead and art is finished maybe the right thing to do is to look for understandingof the situation and its in-betweens. When Walter Benjamin in “The work of art in the age of mechanicalreproduction” was writing about “presence in time and space” that art was supposed to loose, heprobably expected this to go further then just photography, cinema and the other charlatanisticinvention’s of the industrial revolution that existed in his time. The internet would probably horrifythose who claimed that using a camera was a blasphemous form while they were taking the-ir first naive steps to forming a criticism of photography as a valid art form. So maybe the pictures thatfinally found their place in the most respected of galleries and museums are now surrounded bywebsite layouts and advertisements. They can be found on the tube surrounded by people withtheir ipads and those waiting at the next station to get in, this is not a situation to approve, butto appreciate. Maybe in this certain state of mind, the din that surrounds the spectator will turn in to aperfect background which is more sincere then the more and more doubtful contemporary artgalleries that more and more prosper like shopping malls. And I am writing those words as aconservative that a month ago would look for those whitest walls and empty spaces in galle-ries to admire a single piece of art. So it is not about making people watch movies on their cellphones or drug mumble discussions of Leonardo Da Vinci’s genius while admiring some bad repro-duction of the “Mona lisa” in some club toilet (which is still not so bad as some might say). It is moreconcerned with keeping attention on this “aura” which is still a phenomenon which is notreproducible, and maybe thing worth looking for. But my purpose is not to repeat J. Berger and to remind of the great role ofcontext in terms of art reception. It is to question what we can actually catch from themasses. Not in the way that pop-art did, but things that may seem to be more sincere and realnow. To capture that which has been drowning in this mass since the beginning of its existence.piiter
  • 58. Sharon Core; „Five Hot Dogs” ; 2003 (Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery)
  • 59. Sharon Core; „Candy Counter, 1963” ; 2004 (Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery)
  • 60. Sharon Core; „Candy Counter, 1969” ; 2003 (Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery)
  • 61. Sharon Core; „Pie Counter” ; 2003 (Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery)
  • 62. Sharon Core; „Bakery Trucks” ; 2005 (Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery)
  • 63. Sharon Core; „Steak” ; 2005 (Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery)
  • 64. Sharon Core; „Drive-Thru” ; 2005 (Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery)
  • 65. Sharon Core; „Dewars” ; 2006 (Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery)
  • 66. Sharon Core; „Ice Cream” ; 2006 (Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery)
  • 67. PORTRAIT WITH A CURATOR, 2002, DVD, 8’Four Polish artists on the brink of a great artistic career. Members of the Azorro super-group appear atvarious openings and - not asking for permission - photograph themselves with important personas fromthe Polish art world: directors, curators, gallery workers, critics.
  • 68. Supergrupa Azorro (Courtesy of the artists and gallery Raster)
  • 69. Supergrupa Azorro (Courtesy of the artists and gallery Raster)
  • 70. Supergrupa Azorro (Courtesy of the artists and gallery Raster)
  • 71. watch full video:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZZRD-o6sDEU
  • 72. Jordan Tate
  • 73. Jordan Tate
  • 74. Jordan Tate
  • 75. Jordan Tate
  • 76. Jordan Tate
  • 77. Jordan Tate
  • 78. Jordan Tate
  • 79. Jordan Tate
  • 80. “Beautiful Crystal Filled Small Size Iowa Natural Geode. Cracked nicely and ready to be a awesome showpiece for you. Great collecting~yard~pattio or garden. Add to your gem and quartz collection with beauty.Crystals~!!!”
  • 81. Peter Happel Christian
  • 82. Peter Happel Christian
  • 83. Peter Happel Christian
  • 84. Peter Happel Christian
  • 85. „Real nice crystal filled brilliant gem small size cracked Iowa geode. This is a beauty. Full of beautiful shiningquarts. Add this gem to your collection or a great spruce up in the garden or yard. Awesome. A great ShowPiece~!!!”
  • 86. MemoriaSeries “memoria” is an attempt to recover past that was never photographed in its present. Memories that existjust in Junpeis head seem to be transformed by new experiences. The ambiguity of memory and scenes andthings he sees in ordinary life mixes up in his head unconsciously, when you try to remember something or so-meone. As if he himself became a camera to photograph these imprints.
  • 87. Junpei Fukushi
  • 88. Junpei Fukushi
  • 89. Junpei Fukushi
  • 90. Junpei Fukushi
  • 91. Junpei Fukushi
  • 92. Junpei Fukushi
  • 93. Junpei Fukushi
  • 94. Junpei Fukushi
  • 95. YOSSI MILO GALLERY YANCEY RICHARDSON GALLERY 245 Tenth Avenue 535 West 22nd Street 3rd floor(between 24th & 25th St.) New York NY 10011 New York, NY 10001 tel 646-230-9610 mail@yossimilo.com fax 646-230-6131 www.yossimilo.com info@yanceyrichardson.com GALERIA RASTER GALERIE THOMAS ZANDER ul. Wspólna 63 Schönhauser Straße 8 00-687 Warszawa 50968 Cologne / Germany POLAND Phone +49 (0)221 934 88 56raster.gallery@gmail.com Fax +49 (0)221 934 88 58 www.raster.art.pl www.galeriezander.com mail@galeriezander.com
  • 96. Photographer’s index Jon Rafman www.jonrafman.com/ www.9-eyes.com Kohei Yoshiyuki www.yossimilo.com Phillip Toledano www.mrtoledano.com www.phonesexthebook.com Trevor Paglen www.paglen.com www.galeriezander.com Sharon Core www.sharoncore.com www.yanceyrichardson.com/artists/sharon-core Grupa Azorro http://raster.art.pl/gallery/artists/azorro/azorro.htm Jordan Tate www.jordantate.com Peter Happel Christian http://peterhappelchristian.com Junpei Fukushi http://fukushijunpei.jp
  • 97. Thanks to all the artist and galleries supporting Us with this issue. Poncz Magazine EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Maja Dabrowska (maja@ponczmagazine.com) DEPUTY EDITOR Piotr Winiewicz (piiter@ponczmagazine.com)
  • 98. The EndUsers are free to download, use and redistribute this file, provided that it is not modi- fied and that the copyright and disclaimer notice are not removed. This pictures may not be sold for profit or incorporated in commercial documents without the written permission of the copyright holder.Unauthorized inclusion of single pages, graphics or other components of this docu- ment in other web sites, print products or electronic media is prohibited. All contents © the respective artists ponczmagazine.com made in Poland

×