Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2013: Native Plants for Garden Pollinators

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  • The biggest enemy of any garden is not a pest, disease, or poison—it’s any plant with tougher survival skills than the plants it competes with.The recent decline of the European honey bee and other pollinators in North America poses a serious challenge to our food supply and ecological health. About 75 percent of all flowering plants rely on pollinators in order to set seed or fruit, and from these plants comes one-third of the planet's food.

Transcript

  • 1. Heidi Kratsch Horticulture Specialist
  • 2.  Add beauty to our landscapes.  Conserve water.  Reduce mowing costs.  Provides habitat for birds, bees, butterflies and other beneficial insects.  Protect and enhance the soil.  Save money on fertilizers and pesticides.  Provide a sense of where we live.
  • 3.  More than two-thirds of the world‟s crop species rely on pollinators.  Pollinators are keystone species in most terrestrial ecosystems.  Fruits and seeds derived from insect pollination are a major part of the diet of approximately 25 percent of all birds, and of mammals ranging from red-backed voles to grizzly bears.  In many places, the essential service of pollination is at risk from habitat loss, pesticide use, and introduced diseases.
  • 4.  Large herb or subshrub  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Also bumblebees and honeybees  Tolerates extra water.
  • 5.  Fruits are edible.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Larval host for California Hairstreak and Elf butterflies.  Also try Amelanchier utahensis. Amelanchier alnifolia
  • 6.  Food source for American Lady butterfly.  Larval host for Painted Lady butterfly.  Excellent as a ground cover and in dried flower arrangements. Anaphalis margaritacea with Flower Longhorn Beetle
  • 7.  Evergreen  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Good for fire- resistance and erosion control.  Needs excellent drainage. Arctostaphylos patula
  • 8.  Attracts a large number of native bees.  Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds.  Larval host for monarch and queen butterfly.  Good for moist, wet areas.  Aphids are inevitable! Asclepias incarnata
  • 9.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Attracts beneficial insects.  Associates with nitrogen-fixing bacteria.  Loves full sun. Ceanothus velutinus
  • 10.  Evergreen shrub  Larval host for Mountain Mahogany Hairstreak butterfly. Cercocarpus montanus
  • 11.  Fast-growing climbing vine  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Do not overwater and give good drainage.  Avoid C. orientalis – invasive. Clematis ligusticifolia
  • 12.  Attracts large numbers of native bees  Also attracts honeybees.  Larval host for the Checkered White butterfly. Cleome serrulata
  • 13.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Attracts natural enemies.  Provides good erosion control and is pest and maintenance free.  Just ignore it. Dasiphora fruticosa ssp. floribunda
  • 14.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  The bright scarlet flowers produce nectar, supplying hummingbirds with food for the start of their southward migration. Epilobium cana Zone 5
  • 15.  Attracts predatory and parasitoid natural enemies. Erigeron speciosus
  • 16.  Attracts large numbers of native bees  Attracts predatory or parasitoid natural enemies  Larval host for Lupine Blue butterfly  Many, many others… Eriogonum umbellatum
  • 17.  Annual  Attracts large numbers of native bees Gaillardia pulchella
  • 18.  Attracts large numbers of native bees  Attracts butterflies  Easy to grow; self sows.  Blooms in the summer. Hedysarum boreale
  • 19.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Blooms in late spring.  Best in well-drained soils.  Full sun Linum lewisii
  • 20.  Special value to bumblebees.  Larval host for the Gilletes Checkerspot butterfly.  Berries are mildly poisonous. Lonicera involucrata
  • 21.  Attract large numbers of native bees.  Associate with nitrogen-fixing bacteria.  Also try Lupinus caudatus or L. sericeus. Lupinus argenteus
  • 22.  Attracts large numbers of native bees  Sun or shade  Foliage will burn wear exposed in winter.  Good ground cover. Mahonia repens
  • 23.  Attracts birds, butterflies, hummingbirds  Bloom summer into fall.  Full sun  Readily available commercially. Mirabilis multiflora
  • 24.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Also bumblebees.  Blooms late summer.  Blooms in its first year.  Aromatic Monardella odoratissima
  • 25.  Annual  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Part shade preferred.  Give extra water to prolong bloom. Nemophila menziesii
  • 26.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Full sun  Early spring bloomer  Best bloom in morning, sweet scent. Oenothera caespitosa
  • 27.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Likes dry, hot, rocky areas.  Not a showy as other penstemons, but white color is rare. Penstemon deustus
  • 28.  Attracts hummingbirds and large numbers of native bees.  Very adaptable to climatic conditions  But must have good drainage. Penstemon eatonii
  • 29.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Prefers dry, gravelly soils.  Sweetly fragrant blooms  Can get to 5 or 6 feet tall! Penstemon palmeri
  • 30.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Good substitute for the non-native Gayfeather.  Sun to part shade Phacelia sericea
  • 31.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Has a fragrant orange scent in bloom.  Becomes rangy, leggy in shade  Put this in full sun. Philadelphus microphilus
  • 32.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Plant in part shade.  Bark orange and peeling – very ornamental  Hardy to zone 2! Physocarpus malvaceus
  • 33.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Food source for the California Hairstreak butterfly.  Berries make good jam. Prunus virginiana
  • 34.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Good for erosion control.  Plant at least 10 feet from your home in fire-prone areas. Purshia tridentata
  • 35. Rhus trilobata  Attracts large numbers of native bees and provides nesting material.  Sun or part shade  Very drought tolerant.  Berries are edible.  Good for erosion control.
  • 36.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Berries used in pies and preserves.  Sun or part shade  Will tolerate extra moisture. Ribes cereum
  • 37.  Attracts large numbers of native bees and provides nesting habitat.  Attractive pink flowers in spring  Large red hips  Sun to part shade.  Also try R. nutkana Rosa woodsii
  • 38. Rubus idaeus ssp. strigosus  Attracts and provides nesting material for native bees.  Fruit delicious in jams or jelles.
  • 39.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Provides nesting habitat for native bees.  Valuable to songbirds.  Has thorns. Rubus parviflorus
  • 40.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Two-toned blooms  Referred to in Zane Greys classic Western, Riders of the Purple Sage. Salvia dorrii
  • 41.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Both male and female plants required for fruit set – fruit is edible.  Full sun  Tolerates extra moisture. Shepherdia argentea
  • 42.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Attracts natural enemies.  Prefers full sun and sandy, gravelly soils. Solidago missouriensis
  • 43.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Diadasia diminuta (globemallow bee) is a specialist. Sphaeralcea coccinea
  • 44.  Annual  Attracts large numbers of native bees.  Larval host for the Common Buckeye butterfly.  Full sun Verbena stricta
  • 45.  Larval host for the Coronis fritillary butterfly.  Early blooming ground cover or rock garden plant.  Mixes well with grasses. Viola nuttallii
  • 46.  Look for microclimates in your yard.  South gets the most sun.  East gets morning sun – good for plants that afternoon shade. Use them to minimize turf areas in your yard.
  • 47.  Grouping plants into “zones” according to water needs.  Each zone irrigated by a separate valve.  The deeper the roots, the longer and less often you should water. It‟s especially important to irrigation turfgrass separately from other plants in your landscape.
  • 48. They‟re just like kids:  Baby them when they‟re young…  Hands off as they get older! Palmer‟s Penstemon Showy Four „O Clock
  • 49.  http://www.wildflower.org/collections/collect ion.php?collection=NV  http://www.xerces.org/pollinator- conservation/