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Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2013: Kids in the Garden
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Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2013: Kids in the Garden

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  • 1. Kids in the Garden Christina, Jenny, Kathy and Pamela
  • 2. Why garden with kids? • Children are natural gardeners • Nutrition Knowledge & Eating Habits • Increased Physical Activity • Positive Behavior, Attitude, Life Lessons • You can always use an extra set of hands
  • 3. Obesity in America • In the past 30 years, childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and tripled in adolescents. • In 2010, more than 1/3 of children and adolescents were overweight or obese. • In Washoe County, the student obesity rate is 38% - which is higher than the national average.
  • 4. NOTE: Obesity is body mass index greater than or equal to the 95th percentile of the sex- and age- specific 2000 CDC growth charts. SOURCES: CDC/NCHS, National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) I–III; and NHANES, 1999–2000, 2001–2002, 2003–2004, 2005–2006, 2007–2008, and 2009–2010. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hestat/obesity_child_09_10/obesity_child_09_10.htm Trends in obesity among children and adolescents aged 2–19 years, by sex: United States, 1971–1974 through 2009–2010
  • 5. Food Insecurity • 50 million Americans do not know where their next meal will come from • This includes 1 in 4 children • The US Department of Agriculture estimates 101 million people currently participate in at least one of 15 food programs offered by the agency, at a cost of $114 billion in fiscal year 2012. • Documentary: "A Place at the Table-One Nation Underfed"
  • 6. Gardens empower children • Teach kids to grow their own food – Self sustaining & sustains community – Gives them control of their health – Entrepreneurial skills – Classroom correlations come alive – Outside and Active
  • 7. Christina Turner • Grow Yourself Healthy • Ways to Incorporate Gardens into Education “A healthy child is a teachable child.” -Joe Dibble, RD,CSSD,CSCS
  • 8. Grow Yourself Healthy • Garden Based Nutrition Program – Promotes healthful eating habits – Increases physical activity – Promotes positive life behaviors to prevent obesity and chronic disease
  • 9. Program Objectives • 85% of students will be able to name the MyPlate food groups (fruits, vegetables, grains, protein and dairy) • 85% of students will be able to name at least two foods from each food group • 85% will correctly identify at least three benefits of consuming fruits and vegetables • 85% will be able to name at least two types of physical activity • 85% will be able to name the benefit of hand washing
  • 10. Program Results • FY13 data entry and analysis is underway • FY12 results – Knowledge gains were seen in all areas – Exceeded benchmarks set for hand washing and physical activity – Highly favorable response from parents, students, teachers and principals – Willingness to taste new produce 29 different varieties of fruits and vegetables were tasted last year! This year we have tasted 54 different fruits and vegetables!
  • 11. Curriculum • Nutrition/horticulture curriculum tied to the common core educational standards • Formal Lessons offered in the fall and spring • Includes pre/post test to collect data and evaluate whether the program is meeting its goals and objectives • Integrates USDA MyPlate and MyPyramid resources • Partners with WCSD’s Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program • Parent Engagement opportunities are provided through take home assignments, flyers, special events and parent presentations
  • 12. Common Core Education Standards • English Language Arts Grades 3, 4 and 5 – Writing Standards • production and distribution of writing • research to build and present knowledge • range of writing – Language Standards • Knowledge of language • Vocabulary acquisition • Math – Measurement and Data – Number and Operation in Base Ten – Numbers and Operations – Fractions – Operations and Algebraic thinking
  • 13. Direct Education Approach • Each GYH lesson has 3 parts: learn, grow and taste • Students are engaged in different group activities • Gardening related to all subjects
  • 14. Science • Plant, Earth Environmental and Physical Sciences • Garden Experiments and Science Fairs – Plant a question – Sprout a guess – Record observations – Graph Data – Harvest Conclusions – Water cycles, life cycles – Design your own
  • 15. Math • Calculate • Estimate • Measure • Weigh • Graph
  • 16. History and Social Studies • Origination of plants and regions of the world • Agricultural History • Cultural/Ethnic differences • Political, ecological and economic reasons for hunger • Influences in food production • Advertising and Marketing of food
  • 17. Language Arts • Read, Write, Draw • Poems, stories, letters, posters, informative flyers, research • Observe, brainstorm
  • 18. Health and Nutrition • Increase consumption and preference of fruits and vegetables • Food groups and nutrients our body needs • Ways to prepare foods
  • 19. Art, Music, Drama • Painting, drawing • Labels • Collages, mosaics • Puppet shows and plays • Sing and Dance • Flower and plant prints, paper flowers, flower bracelets • Clay or dirt fossils
  • 20. Benefits of School Gardens • Concrete experiences, hands on learning • Motivation for the reluctant learner • Variety to teaching and learning • Increases student achievement • Compatible with current educational practices • Higher order thinking
  • 21. Kids need gardens • Promote healthful choices and fight obesity • Increase consumption of fruits and vegetables • Promote nutrition and physical activity • Create memories and strengthen relationships • Builds character and teaches responsibility • Love our earth
  • 22. Questions?
  • 23. Kathy Williams • Promotion of Children’s Health • Physical Activity
  • 24. I can garden. . . but with kids?
  • 25. Preparation • So important • Small groups work best • Pre-fill containers • Set out tools • Fill water buckets • Have extra supplies • Determine how much time is needed for each activity
  • 26. Flexibility • Expect plans to change • Time constraints • Have a backup plan • Garden chores make great substitutions
  • 27. Engage Imagination • 5 senses • Choose plants with interesting names • Choose plants with interesting shapes and colors “The greatest gift of the garden is the restoration of the five senses” -Hanna Rion
  • 28. Safety / Garden Rules • Establish the garden guidelines before going out to the garden • Keep them simple: show respect, listen and follow directions, no running • Demonstrate the correct use of tools (carrying the “working” end of a tool towards the ground)
  • 29. Everyone can participate • Allow access for wheel chairs between containers and garden beds • Leave room at the edge of the garden beds for children to reach • Children with impairments may need extra time, hand over hand physical assistance
  • 30. Growing in Containers / Garden Beds • Adapt to your home • Options on a porch or balcony • Garden Plot • Container gardening allow more families to participate • Grow veggies that do well in containers (bush tomatoes)
  • 31. Learning Topics • Wonder of seeds • What plants need • How to water • How to transplant • Planning a garden bed or container • Compost/soil • Parts of a plant • Pollinators
  • 32. Wonder of Seeds • How does a seed know it is supposed to grow into a pepper or an eggplant? • What is inside of a seed? • Reading a seed packet • How might looking at a seed’s size tell us how deep to plant it?
  • 33. What do plants need to grow? • Sun • Water • Air • Good Soil with nutrients • Temperature • What do kids need to be healthy?
  • 34. How to water-Get low and go slow! • #1 favorite task of kids! • Physical mechanics of watering • Look at the plant – are there bugs on it? • Child is moving
  • 35. How to transplant a seedling • Takes a little practice • Protecting the stem • Observe the roots
  • 36. How to plan a garden • Choose easy to grow plants and vegetables • Plan space in the container or garden bed • Companion planting
  • 37. Compost / Soil • What is healthy soil? • What is compost? • How do you make it? • What does a worm do for the soil?
  • 38. Parts of the plant • Roots • Stems • Leaves • Fruit • Flower
  • 39. Pollinators • Why are they important to the health of our garden? • Why are they important to the world’s food supply?
  • 40. Activities • Magnifying hand lens • Rulers, measuring sticks • Scales • Scavenger Hunt Bag • Celery Experiment • Root Vue • Grow veggies in a jar • Lettuce Bowls • Vocabulary words • Journaling • Garden Art / Plant labels • Free Digging bed
  • 41. “To plant a garden is to believe in the future” Author Unknown
  • 42. Pamela Van Hoozer • Sustaining a school garden • Keeping commitment “Why try to explain miracles to your kids when you can just have them plant a garden” -Robert Brault
  • 43. Challenges • Keeping everyone involved and committed • Integrating curriculum & keeping focus • Individual school challenges • Staff turnover, team changes
  • 44. Best Practices • Location • Permanence • Organic • Crop diversity • Curriculum Integration • Organization • Administrative Support • Commitment • Community Access • Celebrate & Acknowledge
  • 45. Success in the Garden • Enlist help from the community • Volunteers! Recruit, retain, recognize • Communicate: build relationships and network • Fundraise: donations, special events • Evaluate and gather feedback
  • 46. Planning • Include everything – Sustainability – Daily needs – Long range goals – Engagement – Set children up for success – Everything can be a learning experience
  • 47. Maintenance • Calendars • Special Events • Task List • Debriefing • Alternate plans • Evaluate / feedback
  • 48. Motivation • Include everyone • Journal • Draw pictures • Read stories • Garden games: Follow the leader, I spy • Challenge everyone
  • 49. Far reaching benefits of Gardening • Physical • Psychological • Cultural • Educational
  • 50. Resources • Garden Wizardry for Kids – By Patricia Kite • Gardening Projects for Kids – By Jenny Hendy • Healthy Foods From Healthy Soils – By Elizabeth Patten and Kathy Lyons • How to Grow a School Garden – By Arden Bucklin Sporer and Rachael Kathleen Pringle • Schoolyard-Enhanced Learning – By Herbery W. Broda • The Growing Classroom – By Roberta Jaffe and Gary Appel
  • 51. Available for free online • Junior Master Gardener Handbook – www.jmgkids.org • Grow Yourself Healthy Fall Curriculum – http://www.unce.unr.edu/publications/files/hn/2012/cm1 205.pdf • Gardens for Learning – Creating and Sustaining Your School Garden – California School Garden Network • http://www.csgn.org/
  • 52. Go Grow Yourself Healthy!