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Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places
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Grow Your Own, Nevada! Summer 2012: Composting in Small Places

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  • 1. Angela M. O’Callaghan, PhDSocial Horticulture Specialist Associate Professor 2/25/2013 1
  • 2. Composting: “…the most efficient treatment in producing an environmentally safe and agronomically advantageous soil organic amendment at acceptable operational costs.”Boulter et al. (2000) World J. Microbiology and Biotechnology 2/25/2013 2
  • 3. COMPOST• organic materials – e.g. lawn clippings, leaves or other landscape waste, fruit and vegetable scraps - are degraded by microorganisms• added into the soil to improve structure, fertility, drainage and water holding capacity 2/25/2013 3
  • 4. WHY COMPOST?• Many soils have low fertility and/or poor structure• To be productive, nitrogen and other mineral levels must be raised.• Chemical fertilizers can leach into groundwater,  nitrate pollution.• Unless plant residues are returned to the soil, N fertilizers do not improve soil fertility, quality or health 2/25/2013 4
  • 5. THE WASTE STREAM Of the waste Americans produce –More than ½ is disposed of in land fills –15% is incinerated –Less than 1/3 is reused, recycled or 2/25/2013 composted 52/25/2013
  • 6. COMPOSTING —THE CIVIC GOOD• Currently 62% of American landfill is green waste which produces toxic methane gas (a greenhouse gas, 26x more potent than CO2) and ammonia leachate• Composting could –Reduce municipal solid waste –Reduce methane emissions 2/25/2013 6 6
  • 7. US MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE 2009 2/25/2013 7
  • 8. Compost:• Decreases greenhouse gases• waste  valuable soil amendment• Reduces/prevents erosion• Recycles nutrients back to soil• Retains soil moisture - save water• Reduces haulage costs of green waste• Promotes plant growth• Suppresses plant disease 2/25/2013 8 8
  • 9. HOW DOES COMPOSTING HAPPEN?• Raw materials need to be chopped or shredded so that soil organisms can reach them.• Microbes “eat” organic matter, taking in large compounds and breaking them into humus and other soil organics. 2/25/2013 9
  • 10. 2/25/2013 102/25/2013
  • 11. 2/25/2013 112/25/2013
  • 12. 2/25/2013 122/25/2013
  • 13. COMPOST COMPONENTS• Brown--symbolizes the carbon portions; such as paper, dried leaves, and wood (must be shredded)• Green--symbolizes the nitrogen portions; such as grass clippings, leaves and coffee grounds 2/25/2013 13 13
  • 14. Sawdust 100-500:1 Very high carbon! Paper 150-200:1 Bark 100-130:1 Wheat straw 80:1C Oat straw 74:1 Corn stalks 60:1 Leaves 40-80:1 Carbon Fruit wastes 35:1 Horse manure 25:1 Nitrogen Vegetable wastes 12-20:1 Grass clippings 12-25:1 ratios Apple pomace 21:1N Cow manure 20:1 Coffee grounds 20:1 Alfalfa hay 13:1 Poultry manure, fresh 10:1 Very high nitrogen! 142/25/2013
  • 15. COMPOST HAPPENS 2/25/2013 15
  • 16. TYPES OF COMPOSTING• Pile hot Aerobic• Tumblers hot “• Bins hot “• Worm cold “• Trench cold Anaerobic 2/25/2013 16
  • 17. WHICH IS BEST FOR YOUR SITUATION?1. How much space available?2. How much biodegradable material is available?3. How much compost will be needed?4. How much labor can you/staff reasonably perform? 2/25/2013 17
  • 18. HOT OR COLD? 2/25/2013 18
  • 19. A COMPOST PILE - SIMPLE 2/25/2013 19
  • 20. BUILD A COMPOST PILE1--Place a layer of coarse material several inches thick for drainage on the ground2--Place a layer of high nitrogen material ~3”3--Place a layer of high carbon material ~6”4--Place a layer of garden soil (&/or fertilizer or “compost booster”) ~1”5--Water thoroughly. Repeat numbers 2 through 5 2/25/2013 20 20
  • 21. TO REPEAT:1--Place a layer of coarse material several inches thick for drainage on the ground2--Place a layer of high nitrogen material ~3 inches3--Place a layer of high carbon material ~6 inches4--Place a 1 inch layer of garden soil, or some fertilizer or “compost booster”5--Water thoroughly. 2/25/2013 21
  • 22. THE PILE BECOMES COMPOST• Add chopped materials in a general ratio of 30 parts carbon to 1 part nitrogen• Moisten thoroughly• Turn pile to mix ingredients• Take temperature every few days 2/25/2013 22 22
  • 23. CONTINUED 160• Temperature should rise, then decrease 150 140• degrees (approx) Turn again after temperature drops 130 120• Don‟t turn more than every 3 days 110 100• Takes up to 3 months, depending 90 80 70 60 e k ity rn r g g ly o te er in lin r tu co tiv la ea th ok o to ac to tle co ng co e ng lit ak t ti tim e or ge pe ti ar m st 2/25/2013 23
  • 24. BUILDING YOUR COMPOST 2/25/2013 24
  • 25. 3 feet 3 feet 25 2/25/2013
  • 26. TURN THE PILE – OR NOT?• Pile can be turned regularly using a garden fork or a special auger - Or• Pile can be constructed, mixed once and left to degrade slowly - Or• Pile can be constructed in layers (lasagna) and left to degrade very slowly 2/25/2013 26 26
  • 27. THE ABSOLUTELY SIMPLEST PILE• This passive approach will compost very slowly, and can result in odors escaping if disturbed before completion 27 2/25/2013
  • 28. FOR LARGE AMOUNTS OF COMPOST 2/25/2013 28
  • 29. Aerated static pileIn an Aerated static pile air is introduced to thestacked pile via perforated pipes and blowers.This method requires no labor to turn compostbut is weather sensitive, and can have unreliablepathogen reduction due to imperfect mixing. 2/25/2013 29
  • 30. ADDING SOIL?• Plant disease organisms may be present in soil• These almost always live only on living plant tissue• There’s no living plant tissue in compost• Temperatures in compost “cooking” process kill disease organisms. 2/25/2013 30 30
  • 31. HOWEVER…• Plants that are infected with disease, or that are infested with insects, should not be composted• Why ask for trouble? 2/25/2013 31
  • 32. OTHER MICROBE SOURCES• Commercial products are available• Bacterial spores• Increasing population of microorganisms increases rate of composting 2/25/2013 32
  • 33. TUMBLERS 2/25/2013 33 33
  • 34. TUMBLERS• Have the simplicity of a pile• Compost is enclosed• Easy to turn• MAY BE TOO EASY – Turning too often prevents the mix from reaching good composting temperatures 2/25/2013 34
  • 35. TUMBLER COMPOSTINGSimilar to pile composting:• Add chopped materials in a general ratio of 30 to 1 (C/N) ratio• Moisten thoroughly• Turn tumbler to mix ingredients• Take temperature every few days• Temperature should rise, then decrease• Turn again after temperatures drop• Don‟t turn more than every 3 days 2/25/2013 35 35
  • 36. 2/25/2013 36
  • 37. BINS 2/25/2013 37 37
  • 38. BINS VARY WILDLY• Enclosed• Use fork or auger for turning• May have door for easy removal of finished compost 2/25/2013 38 38
  • 39. 3 – BIN SYSTEM Fill with raw When first is Either holds1st bin 2nd bin 3rd bin materials filled, start materials or gets Allow to second filled after compost Allow to second Turn as with pile compost Allow to Turn first bin compost, turning also first & second 3x3x3 3x3x3 3x3x3 2/25/2013 39 39
  • 40. IN-VESSEL SYSTEMSThis involves using perforated barrels, drums, ormanufactured containers that are simple to use, easyto turn, require minimal labor, are not weathersensitive, and can be used in urban and public areas.The initial investment can be high and handlingvolumes low. 40 2/25/2013
  • 41. DIFFERENT METHODS Electric heat & regular agitation NOT exactly compostinghttp://www.naturemill.com/video_histChan.html 2/25/2013 41 41
  • 42. COOL COMPOSTING 2/25/2013 42
  • 43. WORMS2/25/2013 43
  • 44. COMPOST WORMS• Red wigglers (Eisinia foetida)• Hungrier and tolerate higher temperatures than „nightcrawlers‟• Very fast degrading of materials• Worms eat raw materials• May eat their own weight daily 2/25/2013 44
  • 45. WORMS, CONT.• Foodstuff ground in gizzard• Microorganisms in worms themselves and in degrading materials also involved• Little heat generated• compost = worm castings 2/25/2013 45
  • 46. MANAGING WORMS• Starting materials must be moist• Higher N than other methods• C/N ration not important• Must be protected from heat and cold• Must not get dry!• Many, many worms in 1 pound! 2/25/2013 46 46
  • 47. WORM BIN Under cover 2/25/2013 47
  • 48. 2/25/2013 48
  • 49. ANAEROBIC 2/25/2013 49
  • 50. TRENCHSlowerAnaerobic microbes do work Bury starter material near new garden Add small amount of fertilizer C/N ratio not critical Will smell bad if opened before complete 2/25/2013 50
  • 51. BOKASHI• Demo 2/25/2013 51
  • 52. DON’T COMPOST THESE!!! – Plant with severe – Butter disease or insect – Cheese infestations – Lard – Noxious or succulent – Grease weeds – Mayonnaise – Grasses that spread by – Milk rhizomes – Peanut butter – Dog and cat manure – Oils – Meat or fish leftovers – Salad dressing – Bones – Sour cream 2/25/2013 – Whole eggs 52
  • 53. TOOLS2/25/2013 53
  • 54. HOW MUCH TIME?Preparation –• for a small system, 5 to 20 minutes/week• for a landscape, will vary with – the amount of material composted – number of people attending to process (turning, etc.) 2/25/2013 54 54
  • 55. COMPOST IS COMPLETEDFrom a few weeks to a few months, dependingon•Composition and preparation of feedstock•Turning regime•Outdoor temperature 2/25/2013 55
  • 56. HINTS FOR SUCCESS• Include oxygen in the mixture to support aerobic organisms that break down the materials (STIR)• Don‟t stir too often, or it won‟t get hot enough to compost.• Mix materials on a regular basis• Aeration will cut down odors 2/25/2013 56 56
  • 57. PROBLEMS TO CONFRONT• Dry air – Always keep lightly moistened• Hot – Place in a shady space if possible – Always have a cover• Insects• Odors 2/25/2013 57 57
  • 58.  Bugs happen. They benefit compost & help to expedite process by breaking down starting material No pesticides! Can kill bugs and worms Freeze starting material before putting in composter to decrease flies and other insects If roaches are a big problem, put DE on top of pile 58 2/25/2013
  • 59.  Compost should smell like fresh soil Foul smells may be due to  Anaerobic conditions – stir to add oxygen  Too much green or large green clumps – add some browns and stir well Alwaysmake the top layer of the compost brown 2/25/2013 59
  • 60. ODORS• Too much green or large green clumps• Needs oxygen• Bury the scraps - put a layer of brown on top (use uncomposted material for the brown if you don‟t have any)• stir the pot• Throw in some brown and stir well
  • 61. NOT COMPOSTING???Possible causes:• Turned too often, heat doesn’t generate• Not turned often enough, process is very slow• Too much carbon, no food for microbes• Pile too small, microbes can’t get established 2/25/2013 61 61
  • 62. HYGIENE• Compost is rarely a disease risk• To reduce these remote risks: –Wear gloves when handling –Wash your hands after handling –Cover any cuts on hands or arms –Don’t sniff compost deeply, especially if • your immune system is suppressed (HIV/AIDS, chemo/radiation, organ transplant anti-rejection drugs) • You have asthma, emphysema, etc. 2/25/2013 62
  • 63. IT’S FINISHED WHEN IT:• has no chunks of undecomposed matter• is dark• does not feel “slick”• compresses into a ball when pressed in the hand 2/25/2013 63 63
  • 64. USING THE FINISHED PRODUCT• When to apply it?• Just before planting.• Where?• Into soil of planting bed 2/25/2013 64 64
  • 65. USING COMPOST• Incorporate about 1 – 3 inches of compost into top soil.• Mix thoroughly.• Plant as usual• Or place it on top of soil and allow it to work its way into the soil.• Or – make a slurry and apply 2/25/2013 65 – demo
  • 66. COMPOST TEA• A brew of compost in water• ~ one part compost to five parts water 2/25/2013 66 66
  • 67. COMPOST TEA, CONT.• High in nitrogen and other nutrients• Soluble nutrients are released immediately• Antibiotic and antifungal properties are released over the longer course of brewing 2/25/2013 67
  • 68. COMPOST TEA (CONT.)Properties vary with:1. Starting materials2. Length of brewing time3. Level of aeration and stirring • Insufficient air will cause it to go anaerobic and smell foul 2/25/2013 68 68
  • 69. MANY SYSTEMS, BUT BASICALLY -• Stir/aerate• Allow to settle• Dilute to a tea color• Use tea as – Fertilizer – Disease controller 2/25/2013 69 69
  • 70. 702/25/2013
  • 71. APPLYING COMPOST TEA 2/25/2013 71
  • 72. SUMMARYCompost• Is a terrific source of plant nutrients• Is a source of many beneficial microorganisms• May control plant disease, both as compost and tea• Lowers the amount of organic garbage going to the landfill. 72
  • 73. RESOURCEShttp://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/rrr/composting/benefits.htmhttp://www.caes.uga.edu/publications/pubDetail.cfm?pk_id=6288 2/25/2013 73
  • 74. DREAM COMPOSTER• http://earthfirst.com/magic-marvelous- compost-bin-video/ 2/25/2013 74
  • 75. LEE HAYS ON COMPOSTING • If I should die before I wake, All my bones and sinew take; Put me in the compost pile, And decompose me for a while. • Wind, water, rain will have their way, Returning me to common clay! All that I am will feed the trees, and little fishes in the seas. • On radishes and corn you munch-- You might be having me for lunch! And then excrete me with a grin-- Chortling, "There goes Lee again!!" 75http://compost.css.cornell.edu/yourself.html 2/25/2013

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