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GROW2012 - Why Product Doesn't Matter - Sales and Marketing Do - David Cancel Hubspot
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GROW2012 - Why Product Doesn't Matter - Sales and Marketing Do - David Cancel Hubspot

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David is currently the Chief Product Officer for HubSpot. Before HubSpot acquired Performable, David was the CEO of Performable, a next-generation marketing automation software platform. Prior to …

David is currently the Chief Product Officer for HubSpot. Before HubSpot acquired Performable, David was the CEO of Performable, a next-generation marketing automation software platform. Prior to Performable, David was the co-founder and CTO of Lookery, the founder and CTO of Compete, which was acquired by WPP, and the CTO of BuyerZone, which was acquired by Reed Elsevier.

Published in Technology , Business , Career
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  • Let’s get started\n
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  • Bolt - Community Media Property on the Web, 1996, Facebook before Facebook, 10 years too early\n
  • Bolt - Community Media Property on the Web, 1996, Facebook before Facebook, 10 years too early\n
  • Bolt - Community Media Property on the Web, 1996, Facebook before Facebook, 10 years too early\n
  • Compete - Predictive Analytics based on Consumer Intention Data, 5 years too early\n
  • Compete - Predictive Analytics based on Consumer Intention Data, 5 years too early\n
  • Compete - Predictive Analytics based on Consumer Intention Data, 5 years too early\n
  • Lookery - Realtime Social Media Data Exchange for Ad Networks, ?? too early\n
  • Lookery - Realtime Social Media Data Exchange for Ad Networks, ?? too early\n
  • Lookery - Realtime Social Media Data Exchange for Ad Networks, ?? too early\n
  • Performable, Turn visitors into customers, about perfectly timed\n
  • Performable, Turn visitors into customers, about perfectly timed\n
  • Performable, Turn visitors into customers, about perfectly timed\n
  • Upside is I've gotten less dumb, still not smart, just not dumb enough to repeat painful lessons. \n
  • 16 years of startups, 1000s of product iterations trying to get to Product Market Fit, lots of PAIN\n
  • 16 years of startups, 1000s of product iterations trying to get to Product Market Fit, lots of PAIN\n
  • 16 years of startups, 1000s of product iterations trying to get to Product Market Fit, lots of PAIN\n
  • 16 years of startups, 1000s of product iterations trying to get to Product Market Fit, lots of PAIN\n
  • But I finally learned a secret. I learned this secret at HubSpot\n
  • For the first time I stayed on after my company was acquired, this time by HubSpot\n
  • Common mission, world domination, build something our grandkids will be proud of, build a giant company in Boston (Technically the Republic of Cambridge)\n
  • Common mission, world domination, build something our grandkids will be proud of, build a giant company in Boston (Technically the Republic of Cambridge)\n
  • 1000s of raving Fans\n
  • Common mission, world domination, build something our grandkids will be proud of, build a giant company in Boston (Technically the Republic of Cambridge)\n
  • Over 7500 customers (yes they pay us MONEY)\n
  • Marketing and Sales MACHINE\n
  • But I learned a secret and I'm going to share it with you\n
  • When I learned this I was blown away\n
  • [Raise your hand if you don't code] Congratulations because you are going to love this secret.\n
  • What's the hardest, most expensive thing about getting to Product Market Fit? \n
  • Building the Product is the hardest part, the part that takes the longest.\n
  • You spend so much time finding engineers, building the product, dealing with and retaining PITA engineers like me.\n
  • Building the Product is the hardest part, the part that takes the longest.\n
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  • Customer growth despite the product not matching the promise\n
  • Sold largely on the promise of a solution, sold on the dream\n
  • Sold largely on the promise of a solution, sold on the dream\n
  • Amazing sales & marketing execution\n
  • 6 years later we've rebuilt the entire Engineering, Product, and UX teams. We've rebuilt or should I say finally built about 75% of the product/dream. \n
  • Over the next year we'll finish the last 25% and expand from there.\n
  • Lessons I've learned from this experience:\n\n
  • Timing matters a FUCKING lot (duh!) \n\n
  • Riding market momentum is a mighty force multiplier (warp speed anyone) \n\n
  • Product / Market fit is about finding the solution to a market problem, not necessarily building that solution in advance and hoping you nailed it (no matter how fast you iteration cycles).\n
  • Lock your developers down, stop coding stupid, start listening.\n\n
  • Go out there and find a solution to a real fucking problem first before worrying about building anything. \n\n\n
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Transcript

  • 1. Why Product Market Fit Doesn’t Matter@dcancel
  • 2. I’m David Cancel@dcancel
  • 3. On the internets @dcancel@dcancel
  • 4. I love building things@dcancel
  • 5. But building these is way@dcancel
  • 6. I work at HubSpot@dcancel
  • 7. This is my timeline@dcancel
  • 8. Really excited to be here@dcancel
  • 9. @dcancel
  • 10. Product Market Fit@dcancel
  • 11. Professor Blank@dcancel
  • 12. Professor Ries@dcancel
  • 13. 16 years of searching...@dcancel
  • 14. for Product Marketing Fit@dcancel
  • 15. 1. Way too fucking early@dcancel
  • 16. 1. Way too fucking early@dcancel
  • 17. 1. Way too fucking early@dcancel
  • 18. 2. Way too early@dcancel
  • 19. 2. Way too early@dcancel
  • 20. 2. Way too early@dcancel
  • 21. 3. Too early@dcancel
  • 22. 3. Too early@dcancel
  • 23. 3. Too early@dcancel
  • 24. 4. Close to perfect@dcancel
  • 25. 4. Close to perfect@dcancel
  • 26. 4. Close to perfect@dcancel
  • 27. Good news: I am less dumb today@dcancel
  • 28. 16 years of starting@dcancel
  • 29. 1000s of product@dcancel
  • 30. Trying to find Product@dcancel
  • 31. Lots of pain and@dcancel
  • 32. @dcancel
  • 33. Chief Product Officer@dcancel
  • 34. World domination@dcancel
  • 35. Passionate people@dcancel
  • 36. Raving fans@dcancel
  • 37. Playing for keeps@dcancel
  • 38. 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 Explosive growth@dcancel
  • 39. 60 Apps 2,000,000 Marketers 70,000 Users70 ServiceProviders 700 VAR 220,000 followers 176,000 fans 80,000 members IMU 30,000 4,100 Grads subscribers
  • 40. I learned a secret@dcancel
  • 41. Mind blown@dcancel
  • 42. You’re going to love this@dcancel
  • 43. Finding fit is really hard@dcancel
  • 44. Building is the hardest part@dcancel
  • 45. So much time and money@dcancel
  • 46. Too hard@dcancel
  • 47. You don’t need afucking product
  • 48. 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 No Product@dcancel
  • 49. The promise@dcancel
  • 50. The dream@dcancel
  • 51. Amazing execution@dcancel
  • 52. Today@dcancel
  • 53. Future@dcancel
  • 54. Lessons learned@dcancel
  • 55. Timing matters. Duh.@dcancel
  • 56. Force Multiplier@dcancel
  • 57. Solution !== product@dcancel
  • 58. Listen@dcancel
  • 59. Good luck@dcancel
  • 60. Thank You David Cancel
  • 61. Thank You David Cancel
  • 62. Thank You David Cancel