Return on relationships: Getting the most out of reputation measurement Bjorn Edlund Executive Vice President, Communicati...
Brand and Reputation management How we see & portray ourselves Overall estimation  by stakeholders  Interaction with stake...
The media – the interaction spectrum PR MR GR IR SD Forecourts High control Low/No control Website Display  Advertising TV...
<ul><li>Independent annual survey to track attitudes towards Shell and competitors in some 12-15 countries </li></ul><ul><...
Advocacy…and high expectations Would speak highly of them Would speak critically of them 42% 11% 47% What will special pub...
Communication from company silos Internal Communications Social Performance Employees Communities Marketing /Retail Motori...
Target stakeholder Do you take the hierarchical route? Or do you have a power map? Communication from the company bunker
The world according to the stakeholder <ul><li>Patterns of influence on the target stakeholder are multiple </li></ul><ul>...
Innovation - who’s influencing whom? <ul><li>Can we influence other stakeholders surrounding the target to make their dial...
Innovation - who’s influencing whom? <ul><li>Channel approach to achieve objective </li></ul><ul><li>If this works, then m...
Return on Relationships <ul><li>Build productive relationships and alliances, partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Proactively t...
Strategy and Global Reputation Plan One worldwide reputation plan Primary themes The energy challenge Technology and  inno...
More Upstream,  Profitable Downstream Three Hard Truths Priority projects Public Relations  incl engagement Brand campaign...
Strong impact new media – early hits in 2009 <ul><li>Tell Shell 1998 – Forum serving as window into global corporation </l...
<ul><li>end </li></ul>
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Return on relationships: Getting the most out of reputation measurement by Bjorn Edlund

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Bjorn Edlund, Executive Vice President, Communications for Royal Dutch Shell plc 2005-2010, talks about his experiences at The Group's Measuring corporate brand reputation seminar, 18 May 2010

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  • Special publics In 2008, Shell’s reputation among special publics (Government, media, NGOs, academia) has slightly improved. Globally, net favourability among special publics is marginally up (plus 1% point), while both BP and ExxonMobil are slightly down (both minus 2% points). Shell’s net favourability is now 46% - BP follows with 30%, ExxonMobil only enjoys 9%. Academics and Government remain most positive towards Shell, and media views have improved to almost the same level. NGOs are relatively more critical towards the whole sector. Mood change among special publics We mustn&apos;t forget that Shell’s net favourability score is relatively low compared to other industries. This means that we don’t have a highly trusted position…and in the course of this year we have seen also in other research a mood change across special publics. Special publics recognise that problems due to climate change are happening now and that it affects them personally. They expect radical thinking and want to see action. Oil and gas companies are seen as highly accountable for tackling climate change but are not seen to be taking appropriate action. General public While high fuel prices have had little impact on special publics’ overall favourability, their impact has been dramatic on the general public. Last year the Tracker showed that the general public in key countries sees very little differentiation between the majors. This year we have seen a substantial drop towards the oil and gas sector across all countries we’ve measured. It is not just the price of fuel that has caused public resentment, but its combination with high company profits. &lt;background on the 2008 Shell Reputation Tracker&gt; Fieldwork took place between mid-May and early July 2008. Special publics and general public we’re this year measured in 11 countries: Canada, US, Brazil, UK, NL, Germany, Russia, Nigeria, India, China, Australia.
  • Advocacy is an important measure to focus attention on; what will special publics say when we’re not in the room? How will they speak about us when not in direct conversation with us? Compared to BP and ExxonMobil, Shell has a relative good score. Towards half would speak highly of Shell. Only one-in-ten would speak critically about us. It is important to know that this is a quarter among NGO’s. We should not underestimate the relative high number of special publics that are neutral or have no opinion. In political terms, these are the ‘swing voters’ who still can make the difference. In this respect it is worthwhile to have a look at BP (with 64% neutral/no opinion). The jury is still out for them, since the environmental issues they were confronted with. We can expect – and we see this already in their advertising campaign – that they’re fighting hard to win lost battle ground. The graph at the bottom explains how advocacy is built. It is very clear that d irect engagement is highly effective - special publics who had direct contact with Shell representatives have a higher opinion of the company and are more willing to advocate on our behalf.
  • So given… - our relative good reputation compared to our main competitors the mood change among special publics our relative good advocacy position and… the insights we have on what enhances advocacy and favourability…. We will continue to build on the strong foundation we have established with the energy scenarios and the dialogue series in US (50-city tour) and a.o. NL, UK and Germany…. Against this background, we are proposing to increase the Return on Relationships with a sharpened communications strategy. We will broaden and escalate direct engagement with key stakeholders, and will organise our own dialogue events where possible. Setting the Shell strategic story about More Upstream, Profitable Downstream in the context of the Three Hard Truths and Better Blueprints, we intend to focus on a simplified narrative about Shell’s plan for a new energy future – demonstrating how we contribute to sustainable progress by providing both More energy and CO 2 solutions. More energy The more energy comes in two parts. Hard to Get Energy describes Shell’s technology skills and sustainability approach to talk about projects such as oil sands, deep water, unconventional oil and Artic exploration. Diverse Energy covers our expanding natural gas portfolio, including liquefied natural gas, biofuels and wind. CO 2 solutions The CO 2 solutions side of the Shell narrative covers Energy Efficiency ; stories that will focus on what Shell does to use less energy and emit less CO 2 , and how we help customers emit less and use energy better. The CO 2 Management ingredients cover carbon capture and storage, clean coal technologies and biofuels. The more focused story is also reflected in the new adverts. Within the media placement budget there will be a higher weighting for the US and UK – and for online advertising as this is a highly cost-effective way to connect to special publics.
  • Return on relationships: Getting the most out of reputation measurement by Bjorn Edlund

    1. 1. Return on relationships: Getting the most out of reputation measurement Bjorn Edlund Executive Vice President, Communications Royal Dutch Shell (2005-2010)
    2. 2. Brand and Reputation management How we see & portray ourselves Overall estimation by stakeholders Interaction with stakeholders Behaviour Corporate Identity Who we are and what we stand for Communication Fears Hope Biases Self-interest Trust Effective relationships Performance Corporate Reputation Employees Government NGOs Academics Investors Customers Communities/ Citizens Media
    3. 3. The media – the interaction spectrum PR MR GR IR SD Forecourts High control Low/No control Website Display Advertising TV Digital Outdoor Loyalty Scheme Sponsorships Media Partnerships Viral Seeding Coverage Owned Media Bought Media Earned Media Awareness (=Loyalty) Favourability Advocacy Increasingly, conversation is king. Content is just something to talk about S O C I A L M E D I A
    4. 4. <ul><li>Independent annual survey to track attitudes towards Shell and competitors in some 12-15 countries </li></ul><ul><li>Audiences: special publics, general public and staff </li></ul><ul><li>Special publics are: government, media, NGO’s, academics </li></ul>Shell Reputation Tracker 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Z Shell Y Net favourability over time - special publics 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Z Shell Y Net favourability over time - general public
    5. 5. Advocacy…and high expectations Would speak highly of them Would speak critically of them 42% 11% 47% What will special publics say about you when you’re not in the room? Versus competitor 1 Versus competitor 2 6 7 8 9 6 7 8 9 Environmental responsibility Health and safety Integrity Quality of products & services Responsible on climate change Long-term perspective Alternative energy sources Respect for communities Technology Well managed Human rights Financial performance Economic contribution
    6. 6. Communication from company silos Internal Communications Social Performance Employees Communities Marketing /Retail Motorist/ General public Media Relations Media
    7. 7. Target stakeholder Do you take the hierarchical route? Or do you have a power map? Communication from the company bunker
    8. 8. The world according to the stakeholder <ul><li>Patterns of influence on the target stakeholder are multiple </li></ul><ul><li>Target is exposed to, and seeks out, interaction with third parties </li></ul><ul><li>We need to understand the other dialogues before filling the direct channel with messages </li></ul><ul><li>Testing how measurement can help us with this </li></ul>Target Stakeholder Media SHELL Motorist/ General public Academia (Science) Economic NGOs Environmental NGOs Human Rights NGOs Communities
    9. 9. Innovation - who’s influencing whom? <ul><li>Can we influence other stakeholders surrounding the target to make their dialogue with these stakeholders more informed? </li></ul><ul><li>If we can measure and predict a certain level of behaviours of stakeholders, then engagement becomes a highly tactical channel strategy </li></ul><ul><li>We are testing this with data of the Reputation Tracker and our Henley partner </li></ul>Government Media SHELL Motorist/ General public Academia (Science) Economic NGOs Environmental NGOs Human Rights NGOs Communities
    10. 10. Innovation - who’s influencing whom? <ul><li>Channel approach to achieve objective </li></ul><ul><li>If this works, then measurement truly becomes the basis of stakeholder engagement </li></ul>Government Media SHELL Motorist/ General public Academia (Science) Economic NGOs Environmental NGOs Human Rights NGOs Communities
    11. 11. Return on Relationships <ul><li>Build productive relationships and alliances, partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Proactively tell the story of how you deal with your stakeholder-relevant business challenges </li></ul><ul><li>Broaden and escalate direct dialogues, create and use toolkits </li></ul><ul><li>Minimising risks by understanding and acting on societal expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Utilise your USP, e.g. your technology position </li></ul><ul><li>Spend smarter </li></ul>
    12. 12. Strategy and Global Reputation Plan One worldwide reputation plan Primary themes The energy challenge Technology and innovation Respect for people and the environment Preferred partner Underlying themes Delivering corporate strategy and business performance Management excellence Key messages on Shell’s position per theme Finding factual proof points on all messages Mining for authentic and human stories Basis for all internal and external communication channels and stakeholder meetings Marrying desirable message components as emotional appeal, factual data and authenticity Helping leaders to improve story-telling
    13. 13. More Upstream, Profitable Downstream Three Hard Truths Priority projects Public Relations incl engagement Brand campaign Government Relations Integrated programmes Internal Comms
    14. 14. Strong impact new media – early hits in 2009 <ul><li>Tell Shell 1998 – Forum serving as window into global corporation </li></ul><ul><li>Shell Dialogues – 32,000 visitors, 1500 participants in 5 web chats </li></ul><ul><li>Technology podcasts – 4.5 million listeners per podcast in US </li></ul><ul><li>Web activity and corporate advertising </li></ul><ul><ul><li>550 million impressions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 million visits Shell campaign site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>39% saw 6 minutes Gas to Liquid film </li></ul></ul>Web Q&A with Jeremy Bentham
    15. 15. <ul><li>end </li></ul>

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