Taking photos with a Digital Camera & sending pictures through email
www.greenhectaresonline.com                                                 www.zephyrtraining.ca   info@ greenhectaresonl...
Y Camera our Using a digital camera is very similar to using a film camera: Y point the camera at whatever it is you  ou w...
Diagram of a Typical Digital Camera
Before We Begin… Make sure you have a memory card and that it is inserted into the camera. Youll also need to check the ba...
Taking a Photo Turn on your digital camera. For most digital cameras the on/ switch is located on the top of              ...
Zoom Zoom Zoom Getting in close to your subj is one of the                              ect secrets to taking better photo...
Say Cheese! Let’s begin by taking a few sample photos to try and get the hang of using your camera.
Transferring Your Photos                          FromY Camera to Y Computer our         our There are various ways to tra...
USB Cord Connection USB (Universal Serial Bus) cables are used to transfer data between devices and computers. USB is the ...
Now What? Once the camera is connected to the computer or the memory card is inserted into the memory card reader, the com...
Where Do I Find My Pictures? Since we are trying to send one picture in an email, it is easiest if you choose to “view the...
Ohhhh, This One is Nice! The easiest way to save a specific photo is to drag that photo onto your computer’s desktop. It i...
Renaming Y Photo          our Give the photo a name that describes it well. Now that you have selected a photo you would l...
Opening up a Gmail Account 1. Open your Gmail account at        http:/www.gmail.com              / 2. Click the Compose Ma...
Opening up Microsoft Outlook  1. Open Microsoft Outlook.  2. Compose a new e-mail by clicking on the “New”     icon in the...
Email Window Fill in the To: field with the recipient’s email address. It should follow this pattern; text, then an @ , te...
Slower Internet Connection? If you have a dial-up internet connection, then sending a picture can take a significant amoun...
More Attachments?  Y can send your email with your photo   ou  attachment.  Y can also attach more than one photo into    ...
A Example n H i B ob, This morning I found an unfamil insect                                iar crawl al over my canol pl ...
Compressing Files & Folders Compressed files take up less disk space than uncompressed files, so compressing is useful for...
Creating a Zip File The fastest way to zip a file or a picture is to right click on the file and select “Send to” > “Compr...
A A n nalogy… Y are moving to a new house. Let’s say you  ou have 50 sweaters and you put them all into a plastic bag and ...
To Un-Zip a File To unzip a file, right-click the file, and then click “Extract” or “Open” on the shortcut menu. When you ...
Receiving a Photo When you receive an e-mail with a photo sent as an attachment, it will appear with a paper clip icon in ...
Receiving a Photo 1.   Y can click on the attachment and drag it to       ou      the desktop or a folder, or save to a sp...
Opening a Picture Many programs will allow you to compress a photo into a smaller file size. The picture will look fine on...
Why is This A so Important?             ll Y now know how to take a picture, put it onto  ou your computer and send a pict...
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Green Hectares Rural Tech Workshop - Digital Cameras and Emailing Photos

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An overview of how to use digital cameras and to share those images for business or personal use.

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  • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Welcome to Digital Cameras and Emailing Photos - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - The purpose of this workshop is to teach students how to use their digital camera to take a picture and then send that picture as an attachment in an email. This is an important skill to learn, especially if they live in a more isolated part of rural Alberta. Let’s say they find some sort of strange bug crawling over their crops, and they have no idea what sort of bug it is. Instead of taking a picture and having to get it developed and take the picture to someone who may be able to help them identify it, they can instantly take a picture of this bug with their digital camera and immediately send the picture in an email. This will save them time, money and hopefully solve their problem a lot faster. With more and more people using email and digital technology, this workshop will hopefully teach them some basic skills to help keep them connected in the digital world we are living in. * Instructor Notes will be distinguished through italics Make sure the following are installed / updated: Microsoft Outlook Internet Explorer (High Speed Preferred) Other Requirements: Gmail training accounts Digital Camera with USB cables and memory card readers Sample photographs
  • Apart from top-of-the-range-cameras, you don't need to manually focus or think about technicalities like shutter speed or exposure (this may be offered in another workshop), the camera does that for you. If the camera is set up to use its flash, it will check how much light there is around and flash if it needs to. * This is a class about point-and-shoot cameras, not Digital SLR cameras, (will be offered as a separate workshop) * If you have people with Digital SLR Cameras in your class, just have them turn the dial on the top of the camera to “Green” or to the “Green Camera Icon” which will automatically adjust focus, shutter speed, and exposure.
  • Before you start taking digital photos, you'll need to make sure that the photos have a place to be stored. Unlike a film camera, a digital camera’s pictures are saved to memory card. Most digital cameras will let you take twenty or thirty pictures before they fill up, and once they do, you will have to either delete some photos or copy them to your computer to free up space. Or, if your camera uses special computer memory like CompactFlash or a Memory Stick, put in a new card. You'll also need to check the batteries on your camera. You’ll find that your camera either takes disposable batteries or has a rechargeable battery pack. Whatever the power source, make sure it is charged and ready to go before you begin to take pictures!
  • Most digital cameras have a little screen in the back that lets you see what you're about to photograph without having to look through the viewfinder. The screen will also show you your photo after you've taken it, so you can see whether you've captured the moment or just taken a shot of someone's feet.
  • Zooming in is an important skill to learn if you are trying to take a picture of something really small and want to ensure you capture all of the fine details.
  • Take a few minutes to practice using the cameras. Have students take pictures of each other, pictures of objects in the building, or head outside for some picture-taking. Most digital cameras have a feature that will allow you to view your photos right from your camera's display screen. You can check out the images that you have just captured by going from the picture mode, to the view mode. On most digital cameras this is indicated by a button with a triangle in the middle. * Take some time with each student providing tips, commenting on pictures, etc.
  • Once you've taken your photo, it is stored in the camera until you decide what to do with it.
  • Instructor: Walk around and make sure each student’s computer has accepted and acknowledged the memory card / camera.
  • Remember when you are viewing the the pictures in a new window, they are not saved onto your computer yet. If you are using a Mac computer, your pictures should automatically appear in iPhoto® for you to view. You will be given the options to “Import selected” or “Import all”.
  • Right click on the picture that you have selected. A list of options will appear; click “Rename”. This option will allow you to call your picture whatever you like. Image used with permission from Microsoft ®.
  • First you will need to open an internet browser (Firefox, Explorer, Safari, Camino, etc), and login to your email account. *You can allow the students to use their own web email accounts if they have them, or have them log into the training Gmail accounts you have set up before the course. *WARNING- don’t have the students create new Gmail accounts- because the classroom maybe using a single ISP address, 3-5 new accounts will be created before Google prevents access to creating accounts through that ISP.
  • *Check that Outlook has been installed. It can be configured to the training Gmail accounts or it may already be set up for training accounts.
  • Remember to watch for typos, although some e-mail applications will have a built-in spell check. It is a good idea though to run a spell check when you are finished composing the email.
  • The process for attaching another photo is the same as the process before. If you are using an email account like hotmail or gmail, most will have a size limit to how big your attachments can be. (typically around 10 MB) Just make sure to keep this in mind. Practice: Students can email each other or themselves a photo. Repeat the sending emails with attachments several times.
  • Zipping a file creates a compressed version of the file that is considerably smaller than the original file. The zipped version of the file has a .zip file extension. For example; if you zip a Microsoft Office Word document called Government Proposal.doc that is 6.5 megabytes (MB) in size, the file created, Government Proposal.zip, maybe reduced to 2.5 MB. *Watch your timing. If students spend a lot of time taking photos – then maybe present zipping a lecture or demonstrate it. If there is plenty of time, walk through the steps.
  • Sending something as a zip file is great if you have a slower internet connection. It takes up less space to try and send to a recipient and will make it faster.
  • This is just a very basic idea of what a zipped file is and what zipping a file does. If you go online and look up zip file you can find a plethora of information on sending and receiving zip files. For this class though, this is really all you need to know!
  • Be careful when receiving files ensuring that they are from a known source before you open them, as there are many SPAM mails that have Virus files attached. The common file formats to avoid opening without virus checking include .pif, .scr and .exe
  • If you are going to shrink or compress a photo, make sure that you always save it out as a copy. Never save over the original.
  • People use their computers on a daily basis and you can get your email from anywhere provided that there is an internet connection. Of all the internet activities that people engage in, email is by far the most popular and important. Emailing a picture is free and helps eliminate the costs of having to pay to develop film.
  • Green Hectares Rural Tech Workshop - Digital Cameras and Emailing Photos

    1. 1. Taking photos with a Digital Camera & sending pictures through email
    2. 2. www.greenhectaresonline.com www.zephyrtraining.ca info@ greenhectaresonline.com info@ zephyrtraining.caTHESE MA TERIA A COPY LS RE RIGHTED WITH A RIGHTS A RESERV THIS DOCUMENT MA NOT IN WHOLE OR IN PA BE COPIED, PHOTOCOPIED, REPRODUCED, LL RE ED. Y RTOR REDUCED TO A ELECTRONIC MEDIUM OR MA NY CHINE-REA BLE FORM WITHOUT PRIOR CONSENT, IN WRITING, FROM ZEPHY SOFTWA TRA DA R RE INING LTD. ANDGREEN HECTA CORP. RESA SOFTWA COMPUTER, A PRODUCT NA MENTIONED A MA CTURER A PUBLISHER TRA NY RE, ND MES RE NUFA ND DEMA A A USED ONLY FOR THE PURPOSE OF RKS ND REIDENTIFICATION.Gmail is a registered trademark of Google Inc. Other product and company names mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respectiveowners.Microsoft Outlook is either a registered trademark or trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/ other countries. Other product orand company names mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.iPhoto is a registered trademark of Apple Computer Inc.Photosuite is a registered trademark of MGI Software Corp .
    3. 3. Y Camera our Using a digital camera is very similar to using a film camera: Y point the camera at whatever it is you ou want to photograph, look through the viewfinder to line up your photo, and press the shutter button to take the photo.
    4. 4. Diagram of a Typical Digital Camera
    5. 5. Before We Begin… Make sure you have a memory card and that it is inserted into the camera. Youll also need to check the batteries in your camera.
    6. 6. Taking a Photo Turn on your digital camera. For most digital cameras the on/ switch is located on the top of off the camera. Make sure that your camera is in photo mode. This is usually indicated by a small camera icon.
    7. 7. Zoom Zoom Zoom Getting in close to your subj is one of the ect secrets to taking better photos. Optical zoom refers to magnification within the lens itself when you zoom in or zoom out on the subj ect. The lens adj usts forward and backward j like a ust film camera. Optical zoom does not diminish the quality of the digital photo.
    8. 8. Say Cheese! Let’s begin by taking a few sample photos to try and get the hang of using your camera.
    9. 9. Transferring Your Photos FromY Camera to Y Computer our our There are various ways to transfer your photos from the camera to your computer. Some laptops have a memory card reader installed directly on them. Y can also transfer photos from your camera to ou your computer using your USB cable.
    10. 10. USB Cord Connection USB (Universal Serial Bus) cables are used to transfer data between devices and computers. USB is the universally accepted standard of computer integration with many consumer electronics.
    11. 11. Now What? Once the camera is connected to the computer or the memory card is inserted into the memory card reader, the computer will detect the connection, and a window will appear asking how you would like to proceed. A menu should appear with several options to choose from.
    12. 12. Where Do I Find My Pictures? Since we are trying to send one picture in an email, it is easiest if you choose to “view the photos in a new window”. This is a nice way to view the photos in a much larger format on the computer monitor and decide which ones are worthy of saving.
    13. 13. Ohhhh, This One is Nice! The easiest way to save a specific photo is to drag that photo onto your computer’s desktop. It is a good idea to rename the photo so it is easier to find in the future. Since we are focusing on sending one picture as an e-mail attachment, this way works the best.
    14. 14. Renaming Y Photo our Give the photo a name that describes it well. Now that you have selected a photo you would like attach it to an email. It is time to open up your email account.
    15. 15. Opening up a Gmail Account 1. Open your Gmail account at http:/www.gmail.com / 2. Click the Compose Mail link. 3. Click the Attach a file link. 4. Click the Browse button and browse to the image you wish to attach. 5. Click OK.
    16. 16. Opening up Microsoft Outlook 1. Open Microsoft Outlook. 2. Compose a new e-mail by clicking on the “New” icon in the top left portion of the window. 3. In the e-mail, click on the Insert file icon that looks like a small paperclip, or click on Insert at the top of the window and choose file. 4. Browse to the location that contains your image and double-click the image to insert it. 5. Type message and click “Send”.
    17. 17. Email Window Fill in the To: field with the recipient’s email address. It should follow this pattern; text, then an @ , text then a period, and text. Ex. info@ zephyrtraining.ca Remember to fill in the subj field to indicate ect the email’s contents. It should be clear and concise. Ex: Photo of an insect.
    18. 18. Slower Internet Connection? If you have a dial-up internet connection, then sending a picture can take a significant amount of time if the photo is large. The best way to get around this is to “zip” or compress your photos. This option is also great if you want to send a large number of photos or a bigger document via e-mail.
    19. 19. More Attachments? Y can send your email with your photo ou attachment. Y can also attach more than one photo into ou an email, but you have to attach them one at a time if you are using webmail.
    20. 20. A Example n H i B ob, This morning I found an unfamil insect iar crawl al over my canol pl s. I have never ing l a ant seen somet hing l it before. I t ike ook a phot of it o and I am sending it t you, because I am o hoping t you can hel id ent it for me. hat p ify Thanks, S mit ie t
    21. 21. Compressing Files & Folders Compressed files take up less disk space than uncompressed files, so compressing is useful for making backup copies of your data or for sending information over the Internet. If you compress a single item, the compressed file has the name of the original item with a .zip extension. (e.g.. Insect.zip) If you compress multiple items at once, the compressed file is called A rchive.zip.
    22. 22. Creating a Zip File The fastest way to zip a file or a picture is to right click on the file and select “Send to” > “Compressed (zippped) folder” Y can then upload that file, picture or ou document as an e-mail attachment.
    23. 23. A A n nalogy… Y are moving to a new house. Let’s say you ou have 50 sweaters and you put them all into a plastic bag and you vacuum seal the bag. It becomes a lot smaller and a lot easier to transfer from your old house to your new house. When you get to your new house and unseal the bag, all of the sweaters are still there and are the same size.
    24. 24. To Un-Zip a File To unzip a file, right-click the file, and then click “Extract” or “Open” on the shortcut menu. When you open a compressed file, it is replaced by a folder containing an uncompressed copy or copies of the original items.
    25. 25. Receiving a Photo When you receive an e-mail with a photo sent as an attachment, it will appear with a paper clip icon in the list of e-mails. 2.Click on the message to open it and the file icon will appear in an attachment field.
    26. 26. Receiving a Photo 1. Y can click on the attachment and drag it to ou the desktop or a folder, or save to a specific location. 2. If you double click on the file, it will open in the default program that you have set for that type of file format. ie those ending in .j may open peg in PhotoSuite® or those with .doc in Microsoft Word.
    27. 27. Opening a Picture Many programs will allow you to compress a photo into a smaller file size. The picture will look fine on a computer but the print quality will be diminished should you choose to print it.
    28. 28. Why is This A so Important? ll Y now know how to take a picture, put it onto ou your computer and send a picture in an email. In this age of technology, knowing how to use your email to do basic tasks like uploading and sending a picture is important. Email is convenient and instantaneous.

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