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Great Futures Start with a Great Education Spring Summer 2011
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Great Futures Start with a Great Education Spring Summer 2011

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  • Research indicates that programs focusing on these areas provide results. Just note that there is a lot of replication between these programs with the aspirations we all just discussed in a previous slide. Source: http://www.cosfp.org/HomeFiles/FundingRelation/CSFP.APAExecutiveSummary.2008Study.Sept.pdf
  • Sources: http://www.greateducation.org/statistics-faqs/statistics/ ; http://www.cosfp.org/HomeFiles/FundingRelation/CSFP.APAExecutiveSummary.2008Study.Sept.pdf
  • Sources: http://www.greateducation.org/statistics-faqs/statistics/ ; http://www.cosfp.org/HomeFiles/FundingRelation/CSFP.APAExecutiveSummary.2008Study.Sept.pdf
  • Source: State Higher Education Executive Officers: http://www.sheeo.org/
  • Source: http://cclponline.org/documents/budgetworks/COLORADOTAXPRIMERBudgetWorks2011.pdf
  • Source: http://cclponline.org/documents/budgetworks/COLORADOTAXPRIMERBudgetWorks2011.pdf
  • Transcript

    • 1. Great Futures Start with a Great Education Spring/Summer 2011
    • 2. Summary of Presentation
      • Information to answer the following:
      • What do we want for our students?
      • What is proven to work?
      • How is Colorado doing compared to other states?
      • Why are we in this position? What brought us here?
      • How can we change and improve the is situation for our students, communities and state?
    • 3. Great Futures Colorado Coalition A growing and diverse coalition of organizations that informs the public about the need for an education system -- preschool through higher ed -- that will prepare every student for the challenges of the 21st century. www.greatfuturescolorado.org
    • 4.
      • What do we want for our kids?
      • {Optional: Discussion Element}
      • We’ve asked, and this is what we heard consistently
      • GOALS: Prepare for lifelong learners (Creative Thinking, Technological Literacy
      • STRATEGIES: High Quality Teachers, smaller class size
      Great Futures Members
    • 5. What do we want for our kids?
      • To succeed , every student needs:
        • Inspired, inspiring, high quality teachers
        • Well-rounded curriculum (Music, Art, P.E., etc.)
        • Individual attention and class sizes that work for all students
        • The tools of today: Updated technology and textbooks – and skills to utilize effectively
        • Preschool and full day kindergarten
        • Access to quality, affordable higher education
        • A vibrant economy for our kids to live and work in
    • 6. What works?
      • “ Programs that correlate with improved student achievement”:
      • Preschool and Full-day Kindergarten (particularly for at-risk kids)
      • Small class size (particularly for low-income kids)
      • Technology
      • Professional Development and Teacher Pay
      • Summer School
      • Counselors
      • * Source: 2008 Colorado School Finance Project/Augenblick, Palaich & Associates study
    • 7. What works vs. what we’re doing
      • Programs that correlate with improved student achievement:
      • Preschool and Full-day Kindergarten
        • State provides preschool slots to fraction of those in need;
        • Full-day K for at-risk students is the goal but inconsistent due to a lack of resources at district and state levels
      • Small class size, especially for low-income kids
        • Colorado ranks 42 nd in student-teacher ratios
        • Colorado ranks 50 th in “poverty gap” for 4 th grade reading
      • Technology
        • Colorado ranks 40 th in use of technology in classroom, and how well “wired” our schools are
    • 8. What works vs. what we’re doing
      • Programs that correlate with improved student achievement:
      • Professional Development and Teacher Pay
        • Colorado one of 15 states that spends $0 at the state level for professional development
        • Colorado ranks 50 th when comparing teacher pay with salaries in jobs that require comparable education
      • Summer School
        • - Few districts are able to provide summer school
      • Counselors
        • In 2007: average of 470 students per counselor
    • 9. Why does Colorado look like this?
      • 40 th in per pupil spending adjusting for regional cost differences (2007-08) *
      • $1,682 below the national average in K-12 per pupil spending (2007-08) *
      • 48 th in higher education spending per capita
      * Sources: National Center for Education Statistics, Revenues and Expenditures for Public Elementary and Secondary Education: School Year 2007-08 (Fiscal Year 2008), May 2010; and 2008 gross-state-product data from the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis.
    • 10.
      • What do we want for our kids?
      • {Optional: Discussion Element}
      • We’ve asked, and this is what we heard consistently
      • GOALS: Prepare for lifelong learners (Creative Thinking, Technological Literacy
      • STRATEGIES: High Quality Teachers, smaller class size
      ** Colorado: 48th Higher Ed Funding (per capita) How Low Can Higher Ed Go?
    • 11. No Coincidence . . .
      • 49 th in state taxes
      • 46 th in combined state and local taxes
    • 12. What’s the Outlook ?
      • 2011-12 cuts
        • $227.5 million cut to K-12
          • – about $380 per pupil average
        • $36 million to higher ed
        • – $877 per student
      • Predicted cuts for 2012-13: $300 million
      • On top of:
        • 2010-11: $260 million K-12 cut
        • 2009-10: $110 million cut to K-12
    • 13. The real impact of cuts . . .
      • Provide info about cuts in your district, at your community college…..
    • 14. Not just the Bad Economy
      • Long term problem that we can’t just expect to grow out of:
    • 15. “ But K-12 Funding is Taking More and More of the Budget !”
      • Schools used to be funded 60% local, 40% state. Now the reverse.
      • Gallagher + TABOR + School Finance Act = huge reduction in property taxes ($3.1 billion annual average)
      • Why does this happen?
    • 16. What options do we have?
      • 1) “Fee for Service” Education
      • Continue to expand transportation, athletic, activity, & book fees, fundraising, school supply lists, student fees and tuition . But . . . It’s inequitable, contrary to idea of “free” public schools and accessible higher ed.
      • 2) Cut other state programs . But . . .
      • We rank 49 th in Medicaid (health care for the poor),
      • 48 th in transportation, 125 bridges are “structurally deficient,” and wait lists growing for developmentally disabled, child welfare, etc.
    • 17. What options do we have?
      • 3) Pass a Local Property Tax increase
      • An important option for districts to temporarily cushion deep cuts, but . . . not enough to overcome enormous loss of state revenue.
      • 4) Status Quo: Keep Cutting
      • Continue to search for more efficiencies and try to keep cuts away from classroom. But . . . many or most efficiencies were found in the first two or three years of cuts. 2011-12 will be Year 3-4 of cuts so avoiding key priorities (quality teaching, individual attention, early childhood education, etc.) is hard.
    • 18. What options do we have?
      • 5) Let state voters decide:
      • More cuts to education and other community services or pay for the public education system our kids, state and economy need?
    • 19. Will there be an opportunity to vote in 2011?
      • It’s Up to Us.
    • 20. There is one option in 2011
      • Senator Rollie Heath’s Proposition “X”
        • Returns income, corporate, and sales tax rates back to where they were in 1999 .
        • Raises about $500 million annually .
        • Funds go primarily to education (P-20).
        • Sunsets in five years.
        • Not a “fix” to long-term disinvestment; it would stop or minimize the cuts and provide a bridge until a long-term fiscal rescue is developed.
    • 21. You can help give Coloradans a choice.
      • The Heath Proposition
        • Is the ONLY available option to prevent a fourth year of cuts.
        • Needs 120,000 - 130,000 signatures to get to the November 2011 ballot.
        • Does not yet have major institutional donors to pay for signatures.
        • Does have widespread support from Coloradans who believe that voters should have a chance to stop crippling cuts and tuition hikes.
        • That’s why it’s up to us.
    • 22. What can you do?
          • Sign up to stay informed about latest developments and ways to get involved.
          • Have your organization join the Great Futures Colorado Coalition .
          • Sign the petition to put the Heath proposition on the ballot.
          • Carry a petition for the Heath proposition to help ensure voters have a say this year.
          • Donate to Great Ed Action to help us educate and gather signatures.
    • 23. For More Information: Contact Great Education Colorado Liane Morrison [email_address] Casey Shea [email_address] Join us on Facebook: greateducation.org/facebook www.greateducation.org www.greatfuturescolorado.org

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