Great Futures Start with a Great Education  Winter/Spring  2010
Great Education Colorado Mission Great Education Colorado is a statewide, nonpartisan, grassroots organization, focused on...
Is Colorado Investing In Our Children’s Future? Do  All  Colorado Kids Have Access  to a Quality Education?
<ul><li>What do we want for our kids? </li></ul><ul><li>{Optional: Discussion Element} </li></ul><ul><li>We’ve asked, and ...
Why the gap?
PERA Health Care Salaries Prof. Dev’t Maintenance Buildings Insurance Heating  Transportation Achievement Gap CSAP improve...
Meeting Kids Where  They Are <ul><li>Special Education –  High  %  of unreimbursed costs  [DPS paid 60% of total costs in ...
Cost of Categorical Program Gap to All Districts $816,563,911
2007-08  Cost of Gap in DPS $143,560,259 Special Education English Language Learners Vocational Education $45.4 million $7...
Proposed Cuts to P-12 Education Statewide – 7.5%  $431 million  $over $500 per student Tough Decisions: Cut school days; c...
“ But K-12 Funding is Taking More and More of the Budget!” <ul><li>Schools  were  funded 60% local, 40% state.  Now the re...
Higher Education  Investment Trend <ul><li>Families shoulder greater cost burden over time </li></ul><ul><li>2008:  </li><...
 
<ul><li>Individual attention/smaller classes </li></ul><ul><li>Highly qualified/effective teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Updat...
 
Great Futures Map and Petition greateducation.org/map
Buell Fellows Great Futures Colorado   Feb  2010
Buell Fellows Great Futures Colorado   Feb  2010
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Buell Fellows Great Futures Colorado Feb 2010

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  • Thank you for allowing us the opportunity to talk about Colorado’s school funding crisis and The Great Futures Campaign. This brief power point is designed to provide information on the following topics; -Is Colorado investing in our children’s future? -How does Colorado compare to the rest of the nation in school funding, -Why Colorado’s investment is so dismal, and -How the Great Futures Campaign, which is a coalition of organizations, is working to change Colorado’s inadequate and inequitable investment in education.
  • [LET THEM READ MISSION STATEMENT] We believe Colorado must provide adequate and equalized funding for public schools so that all Colorado children have access to an excellent, comprehensive education that prepares them for the 21st century global economy. NEXT SLIDE
  • Colorado is one of the wealthier states in the country. We are #13 in per capita income. (Colorado Office of Economic Development &amp; International Trade) Yet, one out of 6 Colorado children are now living in poverty, and we have the fastest growing child poverty rate in nation. (US Census Bureau 2007-2008) Between 2000 and 2007, there was an 84% increase in children living in poverty. (Children’s Campaign, May 2009 - Census data). And looking specifically at education-
  • Colorado is 40th in the country in per pupil funding and worse when it comes to higher ed. (National Center for Education Statistics, 2007). These statistics provide a snapshot of Colorado’s investment in its most precious resource - our children. Education should provide our children the necessary skills and tools to compete in the 21st global economy. Failure to do so has huge social and economic costs including the continued cycle of poverty, a greater dependency on social services, and high incarceration rates. Let’s take a closer look at how Colorado’s support of public education compares to the rest of the country, and why it is so dismal.
  • This graph shows how Colorado compares to the rest of the nation in school funding over the past 30 years. The black line represents the national average on per-pupil funding. The red line is where Colorado stands in per pupil spending as compared to the national average. This is really a tale about three Constitutional Amendments passed by the people of Colorado over the past 28 years - The Gallagher Amendment, Tax Payer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR) and Amendment 23, and the graph reveals their impact on the availability of resources for our schools and kids. As you can see, Colorado’s investment in education in comparison to the rest of the nation has fallen dramatically, a trend which continues with alarming speed. The fiscal policies of the past 28 years have prevented the state from adequately investing in K-12 education, higher education and other critical state services. Unfortunately, things aren’t looking better in the immediate future. In fact, they look worse,. Until we as a state, vote to change the way we budget and fund our schools, Colorado can expect to fall further and further behind the rest of the nation. _________________________________________ Let’s start with the passage of the Gallagher Amendment in 1982 (represented by the green vertical line). As you can see, at that time Colorado actually funded its schools approximately $200 above the national average. Gallagher’s goal was to reduce property taxes and it was very successful in its mission. Property taxes used to be the major source for education funding, but Gallagher, combined with the passage of a subsequent amendment known as TABOR (Tax Payer’s Bill of Rights), changed all that. Now it is the State’s general fund that is the major source of funding for our schools. The state has had to replace revenue lost in property taxes. As a result, the greater demand on the state budget for funding schools has taken funds away from other critical services such as higher education, transportation, prisons, and health care. As mentioned, in 1992 Coloradoans passed TABOR, the most restrictive spending limitation on any state in the country. It has constrained the state ’ s ability to keep and use the revenue it collects for the general fund. As a result, the state doesn ’ t have the resources to invest in education, let alone other critical services such as health care, transportation, prisons, and higher education. The graph vividly shows how, since the passage of TABOR, Colorado ’ s investment in education has dramatically fallen in comparison to the rest of the nation. As a result, Coloradoans grew concerned. In 2000, Amendment 23 was passed as an attempt to thwart the downward spiral in education funding. At that time, spending was already about $700 below the national average. Amendment 23 requires the state to increase school funding each year for 10 years by 1% plus inflation. Though it is hard to imagine what would have happened if Amendment 23 didn’t pass, the chart shows Colorado continues to fall further and further behind the rest of the country in education funding. Today, Amendment 23 has returned Colorado to the level of funding we had in 1989 in real dollars.
  • The right side includes items that a school district must support to keep its system going: Upper right : Health care for employees, Salaries, Pensions Bottom right: Safety of buildings and transportation, Maintenance The left side addresses our kids: Upper left: unique qualities and needs Bottom left: standards, requirements, mandates at the state and federal levels
  • It is important to note that if the State covered these costs (as some states do), it would free up local districts to assess where they needed funds the most. [This is the total dollar number that school districts are spending.]
  • Denver - $33.8 million Aurora - $16.4 million Cherry Creek - $12 to $13 million Jefferson - $30 to $40 million Littleton - $7.5 million St.Vrain (Longmont) - $11 million Pueblo - $4.9 million Thompson School District (Loveland) $5.2 million Grand Junction - $1.64 million Delta School District (Rural SW) - $2 million
  • - For most of the last two decades, the local share of school finance declined automatically in two ways: - mill levies were cut (until mill levy stabilization was passed in 2007);  and - the assessment rate (the percent of property value that is subject to property taxes) has decreased. So each year, tens of millions of state dollars went toward replacing the support once provided by local property taxes, rather than increasing total school funding. Put another way, the state spent tens of millions more each year—not for improved schools, but for property tax relief. So yes, K-12 education takes up 43% of the state budget, but as you can now understand, there is a historical context that has brought us to this point – “we didn’t ask to be 43% of the budget” – and as you well know, we face major cuts in the next two years, and does not mean that schools are living high on the hog and are able to provide more services.
  • As you can see that over time, families now shoulder more costs for higher education. Higher Education experienced $56 million in cuts this year and one of the proposals being considered is to give state universities flexibility in setting their tuition rates – which would be one way to plug the hole produced by state budget cuts.
  • ©2008 The National Center For Public Policy and Higher Education: Measuring Up 2008
  • It is important to stress that MORE money in and of itself, is NOT the GOAL. However, in order to provide our children with an education that prepares them for the 21st century global economy, resources are critically important. Wise and increased investment is a necessary means to achieving the goal of an excellent system of public education. [Review the list in the slide] Though this slide does not contain a complete list of things that would give our kids the opportunity to succeed, we can all agree that they are critically important and require a significant investment.
  • Informing others about the causes and impact of our school finance crisis is necessary. People have to understand what’s going on in order to take action. The next slide is an effective online tool used to collect stories, which we intend to provide to the legislature this spring. NEXT SLIDE – INTERACTIVE MAP
  • Great Ed has developed an interactive tool allowing people from all over the state to tell their story about how inadequate resources have affected their schools and their children….. [Briefly explain how it works and the petition on the right side.] And one other easy way to take action – NEXT SLIDE
  • Today, you can pledge to a great future for our students. The pledge states: that we believe that education is the cornerstone of our society; Colorado is not supporting our education system in a wise or his is a statewide problem; That we have no time to lose. You can also donate just $10 to support the Great Futures Campaign. AND, you can buy a t-shirt with that phenomenal graph.
  • Transcript of "Buell Fellows Great Futures Colorado Feb 2010"

    1. 1. Great Futures Start with a Great Education Winter/Spring 2010
    2. 2. Great Education Colorado Mission Great Education Colorado is a statewide, nonpartisan, grassroots organization, focused on improving public education through wise, increased and equitable investment in our schools, colleges and universities.
    3. 3. Is Colorado Investing In Our Children’s Future? Do All Colorado Kids Have Access to a Quality Education?
    4. 4. <ul><li>What do we want for our kids? </li></ul><ul><li>{Optional: Discussion Element} </li></ul><ul><li>We’ve asked, and this is what we heard consistently </li></ul><ul><li>GOALS: Prepare for lifelong learners (Creative Thinking, Technological Literacy </li></ul><ul><li>STRATEGIES: High Quality Teachers, smaller class size </li></ul>How is Colorado doing? <ul><li>40 th in per pupil funding (adjusted for cost of living) </li></ul><ul><li>$1,397 below the national average in per pupil spending </li></ul><ul><li>38 th in pupil to teacher ratio </li></ul><ul><li>40 th in technology in our schools </li></ul><ul><li>49 th in per capita spending on higher education </li></ul><ul><li>$0 for professional development of teachers </li></ul>
    5. 5. Why the gap?
    6. 6. PERA Health Care Salaries Prof. Dev’t Maintenance Buildings Insurance Heating Transportation Achievement Gap CSAP improvement 21 st C. curriculum New Standards Career Tech Ed. Diverse Learners: ELL Special Ed At-Risk Gifted & Talented District Budget = Local + State + Federal $$ Concurrent Demands on a Limited Budget = TRIAGE
    7. 7. Meeting Kids Where They Are <ul><li>Special Education – High % of unreimbursed costs [DPS paid 60% of total costs in 2007-08] </li></ul><ul><li>English Language Learners – $293 per student (2008-09) [DPS covered 98% ELL costs (2007-08)] </li></ul><ul><li>Gifted and Talented – State funded 18% of cost to educate GT students (2007-08) [$9 per GT kid in DPS] </li></ul><ul><li>At-Risk – State adds 12% for each at-risk student </li></ul>
    8. 8. Cost of Categorical Program Gap to All Districts $816,563,911
    9. 9. 2007-08 Cost of Gap in DPS $143,560,259 Special Education English Language Learners Vocational Education $45.4 million $79.4 million $3.7 million
    10. 10. Proposed Cuts to P-12 Education Statewide – 7.5% $431 million $over $500 per student Tough Decisions: Cut school days; close schools; increase class size; freeze wages/reduce benefits; teacher layoffs; eliminate/charge for transportation; eliminate special art/music/electives; cut instructional coach and literacy staff…
    11. 11. “ But K-12 Funding is Taking More and More of the Budget!” <ul><li>Schools were funded 60% local, 40% state. Now the reverse. </li></ul><ul><li>Gallagher + TABOR + School Finance Act = huge reduction in property tax ($3.1 billion annual average) </li></ul><ul><li>State share of K-12 funding: $3.15 billion </li></ul>
    12. 12. Higher Education Investment Trend <ul><li>Families shoulder greater cost burden over time </li></ul><ul><li>2008: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>30% of Family Income needed to pay for 4 year college in Colorado (27% national avg.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tied for 48 th in State & Local Support for Higher Ed per $1,000 of Income </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cutting at least $56 million this yr </li></ul>
    13. 14. <ul><li>Individual attention/smaller classes </li></ul><ul><li>Highly qualified/effective teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Updated technology & textbooks </li></ul><ul><li>Well-rounded curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-School & Full Day Kindergarten </li></ul><ul><li>Affordable higher education system </li></ul>More Money is Not the Goal But it is the Means
    14. 16. Great Futures Map and Petition greateducation.org/map
    15. 17. Today We Can…. <ul><li>Sign the Great Futures Pledge (as an individual) </li></ul><ul><li>Donate $10 or more if you can </li></ul><ul><li>Join the Great Futures Colorado Campaign (as an organization) </li></ul><ul><li>Buy a t-shirt for $20 </li></ul>
    16. 18. For More Information Liane Morrison Executive Director Great Education Colorado 303-722-5901 [email_address] www.greateducation.org

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