Representative Mandy Wright: Public education in wisconsin
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Representative Mandy Wright: Public education in wisconsin Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Representative Mandy Wright 85th Assembly District of Wisconsin
  • 2. Belle and “Fighting Bob” La Follette The UW System and Extensions, higher learning applied to our communities The Wisconsin Idea, higher learning applied to our legislature Wisconsin Technical Colleges Wisconsin’s first Normal School opened in Platteville in 1866 Public funding for public education as a public service Wisconsin’s Constitution includes the right to a free and appropriate public education for all students, ages 4-20
  • 3.  Wisconsin is tied for second in ACT scores  Wisconsin has one of the highest High School Graduation Rates at 87.5%  Wisconsin is ranked #10 for talent in the workforce (WEDC)  86% of our rated schools meet expectations or better, 4% fail to meet expectations (DPI)
  • 4. •Wisconsin spends 34.4% of our state General Purpose Revenue on K12 education •Wisconsin has the Largest Achievement Gap between black and white students in the Nation
  • 5.  58 Rankings of the States 2012  1. WYOMING 604  2. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 542  3. KANSAS 414  4. ALASKA 335  5. TEXAS 320  6. NEW YORK 315  7. NEW MEXICO 308  8. UTAH 278  9. IOWA 266  10. SOUTH CAROLINA 261  11. WASHINGTON 225  12. DELAWARE 215  13. NORTH DAKOTA 212  14. OHIO 212  15. MARYLAND 205  16. ARKANSAS 204  17. NEBRASKA 203  18. COLORADO 201  UNITED STATES 195  19. NEW JERSEY 194  20. CALIFORNIA 192  21. GEORGIA 187  22. MINNESOTA 179  SOUTH DAKOTA 179  24. KENTUCKY 177  25. PENNSYLVANIA 174  26. LOUISIANA 169  27. VIRGINIA 168  28. ALABAMA 164  29. FLORIDA 157  30. MISSOURI 155  31. ILLINOIS 152  32. HAWAII 151  33. CONNECTICUT 150  34. OREGON 150  35. INDIANA 143  36. MISSISSIPPI 142  37. NEVADA 141  38. OKLAHOMA 140  39. NORTH CAROLINA 128  40. MICHIGAN 122  41. MASSACHUSETTS 116  42. ARIZONA 112  43. MONTANA 111  44. WISCONSIN 110  45. MAINE 107  46. VERMONT 103  47. WEST VIRGINIA 103  48. TENNESSEE 97  49. NEW HAMPSHIRE 96  50. IDAHO 86  51. RHODE ISLAND 56  MEDIAN 169  RANGE 548  SDEV. 105  CV 54  U.S. Census Bureau (2012d). K–12 = "Elementary and Secondary" (see  Glossary).
  • 6. Source: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction & University of Wisconsin –Madison, Applied Population Laboratory. Raw Data Source: National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) 2009. http://nces.ed.gov/ Native American, 0.013 Asian, 0.028 Black, 0.094 Hispanic, 0.033 0 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.1 0.12 0.14 0.16 0.18 year 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 PopulationProportion Proportions of Students of Color inWisconsin (1997-2019)
  • 7. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Fails to Meet Expectations Meets Few Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations Significantly Exceeds Expectations % Amer. Ind. % Asian % Black % Hispanic % White
  • 8. Source: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. School Finance Maps. http://dpi.wi.gov/sfs/maps.ht ml In many rural districts, more than half the students are eligible for free-and- reduce lunch. Wisconsin FRL Rate Doubles 2001: 21% 2012: 43%
  • 9. There is a very strong correlation between poverty and school performance. Avg. FRL HIGH-poverty, LOW-performing schools LOW-poverty, HIGH-performing schools
  • 10. Local (Property Tax) $4.6 Billion 43% State $4.7 Billion 44% Federal $0.9 Billion 9% Other Revenue $0.4 Billion 4% Revenue $10.8 Billion  87% of schools funds come from state and local sources.  State and local funding efforts are roughly split 50-50.
  • 11. Property Tax Levy State Equalization Aid Revenue Limit Categorical Aid Federal Funds Other Revenue Outside the Revenue Limit
  • 12. ($600) ($500) ($400) ($300) ($200) ($100) $0 $100 $200 $300 $400 Change in Per-Pupil Revenue Over Time "Psuedo-General" Categorical Aid Revenue Limit Change
  • 13. 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars 1993 Adjusted Dollars Nominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal DollarsNominal Dollars $2,500 $3,500 $4,500 $5,500 $6,500 1993-94 1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-00 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 Year StateDollarsPerFTE Nominal v. Inflation Adjusted State Aid Per FTE (1993 $s) After accounting for inflation, general aid per pupil was at least $500 less in 2011-12 than it was in 2000-01.
  • 14. Reimbursement rates for special education (36% to 26%) and bilingual-bicultural (18% to 8%) services have dropped 10 percentage points since 2000-01.
  • 15. -1800 -1600 -1400 -1200 -1000 -800 -600 -400 -200 0 200 400 Teachers Aides Administrators Support Staff -599 -355 26 215 -690 -153 -43 -130 -1,676 -812 -175 -785 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 Wisconsin schools cut more than 3,000 educators during the Great Recession.
  • 16.  Wisconsin has cut $1.2 Billion from Public Schools since 2010  All 424 Public School Districts across the state are forced to spend 1.5% of their state funds on “2R Independent Charter” schools that operate only in Milwaukee and Racine  Wisconsin is spending $420 Million public dollars on private education in this budget: • $30 Million to income tax cuts for parents sending their children to private schools, disproportionately helps those with higher incomes • Statewide expansion of Vouchers - $6,442/student… GOP calling for “A voucher in every backpack.”
  • 17. District Vote Date Amount Passed/Failed Purpose Delavan-Darien (1380) 4/1/2014 2,100,000 Failed Exceed revenue for operation costs Lodi (3150) 4/1/2014 2,850,000 Passed Fund general operations Luck (3213) 4/1/2014 1,500,000 Passed Operating costs Markesan (3325) 4/1/2014 2,780,000 Failed Operating costs Monticello (3696) 4/1/2014 5,850,000 Passed Operating costs Oakfield 4/1/2014 6,600,000 Passed Operating costs Onalaska (4095) 2/18/2014 10,100,000 Passed Exceed revenue for operations Onalaska (4095) 2/18/2014 2,500,000 Passed Exceed revenue for technology expenses Oshkosh Area (4179) 4/1/2014 27,650,000 Passed Operating & maintenance costs, acquisition of tech equipment Owen-Withee (4207) 4/1/2014 1,500,000 Passed Exceed revenue for operation costs Prescott (4578) 4/1/2014 440,000 Passed Exceed revenue for operation costs River Ridge (4904) 2/18/2014 750,000 Passed Exceed revenue for operating costs Siren (5376) 4/1/2014 1,250,000 Failed Maintain current levels of programs & operations Stockbridge (5614) 2/18/2014 600,000 Passed Exceed revenue cap for operational costs Stoughton Area (5621) 4/1/2014 7,050,000 Passed Exceed revenue cap for operational costs Tomah Area (5747) 4/1/2014 2,550,000 Failed Sustain ed programs and maintain current operational expenses Wheatland J1 (6412) 4/1/2014 3,000,000 Failed Maintain current levels of programs & operations White Lake (6440) 4/1/2014 750,000 Failed General operations
  • 18.  workforce training Wisconsin has twice the incarceration rates as Minnesota Of the Millions in tax breaks Wisconsin has passed in this session, has it actually led to higher property taxes for those who voted to keep their school doors open?
  • 19.  THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Republican Party of Wisconsin, in convention assembled: Urges that parents of school-age children be given vouchers or tax credits designed to give all parents equal freedom of choice in education without regard to their financial means; and  Calls for the state legislature to eliminate funding of 4-year- old kindergarten; and  Urges legislation adopting alternative standards for teacher licensing that do not require a degree in education or student-teaching experience; and  Opposes the adoption and implementation of Common Core Standards as well as the International Baccalaureate Curriculum in the Wisconsin school system; and  Supports allowing properly trained adult staff to be armed in public schools.
  • 20. Increased Sparsity Funding TEACH II (technology) Rural School Teacher Loan Forgiveness Wrap-around services 30% reimbursement for Special Education
  • 21. Enact a school funding formula that is: • fair, sustainable, transparent; • strengthens rural and declining enrollment schools;and • politically viable. Increase revenue limits At least $225/pupil Holds the line on property taxes Statewide net tax 0% (gross tax -18%) Guarantees state funding for every student Minimum $3,000/pupil Accounts for family income and poverty Poverty weighting: 30% or 0.3 FTE per student Provides predictable growth in state aid 2% or CPI Increase hold harmless: 90% prior year Secondary cost ceiling = state average Sends all state aid directly to schools Move the School Levy Tax Credit into the aid formula, reducing district levies Same or better for all districts Statewide 95% of districts increase (402 of 424); all others held harmless
  • 22. Public schools educate every child. An educated citizenry benefits us all. Public schools must follow Federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Public schools are accountable and locally controlled
  • 23.  Advocate! You have plenty of information to write letters to the editor, talk to friends, speak out on social media.  Run for office. We need people of integrity at all levels.  Support your candidate. Learn their positions and hold them accountable. Get involved in campaigns, it matters.