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'Reggae On The Internet: Volume 1'

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A compendium of information and opinion about reggae music from the rec.music.reggae online newsgroup, edited and published by Grant Goddard in 1995.

A compendium of information and opinion about reggae music from the rec.music.reggae online newsgroup, edited and published by Grant Goddard in 1995.

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  • 1. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS Subject: rec.music.reggae Frequently Asked Questions Date: 1 Jun 1995 15:26:51 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises Sender: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Summary: This posting contains a list of Frequently Asked Questions and their answers about reggae music. It should be read by anyone who wishes to post to the rec.music.reggae newsgroup Archive-name: music/reggae/part1 Posting-Frequency: monthly Contents [0]. Is there a Reggae Archives on the Internet? [1]. Dub Recommendations [2]. Can anyone recommend some books on reggae? [3]. What is "Dub" music anyway? [4]. Can anyone recommend some roots reggae? [5]. Live reggae recording recommendations [6]. Who was Marcus Garvey? [7]. Can you recommend some Dancehall? [8]. Is there a newsgroup that caters to those of us who enjoy soca, zouk, [9]. Books on Rastafarianism? [10]. What are the different reggae styles? [11]. CARIBANA FAQ [12]. Can anyone give me some info on the rasta culture? [13]. Could anyone out there suggest to me any albums which combine reggae and jazz? [14]. Caribbean Clubs FAQ [15]. What is the significance of the "Two Sevens"? [16]. What's all this about Sound Systems, Clashes and Dubplates? [17]. Is there a World Wide Web Server for Reggae? [18]. Is there a Gopher Server for Reggae? [19]. What is RAW (Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide)? [20]. Why do purists look down on UB40? [21]. Can anyone recommend good female reggae vocalists (not dancehall). ? [22]. Please give an explanation of "One Drop" Style The Questions and Answers [0]. Is there a Reggae Archives on the Internet? The Jammin Reggae Archives can be accessed in several ways: 1. WWW (World Wide Web) using the Jammin Home Page: http://jammin.nosc.mil/jammin.html 2. Gopher Server - gopher jammin.nosc.mil 3. Anonymous FTP - To access the archives, ftp to ABEL.MATH.UGA.EDU and login with username anonymous, use your email userid and address as the password. After logging in, and changing to the reggae directory using the command "cd reggae", use the "dir" command to see what's there and the "get" command to download files. Don't forget to set binary transfer mode with the "bin" command before retrieving picture or sound files. The files are arranged as follows: audio faq pics Incoming catalogs lyrics radioshows clubs mailorder Sound sample files directory This file Pictures directory For uploading Record catalogs Song lyrics Stage Names Album Covers Tour Schedules If you have any problems or anything to contribute, like radio shows in your local area or pics, post to rec.music.reggae or mail me at mikey@nosc.mil. Files may be uploaded to the archives by anonymous ftp to ABEL.MATH.UGA.EDU in directory Incoming. __________________________________________________________________________________________ [1]. Dub Recommendations Ok, here's a FAQ if I ever saw one: GIMME SOME DUB POINTERS! I've been there a bit already - got some LKJ, Agustus Pablo, Lee Perry, Upsetters, but I have yet to find the really mind searing spaced out heavy dub that I hear hints of once in REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 1 VOLUME ONE
  • 2. awhile. I want loads of echo, pans and sounds like the universe is being ripped apart at the seams in front of me. Skip the drum machines unless they're very tastefully done, lay on the heavy bass and crank up the volume, kick back and close your eyes... Help me find it! My last try was ROIR's TOWERING DUB INFERNO and only a couple of tracks get close to as heavy as I'd hoped. I keep getting pointers to African Headcharge, but that stuff is very steeply priced - is it worth it? - malcolm --------Two words: Mad Professor African Headcharge - is it worth it? Yes. The best stuff from their first four albums is out on two discs, titles I can't remember (they'll be obvious, though, they have "volume 1" and "volume 2" in the title). Also the CD _Songs of Praise_ is excellent, although it's not as twisted as the early stuff; it's more African in an On-U sort of way than spaced out in an On-U sort of way. You are also required to have much Prince Far I within easy reach at all times. ---------I had a Prince Fari LP in New Zealand which seems to fit the bill - had to leave it with a friend as a parting gift since he was so in tune with it. Sorry, can't recall the name now! (it had a track called "Plant Up" which I was really into). Also try some Mad Professor albums. ---------rfrance@umiacs.umd.edu (Robert B France) writes: For good spaced-out dub, try Dub Syndicate (On-U Sound). They're hard to find in the US try the import or World Music section of your local mega-store. ---------malcolm@wrs.com (Malcolm Humes) writes: >GIMME SOME DUB POINTERS! >Help me find it! My last try was ROIR's TOWERING DUB INFERNO >and only a couple of tracks get close to as heavy as I'd hoped. i liked TDI, but i can see what you mean... try any of the ON-U releases like PLAYGROUP (jazzy dub) or PARTY SOUNDS 1, etc. they're quite good. also, anything else Adrian Sherwood does by himself seems to be great dub. >I keep getting pointers to African Headcharge, but that stuff is >very steeply priced - is it worth it? in a word, yes. it's pretty steeply priced here, maybe not at Amoeba in Berkeley. your best bet is to write ON-U directly for better prices. this is what a friend of mine does. i'll send you the address via email when i get home and look on one of my ON-U cds. ----------WOW!! excellent start!!!! You might try some Mad Proffesor Psychedelic Dub. Umm let me go look... well Iroy Crisis time (any Iroy rocks but dub..) also try more Perry, Satan's Dub, The Upsetter and The Beat, Scratch Attack.. The best dub (in my opinion) comes from bootlegs, Steel Pulse does some crazy stuff live: maybe you've heard versions of Roller Skates nana dub style. There are alot of flip side dubins on Bob singles. BTW how's African Headcharge coming out??? jafari ----------Here are some things to look for from the discography in the back of Jon Savage's _England's Dreaming: Anarchy, Sex Pistols, Punk Rock, and Beyond_. He also says that Steve Barrow is working on what should be the definitive book on Reggae and Dub (looks like nothing available yet). (Most of this is Dub, since that's what I'm most interested in hearing, I think.) Aggrovators (mixed by King Tubby) Johnny in the Echo Chamber Dub Justice Collections/Compilations The Harder They Come REGGAE ON THE INTERNET 1989 1990 1972 page 2 Atlantic ATLP Island soundtrack VOLUME ONE
  • 3. King Tubby Meets the Upsetter at the Grass Roots of Dub Keep On Coming Through the Door U-Roy and Friends: With a Flick of My Musical Wrist 20 Reggae Classics Studio Kinda Cloudy King Tubby's Special 1973-1976 1976 Fay Music Trojan 1987 1988 1990 Trojan? Trojan CD Trojan Trojan Culture Two Sevens Clash 1977 Joe Gibbs Rupert Edwards Irie Feelings 1990 Trojan CD Keith Hudson Pick A Dub Torch of Freedom Rasta Communication 1975 1976 1978 Atra Virgin ? Joint Records Junior Mervin (mixed by Lee Perry) Police and Thieves 1976 Island Lee "Scratch" Perry ("The Upsetter") Super Ape Lee Perry and Friends - Give Me Power The Upsetter Collection The Upsetter Compact Set 1976 1988 1988 1988 Island Trojan Trojan Trojan Prince Far-I Heavy Manners 1976 Joe Gibbs Revolutionaries Dub Sensation Bamba in Dub Hordcore Dub 1977 1990 "talkover" "talkover" Skynote OMLP Hudson prod. 30 tracks 20 remixes The manufacturer of a lot of these records: Trojan Records 12 Thayer Street London W1M 6AU A distributor/shop which supposedly has or can get most or all of the Trojan reissues: Shanachie Records US Dalebrook Park Hohokus, New Jersey 07423 USA ---------Here's a list of 10 particularly fine dub albums by non-dub artists (in no particular order): 1. Black Uhuru - Dub Factor (Mango) Sly and Robbie team up with Paul 'Groucho' Smykle for a ferocious dub album. Almost like a heavy metal album in its intensity. 2. Prince Fari - Cry Tuff Dub Encounter chapter I (ROIR cassette, Danceteria CD), II (Virgin/Caroline reissue) III (Daddy Kool) IV (Trojan). The voice Moses heard on the mountain must have been similar to that of the late Prince Fari's. His dub albums rumble and boom as well. Especially fine is I where he hooks up with English dubmeister Adrian Sherwood. 3. UB40 - Present Arms in Dub (Virgin) Before UB40 sold its soul for mass pop-reggae stardom, they released Present Arms, a great album. In Dub is even better. Distinguished by its spare use of traditional dub effects (like echo), it combines a heavy bassline with crisp drums and UB40's best asset - their horn section. 4. Wailers - Tribute to Carly Barrett (Atra) Until Island relents in its pigheadedness and releases Dennis Thompson's dub mixes of the Marley catalog, check the Wailers spotlight on their late drummer. Carlton Barrett, wiped from creation in 1987, had a unique drum style which is mixed upfront on this dub of Horace Andy and Winston Jarrett tracks. Great supporting work from Tyrone Downie's organ and Bobby Ellis's horns. 5. Aswad - New Chapter of Dub (Mango) (Mikey) Dread at the Controls serving up a spacey dub of Aswad's English import New Chapter LP. Includes stellar horn work by Michael ' REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 3 VOLUME ONE
  • 4. Bammie' Rose and Vin Gordon. 6. Bunny Wailer - Dub D'sco Vol. I and II (Solomonic). Unlike his partners, Bob and Peter, Bunny has released two superb dub albums. Vol. I features his vocals mixed high and then pushed/pulled in a wash of dub echo. Vol. II is a more traditional dub album. 7. Ras Michael and the Sons of Negus - Rastafari Dub (ROIR cassette, Crocodisc CD). Nyabinghi dub. Robbie Shakespeare's bass leads the way while the akete, funde and repeater drums complement him against Earl 'Chinna' Smith's flange guitar. Any extremely rare dub album reissued featuring Peter Tosh on clavinet! 8. Treasure Isle Dub Vol. I and II (Treasure Isle). Classic rock steady and early reggae tracks given the dub treatment; like John Holt's 'Ali Baba', Alton Ellis's 'Cry Tough' and the Melodians 'Come on Little Girl'. A good companion to Heartbeat's Duke Reid's Treasure Chest of '92. Check several of Studio One's dub albums as well. 9. Dr. Alimontado - Love Is (Keyman) Like Bunny Wailer's, this is more a vocalized dub album of tracks by one of reggae's most underrated toasters. A perfect example of how deejays have followed U Roy's example in incorporating dub. 10. Alpha and Omega - Watch and Pray (A & O, Greensleeves) Dub's new wave: borrowing a little from Jah Shaka and ON U sound's African Headcharge, Alpha and Omega combine haunting female vocals, spacey dub effects, bonecrushing bass and salutations to Jah for an ethereal mix. Possibly an acquired taste. Bonus: Kings of Reggae featuring Chris Hinze (Keytone) More of an instrumental album. Some cheezy flute player from Holland (Hinze) goes down a yard and teams up with the best of Jamaica's session men: Sly and Robbie, Mikey Chung, Sticky. While the premise for this sounds horrofic, the result is a masterpiece: Sly and Robbie rock hard, the unknown female backups sound great and as a bonus Peter Tosh warbles on a couple of tracks. One more reason reggae music will suprise you every time. ---------Probably the finest single dub album I own is a double LP on Trojan called "King Tubby Special." It consists, of course, of classic tracks dubbed up by the King himself. Kicks butt big time. Also, there is a Prince Far I CD available from Trojan called "Voice of Thunder," and it's essential. Keep an eye out for the Bunny Lee reissues coming out on RAS these days. There's a very nice U-Roy disc ("Rock with I", RASCD 3219), which features U-Roy toasting over gutbusting dub tracks, and also a great collection of instrumental tracks by the Aggrovators which isn't strictly dub but features Bunny's dubwise production style. ----------From: Robert Nelson (rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu Prince Fari has always been one of my all time favorites. His voice sounds like he used to drink Drano :-). He chanted my all time favorite reggae lyric, "The humble cow gives the most milk." I probably feel sadder about his death than Marley's overall. The Cry Tuff album that was produced by Adrian Sherwood was the first Cry Tuff Dub Encounter. It came out in 1978 on the Hitrun label and features the Arabs as the musicians. (In actuality I think the Arabs were really Dub Syndicate). ROIR has released this on cassette and Danceteria has the CD. It's a great dub album, with lots of special effects. Lions roaring that sort of thing; great for your answering machine message :-) The Virgin/Caroline compilation called "Dubwize" has 4 unreleased singles/versions & Cry Tuff Chap II. There are 8 songs listed for II. These Caroline reissues were notorious for leaving various tracks from the original albums off of the CD reissues. Does anyone out there have Cry Tuff II on vinyl? Did they leave off anything? Here's a Prince Fari discography: *Cd availability Cry Tuff Dub Ch. 1 (Roir/Danceteria)* Cry Tuff Dub Ch. 3 (Daddy Kool) Cry Tuff Dub Ch. 4 (Trojan) Dubwize (Virgin/Caroline)* Voice of Thunder (Trojan)* Umkhonto we Sizwe - Spear of the Nation (Wambesi)* Musical Revue (ROIR/Danceteria)* - live with the Suns of Arka Black Man Land (Virgin/Caroline)* - tracks from Message from the King & Livity Under Heavy Manners (Joe Gibbs) Psalms For I (Carib Gems) - Bible verses chanted over reggae beats REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 4 VOLUME ONE
  • 5. Jamaican Heroes (Trojan) Free From Sin (Trojan) Musical History (Trojan) Here's some more I only know about, (if anyone has these and would like to do a trade swap, please mail me) Message from the King (Virgin) Long Life (Virgin) Livity (Pre) Rockers in a Suitcase (Pre) Fari also did stellar work with Sherwood's Singers and Players: Golden Greats (ON U)* War of Words (ON U) Staggering Heights (ON U) Plus there is a nice Prince Fari love song where he sings and a DJ toasts over HIM on the ON U release Reggae Archives Vol 1. If I've left anything out, please let us know. Robert. ---------------------From: pandit@news.delphi.com (PANDIT@DELPHI.COM) Subject: Re: Dub Reggae Reccomendations Well, where do we start? I guess I'll limit this too stuff that is in print... Dub Syndicate/African Headcharge/SIngers and Players -- some of the spaciest and furthest out dub, produced by Brit A. Sherwood, available on import from UK on On-U-SOund. Mad Professor - DUb me Crazy Series, esp. 2, 4, 5, and 6. electro dub from UK. Available domestically from RAS. Burning Spear - Living Dub I and II. you going to do? RAS. Scientist - whatever is available. Wild, playfull, slightly more REmixes are not as good as originals but what are It's all good. Prince Jammy - likewise - except for the electro stuff. Dennis Bovell - some great stuff, some not so great. Lee Perry - Blood Vapour, Blackboard Jungle Dub, SUper Ape, Trojan Box Sets. founding fathers. One of the Prince Far-I - I don't know what's in print, but most dub titles are excellent. That's probably about it. Unfortunatley, most of the best stuff is long out of print, available only on small JA or UK labels on LP, and all us collectors beat you to it. Regards, Pandit --------From: pandit@news.delphi.com (PANDIT@DELPHI.COM) How could I forget? Pandit Black Uhuru's Dub Factor and SLy and RObbie's Reggae Greats. ---------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil 30 Years of Dub on the Go, 2 CD set from Rhino. King Tubby, King Jammy, Scientist and The Mad Professor. ---------Subject: Re: What's your favorite DUB????? I have to agree, Mad Professor's dubs are among the VERY best. I rate Dub Me Crazy Part 2 (Beyond the Realms of Dub) as his best album by a long chalk. But I haven't heard many of the later ones... Other than that, most Scientist is great (especially Dub Landing), as is most of Jah Shaka's output. Cheers, REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 5 VOLUME ONE
  • 6. |> |> On And In Dub ... |> -Echomania is the most recent Dub Syndicate album. Most everything on the |> On-U Sound label is worthwhile and they're now re-releasing old stuff at |> quite a clip. The Dub Syndicate Classic Selections and African Head Charge |> Vintage Selections are good value. |> -One very fine NEW DUB compilation is Time Warp Dub Clash (Island Records). |> The first half is old Sly & Robbie Dubs, but the latter part is a bunch of |> fine new tracks from Jah Shaka,Manasseh, etc. Also check out Jah Shaka's |> Dub Symphony (Mango) |> In terms of classics, my favourite dub album of all time is Johnny In the |> Echo Chamber by the Aggrovators (trojan Records), produced by King |> Tubby.Also look for Lee Perry, Scientist (his 'Tribute to King Tubby' thru |> ROIR Records in New York is cool - it got me thru a seven-hour traffic jam |> trying to get to Glastonbury once.) |> If it's dubwise but not strictly dub yer after, try anything by THE ORB. |> Which is ambient dub, but hey, let's not get into that É _____________________ From: stevem@dcs.gla.ac.uk (Steve McGowan.) Subject: Re: U.K. Reggae Top 40 >|> >|> >1 Various - 30 Years Of Dub Music On The Go (2 CD) (Rhino UK) Mike, I've seen a lot of requests for more information on this dub CD - maybe the track listing ought to go in the FAQ??? ~Title: "30 years of dub music on the go" - various artists. Producer: Bunny Lee. Recorded at various studios in Jamaica. Label: Rhino Records (RNCD 2046). (KT=King Tubby, KJ=King Jammy, CMP=Crazy Mad Professor, S=Scientist) CD1 --- CD2 --- Zion gate dub - KT Money dub - KT Forward home dub - KJ Something on my mind dub - S Mellow dub - CMP Ten to one dub - KJ Glad tidings dub - KT Happy dub - S Hold on dub - CMP Marcus dub - KT Fittest of the fittest dub - KJ Movie star dub - S Graceful dub - KT Different style dub - KJ Blood danza dub - S Natural dub - KT Hard core dub - CMP Pretty dub - CMP Slow motion dub - KJ Jump song dub - KJ Good dub - S Baltimore dub - KT Reggaematic dub - KT Confusion dub - KJ Dark destroyer dub - KJ Penetrating dub - CMP Time dub - CMP Just say who dub - KT Impulsive dub - KT -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[2]. Can anyone recommend some books on reggae? 1. Catch a Fire - The Life of Bob Marley. Timothy White. Holt, Rinehart and Winston. 1983 2. Reggae Bloodlines - In Search of the Music and Culture of Jamaica. Stephen Davis and Peter Simon. Heinemann Educational Books Ltd. 1977 3. Reggae International. Stephen Davis and Peter Simon. Rogner & Bernhard GMBH & Co. 1982 4. The Harder They Come - Michael Thelwell 5. "Bob Marley" by Stephen Davis, published by Schenkman Books, INC ISBN: 0-87047-045-0, 087047-044-2 (pbk) A good biography about Bob's life, mentions all the albums and a lot of concerts, Bob made. A must for the real Marley-fan. 6. 7. 8. Derek Bishton "Blackheart Man" Leonard Barrett "The Rastafarians" Adrian Boot/ Michael Thomas "Jamaica: Babylon on a Thin Wire" 9. Adrian Boot/ Michael Thomas "Jah Revenge: Jamaica Revisited" 10. Howard Johnson/ "Reggae: Deep Roots Music Jim Pines 11. Malika Lee Whitney/ "Bob Marley: Reggae King of the World Dermott Hussey REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 6 VOLUME ONE
  • 7. 12. 13. 14. Dick Hebdige "Cut n Mix" Published 1987 by Methuen & Co. 29 West 35th St., NY, NY 10001. ISBN: 0906890993 (paperback) and 1851780297 (hardback). From the back cover: "This is a book about the music of the Caribbean--from calypso and ska through to reggae and Caribbean club culture." Rebekah M. Mulvaney "Rastafari and Reggae: A Dictionary & Sourcebook" Joseph Owens "Dread: The Rastafarians of Jamaica" ---------------From Lee O'Neill: |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> I also thought that while I'm at it, I should post a reggae bibliography. These are the books that I know about that pertain to Jamaican music. There are many other useful books that deal with Jamaica or Rastafari that are a bit outside the self-imposed limits of this compilation. If anyone has any additions, please let me know via email. Boot, Adrian & Thomas, Michael BABYLON ON A THIN WIRE (Schocken, 1976) Boot, Adrian & Goldman, Vivien BOB MARLEY: SOUL REBEL-NATURAL MYSTIC (St.Martin's Press, 1982) Clarke, Sebastian JAH MUSIC (Heinemann, 1980) Chapman, Rob NEVER GROW OLD 2ed. (1992) Davis, Stephen BOB MARLEY (Doubleday, 1985) (reissued Schenkmann, 1990) Davis, Stephen & Simon, Peter REGGAE INTERNATIONAL (Random House, 1982) Davis, Stephen & Simon, Peter REGGAE BLOODLINES (Doubleday, 1977) (reissued DaCapo,1992) Hebdige, Dick CUT 'N' MIX (Comedia, 1987) Jahn, Brian & Weber, Tom REGGAE ISLAND (Kingston, 1992) Johnson, Howard, & Pines, Jim REGGAE (Proteus, 1982) Kaski, Tero & Vuorinen, Pekka REGGAE INNA DANCE HALL STYLE (Black Star, 1984) Larkin, Colin, ed. GUINNESS WHO'S WHO OF REGGAE (Guinness, 1994) Marre, Jeremy BEATS OF THE HEART (Pantheon, 1985) McCann, Ian COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE MUSIC OF BOB MARLEY (Omnibus, 1994) Mulvaney, Rebekah Michele RASTAFARI & REGGAE (Greenwood, 1990) Observer Station BOB MARLEY: THE ILLUSTRATED DISCO/BIOGRAPHY (Omnibus, 1985) Scrivener, Jean RHYTHM WISE (Black Star) Scrivener, Jean RHYTHM WISE 2 (Black Star, 1990) Scrivener, Jean RHYTHM WISE 3 (Black Star, 1992) Thelwell, Michael HARDER THEY COME (Grove, 1980) Waters, Anita M. RACE, CLASS & POLITICAL SYMBOLS: RASTARARI & REGGAE IN JAMAICAN POLITICS (Transaction , 1985) White, Timothy CATCH A FIRE (Henry Holt, 1983, revised 1989) Whitney, Malika & Hussey, Dermott BOB MARLEY: REGGAE KING OF THE WORLD (Dutton, 1984) ------------------------From: Richard W Anglin <anglin@acsu.buffalo.edu> RASTA AND RESISTANCE by Horrace Campbell, published by The African World Press, gives a history and the situations that led up to and caused to birth of reggae. The Guiness Who's Who of Reggae Publisher: Guiness ISBN: 0-85112-734-7 Welch, Chris BOB MARLEY CD Books ISBN 1-85868-057-3 Don Taylor & Mike Henry, "Marley and Me - The Real Story", Kingston Publishers, 1994, 226 Pages, 54 Pictures Rene Wynands, DO THE REGGAY, Reggae from Poccomania to Raggamuffin. It is published in Germany and Austria by the Piper-Verlag (ISBN 3-492318409-X). It is in german language. Yacouba Konate 1987 Alpha Blondy. Reggae et societe en Afrique Noire. Abidjan (CEDA), Paris (Karthala). Reggae Magazines Dub Missive PO Box 677850 Orlando, FL 32867-7850 REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 7 VOLUME ONE
  • 8. Voice/FAX 407-381-9907 The Beat Bongo Productions PO Box 65856 Los Angeles, CA 90065 Reggae Report PO Box 2722 Hallandale, FL 33008-2722 305-933-1178 FAX 305-933-1077 Email: 74467.3070@compuserve.com Reggae Trade Magazine 63a Bruce Grove Tottenham, London N17 6RN (081) 808-4554 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[3]. What is "Dub" music anyway? Look at the B-sides of Jamaican 45s beginning with rock steady, and you'll notice many of them say "Version". This is "dub", a simple instrumental remix of the A-side that may also include a few scraps of the vocals. The singers are "dubbed out", but in most other respects the version is identical to the A-side. Begun as a test for sound levels during the record-mastering process, version later became vogue. The Jamaican public developed an avid taste for version, and the scat-singing sound-system deejays took to recording their master-of-ceremonies raps over the hit-backing rhythms. "Reggae International", Davis and Simon Chapter 8, X-Ray Music -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[4]. Can anyone recommend some roots reggae? I always recommend the samplers, that way you can choose what sounds interesting and branch out from there. I highly recommend the Greensleeves, Heartbeat, RAS, and Mango samplers, although there are many others. EZ Noh, ------------ mike From: mart@csa.bu.edu (borja larrumbide) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: New Groups, Any ideas? If you like Steel Pulse you will definitely enjoy Aswad. They both sound very alike, especially in albums like Aswad(live, Hulet,...).Try to avoid its most recent stuff and check first its old albums. If you hear Bob Marley then you should check Peter Tosh (Wanted Dread or Alive,...). Other groups I would recommend would be Black Uhuru, Alpha Blondy(It been considered to follow the trends of Bob Marley. Although that's a matter of opinion). Another choice could be Burning Spear(live in Paris, Mek We Dweet,...). There are many more and the list too long. I hope this helps! ------------ Long live reggae! From: fiddick@condor.ucsb.edu (Laurence Fiddick;) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: recommendations here goes: if it's on studio one buy it. in particular you might look for burning spear's 'studio one presents' and 'rocking time', the heptones' 'on top', the carlton and the shoes' lp -generally you can't go wrong with studio one. not on studio one, look for: augustus pablo 'original rockers' augustus pablo 'king tubby meets rockers uptown' augustus pablo 'east of the river nile' culture 'two sevens clash' culture 'harder than the rest' culture 'cumbolo' black uhuru 'red' black uhuru 'showcase/guess who's coming to dinner' linton kwesi johnson 'dread, beat an blood' linton kwesi johnson 'making history' dennis brown 'visions' REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 8 VOLUME ONE
  • 9. bob marley 'rasta revolution' bob marley 'african herbsman' count ossie and the mystic revelation of rastafari 'grounation' burning spear 'marcus garvey' burning spear 'social living' hugh mundell 'africa must be free by 1983' various 'wiser dread' i'm sure others can add more to this list. --------------------Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: recommendations No self-respecting reggae fan should be without a few Lee Perry albums (either ones that he's produced or recorded - or both) Best ones include... Heart of the Ark (Vols I and II) Megaton Dub (Vols I and II) Super Ape Return of the Super Ape Excaliburman George Faith - 'To be a Lover' (Lee Perry Produced)** highly recommended Build the Ark -| Open the Gate -|--- All three are three-album boxed sets Upsetters -| (There's lots more, but these are the ones that you should investigate first, especially the George Faith album. I do think, however, that this album is now deleted [at least on vinyl], so the only place you may come across it are in 2nd-hand record shops or record fares - but it's a classic album which you *must* try and listen to. I got my copy from a record fare a few years ago - for a paltry 3 pounds.) ------------------------From: rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) Subject: Re: New Groups, Any ideas? Here's a list of 10 albums that will give anyone a simple introduction to reggae music. (These are all readily available from most record stores/chains). I'll assume that you'll want to pick up most of the Marley catalog, especially since most of the titles cost about $8 now on CD. 1. Burning Spear - Marcus Garvey/Garvey's Ghost (on CD) (Mango label) 2. Bunny Wailer - Blackheart Man (Mango Label) 3. Black Uhuru - Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (Heartbeat) 4. Peter Tosh - Legalize It (CBS) 5. Aswad - To the Top (Mango or Simba) 6. Steel Pulse - True Democracy (Elektra) 7. Eek a Mouse - Wa Do Dem (Shan. or Greensleeves) 8. Alpha Blondy - Jerusalem (Shan.) 9. Gregory Isaacs - Night Nurse (Mango) 10. Judy Mowatt - Black Woman (Shan.) This only scratches the surface, each one of these artists has many more killer titles all reggae lovers should own. Robert. --------------------From: d2domer@dtek.chalmers.se (Erik Domstad) Culture'Culture in Culture' Mighty Diamonds- 'The Real Enemy' Black Uhuru'Anthem' Bunny Wailer'Liberation' Burning Spear'Resistance' Israel Vibration- 'Praises' Wailing Souls'Fire house rock' Ini Kamoze'Pirate' Ijahman'Haile I hymn' Erik ------------------ixtst+@pitt.edu (Isaac Thompson) writes: REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 9 VOLUME ONE
  • 10. What (reggae) life has taught me, I would like to share with you.--Haile Selasie. following are reggae artists I think true, dyed-in-the-wool reggae heads must have: The >Mutabaruka (Ja.--roots poetry, plenty of brain food) >Linton Kwesi Johnson (Ja.--ditto) >Luky Dube (South Africa) >Evi Edna (Nigeria--female, terrific voice, great voice, down right rootsy!) >Identity (US--group of West Indians) >Cidre Negra (Brazil--def!) >Sandee (Japan) >Check them out. ------------------From: dhoffman@spot.Colorado.EDU (David Hoffman) Couldn't let this one go without adding my essentials: Junior Murvin - the record with "Police and Thieves" Gregory Isaacs, esp. early releases Sugar Minott Black Uhuru - check out "Sinsemilla" Judy Mowatt June Lodge just a few suggestions! Dave -----------------From: linden@fanout.et.tudelft.nl (Hans van der Linden) Name for his style: IJahMan Levi's music. Compare him? It's said that Chris Blackwell decided for him to be THE successor of Bob Marley ("sign me your publishings and I make you a wealthy man").... yet IJahman did go his own way. But of similar musical and lyric-wise level and similar sort of music/lyrics I'd say: A lot of Pablo Moses' (esp. older: Revolutionary Dream and such) work (also still around and hot), also Sugar Minott's work on studio One, Junior Byles (Jordan), Lee Scratch Perry's Heart of the Ark collection, Yabby You's One Love, One Heart (also GREAT), side A of Singers and Players' Leaps and Bounds, Israel Vibration, Wiss, and such. Albums and tapes I have, so I can tell about (not in specific order): `Are We A Warrior?' 1979 (still Island:-) [title song esp. great (7:33min)] `Haile I Hymn (chapter 1)' (ALL 4 NUMBERS PERFECT) (yet still Island) esp. numbers: `Jah Heavy Load' and `Jah Is No Secret' are PERFECT+ `Tell It To The Children' (again very great) `Levi Inside Out' (very great again, incl. 2 love songs, and a new version of `Jah Heavy Load') JMI 1100 (Tree Roots prod. 1989) `Lilly Of My Valley' (lot of love songs, yet VERY good) JMI 500 (Tree R. '85) `IJahman & Friends' (VERY VERY good, esp. most numbers:-) (some guests, like Black Uhuru and His Majesterian appear) JMI 900, Tree Roots '88 `Africa' (to bore you all...again ALL BRILLIANT, great blazing, as usual) JMI 400, Tree Roots '84 Very recently (dedicated to 100th Anniversary of Haile Sellasie) my gf gave me the album: `KingFari', I love side A, side B (love songs) I like.(JMI 1400 Tree Roots '92) (Oh yes, I recorded [from radio!] `Live in Paradiso '87, guess that will not be found worldwide though:-) -------------------From: Richard W Anglin <anglin@acsu.buffalo.edu> Well at the top of my list is BURNING SPEAR!! Anything of Burning Spear up to the late 1980's. Especially the new compilation HAIL H.I.M. CULTURE also primo... newly released BABYLON BRIDGE LINTON KWESI JOHNSON THE GLADIATORS THE ABBYSINIANS....check out their compilation on the HEARTBEAT label..SATTA MASSAGNA it is now considered to be a colector's item. THE MEDITATORS THE ORIGINAL WAILERS.... BOB MARLEY and the WAILERS when they were called the WAILERS U-ROY JACOB MILLER... an unsung HERO! INI KAMOSI.... "BEFORE he went to jail" basically I recommend all roots reggae before the mid to late 1980's ------------------------REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 10 VOLUME ONE
  • 11. In article <3dqelm$43o@newsbf02.news.aol.com>, papalee@aol.com (Papa Lee) writes: |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> >I buy the CD's for a public library and I am trying to build up the reggae >collection. We have about 30 reggae CD's right now and I would like to buy >a lot more. Any suggestions for some great reggae CD's would be appreciated. >irie This is a pretty interesting question, because the implications of buying for a library are very different than buying for a private collection. I'd have to start off with Island's Tougher than Tough Compilation, The Trojan Story V1 and the Trojan Story V2, Duke Reid's Treasure Chest, Mango's Pressure Drop, Coxsone's Ska Bonanza (on Heartbeat). Respect to Studio One and Original Jamaican Classics, Hearbeat's Channel One: Hitbound, Joe Gibbs/Mighty Two, Virgin's Natty Rebel Roots, Bob Marley's Songs of Freedom and the Wailers One Love, Peter Tosh's Equal Rights, Bunny Wailers Blackheart Man and Marcia Griffiths Naturally. Maybe Heartbeat's Dee Jay Explosion. Niney's Observation Station. Clancy Eccles' Fatty Fatty. Any two of VP's Strictly the Best and Jet Star's Reggae Hits series for contemporary balance. Something by Dennis Brown (Some Like It Hot or anything on the Joe Gibbs label would be a good start), something by Gregory Isaacs (anything before 1982), something by Big Youth (on Trojan) and something by U Roy (before 1978). A collection like that would touch on most of the salient points of reggae's history with a touch of contemporary material as well. This material is fairly available in the US as well. Hope this helps. One Love, Lee O'Neill -----------------------In article <APC&1'0'69c4b8aa'c77@igc.apc.org>, Lieschen Montaner <lmontaner@igc.apc.org> writes: |> |> |> |> |> |> |> mango records has a collection of records called reggae greats. sly and robbie's reggae greats album is a great album indeed.it features dub tracks from their work with black uhuru in the 80's. some of the best reggae in history was created by the combination of sly and robbie and black uhuru. one love, beto. ----------------------|> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> Here are a few records that any reggae fan should own - I tried to keep it it to stuff that's currently available in the USA on CD and is sort of rootsy. Upsetters "Super Ape" - most people on this newsgroup agree that Lee Scratch Perry is the greatest reggae producer ever. He's been very prolific, and this is one of his absolute classics. Gregory Isaacs "The Best Of . . ." - 20 classics from the Cool Ruler. When he's not getting hassled by the man, the Lonely Lover's charming all the ladies. Gregory has real style, an impeccable voice and great tunes. This is my favourite record of his - 20 classic hits. Culture "Two Sevens Clash" - you just can't beat this for great vocals and all around righteousness. It's kind of a roots concept album, as is: Burning Spear "100th Anniversary" - this is the Spear's most famous album, "Marcus Garvey", plus its dub "Garvey's Ghost" on one CD. Unbeatable. I'd also recommend just about any compilation of old stuff on the Heartbeat label. They usually have great sound, good liner notes, and a fantastic selection of songs. Good way to hear a range of artists for little $$. Best in my opinion are: "Channel One / Hit Bound: The Revolutionary Sound" "Soul Defenders At Studio One" or any of the three "Best Of Studio One" single CDs. The great thing about reggae (well, one of them) is that you can start with a few titles and expand from there pretty easily - you'll find that you can trust some labels pretty consistently, that you'll develop have a fondness for the work of certain producers at certain times (give me mid-'70s Lee Perry or Joe Gibbs, anytime!) and some artists almost never let you down. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[5]. Live reggae recording recommendations From: geofh@meibm4.cen.uiuc.edu () REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 11 VOLUME ONE
  • 12. Subject: Re: Recommendations for LIVE reggae productions Geof's favorite live discsBlack Uhuru "Tear It Up- Live" on Mango <-- An incredible release featuring my favorite BU lineup (Michael Rose, Ducky Simpson, Puma) with Sly and Robbie rhythm section. Classic rockers A must have. Burning Spear "Live in Paris '88" on Slash/Blue Moon <--- There's been talk of this album on the net before. Whichever version you end up with is a killer one. Toots and the Maytals "Live (at the Hammersmith Palace)" <--- You want great crowd interaction? Check out the 11 (?) minute "54-46 That's my Number" These guys have got soul. The must have recommendation is a given for all of these selections. Peter Tosh "Captured Live" on ??? (this is all from the top of my head) <--- Killer. Relatively easy to find. Bunny Wailer "Live" on Solomonic <--- I've only seen this on vinyl with a pretty low sound quality. Includes stuff from "Blackheart Man" and "Rootsman Skankin' (sorry) and an "I'm the Toughest" cover. Anyone seen this on disc? It's definitely worth it. BMW "Live" <--- The prototype live reggae album. ----------------------From: bbe001@acad.drake.edu Well I'm mostly roots myself, but just by chance I was listening to a "live" dancehall record tonight- Charlie Chaplin's "Take Two." I know this might not be the new NEW dancehall you're talking about, i.e. Ninjaman, Shabba, etc. But Chaplin's the MAN and he's backed by Roots Radics here. I say "live" cause it's live in the studio, but he's got plenty of people whistling and shouting. "Take Two" is 1990 on RAS. More good live stuff would of course be any of the Sunsplashes! I have Eek-A-Mouse w/ Michigan and Smiley from the '84 Sunsplash and Yellowman at the '83. They both slam but try to get the Eek-A-Mouse disc if you have to choose. That's all I can think of for now... ites, Brad -------------------From: oweng@aston.ac.uk (Gareth Owen) Subject: Re: Recommendations for LIVE reggae productions Misty In Roots - Live at the Counter Eurovision '78 (on People Unite) Wonderful stuff -------------------From: dudley@treefort.Corp.Sun.COM (Dudley Gaman) You probably have Marley's _Talkin' Blues_. If not, you must get it. Burning Spear's _Live in Paris_ is very good. My favorite live reggae album is _Gregory Issacs Live_ from the Reggae Greats collection. It was released 8 or 10 years ago, but I still listen to it when I need a dose of Gregory at his best. Dudley -------------------From: rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) Subject: Re: Recommendations for LIVE reggae productions I've got a 2 album bootleg of Peter Tosh wicked version of Babylon Queendom. called "Dealing with the Shytstem". With a There are a couple of other Marley bootlegs in circulation as well: The Lion's Domain Wailing For the Last Time. (I don't feel too bad about picking up bootlegs, since Island shortchanged alot of the rarities on Songs For Freedom; dem maga dogs!) Robert. -----------------------From: mike@jammin.nosc.mil (mike pawka) Subject: Re: Recommendations for LIVE reggae productions REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 12 VOLUME ONE
  • 13. My favorite "live" CD is Mighty Diamonds "Live In Tokyo", although good luck in finding it. It's a Japanese Import, I found it at Tower for $22.50 one day, grabbed it and haven't seen a copy since. I think the performance is from about 1980. -----------------------From: barstow@cv.hp.com (Art Barstow) Subject: Re: Recommendations for LIVE reggae productions A few of my favorites that have not been mentioned: o Bob Marley and the Wailers: Babylon By Bus o Lucky Dube: Captured Live o Pato Banton: I think it is 'American Revolution' or 'Reggae Revolution'; it was recorded in San Fran. and has a good version of "Niceness" and "Don't Sniff ...". -----------------------Reply-To: coker@artiste.sitka.sun.com Well, once again to address real reggae, lovers rock and the dancehall, the 25th Anniversary Album from Alton Ellis is an all-time favorite live album. From: linden@fanout.et.tudelft.nl (Hans van der Linden) Subject: Re: Recommendations for LIVE reggae productions Though most of my favourites have yet been mentioned, still missing is the great: Chalice - Live at Reggae Sunsplash 1982 (VSLP 8902, Vista Records) Greetings, Hans -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[6]. Who was Marcus Garvey? Excerpted from "Reggae International", Stephen Davis and Peter Simon. Ethiopianism includes the appreciation of Ethiopia's ancient civilization as well as its role in the Bible. To blacks, Africa (interchangeable with Ethiopia) became a glorious, Biblical home-land equated with Zion. The recognition of African roots and the desire for repatriation has been a central theme in New World black religion before and since emancipation. Ethiopianism became a "black religious reaction to pro-slavey propaganda." Marcus Garvey's "Back to Africa" movement developed the spirit of Ethiopianism to its fullest extent. ....since the white people have seen their God through white spectacles, we have only now started out (late though it be) to see our God through our own spectacles. Tbe God of Isaac and the God of Jacob let him exist for the race that believe in the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob. We Negroes believe in the God of Ethiopia, the everlasting God--God the Son, God the Holy Ghost, tbe one God of all ages. That is the God in whom we believe, but we sball worship him througb the spectacles of Ethiopia. A. J. Garvey, The Philosophy and Opinions of Marcus Garvey Garvey's words planted the seeds for most "Black Cod" movements in the US and Caribbean. Stressing the superiority of the ancient Africans and the dignity of the black race, he inspired many successful nationaiist movements and numerous African leaders from Kenyatta to Nyerere. Marcus Mosiah Garvey was born in St. Ann, Jamaica, in 1887, descended from the fiercely proud Maroons. He founded the newspaper The Negro World, which took as its motto his nationalist cry, "One God, One Aim, One Destiny." In 1917, he founded UNIA (Universal Negro Improvement Association) in Harlem. Its aims were described in a speech delivered by Garvey in 1924 at Madison Square Garden, New York: The Universal Improvement Association represents the hopes and aspirations of tbe awakened Negro. Our desire is for a place in tbe world, not to disturb the tranquility of other men, but to lay down our burden and rest our weary backs and feet by the banks of the Niger and sing our songs and chant our hymns to the God of Ethiopia. Garvey's goal of repatriation was expressed in his famous slogan "Africa for the Africans." His well-known Black Star Line steamship company was established to trade and eventually carry New World blacks to Africa. This prophet of African redemption was not always successfull in his countless business ventures, but by the 1920s Garvey was the most powerful leader among the black masses in the United States. In 1916, before he left for his US campaign, Garvey's farewell address to Jamaicans included the words "Look to Africa for the crowning of a Black king; he shall be the Redeemer." REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 13 VOLUME ONE
  • 14. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[7]. Can you recommend some Dancehall? Profile's "Dancehall Stylee" Volumes I-III VP's "Strictly The Best" Volumes 1-8 Mango's "Ram Dancehall" | Scott Cairns | email: scairns@fsg.com | ---------------------My own current dancehall faves, if yuh interested: "Gal Wine" - Chakademus / Pliers "Wear Yuh Size" - Lt. Stitchie "Hypocrites" - Michael Prophet / Daddy Freddy "Ruling Cowboy" - Cocoa Tea "Fresh Vegetable" - Tony Rebel "Love Fever" - Cobra "Bandaleros" - Pinchers "Jump Up" - Admiral Bailey "Talk Tough" - Bobo General / Culture Lindsay | DJ Scotty Ranks | email: scairns@fsg.com | ----------------------To show respect to the broad field of dancehall stylees I compiled a list of `Big' DJ/dancehall names (over the years, I guess somewhat since 78). These man and man have settled their names in many ppl's memories and have made more than a couple of albums. I added one of my favourite albums for each of them. I must have missed great ones by lots and must have selected semi-optimal albums for many of them, so lets grow this list please. Also a LOT of more temporary starts have made HOT ridims and lyrics, but including them (Ashanti Waugh, Peter Culture, Scion Sashay Success, Tapper Zukie etc etc etc) would make this list endless. I roy - The General U roy - Natty Rebel (++) Papa/General Echo - 12" of Pleasure (man died too young, hear next album) Clint Eastwoord & General Saint - Two Bad DJ Michigan & Smiley Downpression Yellowman & Fathead - I Cant take it (if live was a thing money coulda buy) Yellowman & Home-T4 - Mr.Consular (this one and previous are 12") Barrington Levi - Here I Come Mikey Dread - World War III Sugar Minott - Time Longer Than Rope Big Youth - Dread Locks Dread Jah Thomas - Dance Hall Connection Jah Woosh - Chalis blaze Little John - True Confession Max Romeo - Holding Out My Love To You (maybe not everyone finds this dancehall) Winston Reedy - Crossover Maxie Priest (slightly disco-ish) - You're Safe Dr. Alimentado (not really dancehall) - Best Dressed Chicken In Town * Eek-A-Mouse (singing DJ) (some like it some hate it)) - Skidip Dillinger - (SORT of, various experiments) I did like CB200 (ocassionally still) With the very many names over the years samplers are especially useful for selecting your taste here. Nice samplers, i.e. `Super Fresh', `Sure Shot', Very nice live samplers: a series called: `Live Dance Hall Session with ...', where ... is `Aces International' or `Lees Unlimited' etc. *) Sons of Thunder is better, yet less dancehall-ish As I didn't purchase much dancehall the last few years, I missed the latest great names. Also some stuff lost some actuality. All titles above are (for me at least) timeless anyway. Oh yes, now we're on it. On MTV I saw Shabba, Snow, and Shaggy on 3, 2, 1 in English chart as well. In Holland they must also be in top 5, accompanied by Dr.Alban (reggae from sweden [or danmark?]). BTW, wouldn't someone be able and willing to post a Jamaican chart on this group sometimes? Even with some delay it might keep us informed of what is hot in Jamaica much quicker. OK, sorry for the length of this, Greetings, Hans (flashbacks will change my musical diet for some days, and they are already doing so:-) Yes, it's one of the dusty, sleepy nyah mon making a dancehall recommendation: Check out the ROIR/RAS CD, "Nice Up Dancee" featuring Sanchez, Flourgon, Little Lenny, Johnny P., Tiger, Tippa Lee & Rappa Robert, Foxy Brown, Little Kirk, Paul Blake & Bloodfire Posse, Super Glen, and Natural Beauty. Also Two Tough Record's "Dancehall Boomshots". REGGAE ON THE INTERNET EZ Noh, page 14 mike VOLUME ONE
  • 15. ------------------------Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: dancehall It's always difficult to determine what is the "latest" dancehall: it always depends on how soon you were able to get to the local reggae store before the last shipment done!! Anyway: -"Oh Carolina," Various Artists, King Jammy's version (Which is substantially faster and different from the Signet (Sting Int'l) version. -"Ghetto Vibes" Various Artists, also of Jammy's. Features D. Brown, Courtney Melody/Risto Benjy, Bounty Killer etc. -Sound Boy Burial - Trouble, Tan Yah records -Welfare/Good Enough - Blacka Ranks/ the late great Alton Black, Tan Yah. -People - Gen. Degree, Penthouse -Creator - Tony Rebel, Penthouse _Operation Ardent = Buju, Penthouse -You a lead/??? - Nardo/Galaxy P, Penthouse -Love will lead you back - Wayne Wonder, Penthouse -Excellence - Louie Culture, Madhouse I will check on some new stuff that I just got in the last month and give you the names. Also let me know how far back you mean (1993 stuff, last month, etc..) As for classic favorites - I'll just name some of mine: "Here I come" - Dennis Brown "Pumpkin Belly," "Ring the Alarm" - Tenor Saw "Bam Bam" - Muma (then Sister) Nancy, Techniques (Winston Riley's - its on the same rhythm as Tenor Saw's Ring the alarm and more recently Buju's "Do dem sup'm". Big Beat recently rereleased it with a *Phizattt* hip-hop remix as well as the original.). "Murderer," "Under me Sensi" - Barrington Levy "Night Nurse," "Mr. Brown" - Gregory Isaacs "Loving Pauper" - Dobby Dobson "No,no,no" (You don't love me and I know) - Ken Boothe "Greetings" "Level the vibes" - Half Pint "Bobo Dread," "Leggo me hand" - Josey Wales "Gunman Connection," "Suzy Q" - Nicodemus Innumerable Yelloeman, especially with Fat head (e.g BAM BAM) "Cry fi the Youth", "Mud up," "Sweet for my sweet," "Under Pressure," "Boops" - Super Cat. "Synthersizer voice" - Pampidoo "Gi me punany," "Think me did done" (part II), "Big Belly Man" - Adm. Bailey "Big Batty Gal," "Jump Spread out" - Flourgon "Ram Dancehall," "Boombastic," "No wanga gut," "Mi lover mi lover" - Tiger Any pre-Atlantic record of Lieutenant Stitchie After: "Father Beat me hot, Old Confession, All nations, Wear yu size" "Pretty Looks done" - Major Mackerel "Cover Me" - Ninja Man/Tinga Stewart Etc. etc... Selector Dudu Black --------------------------From: ac999a11@umbc2.umbc.edu Subject: RE: dancehall Here are a few more to add: Zion in a vision - Garnet Silk Love of a lifetime - ??? Love how de gal dem flex - Buju If I ever fall in love again (cover) - Pinchers Why so much gun and ammunition - Tony Rebel They're not brand new, but are among some of the better '93 selection to come out. As for classic favorites - Some to add here would be: Jump Up - Tiger Babylon Boops - Lovindeer Computer Burial - ??? Sorry - Foxy Brown Love the life you live - Colonel Mite and Frighty Gun Talk - Tony Rebel Dolly My Baby (Original Version) - Super Cat Cuff - Shelly Thunder She a Trickster - ??? Love the Ghetto Youth - Admiral Bailey Telephone Lover - J.C. Lodge One Blood - ??? REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 15 VOLUME ONE
  • 16. >Selector Dudu Black -----------------------Some Stuff That Came out in 92 that may be classic soon: Ting-a-ling - Shabba Boom Bye Bye - Buju Murder She Wrote - Shaka Demus and Pliers Lord, Me Can't Take it No More - General Degree Granny - ??? (Same Version as that above) Falling in Love All Over Again - Beres Hammond Big Up Big Up - ??? Murderation - Capleton Dem A Bleach - Nardo Ranks Hot This Year - ??? Love is Guaranteed - Reggie Stepper Richard Thomas ac999a11@umbc2.umbc.edu --------------------Also, you'd asked about updating the dancehall FAQ recently. I think of course the selectors like Mr. Black are most qualified to do so, but I do think for '94 anyhow, the new Pepperseed Riddim should get some mention Stress Tickle Her Body Big Speech Wifee Dappa Big Thing a Gwan Kotch, #2 Michigan and Smiley Baja Jedd Frisco Kid Dugsey Ranks Donovan Steele, Daddy Screw " " Terror Fabulous -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[8]. Is there a newsgroup that caters to those of us who enjoy soca, zouk, salsa, or merengue? Try rec.music.afro-latin -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[9]. Books on Rastafarianism? The title says it all. I currently have Leonard E. Barrett's book. Anyone know of other reputable titles? ----------------------From: "richard paul" <richard.paul@canrem.com> Well Steve... it's been a while since I have been up on the topic... ( moved back to Toronto Canada after working in Jamaica in 1979-80), but you may wish to check out Joseph Owens, DREAD: The Rastafarians of Jamaica. Published by Sangsters (Jamaica) in 1979. Rex Nettleford also has some interesting things to say in his book, Caribbean Cultural Identity: The Case of Jamaica - AN Essay in Cultural Dynamics (1978) Institute of Jamaica I seem to recall a professor at York University in Toronto - Carol Yawney I beleive working on her PhD. dissertation on this very topic. If you have access to interlibrary loan, you may be able to get hold of this work. ----------------------From: bb@generali.harvard.edu (Brent Byer) Check for: By: Publisher: "Rasta and Resistance" (From Marcus Garvey to Walter Rodney) Horace Campbell Africa World Press, Inc. PO Box 1892 Trenton, NJ 08607 Phone: (609) 695-3766 ISBN: 0-86543-035-7 (paper, 234 pg, $12.) c1987; 3rd printing, 1990 From the back cover: "Rasta and Resistance" is a study of the Rastafarian Movement in all its manifestations, from its evolution in the hills of Jamaica to its present manifestations in the streets of Birmingham and REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 16 VOLUME ONE
  • 17. the Shashamane Settlement of Ethiopia. It traces the cultural, political and spiritual sources of this movement of resistance, highlighting the quest for change among an oppressed people. This book serves to break the intellectual traditions which placed the stamp of millenarianism on Rasta. From close of Chapter 3: "The symbols of the flag, the lion, the drum, the chalice, the locks, and the distinctive language were reflections of a style of resistance. The Rasta were neither crazy nor millenarian, for they were part of the sufferers who were making their own protest against the sickness of the colonial society. .... The Dreadlocks of the hills were making their imprint on the consciousness of the poor and it is to the evolution of the movement which we now turn. The Rastafari were creating the musical forms to strengthen the people to meet the violence and thuggery of neo-colonialism." --------------------->Dear fellow internet_er, > I am an anthropology student in Fredericton, Canada and I am >trying to obtain information about Rastafarianism. I would like to know >if this movement is a millinerian movement or if millinerian is just a >generalized title of the movement. I would appreciate any comments or >information pertaining to this debate. Check out the books.... AUTHOR: Barrett Leonard Emanuel TITLE: The Rastafarians IMPRINT: Kingston, Jamaica Sangster's Book Stores Ltd London Heinemann Educational 1977 PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION: ill SUBJECT: Ras Tafari movement History CLASSMARK: Theology AF 430 BAR Revised and Updated Edition, 1988, Beacon Press (Boston) BP795, ISBN 0-0870-1026-X ; ISBN 0-8070-1027-8 (paper) and.... AUTHOR: Cashmore Ernest TITLE: Rastaman the Rastafarian movement in England IMPRINT: London Allen & Unwin 1979 SUBJECT: Ras Tafari movement England * West Indians England CLASSMARK: Theology AF430 CAS * Adam Smith Lib 2 copies The first book goes into this subject in reasonable depth, and also gives valuable pointers to other sources. I've just started reading the second, so no great comments to give for that particular one... Maybe you should include this book in the archives... AUTHOR: Cashmore Ernest TITLE: Rastaman the Rastafarian movement in England IMPRINT: London Allen & Unwin 1979 SUBJECT: Ras Tafari movement England * West Indians England CLASSMARK: Theology AF430 CAS * Adam Smith Lib 2 copies --Steve. ----------------|> Several books to look for: |> |> ITATIONS OF JAMAICA AND I RASTAFARI (First Itation) |> ISBN: 0-9512222-0-1 |> AUTHOR: Mihlawhdh Faristzaddi |> AND |> ITATIONS OF JAMAICA AND I RASTAFARI (Second Itation) |> ISBN: 1-962-3333-1-2 |> AUTHOR: Mihlawhdh Faristzaddi |> |> Both books explore and celebrate Rastafari culture in Jamaica and |> elsewhere with poetry, psalms, praises and wonderful photographs, |> including many from Ethiopia. These books are perfect companion |> pieces to Norman's insightful posts, which by the way, are respected |> as positive contributions to rmr. |> |> The books are available from: |> |> JUDAH ANBESA |> P.O. BOX 160998 REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 17 VOLUME ONE
  • 18. |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> MIAMI, FLORIDA 33116 USA Here are a few more that I found helpful and/or interesting: Title:Rastafari: The Healing of the Nation Author: Dennis Forsythe Date: 1983 Publisher: Ziaka Publications Box 405 Constant Springs P.O. Kingston, Jamaica /// I doubt if the address is still valid but I purchased it in JA last summer so, who knows./// Title: Roots of Rastafari Author: Virgia Lee Jacobs Date: 1985 Publisher: Avant Books Slawson Communications, Inc. 3719 Sixth Avenue San Diego, CA 92103-4316 IBSN: 0-932238-25-4 (pbk) Title: Race, Class, and Political Symbols: Rastafari and Reggae in Jamaican Politics. Author: Anita M. Waters Date: 1985; paperback edition 1989 Publisher: Transaction Publishers New Brunswick, NJ 08903 IBSN: 0-88738-632-6 (pbk) and 0-88738-024-7 (not pbk) ///This is a scholarly work--almost a textbook--thats appears to be a spin off of a PhD disertation. Nonetheless, there is a whole heap of valuable information and EXTENSIVE bibliography. I hope all of this helps. --Papa Pilgrim Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide pilgrim@xmission.com -----------------------|> |> |> |> |> There's a pretty new book on Rasta out called "Rastafari: Roots and Ideology" by Barry Chevannes, a professor of Sociology at UWI. I haven't read it yet, but it might be in there. ISBN 0-8156-0296-0. Robert Nelson -----------------------"Rastafari: Roots and Ideology" Author: Barry Chevannes Copyright (1994) Syracuse University Press Sewell, Tony. "Garvey's Children: The Legacy of Marcus Garvey". Publishers Inc. ISBN 0-333-49124-6 _RASTAFARI: ROOTS AND IDEOLOGY_ 298pp 1990, London, Macmillan by Barry Chevannes Syracuse University Press, 1994. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[10.] What are the different reggae styles? From: pharvey@quack.kfu.com (Paul Harvey) Subject: Re: Reggae styles In article <Mar08.171038.66404@yuma.ACNS.ColoState.EDU> jn163051@longs.LANCE.ColoState.Edu (Joel Nevison) writes: >One thing I am a bit fuzzy on is the defining characteristics of >the various styles of reggae; dancehall, rock steady, etc etc. >I have a grip on the difference between ska and dub, but those >are pretty obvbious. Could some of the experts here give an outline >of the musical characteristics of the various styles? Also helpful >would be a short list of titles that are good examples of or define >a particular style. I've been listening to reggae for so long, and >mainly break it down into two groups; love it, and okay. Seems I >ought to maybe think about it a little more now. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 18 VOLUME ONE
  • 19. I'll start but, it's not easy to do in writing. And I could probably stand some education myself, anyway: Ska - 50-60's, pioneered by the Skatalites? There is a thing called the ska beat, which I don't really know how to describe, maybe you take each beat and make it triplet with the two outer notes played by a guitar or keyboard or horn and the center note a drum hit. Anyway, much ska was just American pop of the 50-60's with a ska beat, but there was orginal stuff also and there were certainly a lot of variations in the basic ska beat. [For more info on Ska, check the alt.music.ska FAQ: <URL:http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/music/ska-faq/top.html> <URL:ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/music/ska-faq/part1> <URL:ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/music/ska-faq/part2> <URL:ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/music/ska-faq/part3> ] Dub - is just dubing something, usually vocals, onto an instrumental version, often a B side. Rock Steady was late 60's and was a slowed down version of ska with more of a rock feel. Roots was sort of a cross between American Rock and Ska/Rock-Steady, The Wailers being the equivalent of the Beatles. Dancehall seems to be the catchall for 80's and 90's Jamaican music and is a varied as American Modern Rock/Pop music. Shabba Ranks is probably the big name here, but there are of course many others. There are lots of terms for sub-types of Dancehall. --------------------From: ld21@cunixf.cc.columbia.edu (Lee Dirks) Subject: Re: Reggae styles I'm not sure anyone can say exactly who pioneered ska, but the Skatalites were definitely right there at the beginning...and are still going strong! As far as I know, Dub should probably come in later down in this list, but that is a minor point. >Rock Steady was late 60's and was a slowed down version of ska with more >of a rock feel. I think you could safely say early 60s... >Roots was sort of a cross between American Rock and Ska/Rock-Steady, The >Wailers being the equivalent of the Beatles. Good call. Fitting in after Roots (chronologically) would be Lover's Rock and the man Gregory Isaacs, along with many other smooth singers of this style. Before we jump on to dancehall, I think you should mention its origins, those being Toasting and DJ. At least I would say these are the precursors, or the given to dancehall before it was called dancehall. Toasting: U-Roy would probably be one of the grand-daddys of this musical form (Big Youth as well?), working the sound systems and chanting and toasting over dub versions of other popular tunes of their day. Then, that was followed by the DJ style popularized by The King (in his day) Yellowman; this style glided straight into Dancehall as we know it today. At least, this is my take on the situation. I'm more a roots man myself, so I'm not exactly taking about my field here. >Dancehall seems to be the catchall for 80's and 90's Jamaican music and >is a varied as American Modern Rock/Pop music. Shabba Ranks is probably >the big name here, but there are of course many others. There are lots >of terms for sub-types of Dancehall. I think this idea of drawing up catageories and writing descriptions and listing artists which define the style is a good idea which should be continued by all who wish to contribute. This could develop into a file worth saving. Let's keep filling in the blanks!! -------------------From: bbe001@acad.drake.edu Subject: Re: Reggae styles >>Dub - is just dubing something, usually vocals, onto an instrumental >>version, often a B side. Ah but so much more brah. It started out with people like King Tubby and Augustus Pablo taking the instrumental tracks from the A-sides, then pumping up the bass, using delay (like an echo) effects on the instruments and sometimes maybe a snatch of vocals for the B-sides. If it was just stripping the vocals off, then it's just a "version" record. This is why some songs use the same riddims. But then, they just started having studio musicians provide the music. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 19 VOLUME ONE
  • 20. Now, with the new techno-dub, for lack of a better word, the drum machines and synths are doing a lot of it- like Jah Shaka and King (used to be Prince) Jammy's newer stuff. >>Dancehall seems to be the catchall for 80's and 90's Jamaican music and >>is a varied as American Modern Rock/Pop music. Shabba Ranks is probably >>the big name here, but there are of course many others. There are lots >>of terms for sub-types of Dancehall. Definately true- about the deejay style of the 80's before dancehall now. Like Eek-AMouse, Michigan and Smiley, and King Yello. For those of you interested in some CONSCIOUS DANCEHALL- check out Charlie Chaplin -"Take Two," etc. I remeber reading about all these wierd names like "sleng-teng" and some others I don't remember. I think sleng-teng was real techno-synth stuff. And I still don't know what "inna yard style" is! Yeah yard is your house, but someone tell me an actual artist in the yardee style, if any. Respect, Brad ---------------------From: mcbean@vax.oxford.ac.uk Subject: Re: Reggae styles Date: 13 Mar 93 07:29:05 GMT In article <C3pyGB.sq@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk>, stevem@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk (Steve McGowan) writes: > > > > > I think Mento may have been more blues oriented than reggae (as we know it today), but not so distant that reggae could not evolve from it. Anyone shed some light? My understanding of mento was that it is more like calypso (old calypso as opposed to soca). It certainly sounds like it, more rhythmical lyrically, in a storytelling tradition which suggests that it is closer to the original African music forms. Some fuzzy memory tells me I'm on the right track but don't quote me definitely. It was probably more influenced by the folk music forms of England & great britain, since it comes from an era where dances like the quadrille were still prevalent. It definitely predates ska, and if you listen to ska then you can hear some of the mento influence coming through, and of course reggae comes out of the ska tradition. There is a Jamaican "musicologist" (whatever that is supposed to mean), Dermot Hussey, who has published several articles on this. Unfortunately residing in "Babylon" at present means I have no way of enlightening you:-) -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[11.] CARIBANA FAQ CARIBANA '93 - FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ) Version 1.00 - Last updated July 14, 1993 Compiled by Steve Frampton <frampton@vicuna.ocunix.on.ca> with help from several contributors (listed at the end of this document, section "Q-15"). This document is copyright 1993 by Steve Frampton (on behalf of himself and all the contributors) but is freely distributable to the benefit of Caribana '93 and the West Indian communities in Toronto and surrounding areas. ---=== Q-00. Q-01. Q-02. Q-03. Q-04. Q-05. Q-06. Q-07. Q-08. Q-09. Q-10. Q-11. Q-12. Q-13. Q-14. Q-15. Q-16. Do you have any legal disclaimers to get out of the way first? What the #&*$! took you so long to release this FAQ!? What the heck is "Caribana", anyway? When will Caribana '93 take place? What is the schedule of Caribana '93 events? Sounds great, now where can I purchase tickets? Can you recommend some nice and affordable accomodations? Which forms of transportation should I use to get around? What kind of musical styles (and who is playing!) will be featured? Where are some good places to get authentic West Indian food? Caribana aside, what are some good Caribbean clubs in the area? Which Caribbean radio stations can I listen to while I'm in Toronto? How can I get more information about this wonderful event? I'm too far away for Caribana -- do you know of any similar events? Any "Quotable Quotes" from past attendees you want to share? Who contributed to this FAQ document? In the perspicacious words of Janet Jackson, "Is that the end?" ---=== REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 20 VOLUME ONE
  • 21. Q-00. Do you have any legal disclaimers to get out of the way first? Neither myself (Steve Frampton) nor any of the contributors (listed at the end of this document) shall be held liable for any damages caused by the information (or misinformation, as the case may be) contained within this document, including but not limited to, special, incidental, consequential, or other damages. Although every attempt has been made to ensure a reasonable degree of accuracy is contained herein, this document has been prepared more as a general guide and is not intended to be used as a definitive "bible" of the events at large. You are encouraged to contact any of the people listed under section "Q-12" for more information on Caribana '93 before making any plans. In short, USE THIS INFORMATION AT YOUR OWN RISK. ---=== Q-01. What the #&*$! took you so long to release this FAQ!? This is the first-ever release of the Caribana FAQ. The information gathering took a lot longer than I had expected, due not only to the fact that Caribana planning seems to be delayed until the last minute, but also due to my excessive procrastination. :-) I'd like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who kept in constant contact with me to get this thing done, and also to apologize to the net for the incessant delays in releasing this FAQ, as well as some of the information being unavailable for inclusion. Much of the information herein will hold true for future Caribana events, so I'll be able to release this FAQ in coming years much earlier than this one. In short, we'll get it right for Caribana '94! :-) Thanks for your patience, and on behalf of myself and all who contributed, good luck and have a blast at this year's Caribana! ---=== Q-02. What the heck is "Caribana", anyway? Caribana is an annual event, founded 26 years ago by Toronto's Trinidadian community as the Northern version of Trinidad's Carnival. As Caribana increased in popularity, other West Indian communities contributed to the festivities, and recently the Latin and African communities joined in as well. During the last two and half decades, Caribana's popularity has been increasing exponentially. 25 years ago it was a celebration of only a few thousand. Last year, Caribana celebrated it's 25th anniversity -- and over 2,000,000 people were in attendance to make it the most successful year for Caribana so far. According to a past member of the Caribana Cultural Committee, the Mardi Gras in New Orleans had approximately 4,000,000 people attend in 1991. At Caribana's current rate of growth, Caribana will surpass this famous carnival within only a couple of years. Caribana is the success it is because of the people who attend -- and they come from all over the world, often to meet with family who are also in attendance or living in the area. A publication that was released for Caribana '92 indicated that many people plan family reunions. During past years, people made plans to meet at specific street corners on the parade route. In 1991, however, the route was changed to follow the lake shore, where there were no specific buildings or corners. Luckily, some bright individual noticed that each lamp post had unique code numbers affixed, and the word went out that this would be an ideal method used for meeting family and friends. ---=== Q-03. When will Caribana '93 take place? Caribana is a two week period of events beginning in the latter part of July, ending with a major blowout on the long weekend (Canadian Civic holiday) at the beginning of August. Although many people believe that Caribana is only a single weekend consisting of the parade on Saturday and the island picnics on Sunday, it is actually two weeks in length! There are many events that are held during this period, including the Junior Carnival, and the King & Queen's Pageant to name only a couple. ---=== Q-04. What is the schedule of Caribana '93 events? There are all kinds of parties and activities at Caribana that will take place all around Toronto. Here is the schedule and pricing information: MONDAY, JULY 19, 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM: OFFICIAL FESTIVAL LAUNCH Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall / Cost = FREE REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 21 VOLUME ONE
  • 22. Entertainment will include "Massive Chandelier", "Lady Pearl", "Pan Fantasy Steelband", as well as "The Scarborough Caribbean Youth Dance Ensemble". FRIDAY, JULY 23, 7:30 PM - 11:30 PM: WARM-UP PARTY Nathan Phillips Square, City Hall / Cost = FREE Entertainment includes "Massive Chandelier", "Moss International", "Lady Pearl", "Elsworth James", "The Caribbean Folk Performers", "Metrotones Steelband", "Brother Resistance", and the Rap and Step Dance winners from a previous CCC event. SUNDAY, JULY 25, 2:00 PM - 8:00 PM: JUNIOR CARNIVAL Lamport Stadium, 1155 King Street West Cost = $12.00 adults, $5.00 seniors & children (Competition of children's carnival costumes). Entertainment includes "Tropical Youth Dancers", "Panatics Steel Band", Rap-Off 1st runner-up, step dance, and D.J. Frankie, D.J. Lee. MONDAY-FRIDAY, JULY 26-30, 7:30 PM - 11:30 PM: SUNSET CRUISES The Trillium / Cost = $25.00 adults (excluding bar & meals) Cruise on Lake Ontario while you dance as the sun sets. Board the ferry at the foot of Bay Street. Featuring Caribbean cuisine and a cash bar. Entertainment varies depending on evening: Monday is "Massive Chandelier" and "D.J. Lee", Tuesday "Pelham Goddard & Charlies Roots" and "D.J. Bad Lad", Wednesday "Atlantik" and "D.J. Bad Lad", Thursday "Carribbean Traffic Jam" and "D.J. Frankie", and Friday is "Moss International" and "D.J. Lee". WEDNESDAY-FRIDAY, JULY 28-30, 12:00 PM - 4:00 AM: CASINO CARIBANA Regal Constellation Hotel, 900 Dixon Road / Cost = FREE Casino gambling; $10.00 maximum bets (Rapid Blackjack up to $100), Las Vegas style rules, professional dealers. THURSDAY, JULY 29, 8:30 PM - 1:00 AM: KING AND QUEEN OF THE BANDS Lamport Stadium, 1155 King Street West Cost = $15.00 adults, $5.00 seniors & children A competition for the King, Queen & Individual of the bands. Features spectacular display of costumes, Caribbean cuisine. Entertainment includes "Silhouettes Steelband", and "D.J. Bad Lad". FRIDAY, JULY 30, 8:30 PM - 2:00 AM: CARNIVAL DANCE Toronto Airport Hilton, 5875 Airport Road / Cost = $25.00 adults only Dance all night long to the music of "Pelham Goddard & Charles Roots", "Brass Trazx", "D.J. Bad Lad". Chance to win family accomodation for 4 nights at Caribana '94 at the Toronto Airport Hilton (winner to be announced night of this event). SATURDAY, JULY 31, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM: CARIBANA PARADE Exhibition Stadium, Lakeshore Blvd. West Cost = $10.00 adults, $5.00 seniors & children, $26.00 family of four The most well-known event of Caribana. Thousands of masqueraders in colourful costumes parade before panel of judges. Dance to the Caribbean's pulsating music, as the bands play west along the Lakeshore to Parkside Drive. SATURDAY, JULY 31, 8:30 PM - 2:00 AM: CARIBANA 'LAS' LAP' DANCE Delta Toronto Airport, 801 Dixon Road / Cost = $15.00 adults only After the parade dance to the rhythms of "Shandu", and "D.J. Lee". SUNDAY, AUGUST 1, 8:00 PM - 2:00 AM: KAISOFEST Skyline Hotel, 655 Dixon Road / Cost = $15.00 adults only Featuring local Calypsonians, cash bar. SUNDAY-MONDAY, AUGUST 1-2, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM: OLYMPIC ISLAND CARIBBEAN MUSIC FESTIVAL Take the ferry at the foot of Bay Street to Olympic Island Cost each day = $15.00 adults, $5.00 seniors & children This is a 2 day festival featuring Caribbean music, dances, craft exhibitions, and Caribbean cuisine, as well as a beer garden. Entertainment varies depending on day; on Sunday: "Atlantik", "Pelham Goddard & Charles Roots", "Sparrow", "David Rudder", "United Sisters", "Iwer George", "Anslem Douglas", "Show-Do-Man", "Triveni Brass", "Hit Squad", "Jayson", "Jones & Jones", "Jackie James", "Chester Miller", "Los Karachis", "Tommy Joseph", "Ballet Creole", "Afro Pan", and "Protector". On Monday: "Atlantik", "Second Imij", "Sparrow", "David Rudder", "United Sisters", "Rikki Jai", "Anslem Douglas", "Instant Jam", "Elsworth James", "Tabaruk", "Devon Irie", "Inspector Lenny", "Dance Caribe", "Pan Fantasy", "Ramabai Espinet & Sudharshan", "Tommy Joseph", "Protector", "Jones & Jones", "Military Force", "Simply Majestic", as well as the Rap-off winner from a previous CCC event. ---=== Q-05. Sounds great, now where can I purchase tickets? Tickets for any of the events can be purchased in any of the following outlets: * Toronto Central * REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 22 VOLUME ONE
  • 23. Caribana Carnival Shop & Main Ticket Outlet College Park, 444 Yonge St. (at College Subway) (416) 977-8337 Pizzazz Unlimited 1266 Danforth Ave. (near Greenwood) Toronto, Ontario (416) 465-6738 The Official Caribana Store #1 College Park, 444 Yonge St. (inside mall) (416) 977-8337 The Bay, Queen St. 401 Bay Street Toronto, Ontario M5H 2Y4 (416) 861-9111 The Official Caribana Store #2 301 Yonge St. @ Dundas St. Toronto, Ontario (416) 974-9888 Rock Wells 301 Yonge St. Toronto, Ontario (416) 974-9888 M5B 1R2 * North Central * Loxx Hair Design & Esthetics 4844A Yonge Street (1 block north of Sheppard) North York, Ontario (416) 222-0311 * West * Climax Records Promotions 8 & 10 MacDonnell Ave. (Queen & Lansdowne) Toronto, Ontario (416) 588-5372 Mr. Jerk 1552 Eglington Ave. W. @ Dufferin Toronto, Ontario (416) 783-1367 Elma's Spice Corner 255 Dundas St. West, Unit 4A (Parker Hill Centre) (416) 277-0557 Nappy's 267 Queen St. East Brampton, Ontario (416) 453-3037 Fade II Black Main Mall Level 140 King St. East Hamilton, Ontario (416) 527-3233 Nappy's 20 Dundas St. East Mississauga, Ontario (416) 949-6787 Northern Lights Records Tapes & Discs 3-1750 The Queensway, Suite 1329 Etobicoke, Ontario (416) 674-3836 * East * Mello Music Liberty Square Plaza 2388 Eglington Ave. East Scarborough, Ontario (416) 757-7812 Network Records 2918 Sheppard Ave. East (at Victoria Park Ave.) North York, Ontario (416) 489-0938 Mr. Jerk 3050 Don Mills Road North York, Ontario (416) 491-3593 ---=== Q-06. Can you recommend some nice and affordable accomodations? Accomodation can be tight, with most hotels usually being fully booked for at least the final weekend. Because of this, it is very important that you make hotel reservations *well in advance*. It cannot be stressed enough: MAKE RESERVATIONS WELL IN ADVANCE! It is recommended you make reservations as much as 2 months in advance of your intended stay. (You'll of course be able to do this for Caribana '94 when this FAQ is released a *lot* earlier). Another thing to consider is that generally accomodation rates raise for the event. Accomodation rates right in the downtown area can go as high as $140 CDN per night. Some good ideas to help keep accomodation costs down are to make plans to stay with friends or relatives if possible, or perhaps find others who may with to join you in sharing the cost of a room. Another way to keep costs down is to stay in a hotel near the airport, or even stay in Mississauga, Brampton, Oshawa, or any other of the cities outside of Toronto. This could REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 23 VOLUME ONE
  • 24. save you plenty; and most of these areas have reasonably efficient public transportation to take you back and forth to Caribana. If money isn't a big concern with you, then staying in downtown Toronto is probably the best bet, as you would be within walking distance to many of the events! Below are a few places you may wish to consider for your accomodation needs. Prices should not be taken as absolute; they are more of a range of prices you can expect. You are recommended to contact any of the hotels for actual prices. Don't forget to inquire about weekend package deals. Prices and phone numbers subject to change without notice. If you find an error in this FAQ document, please e-mail the correct information to the FAQ maintainer. In addition, if you can find it the e-mail address of a particular hotel (if available) I would appreciate it if you can pass the information on so it can be included here. * Toronto Downtown * BEST WESTERN PRIMROSE HOTEL - (416) 977-8000 or FAX (416) 977-6323 111 Carlton Street - Single $ 99-$129 Toronto - Double $109-$159 BOND PLACE HOTEL 65 Dundas Street East Toronto - (416) 360-6406 - Single $ 59-$ 89 - Double $ 69-$109 CARLTON INN 30 Carlton Street Toronto - (416) 977-6655 or FAX (416) 977-0502 - Double $ 69-$ 79 HOLIDAY INN ON KING 370 King Street West Toronto - (416) 599-4000 - $ 70-$124 HOTEL IBIS 240 Javis Street Toronto - (416) 593-9400 or FAX (416) 593-8426 - Single $ 94 - Double $109 HOTEL VICTORIA 56 Yonge Street Toronto - (416) 363-1666 or FAX (416) 363-7327 - Single $ 99-$120 - Double $114-$135 STRATHCONA HOTEL 60 York Street Toronto - (416) 363-3321 or FAX (416) 363-4679 - Single $ 59 - Double $ 69 * Toronto Airport * Suggestions would be appreciated. * Hotels Around Vicinity * BROWNSTONE HOTEL 15 Charles Street East Yorkville - (800) 263-8967, (416) 924-7381 - Single $ 90-$110 - Double $100-$120 HOTEL SELBY 592 Sherbourne Street Toronto - (416) 921-3142 or FAX (416) 923-3177 - Single $ 45-$ 55 - Double $ 55-$ 75 JOURNEY'S END 280 Bloor Street West Yorkville - (416) 968-0010 or FAX (416) 968-7765 - Single $ 94 - Double $109 VENTURE INN 89 Avenue Road Yorkville - (416) 964-1220 or FAX (416) 964-8692 - Single $ 89 - Double $ 99 * Toronto North Vicinity * ROEHAMPTON HOTEL 808 Mount Pleasant Road Toronto - (416) 487-5101 or FAX (416) 487-5390 - Single $ 85-$ 95 - Double $ 85-$ 95 * East North Vicinity * THE SHERATON TORONTO EAST 2035 Kennedy Road Scarborough REGGAE ON THE INTERNET - (416) 299-1500 or FAX (416) 299-8959 - Single $ 89-$135 - Double $ 85-$160 page 24 VOLUME ONE
  • 25. * Pickering * Suggestions would be appreciated. * Mississauga * Suggestions would be appreciated. * Oshawa * Suggestions would be appreciated. ---=== Q-07. Which forms of transportation should I use to get around? Caribana events are held in locations all around Metro Toronto, and for many of them, transportation is required. During the day, you are strongly urged to take public transportation to and from the various events. Toronto is quite convenient as far as public transportation is concerned, offering subway, bus, and streetcar to get you where you want to go. GO trains are also available to transport you from some of the more distance areas (for example if you have arranged accomodations in Oshawa). All parking at GO stations is free, so a good idea might be to drive to a GO station and take the train in. In Metro Toronto, the subway system runs until ??:?? am, with the busses running until ??:?? am. This is pretty convenient, but if you're planning to wind your waist well into the night, a car will probably be required. Phone the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) at (416) 393-INFO for special information on the Caribana route. A word to the wise: Do NOT drive a car on the final weekend (Saturday, the day of the parade). There will be *lots* of people in Toronto for this event, and it is pretty sure that driving will be a headache and parking will be a nightmare. ---=== Q-08. What kind of musical styles (and what bands!) will be featured? If it has any relevance to the Caribbean, it will be featured. Calypso, rap, reggae, soca, even some dancehall will all be offered, whether at Caribana or at any other of the great Caribbean clubs in the area. By far, the best deal is to go to Nathan Phillips Square. Everybody shows up to perform, and it only costs about $15. For more information on this or any other musical event, see question "Q-04", schedule of events. ---=== Q-09. Where are some good places to get authentic West Indian food? Good news! West Indian food is in abundance at any time of the year in Toronto, but even more so when Caribana comes to town. You can find good West Indian restaurants with great food at reasonable prices. Toronto is an expensive city though, so the finer restaurants will set you back a bit. There are also many street vendors providing West Indian delicacies at Caribana events. Toronto is the city and Caribana is the event where you can act out all your culinary fantasies! Imagine if you will, curry goat with fried dumplings. How about some spicy beef roti, or perhaps some jerk chicken to put fire in your eyes. All the good restaurants and night clubs are situated in a relatively small area, so they are all easy to get to. Caribbean Restaurants/Cafes: The Real Jerk Pit ???? Roti Palace Bathurst Street, about a block south of "Honest Ed's" Supreme Restaurant & Tavern 1559 Eglinton Avenue West Toronto Phone: (416) 782-1470 Ali's West Indian Roti Shop REGGAE ON THE INTERNET Michidean's Take Out 758 Dovercourt Road Toronto (416) 531-1474 page 25 VOLUME ONE
  • 26. 1446 Queen Street Toronto (416) 532-7701 Caribbean Grocery/Specialty Stores: Mr. $aver - Signature Plaza 1366 Weston Road Toronto (416) 241-9470 Wire's Variety 753 Dovercourt Road Toronto (416) 531-2616 Danforth Variety/Fruit Market 2742 Danforth Avenue Toronto (416) 690-5579 Tower Fresh Fruit Market 10-12 Tower Drive Scarborough (416) 750-8599 Caribbean Corner Variety 1032 Brock Street, Unit 2 Whitby (416) 430-6275 ---=== Q-10. Caribana aside, what are some good Caribbean clubs in the area? I was able to get names of the nicer clubs but unfortunately not the addresses for the majority of them. Look them up in the phone book if you want to patronize them, hopefully I'll be able to include further information next year. - California Dreams, downtown Toronto, near Yonge & Bloor. - Rockit, downtown Toronto, near Yonge & Bloor. - Jaguar (Fridays & Sundays), downtown Toronto, near Yonge & Bloor. - Vertigo, near Dufferin & Finch. - Cutty's Hideaway in Scarborough, 538 Danforth Avenue, west of Carlaw. - Crystal Palace, north-end of Toronto. - Club Trinidad, downtown Toronto, around Church Avenue. A favorite hangout of many Torontonians, this 2-floor establishment seems to be always featuring well-known calypso artists. ---=== Q-11. Which Caribbean radio stations can I listen to while I'm in Toronto? The Canadian Radio Television Commission (CRTC) has not yet allowed the establishment of a dance/black radio station in Toronto, so the station of choice is an American station (WBLK 93.7 FM) in Buffalo, New York. Another good choice would be a station based in St. Catherines, Ontario, at 107.9 on your FM dial. They offer a reggae/calypso show on Saturday afternoons. There is a student-run radio station (CKNL 88.1 FM) based at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute. They are mandated to follow an alternative format so they do cater to a variety of different cultures. Finally, another station of unknown origin has been discovered (105.?? FM) which also caters to a variety of musical tastes. They offer a reggae/calypso program, usually on Sunday evenings. The signal is fairly weak in Toronto, however. ---=== Q-12. How can I get more information about this wonderful event? I suggest, when you get to Toronto, pick up a copy of "Share" to find out what is available. Share is a West Indian community newspaper that is distributed free and is available many places throughout Metro. Official Contacts: Caribbean Cultural Committee 171 Carlton Street, Suite 200 Toronto, Ontario M5A 2K3 (416) 925-5435 FAX (416) 925-1108 Or feel free to contact any of: Toronto Tourist Bureau/Board of Trade REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 26 VOLUME ONE
  • 27. <address unknown> (416) 366-6811 Afro-Caribbean Students' Association 44 St. George Street Toronto, Ontario M5S 2E4 Indo-Caribbean Students' Association University of Toronto 12 Hart House Circle Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 Caribbean Student Associations (e-mail contacts): SCA@biology.watstar.uwaterloo.ca Sandra M. <sosc1055@reader.yorku.ca> <more of these would be appreciated> ---=== Q-13. I'm too far away for Caribana -- do you know of any similar events? The most famous event that is similar to Caribana (and in fact, Caribana is *based* on this event) is called "Carnival" and is held annually in Trinidad, around the time of Ash Wednesday. Montreal has an event called "Carifete" which is similar to Caribana. month of June(?), and ... [further information would be appreciated]. This section could benefit from some further information. It is held in the :-) ---=== Q-14. Any "Quotable Quotes" from past attendees you want to share? "For anyone stuck in Canada and unable to get any `regular' cultural stuff, (as compared to New York City, for example), this is the *wildest* time one can have." - Gerry George "Must-see include the Brazillian float - Oh Gawd!!!!" - [ Unknown :-( ] "Last year's Caribana was almost Trini style, of course there was the Canadian conservatism and no whining and GRINDING." - Ian Murray "Between the various concerts, picnics, dances and parades there was music everywhere." <richards@sco.COM> If you have something to say about Caribana send it to the FAQ maintainer (currently <frampton@vicuna.ocunix.on.ca>) and it will be considered for inclusion herein. ---=== Q-15. Who contributed to this FAQ document? This document would not have been possible without the generous and informative contributions made by the following people: Calvin Henry-Cotnam <cal@ee.ryerson.ca> Tricia "Trish-E" Graham <TRISHE@vms.cis.pitt.edu> Evelyn Walker <ewalker@magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu> George Chow <george@ucs.ubc.ca> Ian Murray <murrayian@phibred.com> richards@sco.COM Gerry George <ggeorge@acs.bu.edu> Patrice A. Simon <simon@acsu.buffalo.edu> ... apologies to anyone I forgot to mention ... Mr. Henry-Cotnam stands out among the others, because not only did he provide an enormous amount of information for this document, he has also served on the Caribana Cultural Committee in past years and has volunteered much of his time, helping to make Caribana a reality. Ms. Graham also holds an honoured place in the above list, because she provided a great deal of first-hand experience about Caribana as well as information about many notable West Indian establishments in the Toronto area. Finally, Ms. Walker must be thanked for doing the legwork of finding out accomodation information in Toronto and surrounding areas. ---=== REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 27 VOLUME ONE
  • 28. Q-16. In the perspicacious words of Janet Jackson, "Is that the end?" Yes it is. Thank you for reading. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[12.] Can anyone give me some info on the rasta culture? Rastafarians {rah-stuh-far'-ee-uhnz} Rastafarians are members of a Jamaican messianic movement dating back to the 1930s; in 1974 they were estimated to number 20,000 in Jamaica. According to Rastafarian belief the only true God is the late Ethiopian emperor HAILE SELASSIE (originally known as Ras Tafari), and Ethiopia is the true Zion. Rastafarians claim that white Christian preachers and missionaries have perverted the Scriptures to conceal the fact that Adam and Jesus were black. Their rituals include the use of marijuana and the chanting of revivalist hymns. REGGAE music is the popular music of the movement. The Rastafarians, who stress black separatism, have exercised some political influence in Jamaica. Bibliography: Barrett, Leonard E., The Rastafarians: Sounds of Cultural Dissonance (1977); Sparrow, Bill, and Nicholas, Tracy, Rastafari: A Way of Life (1979). "In the beginning Jah created heaven and earth". This is what the the Bible says. Jah is the creator, Jah is God. Jah, Jahova, Jehova, Jahve are just different spelling of the name of God. In the beginning of this century, a man called Marcus Mosiah Garvey from Jamaica said "Look to Africa, where a black king shall be crowned". A little after that, Ras Tafari Makonnen was crowned, and became the Emperor of Ethiopa, His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie I, King of Kings, Lord of Lords, conquering Lion of the tribe of Judah, Elect of God. Marcus Garvey started an organization with the aim to help black people in Babylon (the West World) cross river Jordan (the Atlantic Ocean) and go back to Zion (which is not Israel, but all of Africa, especially Ethiopia). People in Jamaica followed Marcus the prophet. This was the beginning of the Rasta movement. Rasta is of course short for Ras Tafari, the name of Haile Selassie. There is more to say, and I'm sure many others will add to and correct what I have written. Jah Love Bo -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[13.] Could anyone out there suggest to me any albums which combine reggae and jazz? From: dudley@treefort.Corp.Sun.COM (dudley) Just about every jazz/hip-hop fusion album has a couple of reggae numbers. Arrested Development, or Dream Warriors. Check out Us3, Of course, if you aren't into get-down funky groovin' dance music, you probably won't like the rest of the stuff on the albums. dudley --------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (Mikey I) I would suggest some Dean Fraser, in particular "Taking Chances". Along these lines, there is an interesting snippet in the current issue of The Beat about a sax player named Arturo Tappin and an album called "Strictly Roots Jazz". Anybody heard it? -------------------- EZ Noh, mike From: ckhan@bbn.com (Chico Khan) I'd recommend Jamaican pianist Monty Alexander. Circle". REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 28 Check out his Chesky release "Caribbean VOLUME ONE
  • 29. Chico. -------------------From: Kofi Apeagyei-Wiredu <ka27+@andrew.cmu.edu> John P. Stevenson@coral. try rico rodriguez. -------------------From: ibsenj@govonca.gov.on.ca (Jeff Ibsen) I'm a big fan of a hitherto neglected sub-genre of reggae that I call "instrumental reggae" This type of reggae generally is very horn-heavy and contains lots of solos. It is frequently also heavily dubbed, and often the 'straight' and dubbed versions of songs are both included on the same album. Some examples of albums which I consider to belong to this category are: Aggrovators Meet Revolutionaries: Side 1 is straight instrumental stuff, lots of horn solos, side 2 has dub versions of the songs on side 1 Fatman Riddim Section Meets Downtown Horns: A great album with reggae versions of some well-known jazz standards. The Workers Speak To Their Slave Masters With STRIKE!: The best album title (and cover) in the known universe. I've never seen another copy of this one but it has great tunes, with titles like 'Better Working Conditions for Workers' and 'More Opportunity for Workers' Children'! A Studio 16/Winston Edwards production, all tracks played by the 'Well-Pack Band' Some tunes are dubbed versions. Count Ossie -:Tales of Mozambique: Not strictly instrumental, but lotsa horns and good soloing. Also, there is tons of early instrumental ska that contains extended soloing - anything by the Skatalites - Tommy McCook, Don Drummond, Roland Alphonso et. al. The jazz pianist George Shearing considered the late Don Drummond one of the best trombonists in the world. Jeff Ibsen -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[14.] Caribbean Clubs FAQ CARIBBEAN CLUBS - FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ) Version 1.01 - Last updated March 25, 1994 Compiled by Steve Frampton <frampton@vicuna.ocunix.on.ca> with help from several contributors (listed at the end of this document, section "S-06"). This document is copyright 1994 by Steve Frampton (on behalf of himself and all the contributors) but is freely distributable to the benefit of lovers of Caribbean culture world-wide. ---=== S-00. S-01. S-02. S-03. S-04. S-05. S-06. S-07. S-08. Legal disclaimers and important information. Caribbean restaurants in the United States and Canada. Caribbean restaurants in other parts of the world. Caribbean (music) clubs in the United States and Canada. Caribbean (music) clubs in other parts of the world. Notable future (next 6 months) live performances in clubs world-wide. List of contributers to this FAQ document. Where to send your club FAQ submissions to. And so endeth this document. ---=== S-00. Legal disclaimers and important information. Neither myself (Steve Frampton) nor any of the contributors (listed at the end of this document) shall be held liable for any damages caused by the information (or misinformation, as the case may be) contained within this document, including but not limited to, special, incidental, consequential, or other damages. It would not be possible to guarantee a 100% degree of accuracy for the establishments listed herein. These clubs and restaurants are bound to move, shut down, change prices or REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 29 VOLUME ONE
  • 30. hours, etc. without notice. A telephone call made first before paying a visit may prevent considerable inconvenience and aggravation. In short, USE THIS INFORMATION AT YOUR OWN RISK. ---=== S-01. Caribbean restaurants in the United States and Canada. This section includes full restaurants which MAY or MAY NOT have clubs. UNITED STATES: "Caribee Dance Center" 14th & Webster Streets, Oakland, CA Phone: (510) 835-4006 Features: Small cafe-type operation with all cooking done off-site is open Wed-Sat nights with limited menu (curry goat, jerk chicken, escovitch fish, and Veggie Curry, etc.) Club open Wednesday to Saturday, and sometimes on Sunday 9:00pm-1:00am, with reggae, dancehall, and one salsa/latin night. Live bands occasionally. Alcohol available but club is equally friendly towards non-drinkers with a wide variety of non-alcoholic beverages. Cover: $5 Wed, $5-$8 Thu-Sat. "Caribbean Experience" 2897 Bailey Avenue, Buffalo, NY Phone: (716) 838-5131 Features: Great food, bar, dance floor, experience "Dr Bird Inc" 842 Delevan Avenue, Buffalo, NY Phone: (716) 892-7454 Features: Food, groceries (ie, not a club) "Nagasaki's Restaurant & Nightclub" 276 Fulton Ave., Hempstead, NY Phone: (516) 292-9200 Features: Restaurant daily, featuring West Indian and Asian dishes, reasonably priced, good eating atmosphere. Weekends club featuring mainly dancehall, reggae and soca, with some r&b, hip-hop, etc., Club Cover - Friday: men free before 9pm, ladies free b/f 10pm $5 until 12am, $10 after - Saturday: $5 b/f midnight, $15 after ---=== S-02. Caribbean restaurants in other parts of the world. This section includes full restaurants which MAY or MAY NOT have clubs. Submissions would be appreciated. ---=== S-03. Caribbean (music) clubs in the United States and Canada. This section includes full dance clubs, which MAY or MAY NOT serve limited food items. UNITED STATES: "Alberto's" 736 W. Dana Street, Mountain View, CA Phone: (415) 968-3007 Features: Dance club specializing in live dance music of all types; styles include Reggae, Latin, Brazilian, Soca, Calypso, Tango, Cajun. Many shows include free dance lessons. Cover: from $4 to $10. "Western Front" Western Ave. & Putnam St., Cambridge, MA Phone: n/a Features: Styles include reggae, calypso, soca, etc. Live performances most nights - gets both local talent, regional bands, and sometimes bigger name musicians like Eeek-a-Mouse and Mutaburuka. Friendly, laid back, nice atmosphere. Cover: from $10 to $20 "Club Eclipse" 247 Fabyan Place, Newark, NJ Phone: (201) 923-5869 Features: reggae, dancehall, a small amount of soca, etc. Cover: $10 "Club Illusion" 103 Empire Boulevard, Brooklyn, NY Phone: (718) 941-7220 Features: mostly Jamaican music, dancehall, reggae, etc. Very popular. Cover: n/a REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 30 VOLUME ONE
  • 31. "Tilden Hall" Tilden Avenue, Brooklyn, NY Phone: n/a Features: a variety of DJ's Cover: n/a "Callalloo II" ** address unknown **, Brooklyn, NY Phone: n/a Features: lots of Trinidadians, food also available Cover: n/a "Starlight Ballroom" 4016 Church Avenue, Brooklyn, NY Phone: n/a Features: Nightclub weekends, featuring dancehall, reggae and soca, r&b, hip-hop, house, etc. Performers & sound systems occasionally "Club SOB's" Varick & Houston, Manhattan, NY Phone: n/a Features: always have live music, sometimes Caribbean performers such as Mighty Sparrow or reggae music, etc. Cover: depending on performance, $12 or more. "China Club" Broadway, between 74th & 75th, Manhattan, NY Phone: (212) 877-1166 Features: Nightclub, Wednesday thru Sunday with dancehall, reggae and soca, r&b, hip-hop, house, etc. Performers frequently; local radio stations (either WRKS or WBLS) broadcast from the club weekly. Sundays: Sheek Sundays - "for mature reggae crowds" (23 & over) - $5 b/f midnight, $10 after "The Arena" 24th Street between 5th & 6th Ave., Manhattan, NY Phone: n/a Features: Nightclub weekends, two floors of music: 1st floor - calypso & soca 2nd floor - dancehall & reggae, Fridays for the afterwork crowd "Bentley's" 40th Street & Madison Avenue, Manhattan, NY Phone: n/a Features: Nightclub Friday & Saturday, two floors of music - 1st floor: r&b, hip-hop, house, etc. 2nd floor: reggae, soca, dancehall, etc. Local radio station WBLS broadcasts from here every Saturday. Performers occasionally. Cover: from $10 to $15 "Club Harambe" 127 W. 43rd Street., Manhattan, NY Phone: (212) 819-1123 Features: Nightclub weekends, featuring dancehall, reggae and soca, plus some r&b, hiphop, house, etc. "Club S.I.B.'s" 92-32 Union Hall St., Queens, NY Phone: (718) 291-2969 Features: Nightclub weekends, featuring dancehall, reggae and soca, r&b, hip-hop, house, etc., Cover: from $5 to $15; After work Wednesdays - $5 "Krystal's" Hillside & Merrick Avenues, Queens, NY Phone: n/a Features: Nightclub weekends, featuring dancehall, reggae and soca, plus some r&b, hiphop, house, etc. Performers frequently; Music (normally) by Sting International Cover: from $10 to $15 Friday & Saturday, $1 Sunday (yes, $1!!) "Cue (Q?) Club" 93-37 150 Street, Queens, NY Phone: n/a Features: Nightclub weekends, featuring dancehall, reggae and soca, r&b, hip-hop, etc. Performers frequently; sound systems occasionally Cover: Ladies $1 b/f midnight, $10 - $15 otherwise "Infinity" 3878 Bay Boulevard, Queens, NY Phone: (718) 631-1500 Features: Nightclub Friday & Saturday, featuring dancehall, reggae and soca, r&b, hip-hop, etc. Local radio broadcasts from here occasionally. "Trafalgar Square" 91-12 144th Place Archer Ave., Queens, NY Phone: (718) 291-1234 REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 31 VOLUME ONE
  • 32. Features: Nightclub Wednesdays, featuring mostly dancehall, reggae, and soca, in the V.I.P. Louge, and on most weekends featuring dancehall, reggae and soca, r&b, hip-hop, house, etc. Performers frequently CANADA: "Rockit" 120 Church Street, Toronto, Ontario, CANADA Phone: (416) 947-9555 Featuring: Dancehall music, drinks "Opera House" 735 Queen Street East, Toronto, Ontario, CANADA Phone: (416) 466-0313 Featuring: Dancehall music, drinks "St. Lawrence Market" 92 Front Street East, Toronto, Ontario, CANADA Phone: (416) 781-1695 or (416) 286-0207 Featuring: Dancehall music, drinks "Twilight Zone" 491 College Street, Toronto, Ontario CANADA Phone: n/a Featuring: Dancehall music, drinks "Phoenix" Sherbourne & Carlton Ave., Toronto, Ontario, CANADA Phone: n/a Featuring: Dancehall music, drinks "Limelight" 250 Adelaide Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, CANADA Phone: n/a Featuring: Dancehall music, drinks "Tropicana" 686 Princess Street, Kingston, Ontario, CANADA Phone: (613) 542-0014 Featuring: Mostly soca, latin, some dancehall. Sometimes live calypso bands, usually from Toronto. Some light, simple foods are available. ---=== S-04. Caribbean (music) clubs in other parts of the world. This section includes full dance clubs, which MAY or MAY NOT serve limited food items. "Rastatoo" La Gasca 120, Madrid, SPAIN Phone: n/a Features: Roots and some Dancehall style, reggae videos from live concerts and interviews. Cover charge: Usually none. ---=== S-05. Notable future (next 6 months) live performances in clubs world-wide. This section lists NOTABLE (ie. big-name) live performances in clubs world-wide for the period from March 1, 1994 until August 31, 1994. Submissions would be appreciated. ---=== S-06. List of contributers to this FAQ document. This document would not have been possible if the following people hadn't taken the time to submit club information: Calvin and Donnia Henry-Cotnam <cal@ee.ryerson.ca> Tricia "Trish-E" Graham <TRISHE@vms.cis.pitt.edu> Evelyn Walker <ewalker@magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu> George Chow <george@ucs.ubc.ca> Ian Murray <murrayian@phibred.com> Albertos <albertos@sunpath.Stanford.EDU> <richards@sco.COM> Raun Kupiec <rkupiec@athena.mit.edu> Barbara Caramba-Coker <Barbara.Carambacoker@Eng.Sun.COM> Gerry George <ggeorge@acs.bu.edu> Patrice A. Simon <simon@acsu.buffalo.edu> Jeffrey R. Meade <meade@acsu.buffalo.edu> Borja Larrumbide Martinez <mart@cs.bu.edu> Dudley Gaman <Dudley.Gaman@Corp.Sun.COM> REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 32 VOLUME ONE
  • 33. George Elkins <elkins@remus.rutgers.edu> ... apologies to anyone I forgot to mention ... ---=== S-07. Where to send your club FAQ submissions to. If you have some club information you would like to see listed in the FAQ, you may send your submission to: <CLUB-FAQ@vicuna.ocunix.on.ca>. Please try and stick to the format used in this FAQ, it makes for easier editing. Too much information, and you risk being severely edited, and too little and you aren't helping us. :-) ---=== S-08. And so endeth this document. Please send in some club information! Steve Frampton E-mail: <frampton@vicuna.ocunix.on.ca> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[15.] What is the significance of the "Two Sevens"? here is what the liner notes for the album has to say: "One day Joseph Hill had a vision, while riding a bus, of 1977 as a year of judgement -when two sevens clash -- when past injustices would be avenged. Lyrics and melodies came into his head as he rode and thus was born the song "Two Sevens Clash" which became a massive hit in reggae circles both in Jamaica and abroad. The prophecies noted by the lyrics so profoundly captured the imagination of the people that on July 7, 1977 - the day when sevens fully clashed (seventh day, seventh month, seventy-seventh year) a hush descended on Kingston; many people did not go outdoors, shops closed, an air of foreboding and expectation filled the city." -----------------------From: redingtn@athena.mit.edu (Norman H Redington) Subject: Re: Two Sevens Clash "Mi know prophet Marcus Garvey prophecI say: St. Jago de la Vega and Kingston is gonna meet. And I can see with mine own eyes It's only a housing scheme that divides. What a liv on bamba yay when the Two Sevens clash! Marcus Garvey was inside at Spanish Town District Prison, And when they were about to take him out He prophecied and said: As I have passed through this gate, No other prisoner shall enter and get through. And so it is until now: The gate has been locked. So what, What a liv on bamba yay when the Two Sevens clash!" --Culture Excerpts from a very interesting article by Beverly Hamilton in the June '91 _Jamaica Journal_: "...One version of the prophecy claimed that Garvey said there would be severe hardships, doom, and destruction 'when the two sevens meet'. Another was that Garvey said that if black people could pass through the seventies, they could pass through anything. A third claimed that Garvey said that the black man would rise up when the two sevens met. This prophecy received official sanction when Mr. Edward Seaga, the then-Leader of the Opposition and a noted sociologist, referred to it in his New Year's message. The idea gained further currency through the music of some reggae artists, especially Culture... "In 1977 I interviewed two Garvey elders about the prophecy. Z. Monroe Scarlett said quite clearly he had never heard Garvey make any specific statement about two sevens. What he remembered him saying was that if black people could pass through the seventies they could overcome all major difficulties. The other, Van Riel, a BITU veteran, explained: 'Him (Garvey) say 1977 will be a hard year. Yu see already. The Prime Minister say yu belt tight.' ... Two months later, Jamaica went to the International Monetary Fund for assistance. "...One must remember that this period followed the 1976 elections, the most violent in Jamaica up to that time. As 1977 progressed, different versions were added to the prophecy...finally it was a special day, July 7, 1977, when the 'four sevens' met. One REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 33 VOLUME ONE
  • 34. even heard that blood was going to flow and that Manley's head would roll. A report in the _Daily Gleaner_of July 7, 1977 [says]:'...The Combined Security Forces have been put on full alert so as to be prepared [for] possible trouble when the four 7s meet today (the 7th of the 7th month of '77), Minister of National Security Munn told the _Gleaner_ yesterday...' "There was a further official response. That day was used to launch a constitutional reform programme...with the Prime Minister scheduled to speak at 7 p.m. -- when the 'five sevens' met... "...Other Garvey prophecies are about Jamaica...Garvey is credited with predicting the twinning of Spanish Town, the capital of St. Catherine, with Kingston, the present capital of Jamaica. In the late sixties and early seventies, a massive housing development scheme known as Portmore was carried out in southern St. Catherine. A causeway was built across Kingston Harbour to link this development with Kingston, thus fulfilling Garvey's prophecy... "...Another prophecy relating to Garvey's stay in Spanish Town prison is that he is supposed to have put a seal on the prison door through which he left. Many claim that this door has been fastened to this day. Prisoners in the Spanish Town Penitentiary still tell of being shown the gate on which Garvey was supposed to have put this curse..." [from "The Legendary Marcus Garvey", by Beverly Hamilton, _Jamaica Journal_ 24(1)54, June 1991.] COMMENT: I used to think that the Two Sevens was a classic example of failed prophecy. However several explanations have been offered. 1) Who knows what happened that day which didn't get noticed by the world? Maybe someone was born, for instance. 2) The mid Seventies were the high water mark of the Soviet Empire, which engulfed Ethiopia a little earlier and was on the move in the Caribbean along with its CIA mirrorimage. In late 1976, an Orthodox monk named Seraphim Rose (who was almost certainly unaware of the Garvey prophecy) had a vision on the Day of the Seven Sleepers in which he saw a vast multitude singing the Easter Psalm ("Let God arise, let his enemies be scattered, as smoke vanishes so let them vanish, as wax which melts before the fire!"). It was explained in the vision that for one particular enemy - the Soviet Empire - this would "now" be fulfilled: it would vanish. In 1977, people doubted this prophecy, to say the least! 3) As Bop pointed out in his post, two sevens clash in Pharaoh's dream in Genesis. The clash reflects conflict and opportunity, as do the various versions of Garvey's prophecy. The clashing sevens saved Israel, because Joseph by correctly interpreting the dream went from being a slave (and on top of that, in jail and presumed dead by his relatives!) to Prime Minister of Egypt, able to save his people. But the Israelite migration into Egypt was a mixed blessing; they would end up as slaves and it would take Moses to get them back to Zion. All this is connected to the Garvey prophecy, which seen in this light is very much deeper than it appears. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[16.] What's all this about Sound Systems, Clashes and Dubplates? >Dumb question...but here goes, >What is a sound system? >Hope this does not destroy my credability has a true reggae >music lover :-) A sound system, well consider it to be a glorified stereo system. Basically it is usually lots of base boxes lots of mid-range boxes and lots of high end boxes ( what I mean by boxes is large speaker cabinets). All this is driven by lots of amps to make it so loud that the base makes the hair on your neck move to the beat. You really haven't experienced true dancehall until you've been to a true yard dance like Stone Love at House of Leo (Kingston JA) --------------------In article <2qp6iv$s1k@bruce.uncg.edu> pennyr@hamlet.uncg.edu (Reginald Penny) writes: >Does anyone have a list (brief or massive) of what people are in what >sound system? Also what are the top 5 largest sound sytems in the world >or JA? >BTW - what exactly is meant by a clash? Is it when more than one SS battle? >RWow thats a tough question as to the top five. It would fall under personal pref. " Stone Love" is one of the best; the selectors are Rorey , Weepow and Cancer. "Bodygaurd" is another top sound, their main selector is Johnny and they are bringing in a few more. " Metromedia" is a more classic sound, selector is Skyjuice who is a performer in his own right -- you really haven't seen metro until you've seen Skyjuice take his shirt off. "Jamrock" is another big sound, I don't remember who the seletor is. There is straight REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 34 VOLUME ONE
  • 35. outta NYC "Addis" with selector Baby Face; they were up in the top at the world cup. Innercity, with selectors Mark, Danny and Wally -- they rank right up there. There are tons of sound systems and I could go on for ever listing them. As far as a "clash" there can be at least two sounds clashing. It is best with two, a clash is like a strategic chess game. When sounds clash they try to out do each other, who can play the best "Garnett Silk" dubplate and who can get the crowd to respond more. You try to play what the people want to hear and the trick is to do it better than who you are clashing. Maybe I should explain what a dub plate is. A dub plate, aka "a special", is created when you take a tune and ask the artist to customize it for you, such as getting Buju Banton to do a version of Boom Bye Bye, but, change the lyrics to Boom Bye Bye in a sound boy's head. In other words they customize the lyrics of there songs to put either the sound systems name in it or the sound system that the are clashing's name in it. None of this is free -- it costs dollars unless you have connections but it still costs dollars. I hope this all makes some sense and that I havn't totally confused you if you have any quetions post them and I will try ro answer them. Robin -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[17.] Is there a World Wide Web Server for Reggae? Yes, there are several Home Pages: http://jammin.nosc.mil/jammin.html http://nyx10.cs.du.edu:8001/~damjohns/reggae.html http://wsogata.cc.u-tokai.ac.jp http://www.biologie.uni-freiburg.de/data/reggae/reggae.html http://www.netaxs.com/~aaron/Marley/Marley.html -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[18.] Is there a Gopher Server for Reggae? Yes, the Jammin Reggae Archvies features such a server, gopher to jammin.nosc.mil (128.49.28.5) -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[19.] What is RAW (Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide)? Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide (RAW) began with a seed planted in 1990 by Inner Circle guitarist Roger Lewis. In a casual conversation he mentioned that everywhere they performed they met a "Papa Pilgrim," that is, someone familiar with local runnings and committed to the growth of Reggae music. He suggested that we begin linking up and do some serious networking. In the ensuing years Roger would again mention networking each time we met. During the summer of '92 I had a chance contact with Rastaman Nane' of Grand Rapids, Michigan. As we chatted I mentioned Roger's suggestions. Nane's response was "Let's do it." When I put him off because I was "too busy," he countered with "When I want to get something done I give it to the busiest person." How could I refuse? Grand Rapids was selected as a meeting place because of Nane's certainty that that city's Reggae community would endorse such a gathering. Encouraged by Nane's enthusiasm, support, and confidence, letters were written, phone calls made, and off we went. As Nane' said, "Even if there are only two of us, that's a start." On December 11-13, 1992 more than fifty conferees representing the grass roots of Reggae met in Grand Rapids to forge the beginning of an exciting new direction for popularizing Reggae music. This meeting, which came to be known as Conference '92, represented the fruition of that seed planted by Roger Lewis. Our combined vision was that Reggae music, given the media support it so richly deserves, would become as mainstream as rock, country and other "Top 100" genres. Further, we wanted to actively contribute to increasing the public's awareness of Reggae artists living both in and out of Jamaica and to provide increased opportunities for unsigned performers. Borrowing the concept from Third World's hit of the same name, Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide was "born." Performing artists, deejays, promoters, club owners, writers, label representatives and others met and began forming a networking system aimed at having Reggae music achieve 100% parity with other genres. With so many facets of the business of Reggae coming together, we realized we were doing something right and we were doing it with a sense of purpose, commitment, optimism, and unity . The bottom line for each participant seemed to be to "Forward the Reggae Vibe...Everytime!" Conference '93 was again held in Grand Rapids August 13-15. More than one hundred Ambassadors and other conferees shared visions, created ideas, and networked. Foundations were laid for an album release and tour showcasing member artists. Committees were formed to assist with various tasks and a decision made to seek non-profit incorporation. Conference '94, in Wichita, Kansas brought the grassroots of Reggae to the Heartland of America. More RAW business was conducted along with a whole heap of Networking. Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide, the world's largest Reggae network, is hosting Convention '95 in Las Vegas, Nevada August 25-27, 1995. This year's theme is "Networking Works" and REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 35 VOLUME ONE
  • 36. the focus will be on Education, Entertainment and Networking. Invited keynote speaker is world reknowned author and Marley lecturer Roger Steffens. Three nights of RAW members artist showcase will be at the Fremont Street Reggae & Blues Club. For more information on this once a year Networking opportunity that you can't afford to miss contact the following. Rastaman Nane' at 702-256-4532 (phone/fax); e-mail <70431.615@CompuServe.com> or Papa Pilgrim at 801-355-1405 (phone/fax); e-mail <pilgrim@xmission.com>. RAW Mission Statement: ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide is an international network of Committed Reggae Enthusiasts who have joined forces to spread the positive vibe of Reggae music. Daily we will move forward educating humankind about our music, always remembering the vision of One Love! RAW Vision: To be the primary reference for the Reggae Industry. ^^^^^^^^^^ Annual membership fees range from $15 to $50 depending upon membership category. Lastly, in conversations with Ambassadors from around the world, I and others are beginning to sense that the growth potential of Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide is limitless. We are growing because of your efforts. Ambassadors are helping Amassadors! If you want more information about Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide e-mail me <pilgrim@xmission.com> your postal mail address. Forwarding the Reggae Vibe...Everytime! ----papa pilgrim reggae ambassadors worldwide pilgrim@xmission.com Finger for more info. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[20.] Why do purists look down on UB40? From: tomdp@selway.umt.edu (Thomas D Potterf) UB40 has consistently released albums with intelligent lyrics, though sometimes Ali Campbell's enunciation is not that great! My question, why do so many "reggae purists" consider the UB's contribution to the genre as minimal at best? Their lyrics speak about individual power, fighting injustice, and are backed by a solid reggae beat. Is it because they seldom refer to Jah? -----------------From: hbowser@bianca.amd.com (Horace Bowser) Subject: Re: UB40: concious reggae Nah, homey... It's the sound... the sound... the One Drop, Heartbeat Riddim I Ya! No doubt, lyrics are important and, from what you say, their's seem to be on the one. But it's about the music. ------------------From: walkup@phyast.nhn.uoknor.edu (John Walkup) Subject: Re: UB40: concious reggae The way UB40 "reggaefies" mainstream songs annoys me. ------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Subject: Re: UB40: concious reggae For me it's how lame their new stuff sounds compared with their early eighties tunes like "Madame Medusa", "Tyler", "Burden of Shame" and "My Way of Thinking". ------------------- EZ Noh, mike From: bobko@nunki.usc.edu (Ryan Bobko) Subject: Re: UB40: concious reggae I'm not too sure, but I'm almost certain Elvis wasn't writing {insert UB40's last remake} in the mindset of a poor Jamaican fighting oppression in his homeland. Not that much oppression of Jamaica in Tennessee... ------------------From: TIMRAS@aol.com it might have more to do with the fact that Campbell is white. I think they have had a major influence in popularizing the genre/music, and their earlier releases (pre Rat in the Kitchen) were representive of the whole Steel Pulse/Naturlites UK roots-dub sound. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 36 VOLUME ONE
  • 37. Political lyrics, horns, bass heavy dub mixes while Junjo and Phang and their dancehall style was the style in Jamaica. When UB40 got more "pop"ular in their sound, "I Got You Babe" - "Red Red Wine", which was around when their mixer/producer Pablo Falconer? , the bass players brother, died (in a car crash?), they lost all alot of their old fans, me included. I still think they are great for what they do, but "Signing Off" thru "UB44" were genius, and the 12" mixes from that time are really great. Ultimately race and success may have been their un-doing in the eyes of the so called reggae "purest" For me the best reggae is often the most un-pure. Give me Everly Brother covers and harmonica and banjo riffs to keep the sound the mix of influences that first turned me on to that funky music from Jamdown. ----------------------From: kmayall@cousteau.uwaterloo.ca.uwaterloo.ca (Kevin Mayall) In article <walkup.780270352@phyast>, John Walkup <walkup@phyast.nhn.uoknor.edu> wrote: > >The way UB40 "reggaefies" mainstream songs annoys me. The way UB40/35 "mainstreams" reggae songs annoys me. :) Cool..................... Kev ----------------------From: tafari@netcom.com (Ras Mikael Enoch) Subject: Re: UB40: concious reggae UB35: Manipulative opportunists who have been pushed and pedestalised by the white controlled music industry - with need for white stars/bands/with token black backdrops. And in their top position, they now vilify RasTafarians in the scene, and the influence it has in reggae. They are Pomie Ras Clots that's all - what other mind set would you expect from a bunch of shaved faced, baldhead poms - that are more than proud to be citizens of England? We are all happy for them, and their preferential treatment that they have received. Always sounds like an inside job to the I. It's a pomie creation, invention, outward push to the world. For we know about all of the shunned Jamdown artists, who are replaced with phoney chart pushed of Snow, Vanilla Ice, UB35, Ace of Base, New Kidsionne of the Block. Anti-Jah, Anti Ras Tafarians - that is UB35. Their vocal expressions against such, will always be their downfall and but a constant pagenote on the Internet - so let the world know, of the eradicated truly Jamaican style, fashion, artists. Ras Mikael Enoch ---------------From: papalee@aol.com (Papa Lee) Subject: Re: UB40: concious reggae I can't resist responding to this question. I think that there are many minor reasons as to why UB40 has is so disrespected by reggae "purists" but there are also a couple of serious reasons that many people probably don't want to deal with. First, the easy stuff (1) They did their most serious work and some think their best work before A&M picked them up so many of their best and most conscious songs were not heard until the poppier material gave them their image. (2) They really haven't done much interesting songwriting in about seven or eight years. (3) They don't sing about Rasta themes and don't use Rasta iconology (4) They don't connect in any way with Jamaica (5) There is a natural inclination among purists of all genres to dismiss those who achieve success on a more universal level (George Benson, anyone?) (6) There is also a fundamental distrust of any act that even deals on a global level. Although I believe Third World's last two or three records among their best and some of Steel Pulse's flirtations with modern R&B to be exciting, there are too many people who pine away for the good old days when they were on Mango. UB40, on A&M and Virgin, "suffers" from the same attitude (7) They emerged at the same time that the Two-Tone movement was peaking and to many are indelibly linked to Madness, the Specials and that ilk. The relationship of those acts to "real" ska is tenuous at best but it can influence the perception of the connection between UB40 and "real" reggae. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 37 VOLUME ONE
  • 38. On a deeper level, I believe that there is a certain amount of racism involved here and I also believe that many people come to reggae with a very specific cultural perspective that is not entirely musical. On the issue of racism, I've seen this over and over again in the criticism and literature of different musics that were invented or developed out of various black communities. Jazz, soul and blues have all had passionate arguments over the issue of white musicians within those genres and while it is undoubtedly true that jazz is fundamentally a black based musical style, that doesn't mean that Bill Evans, Stan Getz and Art Pepper aren't creative, innovative and exciting musicians. The same arguments have raged over Stevie Ray Vaughn, Paul Butterfield and Joe Cocker and they are equally pointless there as well. As regards UB40, I have to believe that at least in their material from Signing Off to Labour of Love (and Rat in the Kitchen as well), that the very fact that they are (predominantly) white works against them within the reggae community. One other band that I think suffered from this kind of racism was the Blue Riddim Band, a truly excellent American band from the early 1980s that never quite got the recognition they deserved despite a tremendous talent and devotion to classic reggae. Finally, I believe that there are distinctions to be made between reggae and Rasta and reggae and Jamaica. The three are not identical and it is important to keep their identities somewhat separate. Reggae is a *musical* form that was born out of commercial necessity and grew up in a competitive, commercial environment. It has consistently adapted influences from all over the place and had grown tremendously in content and popularity. The fact that many international listeners "discovered" reggae in an era in which most musicians were dedicated to Rasta themes or came to find the music through Bob Marley has caused them to identify the music with that specific culture. That's a mistake. Reggae is much broader than the music of Bob Marley would indicate just as the culture is broader than reggae. Yet because UB40 exists completely outside of the culture defined by Bob Marley they are dismissed by those who define reggae by Marley's standards. That's unfortunate because UB40 are excellent musicians who are often capable of powerful songs (although their last three records have left me pretty cold). One Love, Lee O'Neill -----------------------Date: Fri, 23 Sep 1994 19:40:03 -0700 (PDT) From: Allen Kaatz <highnote@eskimo.com> To: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil Subject: Re: UB40: concious reggae I like UB40, myself, but the only record I own by them is a single of "Red Red Wine", which I knew would be a hit the first time I heard it, I thought they did a great job with that song. A long of reggae fans prefer more rootsy Jamaican reggae, I guess. I don't know why people waste so much energy putting them down... maybe it's easier than saying something positive for some people. I think UB40's records have helped a lot of younger people get turned on to reggae in general, which is a good thing. The band themselves are always very honest about their roots, having recorded two albums worth of older Jamaican songs (Labour Of Love). I think that UB40 are just another facet of the modern reggae scene, they love the music, and have as much right to play it as anyone else. As far as the rastafarian aspect, there are plenty of non-rasta Jamaican artists who get respect in Jamaica. Reggae is a musical form, not a religion, and although the rastafarian movement has had obvious influences on reggae music, it is far from the only influence on Jamaican music. American rhythm & blues, mento, calypso, etc. are some of the others. I have heard musicians in Jamaica mention UB40 with respect, they seem to be accepted there, if not a favorite. Many Jamaicans, including recording artists, seem to be proud that musicians from other countries are interested in their music. Another point in UB40's favor is that when they record material by Jamaican artists they have gone out of their way to made sure that the original writer gets paid. This type of thing does not go un-noticed by musicians & artists in Kingston. Al *Allen Kaatz* <highnote@eskimo.com> -----------------------From tpj@de-montfort.ac.uk Fri Sep 30 09:39:48 1994 To: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Interesting question, this. At a guess I would say that UB40 are loved and hated in roughly equal proportions! I think it is not really UB40 who are perceived as the problem, but they do tend to get a lot of flak as the result of a more general problem. It is clear that UB40 have achieved a level of success exceeding their abilities as a reggae band. I have nothing against them musically, except to say that they are very ordinary. A similar case can be made concerning ex-Simply Red's Mick Hucknall. He's got a good voice, but not the best, and his style is basically an good imitation of other people's REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 38 VOLUME ONE
  • 39. music. Also Lisa Stansfield (sorry these are all English examples), the soul singer- good singer, but not *that* good...the list goes on. Why is this? Check out the old Macka-B song that says something like, "UB40 a-make the most millions." In there, I don't think he's criticisng them personally, but using them as an example of something more general a lot of black artists have been complaining about for years. Their argument is that the music they produce is marginalised and marketed as something alien, to then be replaced in the mainstream by weak imitations by white artists (or at least partly white, in UB40's case). However, if this is indeed the case (I would tend to agree) I think that the 'consumers' and not just the marketers of the music must shoulder some of the responsibility for this phenomenon. Most people, and I certainly, with hindsight, must include myself among them at some times naturally aren't aware of this bias for whatever reasons. They genuinely think that lisa, Mick, Ali or whoever are the better artists. That's the opinion of this purist, anyways. Best wishes, all. Tom (tpj@uk.ac.dmu) -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[21.] Can anyone recommend good female reggae vocalists (not dancehall). ? A friend turned me on to Annette Brissett and the Taxi Gang's "Annette." He's crazy about her and since he's got a birthday coming up I was wondering if any kind souls could offer suggestions? Thanks in advance for the help. -------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Check out Sophia George, either the "For Everyone" or "Latest Slang" CD. Also "Black Woman" by Judy Mowatt. EZ Noh, -------------------- mike From: sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu (Bush Doktor) Try one of my faves... Kofi Try Ernie Bsssssss, he has it. BUSH DOKTOR Her first cd is great, I believe it's called "with sugar". sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu -------------------From: deen@primenet.com (Deen Ipaye) Judy Mowatt's "Look At Love" CD is a recent favorite Marcia Griffith's "Naturally" is a mellow classic Rita Marley's "Who Feels It" LP with "One Draw" track is another good one Martha Velez's "Escape From Babylon"--Produced by Bob Marley (If you can find it!) TAKE YOUR PICK... I'm sure there are lots more! [dEEN] -------------------From: papalee@aol.com (Papa Lee) Marcia Griffiths is an amazingly talented singer and almost any record she's ever made is worthwhile. Judy Mowatt (Griffiths, Mowatt and Rita Marley were members of the I-Threes, the harmony singers for Bob Marley) is good songwriter and singer and her Black Woman album is one of the greatest of all time. Hortense Ellis is another great female singer, although finding her records is getting to be very difficult these days. I'd also recommend Doreen Shaffer and Dawn Penn unequivocally. I also love JC Lodge and Carlene Davis, although both have a tendency to get a bit mawkish. And before I forget, there's Sandra Cross, Janet Kay, Carroll Thompson and Susan Cadogan from England. Happy hunting, Lee O'Neill -------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 39 VOLUME ONE
  • 40. Marcia Griffith's Studio One LP is a classic... I think it is currently available, although the music is older style... Al -------------------From: d2domer@dtek.chalmers.se (Erik Domstad) I would recommend Aisha, either "High Priestess" or "Daughters of Zion". Nice roots style, Mad Professor at the controls.... Erik -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[22]. Please give an explanation of "One Drop" Style In article <3lkbp7$bpm@newsbf02.news.aol.com>, lcarmean@aol.com (L Carmean) writes: |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> My understanding of the one drop style is that the drummer doesn't strike any of the drums on the first beat of a four beat bar or measure. Then on the third beat the drummer will usually strike the snare drum and bass drum at the same time. However, he/she might hit only the snare or bass drum on the third beat. The drummer might strike the high hat on the first beat, but he/she "drops" the first beat as far as the drums are concerned and instead emphasizes the third beat with the drums. Frequently the bass will make up for the dropped first beat by landing on it with a strong bass note. If anyone has a better explanation I would be happy to hear it. Larry Carmean RAW #336 ------------------------|> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> |> This is a pretty good explanation of one drop - but the bass also often misses the first beat too. Ska was the original "one drop" rhythm... leaving off the down beat with the bass drum is one of the things that made Jamaican music so unique and instantly recognizable. American R&B and rock drummers are habituated to hitting the downbeat really strong with the bass drum - this is one of the reasons it is so hard for them to play authentic-sounding reggae. Reggae lost the "one drop" feel somewhat when Sly Dunbar started using different patterns that he adapted from funk & rock beats... this created the rockers style, where the bass drum hits all four beats, and led to a "heavier" style that you can hear on a lot of the late 70's/early 80's records that SLy & Robbie played on & produced, where the drum pattern is almost like a simple, slowed down rock beat. I miss the one-drop beat, a lot of the modern dance-hall records don't use it anymore, but you do still hear it sometimes. IMHO it is the classic reggae beat. Al -- ~~~~~~~~~~ Allen Kaatz (highnote@eskimo.com) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ------------------------- REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 40 VOLUME ONE
  • 41. DUB From: al302@lafn.org (William Just) Subject: dub Sender: news@lafn.org Organization: The Los Angeles Free-Net Date: Wed, 7 Jun 1995 16:53:05 GMT DUBWISE CDs: **************************************************************************** * updates this version (these entries either added or expanded upon since * * last update): * * armagideon steppin forward/natural elements armagideon* * israel vibration rudeboy shufflin ras * * king tubbys augustus pablo presents the late rhino uk * * king tubbys/ in the house of dub graylan * * channel one * * king tubbys roots of dub clocktower* * l perry black ark almighty dub chapter 3 black ark * * scientist encounters pac man greensleev* * scientist rids the world of evil curse of vamp greensleev* * scientist meets space invaders greensleev* * various dubwise shower esoldun * * various king size dub vol 1 echo beach* * various pay it all back restless * * wailing souls wild suspense mango uk * **************************************************************************** **************************************************************************** * following is a list of reggae dub cds i am familiar with. * * this listing is provided in the hopes that others will add to it or add * * comments or information regarding the cds. * * Others are ENCOURAGED to add their own reviews of dub cds they are * * familiar with. * * promo copies of dub cds humbly solicited for review and inclusion... * * though not with much hope of receiving any...and will return them * * upon request * **************************************************************************** * note that some of the recordings listed here contain vocal tracks as well * as dub tracks...i tried to mention only those of significant interest or* * those containing mostly dub tracks. many labels (RAS is a good example) * * include many dub tracks on mostly vocal releases, the dub tracks being * * included as "cd bonus tracks"...most such recordings are not listed here* * though at some time in the future i may incorporate them into this list-* * ing, * **************************************************************************** * also note that i will be adding a section on vinyl dub lps i man control* * but will not duplicate entries in this listing...for instance, raiders of * the lost dub on mango/island vinyl will not be listed in the vinyl * * listing because it is included here, though under the cd named "time * * warp" on which it is included. * **************************************************************************** * note that timings are from cd index track...those with notation "> x min" * have not been reviewed for times but are known to be greater than x * * minutes in length. those with notation "> x min?" are thought to be * * greater than x minutes in length, but that has not been confirmed as of * * last update. * **************************************************************************** * updates will be made approx every 2 weeks, mostly filling in times and * * adding short reviews, and of course adding new titles as they find their* * way into my collection. * **************************************************************************** * compiled for rec.music.reggae by jah bill * * email: wjust@isbsrvr.swrcb.ca.gov * * last update: 06/06/95 * * selah...jah bill * **************************************************************************** aggrovators instrumental reggae ras like the title says, more instrumental than dub; 7 tommy mccook tracks, 10 bobby ellis tracks; fairly pleasant overall, heavy riddims by aggrovators, but put back in the mix some with jazz/ska horns over...some of the horn overdubs sound almost comically forced, others sound very natural; 66 minutes dr alimantado in the mix chpt 1 keyman musicians: alimantado experience: macka dub: bass, riddim guitars; black steel: drums, lead guitars; alimantado: keyboards; REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 41 VOLUME ONE
  • 42. ruben: congas surprisingly roots sounding considering the lack of personnel, not drum machine sounding 30 minutes...also in the running for shortest "full length" cd ever r. alphonso/j johnson reggae sax rohit more instrumental than dub, 2nd best release ever on rohit, imho armagideon steppin forward/natural elements armagideon english techno dub in the alpha & omega vein but a bit more lively. good production, good mastering, good sound. even a sample of iroy from spaceflight... 73 minutes aswad new chapter of dub mango little too aswad for me, but good mixes barrett bros macka dub ras brad osbourne/clocktower production, from master tapes for a change (though not for ras)...kinda plodding (trodding?) riddims 39 minutes roy cousins king and queen of dub tamoki wambesi versions of some tracks on roots of david cd; versions of some scientist king of dub riddims; don carlos' go find a fool; other roy cousins productions. 47 minutes lloyd coxsone king of dub rock pts 1,2 tribesman sly and robbie, lloyd parkes and plenty ja heavyweights, these two rare lps on one cd on greensleeves associated label. pretty smooth, good sound from master tape. avante garde jazz horns on some selections, solid backing. 66 minutes culture 15 dub shots heartbeat various sonia pottinger dub selections; riddims by sly and robbie and taxi gang mostly, a must for any culture fan. liner notes say that most taken from original master tapes (as usual with heartbeat original reggae masters series) but a few were taken from original acetates. version of hola mt zion, iron sharpen iron, dem a payaka, etc. another great release by heartbeat. 61 minutes dread and fred iron works/on high jah shaka two lps on 1 cd, musicians: drums, bass, keyboard: fred; percussion, synths: dread; additional keyboards:lloyd gus mckenzie. hard modern drum machine sound inna jah shaka production stylee. 77 minutes gussie p raw rub a dub pt 1 and 2 gussie p part 2 is aka einstein's theory. riddims by mafia and fluxie and gussie p crew. guest appearance by ninjaman, keith hudson, etc. modern, quirky, interesting stuff. much better than the lurid cover might suggest. 75 minutes mikey dread african anthem revisited ras bunch of mikey dread tracks collected inna dubwise stylee, heavy on the video game sound effects and sighing female voices begging for more mikey dread. musicians include roots radics band and some more modern, drum machine, tracks. not very impressive overall. 48 minutes half pint classics in dub outa/hightone dub version of lp half pint classics on same label. well mixed well charged versions of half pints hits including winsome, babylon release the chain, hold on, whats going down, etc 47 minutes heptones observer style observer vocal/version cd...vocals same as rohit release better days, version for each vocal...very strong dubs > 60 min? keith hudson pick a dub blood and fire more crucial roots dub from blood and fire, good sound quality, keith hudson productions. compiled and liner notes by steve barrow. 34 minutes meditations dub technique mastered from vinyl 51 minutes larry marshall throw mi corn original music vocal/version of classic tracks by this underrated and largely ignored roots singers. this is third or fourth recent reissue featuring marshall, this one is showcase style throughout. dub versions are haaard, all tracks sound like they're taken from master tapes. title track helped define reggae itself, as did track heavy load. marshall's sweet, smooth vocals spice up the dub versions nicely. this along with bim sherman/horace andy/u black release on same label are some of the best of the classics. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 42 VOLUME ONE
  • 43. 46 minutes mixman new dimension dub: dub series 1 blakamix dub like wildfire: dub series 2 modern, electronic sound 77 minutes mixman african gold: dub series 3 blakamix more modern drum machine sound inna rub a dub style; sounds a lot like jah shaka meets alpha and omega inna dub syndicate clash. nice solid dynamic sound, great fidelity, wall shaker bass vibe. 45 minutes niney observer space flight dub roir musicians: flabba holt: bass; style scott: drums; riddim guitar: dwight pickney; horns: bobby ellis; vin gordon; deadley headley; percussion: sticky; riddim and lead guitars: chinna smith; voices: niney and joe lickshot; keyboards: fox; a great dubwise collection recorded at channel one in 1989, probably the best dub available on roir label. note that most of the musicians are roots radics band...but where's bingy bunny? 44 minutes niney observer observer attack dub roir more classic observer riddims, same era and sound as king tubbys special. some tracks mastered from vinyl. observer speaks between tracks ala space flight dub. looks like your basic soul syndicate laying the riddims, errol thompson on the board (listed as original engineer, "final modern mix" at mixing lab in 95.) 47 minutes rico man from warika mango more instrumental than dub, but definately inna roots stylee. mostly sly and robbie, dougie bryan, lloyd parkes, (on riddim guitar), jr marvin, skully, ansel collins, skully, dick cuthell, full roots horn section...this is foundation rasta reggae from the one-time specials horn player and long time wareka hill roots man. 34 minutes jah shaka presents dub symphony mango little too symphonic for me... supersonics treasure isle dub vol 1 and 2 lagoon plenty treasure isle riddim, duke reid productions. mastered from vinyl but reasonable sound quality considering. plenty of organ/keyboard and horns, not much wild mixing. errol brown, engineer, as on all esoldun/lagoon releases, thanks given to JA (???)...funny thing, some lyrics are recognizable, but also recognizably not the artist you associate the lyric with...for example, ali baba (not by john holt), loving pauper (not by gregory isaacs, though it may be by dobby dobson), etc 56 minutes twinkle bros dub massacre part 1 and 2 twinkle heavy version of twinkle brothers tracks, lots of effects, hard riddims. musicians include roots radics and others 74 minutes wailing souls wild suspense mango uk i know its stretching it calling this a dub recording, but mangos reissue of this classic includes 7 dub tracks, 6 of tracks on the album and one extra, a version of walk but mind you dont fall. first 10 tracks are from the original release, though most are lengthened and remixed slightly. dubs are great, sound is awesome. music by revolutionaries, according to liner notes. from the lp the musicians are: sly dunbar, drums; stick and skully, percussions; robbie shakespear and bopee, riddim guitars; duggie, lead guitar; ansel collins and tarzan nelson, keyboards; ranchie, bass; vin gordon, cedric brooks, headley bennett and dickage(?), horns. an all around crucial release by mango uk, who once again appear to be getting serious about reggae. liner notes by steve barrow. 77 minutes yellowman/mad professor a feast of dub ras dub version of wild wild west, killer mixes of good riddims, electronic roots radics, very distorted yellowman vocals floating in and out of mix. 43 minutes ********************************************************************************** joe gibbs studio: joe gibbs african dub vol 1 and 2 rocky one taken from vinyl masters, i believe, but then so were the original vinyl pressings of these dub lps. one of these vols (2, i think) was REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 43 VOLUME ONE
  • 44. the first dub record i ever bought...took it back when i man couldn't make sense from it. times have changed... musicians: bass: fully fullwood drums: santa guitars: tony chin horns: dirty harry tommy mccook bobby ellis keyboard: leroy "horsemouth" wallace 74 minutes joe gibbs african dub vol 3 and 4 rocky one again taken from vinyl masters, vol 3 is full of effects (doorbells, cuckoo clocks, ringing telephones, etc) and vol 4 just solid. this time, is lloyd parkes and we the people, and sly and robbie laying riddims, this one even more than vols 1 and 2 are ruff roots dub. 68 minutes joe gibbs phase 1 dub wise vol 1 and 2 joe gibbs great one, lots of familiar riddims, cool mixes. includes some black uhuru riddims (from black sounds of freedom) 67 minutes ********************************************************************************** alpha and omega: hypnotic electronic riddims inna english stylee. more ambient than dub syndicate and not as memorable, but irie meditation, seen? some cds have 2 lps per disk alpha and omega watch and pray/ overstanding A & O > 60 min alpha and omega everyday life A & my pick of the bunch alpha and omega daniel in the lions den/ A & king and queen > 60 min alpha and omega almighty jah...meets dub judah A & dub judah on vocals, seems like a particularly hard one 63 minutes alpha and omega dub plate selection vol 1 A & dub plate mixes of tracks from their other releases. dub dub mixes, even heavier on the echo and phasing than most a & o. certainly dont have to worry about mastering source, sounds ddd all the way. 46 minutes O O O O ********************************************************************************** bob marley dubwise: i know of no strictly dub bob marley cds at present. the cds listed here are at least partially vocal version. most are more instrumental tracks rather than dubwise mixes. many versions of bob songs also appear on various lee perry productions, scratch attack on RAS is a good example. bob marley and wailers all the hits rohit definitely the best this label released, contains 10 unlisted dub version of early tracks. vocal and version stylee. pretty marginal recording but what it lacks in fidelity it makes up for in rariety of material. persistent low-level hum throughout, but not that noticeable. bunnie lee production. bob marley and wailers soul revolution vol 1 and 2 trojan vocal and version on 2 cds. one cd vocal, with simple separation (vocal in one channel, version inna other), one version cd, just version in both channels. trojan refers to the rather unique mix of the vocals as "original two track" recording in the liner notes. lee perry production, 1970/71. bob marley and wailers upsetter record shop vol 1 esoldun complete soul rebels vocal and version of original soul rebels lp. lee perry production, mastered from primitive tape, it sounds to me. rare material, even rarer versions. 65 minutes bob marley and wailers upsetter record shop vol 2 vocal and version stylee to more old and rare tracks... different version of concrete jungle plus dub; rainbow country/version; keep on moving/version, etc lee perry productions REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 44 esoldun VOLUME ONE
  • 45. 59 minutes ********************************************************************************** burning spear: burning spear living dub vol 1 (original mix) burning spear version of marcus children (ja release)/social living (uk release); one of the most satisifying dub albums you'll find, along with volume 2. mastered from vinyl. 32 minutes burning spear living dub vol 1 (heartbeat mix) heartbeat pretty radical remix of above; mastered from original tapes. it has been pointed out that this release also has numerous other differences from the original dub mix, to wit, it does not contain the track irie niya keith, but does include two extra tracks, run come dub and hill street dub, original source unknown. 38 minutes burning spear living dub vol 2 (original mix) burning spear more great burning spear dubwise, this time pon the classic hail HIM lp; again mastered from vinyl. 39 minutes burning spear living dub vol 2 (heartbeat mix) heartbeat mild remix of above; mastered from original tapes it has been pointed out that this release also has numerous other differences from the original dub mix, to wit, it does not contain the track jah see, but does include two extra tracks, world dub (dub version of bad to worst) and over all dub (version of civilized reggae). 39 minutes (which seems strange given the extra tracks...) burning spear marcus garvey/garveys ghost island vocal and version lps on one cd dry and heavy...these lps have been around from time, but still some of spears best and that means some of reggae's best... 71 minutes ********************************************************************************** gladdy (gladstone) anderson: gladdy anderson peace pipe dub roots riddims 39 minutes gladstone anderson forever dub vol 1 another good one, though 1 or 2 tracks approach elevator muzak 39 minutes gladstone anderson caribbean breeze pretty touristy...which is pretty surprising considering gladdys usually roots playing. seven leaves roots overheat ********************************************************************************** israel vibration dubwise: all of these are first rate...almost redundant to review them... pretty much any lover of dub stylee has at least one of these, i would wager...all contain over an hour of solid roots version; the ras releases are arguably the best they have put out in their history as a reggae label. all ras and greensleeves have superior sound quality... israel vibration vibration in dub ras dub versions of strength of my life and praises. roots radics band provide vibes, nuff nuff... 73 minutes israel vibration israel dub greensleeves dub versions of same song and unconquered people; sly and robbie, soul syndicate and tuff gong gang do de riddims 70 minutes israel vibration iv dub ras dub version of iv plus 6 dubs from lp forever (remaining dubs were bonus tracks on that cd). roots radics band 66 minutes israel vibration unconquered people vp? vocal and (unlisted) version. same dubs as israel dub on greensleeves > 60 min israel vibration rudeboy shufflin ras cd single contains original and jungle vocal mixes and four (yes, four) dub or instrumental mixes by mad professor, jim fox and digital dougie. roots radics riddims on this selection version. 30 minutes ********************************************************************************** REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 45 VOLUME ONE
  • 46. king tubbys studio: king tubbys/ in the house of dub graylan channel one after hearing nuff nuff rhino tubbys collections, this one is a welcome breeze of fresh air. clean recordings, solid riddims, crisp production, all dem tings. a few tracks sound like theyve been liberally remixed with drum machine accompanment, but those are few and a nice break, though sort of out of place. musicians include revolutionaries and roots radics. liner notes say produced by upsetters mostly. cover bears some resemblance to the dreadful (not in a rootical sense) release, king tubbys/prince fari in the house of vocal and dub, but any resemblance is purely coincidental. 72 minutes king tubbys roots of dub clocktower mastered from vinyl, a lot of these are duplicated on various rhino uk and associated labels, but still a strong set of best of clocktower dub. 35 minutes king tubbys surrounded by the dreads studio 16 mastered from ja vinyl, which means VERY scratchy-record sounding... with so much good tubbys out, why bother...especially at import (UK) prices. riddims are good and rootsy though...nice cover is seductive; only liner notes: "...winston edwards production...", no musicians listed, "at the national arena, kingston, jamaica" on front cover, "recorded at the king tubby studio, waterhouse, kingston, ja" on back cover. recording seems to have NOTHING to do with national arena! however, there are three vocal/version tracks here: tony brevitt : come on little girl, prince hernon : ethiopia land of my father, and capt bradford : i will be waiting. 38 minutes king tubbys special (2 cds) trojan classic dennis brown (cassandra version), john holt (i trim the barber version (ali baba)), cornell campbell (gorgon speaks version (conquering gorgon), dancing version (dance inna greenwich farm)), ken boothe (silver words version) etc. unlike some trojan releases, this one is mostly taken from original master tapes, though some tracks on the second disk are mastered from vinyl (trim the barber version, for example). disk one was released by tubbys as an lp in ja, disk two is a collection of tracks from various sources. this set is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED for all rootsman posse. musicians: aggrovators and observer allstars. niney produced. disk 1: 39 minutes disk 2: 49 minutes king tubbys dub gone crazy blood and fire number 1!!! good clean sound, heavy mixes of classic bunny lee productions riddim by aggrovators 48 minutes king tubbys controls blue moon contains tracks from various clocktower label releases. mastered from vinyl, but selections are well worth having riddim by aggrovators 45 minutes king tubbys i am the king sprint 50 minutes king tubbys fatman presents unleashed dub vol 1 fatman same as shining dub release in striped cover series; better sound quality 43 minutes ********************************************************************************** striped cover series...all are killer except computer 1...which is pretty weak...all are roots except computer 1 and 2. some less than perfect sound quality but consistently good versions of well known tracks. king tubbys shining dub esoldun unleashed dub vol 1 see fatman presents unleashed dub vol 1 for details king tubbys penwood walk esoldun unleashed dub vol 2 another collection of great riddims 47 minutes king tubbys laser rock esoldun unleashed dub vol 3 version of johnny osbourne jahovha, folly ranking, black uhuru african love version and more video games sounds than in other disks, though not overdone. check surrender (track 8) for really cool phase shifting and distorting echo vibe. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 46 VOLUME ONE
  • 47. 43 minutes king tubbys roots dub esoldun unleashed dub vol 4 volume of total roots classics...contains throw me corn version, version of mighty don carlos track (live in harmony), kaya version, more very recognizable tracks. 45 minutes king tubbys crossfire esoldun unleashed dub vol 5 another collection of great riddims 45 minutes king tubbys rub a dub esoldun computer 1 early computer sound, pretty dull offering king tubbys official dub esoldun computer 2 a little weak, but some gems here...throw me corn version for one, early computer sound and some roots sound here too 44 minutes king tubbys water dub esoldun 42 minutes ********************************************************************************** k. tubbys/sly and robbie meet king tubbys esoldun see sly and robbie section king tubbys/ roots and society esoldun lee perry not much scratch perry influence evident here, but is another excellent tubbys release. good sound quality, probably from master tape. 46 minutes king tubbys/prince fari in the house of vocal and dub lj??? pretty strange release, 4 vocal tracks by prince fari, plus 10 dubwise tracks, some possibly from yabby you lp "prophecy of dub". dubwise selections mastered from noisy vinyl (skips in one place), fari tracks mastered from tape. prince fari tracks are very strong, with dub version incorporated on some. 52 minutes king tubbys/yabby you king tubbys at his best yabby you vocal side/version side stylee more great including chant down babylon/version (though not in track order) 41 minutes king tubbys/yabby you prophesy of dub blood and fire another absolutely killer release on blood and fire, extensive liner notes by steve barrow. more great yabby you tracks inna heavy dub stylee. this is a re-release of a jamaican-only lp. some vinyl noise but very minimal. according to recent yabby you discography possibly compiled by yabby you himself, this, like most other uk yabby you releases, is a known pirated recording, with no royalties returning to the artist(s). other alleged pirate yabby you releases include all island label recordings and the babylon motion picture soundtrack on chrysalis and cbs. 46 minutes king tubbys/yabby you/ meets scientist at the dub station yabby you michael prophet + more some vocals by michael prophet and others but plenty killer dub style. some tracks in vocal/version stylee, but even those are almost version/version. extensive biographical liner notes on yabby you. it sure seems like these two artistes (yabby you and michael prophet) have come of age this year, though most of their recordings released in the past year must date to the late 70s. ironically, the liner notes talk about pirate releases of yabby you material (including by island records and cbs). 36 minutes king tubbys/aggrovators upset the upsetters rhino uk 45 minutes king tubbys augustus pablo presents the late rhino uk subtitled "20 unreleased dubs by the late great king tubby", this collection seems to have little to do with augustus pablo, though he is credited with production, and to claim that these tracks are "unreleased" is particularly laughable. these are all well known riddims and while it may be possible that there are SLIGHT variations in these versions, these variations are basically unnoticeable. no other information on musicians, but one would assume aggrovators. typically spotty fidelity, on a par with rhino's other recent releases. definately tubbys sound. includes someones (linval thompson?) version of nice time, roots wailers tune, also deadly version pon gregory isaacs slavemaster (tubbys dreadful dub), with unknown dj fragments (this track may well be previously REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 47 VOLUME ONE
  • 48. unreleased but for the version side of original dj cut). next track, festival dub, is particularly good, and unfamiliar to the i as well. as usual, it seems rhino has sandwiched in some real killer with a lot of filler that is really pretty irie on its own, and, fidelity aside, come up with a fairly solid collection of roots dub. 60 minutes king tubbys/ meet at king tubbys rhino uk lee perry see lee perry/upsetters section king tubbys/ dub basket rhino uk rupie edwards all stars one of the best tubbys dub cd, mastered from tape, good selection of roots tracks 68 minutes ********************************************************************************** lee scratch perry / upsetter: l perry black ark almighty dub chapter 3 black ark 10 lee perry dub tracks, some sound like theyve been remixed with drum machine. mastered from tape, sound better than most lee perry thats been released recently. sparse liner notes, no musicians listed, riddims presumably by one generation or another of the upsetters. title track is dub version of bob marley and wailers souls almighty. 33 minutes l perry meets mafia and fluxy in jamaica esoldun liner notes claim that was recorded at bunny lee studio in 76-77 but thats pretty hard to believe given its computer riddim feel. liner notes also claim musicians are mafia and fluxy, sly and robbie, aggrovators and upsetters. hard to tell what, if anything, lee perry had to do with this session. 44 minutes l perry in satans dub danceteria dub version of satan kick de bucket; modern sound with scratch floating in and out of mix...lots of aural effects including newscasts, etc. perhaps the best of lee perry computer riddims 45 minutes l perry black ark in dub esoldun musicians: barrett bros, jr murvin, winston wright, ansel collins, recorded 1977, various dense scratch riddims 57 minutes l perry, upsetters meet at king tubbys rhino uk sun is shining (black uhuru version) dub, again, hard to detect much scratch influence on this release; on the other hand, this is a very good tubbys package 58 minutes king tubbys, l perry roots and society esoldun see king tubbys section l perry hold of death rhino uk dense dub riddims, sounds more like tubbys than lee perry, seems pretty unlikely lee perry had anything to do with these tracks; excellent sound, from studio tapes evidently 40 minutes l perry revolution dub crocodile recorded 1970 - 75, early reggae riddims and some scratch vocals... pretty poor master, possibly vinyl though surface noise is minimal, not NEARLY his best tracks and very short running time make this one for the compleatist only 30 minutes upsetters super ape mango some vocals (by unnamed singers, but probably meditations, heptones, jah lion), prince jazzbo toast (croaking lizard), this is a heavy weight mix... 38 minutes upsetter upsetting the nation trojan old ska/reggae instrumentals mostly; some vocals...soul/ska stylee 49 minutes upsetter upsetter collection trojan good collection of early to mid period scratch instumentals, dubs and vocals. decent sound quality on later tracks. 50 minutes l perry scratch attack ras includes lps upsetter chpt 1 and blackboard jungle dub. contains bmw riddims and classic scratch tracks > 60 min l perry open the gate trojan build the ark two 2 cd sets, vocal/scratch/dub version stylee...these are crucial. artists include meditations, heptones, congos, leroy sibbles, diamonds, etc. these are about the best lee perry REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 48 VOLUME ONE
  • 49. productions ever released, imho, and that is saying something. most are vinyl mastered, but thats excusable given the quality of music and because scratch burned down black ark studio with master tapes inside. plus its usually mastered from QUIET vinyl... open the gate includes a great mistry babylon by heptones, bad weed by junior murvin pon police and thieves riddim, cherry oh baby (long upsetter version) by eric donaldson, neckodeemus by congos, open the gate by watty burnett, plenty more killer. pretty much all tracks include extended version or dub track. (mighty) diamonds track talk about it has lee perry's children chanting out in the version...its credited to upsetters. steve barrow liner notes. build the ark contains many great tracks too; my favorites: my little sandra/version by leo graham, white belly rat/dj/ version by lee perry (this one will give you something to sing for a long time), land of love/version by previously unheard of sons of light, meditations doing think so/version, cross over/version by jr murvin, travelling/version by debra keese and the black five, green bay incident/version (on big neck police riddim) by sassafras, and a great at the feast by congos (unfortunately no version included). everything on this pair of cds is pretty outstanding and great examples of perry's abilities as a producer. compiled by steve barrow, limited liner notes though musicians are credited. of the two sets, i prefer build the ark but its a very close call... open the gate cd 1: 62 minutes open the gate cd 2: 69 minutes build the ark cd 1: 67 minutes build the ark cd 2: 60 minutes l perry/jolly boys conscious man/brotherly love roots two track cd single, massive. extended version plus full dub version of each of these great tracks. features heavy heavy upsetter mix, if you see this cd, buy it!!! 21 minutes ********************************************************************************** scientist: greensleeves cartoon cover series these are HARD dubs of lps released by greensleeves by barrington levy, michael prophet, johnny osbourne, eek a mouse, others. riddims by roots radics band mostly. these are amongst the best dub riddims ever, recording and mastering quality are first rate. most are of short length, would have been great to get these 2 lps to the cd. scientist, prince jammys big showdown greensleeves about the most powerful roots radics riddims around, when the idren want a sure fire wall shaker, this is the one; numerous barrington levy dubs, bounty hunter and plenty from greensleeves lp englishman, best of bunch, imho 38 minutes scientist rids the world of evil curse of vampires greensleeves lots of horror show effects, voices, noises. junjo lawes produced, roots radics band. includes dread version pon wailing souls firehouse rock, probably best ever johnny osbourne versions 37 minutes scientist meets space invaders greensleeves micke scott/linval thompson production; radics riddims, dubs pon various greensleeves artists inna yardman style. plenty video game sounds. 31 minutes scientist encounters pac man greensleeves more favorite greensleeves radics dub riddims. produced by linval thompson, dis ya one HAAAAARD, but also sort of subdued compared to some scientist version. 33 minutes ********************************************************************************** scientist king of dub a good one, was a vinyl release, reissued early 80s on cd with extra tracks. same riddims as prince fari umkhonto we sizwe on tamoki wambesi label. mastered from orig tapes imho. 60 minutes kingdom ********************************************************************************** various artistes/studios in label order: various king size dub vol 1 echo beach 2 cd set of english modern sound dub. includes 1 or 2 tracks from just about every current uk dub specialist: dub syndicate, bim sherman, zion train, disciples, century, iration steppers, small axe, REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 49 VOLUME ONE
  • 50. revolutionary dub warriors, etc. good sampler, but some tracks are too industrial sounding for my taste and a bit repetitive, especially if one listens to both cds back to back. vol 2 is promised shortly, they even solicit recordings for inclusion in vol 2... very extensive booklet and liner notes, unfortunately theyre mostly written in german. most tracks are listed as previously unreleased mixes or special remixes or "the mix"...whatever that means cd 1: 76 minutes cd 2: 77 minutes various heavy metal dub clocktower nothing to do with heavy metal, just pounding dubwise of classic tracks. sounds like mastered from vinyl 38 minutes various dubwise shower esoldun has to be the best that esoldun ever put out, good mastering quality for a change (doesnt sound like a vinyl master), extensive liner notes by steve barrow including interview with alton ellis, general essay on early years of dub stylee, and pretty much track by track history. classic riddims here and nice solid dub mixes. 66 minutes various twin spin vol 1. fatman contains dub confrontation, fatman vs jah shaka; first, second and third generation of dub, king tubbys, jammy and scientist. more version of johnny osbourne jahovha, folly ranking (see laser rock: king tubbys), in fact, this release shares many, perhaps all, tracks with disks in the king tubbys striped cover series, which were also produced by fatman, sound quality seems a little better than the striped cover releases...seems to be mastered from original tapes 66 minutes various check the winner/instrumental greensleeves pantomine label instrumental collection. produced by glen brown, mixed by king tubbys and featuring the most heavy weight musicians of the time, this is the instrumental companion to the vocal and the dj lps also available from greensleeves. quoting from the liner notes: "lunatic is a word that arrives easily when listening to this cd. the rhythms are heavier than an elephant's ass, with king tubby mixing in full precise effect. the horns roll like the walk of a man with too much overproof in his bloodstream. the melodies are effortlessly spirited and enlivening, but best of all mr brown has his musical jokes that set him apart from the pack. serious yes, but a pantomine too. a serious joke, as lee perry once had it." some tracks feature less than pristine sonics, and appear to be taken from vinyl sources, while others sound like they're from master tapes. 59 minutes various downboat the ruler, killer instrumentals heartbeat best of studio one, vol 3. classic studio one riddims, more instrumental than dub though heavy mixes are featured on most selections. favorites include real rock (dub of willie williams armagideon time, among many others) and two versions of throw me corn version, one a 10" mix, the other a 1987 remix. also included are a great man in the street version by don drummond. good liner notes, great photos (one of broken up sound equipment after police raided a coxsone dance) and good sonic quality. 35 minutes various time warp dub clash mango uk it's releases like this one that keeps island/mango records a viable source of hard reggae (and dub). disk consists of two parts: 1. old school: raiders of lost dub...sly & robbie/black uhuru, burning spear, wailing souls, ijahman, etc; one of the most dynamic dub style recording ever, most tracks were first released as version (or extended version) on respective island vocal's 12" dubplate 2. new school: 10 modern sound dub tracks by mad professor, mixman, alpha and omega, jah shaka, dub syndicate; good collection of more modern sounding dub masters 74 minutes various sensi dub vols 2,3,4,5 original music two volumes per cd vol 2/3: lee perry and upsetters, sly and revolutionaries/king tubbys vs prince jammys quoting from the liner notes: "sensi dub another masterpiece of classical dub tracks these backing tracks are very popular known songs. track 1 is the original backing track of gregory issacs, sister ristocrat, watty REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 50 VOLUME ONE
  • 51. burnet, solderman and many many more classics. listening to these dubs will inspire and cause the listerer to meditate on good vibes. like the good book say herb is for the healing of the nation also good for meditation seen." 67 minutes vol 4/5: jah shaka meets sly and robbie/revolutionaries quoting from the liner notes: "sit back, relax, rewind, when you feel fine and rock, cause this yah sound a shack akakak...! dub it! one love!" 60 minutes various dub story vol 1 piper records various 30 years of dub music on the go vol 1 rhino uk scientist, tubbys, king (actually then prince) jammy, (crazy) mad professor...does not seem to be THE mad professor though (see note below regarding attribution of credits. has been spotted for $14.00 for 2 cd set. contain version of g. isaacs hang on, plenty linval thompson, johnny clarke every knee shall bow. my friend and noted clocktower label expert, hany hosney, claims that this set should be called 30 years of clocktower dub, because the tracks are from the clocktower label. in fact, he submitted the following discography for all tracks on both cds: Disc One: tracks 1 through 10 are Rockers Almighty in its entirety; tracks 11 through 14 are King of Dub (the clocktower release, not the kingdom cd listed elsewhere), track 1 through 4, track 15 is King of Dub track 6. Disc Two: track 1 appears to be King of Dub track 7, with a slightly different intro; tracks 2 through 4 are King of Dub tracks 8 through 10; tracks 5 through 14 are Scientific Dub in its entirety. So basically three CT lps recorded straight on two cds minus 1 track from the lp King of Dub. To the best of my knowledge engineers couldn't possibly be anyone but Scientist and King Tubby, so I still feel like the credits are a big farce. - hany cd 1: 47 minutes cd 2: 46 minutes various 30 years of dub music on the go vol 2 rhino uk more 30 years of clocktower dubwise, riddims by aggrovators, sly and robbie. lots of johnny clarke version. there is something VERY familiar sounding about both of these disks. i wouldnt be surprised to learn that they are verbatim copies of 2 or more existing king tubbys cd releases and/or clocktower lps. liner notes: "...all you have to do is turn up the volume and equalise to please hit the bass til you feel it in your knees..."; sound quality seems poorer than vol 1, and unfortunately "master" skips at least once. youve probably heard all of these, particularly on king tubbys striped cover series, but for the price (seen for $15 (for 2 cd set) at time of writing) this is a lot of roots dub. cd 1: 61 minutes cd 2: 58 minutes various dub or die roir very modern collection of dub from roir (one-time tape cassette tape only company). 62 minutes various towering dub rykodisk modern dub selection from various roir releases...lee perry, dub syndicate, ras michael, black uhuru, roots radics, more. great sound quality. 63 minutes ********************************************************************************** black uhuru / sly and robbie: black uhuru love dub rohit weird, fast remix of black sounds of freedom black uhuru iron storm dub mesa dub version of iron storm 40 minutes prince jammys/ sly and robbie dub extravaganza CSA contains black uhuru dub (same as love dub but MUCH more roots), dub mix of black sounds of freedom on greensleeves j. osbourne plus dub mix of greensleeves j. osbourne lp > 60 min sly and robbie overdrive in overdub sonic sounds collection of sly and robbie dub and instrumental tracks, sources vary (original tape, vinyl...), old sound and drum machine sound. 59 minutes sly and robbie summit ras sort of same riddim throughout...electronic, this one does REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 51 VOLUME ONE
  • 52. grow on you. sort of like sly and robbie lp sting on rohit label... sorta cheesy but somehow cool. sly and robbie meet king tubbys esoldun good riddims played by taxi gang, aggrovators, bunny lee production 46 minutes ********************************************************************************** augustus pablo: a pablo rockers meets k. tubbys inna firehouse a pablo eastman dub in the running for shortest "full length" cd ever...most riddim tracks used on other pablo productions 30 minutes a pablo presents dub store 90's short collection of augustus pablo and others... good selection of riddim; good sonics 33 minutes a pablo/hugh mundell africa must be free vocal lp and dub lp on one cd. > 60 min? a pablo heartical chart some drum machine riddims, but good overall 44 minutes shanachie shanachie ras ras ras ********************************************************************************** prince fari: prince fari umkhonto we sizwe (vocal and version) tamoki wambesi most of the dubs are note for note from scientist king of dub > 60 min prince fari cry freedom dub tamoki wambesi roots radics lay de riddims...more well crucial version dis ya one 58 minutes prince fari dubwise virgin 8 "unreleased" tracks (actually, 5 of them were released on prexf3, ram packed showcase in a suitcase (prince far i meets veros artis)), plus 8 tracks from cry tuff dub encounter pt 2 (the original release had 9 tracks). musicians strickly radics for first 8, plus congo ashanti roy, then soul syndicate/radics/sly. good sonic fidelity (great by ja cd quality standards). 57 minutes prince fari dub to africa pressure reissue of long lost dub version special originally on hitrun records (adrian sherwood's early company) now available on on-u sound offshoot label. musicians include early incarnation of roots radics (style scott, flabba holt, sowell radics) plus others. includes two tracks not on original lp and only available as dubplates previously. mastered from quiet vinyl...as seems to be the norm these days. 39 minutes ********************************************************************************** gregory isaacs dubwise: g. isaacs come again dub roir dub version of call me collect, roots radics band drum machine stylee 36 minutes g. isaacs slum in dub trojan dub version of party in the slum...hard hard hard riddims with cool ruler echoing round 33 minutes ********************************************************************************** on-u sounds: some of these are not total dub, some may have vocal on some or all tracks. all are killer, some are more others. note that dub syndicate and other recordings roots radics. same riddim tracks are used on many of so heavily remixed as to be nearly unidentifiable. tracks incorporated electronic than include members of these, but sometimes african head charge live pride and joy on-u a surprisingly great live performance, captures ambience well; african head charge great vintage vol 2 on-u > 60 min african head charge songs of praise on-u 14 tracks of, as the title implies, praises to the most high, from various sects (some gregorian chant, some orthodox christian (sample), muslim, buddism), but mostly in the form of HIM, ras REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 52 VOLUME ONE
  • 53. tafari. pretty much dub syndicate laying the riddims. one of the most reggae sounding of ahc's releases to date. 59 minutes african head charge touch i cd single; remix of 1 track from songs of praise, 1 track from shamanasie land, two previously unreleased tracks. 25 minutes on-u creation rebel historic moments vol 1 on-u reissue of first two creation rebel lps, dub from creation and rebel vibrations. musicians fish clarke, style scott drums; lizard, clinton jack, bass; bigga morrison, keyboards; crucial tony, guitar; slicker, percussion; and dr pablo, melodica. surprising sounds like was mastered from vinyl, but it IS quiet vinyl. 64 minutes creation rebel historic moments vol 2 on-u entire starship africa lp plus 3 tracks from threat to creation plus 1 previously unreleased track, in i fathers house, which is a version of prince fari quanta jubila, with fari's voice played both forward and backward at the same time...dub it dreadie! 56 minutes dub syndicate echomania on-u some of dub syndicate's hardest riddims used in this ya one, issa echo MANIA...special vocals by scratch perry 56 minutes dub syndicate live on-u live dub would seem to be a pretty hit-and-miss proposition, but this release REALLY HITS hard. live, some significantly different than previously released, renditions of dub syndicate classic hits including secret laboratory dub, with lee perry (he must be on tape, since they dont mention him in the credits), features bim sherman with wicked version... 59 minutes dub syndicate classic selection vol 1,2,3 on-u vol 2: more great dub syndicate version 69 minutes vol 3: this gets pretty redundant, but another great one... lee perry pon the version; etc. track 9, fucious pt.2, uses (i swear) "gilligans island" riddim 69 minutes dub syndicate stoned immaculate on-u 4 prince fari vocals with major dubwise support, keith hudson samples (seems to be very popular vocal sample these days), more of the same style dub syndicate, which translates roughly to be best available. massive respect to musicians: style (pure style production) scott, bingi bunny, noel and dalton brownie, skip mcdonald, keith levene, etc. 51 minutes singers and players singers and players > 60 min leaps and bounds golden greats vol 1 on-u on-u various pay it all back vols 1,2,3,4 > 60 min most vols, these are mixed style: some reggae, some techno/industrial, some weirdness various pay it all back judging from the track listing, one would assume that this un-numbered volume of piab, released on the american on-u distributors label, would be a sampler of all the paib volumes released on on-u itself. turns out that most, if not all of the tracks here are quite noticably unique mixes, and interesting ones at that. included here are my god and what a wonderful day (radical remixes of both), train to doomsville, stoned immaculate and hey ho by dub syndicate (again, massive remixes), run them away by bim sherman (a bit more mild remix), and more from prince fari, eskimo fox, mark stewart, strange parcels, little annie and gary clail (great version of false leader with big youth samples dominating). 58 minutes various on u celebration > 60 min, mostly reggae, some weirdness various reggae archive vol 1 and 2 > 60 min both vols on-u restless on-u on-u ********************************************************************************** REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 53 VOLUME ONE
  • 54. century: label associated with on-u sound, releases bim sherman and bim dubwise tracks mostly. music by dub syndicate, roots radics, others. use same riddims in most cases as on-u releases, but again sometimes so heavily remixed as to be nearly unidentifiable. bim sherman crucial cuts vol 1,2 century both contain 1 mostly vocal lp with extended version, plus 5 vocal tracks plus dub version. vol 1 is particularly hard, while vol 2 has some of the best dub versions, but strangely, the fidelity is not as good on those tracks. musicians include roots radics, gladiators band, soul syndicate and dub syndicate. both volumes highly recommended for all bim sherman fans and all roots vocal/version style lovers as well. vol 1: 77 minutes vol 2: 52 minutes bim sherman lion heart dub century dub version of reality; mixed by mad professor; modern sound but very cool mixes of good solid rootsy tracks. 47 minutes bim sherman matrix dub century package says vol. 4 on it so maybe this is meant to be african rubber dub vol 4 (see below). dub versions of exploitation plus others from various sources. personnel: rennie, louie: guitar, reuben (moses): bass, carl: keyboards, bonjo, louie: percussion, also robbie shakespear (sic): bass on one track. 52 minutes various african rubber dub vol 1,2,3 century volumes are screwed up, no vol 1 and two vol 3s, one of the vol 3 is marked vol 2 on disk making two vol 2s and one vol 3 (got that?), but material excuses this confusion...great stuff sounds by radics mostly; by catalogue number: vol 1: century cd 1200; brown cover; disk says vol 3; 15 tracks best of the bunch, wicked mixes of some of adrian sherwoods best riddims with roots radics, sly and robbie, soul syndicate, gladiators band and voluntary; mixed by king tubby, scientist and a. sherwood 50 minutes vol 2: century cd 1400; white cover; disk lists no vol number; 13 tracks 46 minutes vol 3: century cend 2000; green cover; disk says pt 2; 10 tracks aka raw raw dub contains one u-brown toast and dub (golden locks riddim); one bim sherman vocal/jah stone toast (raining riddim); seven more dubs. most are remixes of tracks on vols 1 and 2. 41 minutes bim sherman got to move part 2 century dub version of crazy world; more drum machine than most bim sherman bim sherman voluntary century justice league of zion/ creators century bim sherman vocal/version stylee, drum machine stylee > 60 min bim sherman not on century or on-u sound labels: bim sherman et al meets h andy and u black in a rub original music a dub style original bim sherman tracks before adrian sherwood got hold of him. 15 tracks (despite cover claiming 11), vocal/version in most cases. 5 tracks are bim sherman vocal tracks, 2 are u black dj tracks (on bim sherman and horace andy vocal tracks), all include dub versions, plus one dub only track on horace andy vocal, it seems. taken from master tapes. this is a really great roots classic release. musicians include sly dunbar, horsemouth wallace, flabba holt, bingi bunny, bo pee, ansel collins and vinnie gordon. some bim sherman tracks will be familiar to adrian sherwood fans, others may not be. 56 minutes bim sherman/ raw blanc records keith leblanc bim sherman vocals on two tracks; electronic funk reggae riddims, percussion bonjo iyabinghi noah (only one track); keyboards david harrow (he is the only musician credited, and he's only credited with 6 tracks, though keith leblanc is presumably playing drums or drum machine on all tracks); most mixed by adrian sherwood. pretty techo, but definite reggae feel, especially with bonjo noah REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 54 VOLUME ONE
  • 55. (african head charge) with copious percussion sounds on one etheral track and bim sherman prominent vocals on two tracks. 32 minutes -one love rasta4I jah bill -----------------------------From: dubsffra@aol.com (Dubsffra) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: tripped out dub suggestions? Date: 27 May 1995 14:48:17 -0400 The Mighty Dub is well represented on the following... Fatman Presents - UNLEASHED DUB from King Tubby's Studio Vol. 1 Niney the Observer - OBSERVER ATTACK DUB Prince Fari & the Arabs - DUB TO AFRICA Culture - 15 DUB SHOTS asst. On-U Sound - AFRICAN RUBBER DUB Vol. 3 Lee "Scratch" Perry - IN SATAN'S DUB "ORIGINAL" BLACKBOARD JUNGLE DUB BLACK ARK ALMIGHTY DUB Chapter 3 All can be obtained from Ernie B. Give Jah thanks and praises...................... FMCD0003 Roir-8209 CD PS002 (it's on Heartbeat) Century 1200 CD DANCD006 Orchid 1 BCD403 ---------------------------From: fu071@cleveland.Freenet.Edu (Lao Marzuki Zarief) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Reggae Dub wise ! Date: 29 May 1995 14:25:40 GMT Organization: Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (USA) Could someone recommend me some good dub stylee Lps (various artist). email me at zarief@pop.jaring.my thanks in advance ------------------------From: grant <GRANT@grantg.demon.co.uk> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae Dub wise ! Date: 8 Jun 1995 06:59:11 +0100 difficult to recommend budget titles for king tubby since most cd compilations and reissues are all full price. my pick of the reissues are: king tubby's special 1973-1976 [trojan cdtrl 409] this is the cd version of a double lp released in 1989 with excellent sleeve notes by reggae expert steve barrow and beautiful artwork. a totally fitting tribute and great music. the first lp is a straight reissue of "dubbing with the observer" with incredible versions of niney the observer productions from 1975. the second lp is bunny lee productions from 1974-76. worth every penny. the agrovators: dub justice [attack atlp 110] the agrovators: dub jackpot [attack atlp 111] the agrovators: johnny in the echo chamber [attack atlp 106] these are all compilations from 1990 on trojan's offshoot label, attack, and comprise some of the best mid 1970s b-sides from bunny lee productions on his justice and jackpot labels and his work with singer johnnie clarke. i have the vinyl versions but i think they're also out on cd with the "cdat" prefix instead of "atlp". king tubby & friends: dub gone crazy [blood & fire bafcd 002] a 1994 release of material from 1975-89 produced by bunny lee, again with great steve barrow sleeve notes and comprising some of the excellent versions found only on the bsides of jamaican singles. all these are uk-released cds at full price, so if you're in the us, i guess you'll have to pay import prices [even in the uk, they are $21 each]. but they are all the genuine article and not cash-ins on king tubby's name, like many i have seen in the shops. king tubby was not the only dub mixer/producer. check out errol t's work on the joe gibbs productions "african dub chapters 1-4" [out on cd, but i don't have the numbers]; keith hudson's work on the cd reissues of "brand" [pressure sounds pscd 004] and "pick a dub" [blood & fire bafcd 003]; and anything by augustus pablo [lots on cd]. happy listening!! -REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 55 VOLUME ONE
  • 56. grant e-mail:grant@grantg.demon.co.uk -----------------------------From: ms20@Wolfe.NET (mAD sCIENCE 2o) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: King Tubby Discography? Date: 30 May 1995 16:55:25 GMT Organization: Wolfe Internet Access, L.L.C. I've been rediscovering King Tubby these last few weeks. I'm trying to find an old album I used to have, but can't remember the title. Does anyone have a discography they'd be willing to post? Thanks, ROmeo Fahl ----ms20@wolfe.net -----------------------------From: GRANT GODDARD <GRANT@grantg.demon.co.uk> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: King Tubby Discography? Date: 3 Jun 1995 22:16:18 +0100 ROmeo some of the best king tubby mixes were to be found on the b-sides of many hundreds of 7inch singles that came out of JA in the 1970s. if you see any of these in secondhand shops, grab them - even if the a-side is not so hot, the dub can be incredible. otherwise, here are some vinyl albums from the period that you should look out for: dub from the roots (ja:total sounds:1974) the roots of dub (uk:grounation grol502:1975) shalom dub (uk:klik klp9002:1975) king tubby meets the aggrovators at dub station (uk:live & love lalp02:1975) king tubby meets the upsetter at the grass roots of dub (uk:fay music fmlp304/france:celluloid ltm1035/uk:studio 16 we101:1975) harry mudie meets king tubby's in dub conference vol. 1 (ja:moodisc hm108:1975) harry mudie meets king tubby's in dub conference vol. 2 (ja:moodisc hm110:1976) harry mudie meets king tubby's in dub conference vol. 3 (ja:moodisc hm112:1977) blackboard jungle dub [with lee perry/upsetters] (ja: us:clocktower:1981) dubbing with the observer [with niney/observer all stars] (uk:attack atlp1017:1975) king tubby's meets rockers uptown [with augustus pablo] (ja:yard music/us:clocktower:1977) rockers meets king tubby in a firehouse [with augustus pablo] (us:yard:1980) beware dub [with yabby U] (uk:grove music:1978) king tubby meets roots radics -dangerous dub [with ranking joe] (uk:copasetic coplp5002:1981) ghetto-ology dub [with sugar minnott] (ja:black roots:1981) surrounded by the dreads at the national arena (uk:studio 16 we102) 1st, 2nd, 3rd generation of dub [with jammy/scientist] (uk:kg imperial kglp002) dance hall style dub (us:clocktower ctlp0118) dubbing in the backyard (uk:black music bmlp804) majestic dub (ja:star/uk:jet star ptplp1029) presents the roots of dub (us:clocktower ct084) prophesy of dub (ja:prophets/uk:prophets/us:tr international tr520:1976) the dubmaster (us:clocktower lpct0091) upset the upsetter (uk:live & love lap15) king tubby versus channel one studios (us:bumb bumlp101) rocker's almighty dub (us:clocktower lpct0102) by no means is this a complete list!! i have only listed original vinyl LPs. since then, there have been innumerable re-compilations and re-issues of King Tubby material. beware!! beware!! many of the cd's i have seen in shops that bear king tubby's name may well not be mixed by king tubby - many were simply recorded or mixed in his studio. perhaps i will post a separate list of reissues at some point. ............................................................................... postscript - excerpt from my obituary of tubby/review of "harry mudie meets king tubby......vols 1/2/3" reissues in 1989: "..............King Tubby's remix skills received scant attention outside the reggae world and, sadly, always remained a sideline to his electrical repair business and sound system work. Dub was he only truly innovative popular music to emerge from the 70s, and Tubby completely redefined the creative limits of what could be produced in a basic 4-track recording studio. His legacy is embodied in twelve dub LPs that are essential to any reggae collection. It's good to know that three of these are available again at long last." City Limits magazine, 20 April 1989 REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 56 VOLUME ONE
  • 57. ............................................................................... yours (in dub) - grant ----------------------------------From: shea@io.com (Ray Shea) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: need subscribe info for the DUB list Date: 25 Jun 1995 08:59:31 -0500 Organization: Illuminati Online Some of us found ourselves suddenly without jobs on Friday afternoon, and we weren't allowed a reasonable amount of time to salvage any personal files off our computers before being booted out, so if someone could send me info on how to resubscribe to the Dub list from my new address, I'd appreciate it. Also, if someone in the Austin area has a use for a slightly-used-but-talented GUI/C++/Unix/Motif developer who's very much into Mad Professor, by all means give me a ring. Thanks. -Ray Shea shea@io.com (home) DoD #372 : '88 Hawk NT650 | | | -------------------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: need subscribe info for the DUB list Date: 27 Jun 1995 15:28:55 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises To subscribe to this mailing list, send the following command in email to "dub-request@priscilla.ultima.org": subscribe dub (your e-mail address here) Or you can send mail to "Majordomo@priscilla.ultima.org" with the following command in the body of your email message: subscribe dub (your e-mail address here) REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 57 VOLUME ONE
  • 58. JAMAICA COPYRIGHT LAW From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: Jamaica Copyright Law. Organization: very little Date: Fri, 26 May 1995 07:55:16 GMT Brian Tremblay <btremblay@delphi.com> wrote: (text deleted) > >To conclude, how does a reissue label make sure that the artist gets t >the money? They don't - it is not *legally* their responsibility, they are only leasing the music from the legal owner, in a way. Whether or not there is a moral responsibility to make an effort to see that the artist is paid is open to discussion. If the legal owner is not actually the person who created the music, that is not the record company's problem - the problem is between the creator of the music, and the person who owns the rights to the music to work that out... in an ideal world this would be one & the same person, but such is not the case usually - especially in JA. If for example Coxsone Dodd legally has the rights to all of Larry Marshall's material (which is probably the case), then there really isn't anything Heartbeat can do about it, when they put out the music, they have to pay Coxsone, that's who they are dealing with, and if they don't pay him, and pay Larry instead, Dodd could sue them for it. In this senario Larry doesn't have a legal leg to stand on... about his only option is to try to get a lawyer & prove in court that he did actually compose the music, and was tricked into signing the rights away... but Larry proabaly doesn't have either the money or the knowledge to do that (some singers I've met can barely read)... and even if he did, he still might lose the case. >It seems nigh impossible, wheeher in Jamaica or outside. >Only the *big* rock artists (like David Bowie, for example), control >their own back catalog. > >Do I understand all this correctly, or have I missed something >important? Many rock stars do NOT own their own back catalogues... I remember when The Eagles sued there record company to get their publishing back ( they had given it away in one of their early recording contracts) anyway it was a really big deal to them to get the rights back to their own songs. Giving up at least half (if not all) your song publishing royalties to your record company is *standard practice* for new or unkown artists. Al -------------------From: Brian Tremblay <btremblay@delphi.com> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Jamaica Copyright Law. Date: Sat, 27 May 95 17:28:48 -0500 Organization: Delphi (info@delphi.com email, 800-695-4005 voice) Lee O'Neill <papalee@ix.netcom.com> writes: >The image of the evil, manipulative producer is standard in reggae and >that stereotype has been forwarded quite strongly in this forum. Could >someone suggest a better idea for the production and retail distribution >of reggae records in Jamaica? It simply isn't enough for a singer to >walk into a studio and make a record. Who pays the musicians? Who >builds the studio and maintains the equipment? Who pays the pressing I often wonder about this. If I had to guess, I'd say that, as ruthless as the various producers were, they probably weren't filthy rich when their studios were in full swing (though probably better off than the musicians they employed). The moral question comes now, when a producer like Coxsone Dodd is sitting on a high-in-demand catalogue, with no new expenses to pay out. He can continue to capitalize on the recording made at his studio, but only him. -BTrem ----------------------From: papalee@ix.netcom.com (Lee O'Neill ) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Jamaica Copyright Law. Date: 28 May 1995 00:25:59 GMT Organization: Netcom In <p4wfcow.btremblay@delphi.com> Brian Tremblay <btremblay@delphi.com> REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 58 VOLUME ONE
  • 59. writes: > >Lee O'Neill <papalee@ix.netcom.com> writes: > >>The image of the evil, manipulative producer > > The moral question comes now, when a >producer like Coxsone Dodd is sitting on a high-in-demand catalogue, >with no new expenses to pay out. He can continue to capitalize on the >recording made at his studio, but only him. > >-BTrem When I made my original reply, I wasn't intending to exonerate the questionable practices of the Jamaican producers. I am not a proponent of greed or violence but I think that I'm enough of a realist to understand that what we perceive to be moral or immoral is often irrelevant to the facts. Allan Kaatz made a comment a few days back saying that over time, the people who have been screwed the most throughout reggae have been the musicians and I wholeheartedly agree with him. I've been thinking about that a lot and want to offer this idea for discussion. I think a strong case could be made for explaining why reggae has become an international music and has grown and developed over 30 years as the direct result of the combination of the entrepreneurial spirit (read: greed, if you will) of the producers who held the commercial strings and a group of extremely creative and talented musicians. Without the Dodds, Reids, Gibbs, Lees and Nineys of reggae I seriously doubt that the sound system/record synergy would have developed and without that it certainly wouldn't have grown to the dimensions that we enjoy today. By the same token, without the musical creativity of the Mittoos, McCooks, Ranglins, Dunbars, Taits, Wrights, etc., Jamaican music would have become stale and dead long ago. It's rare that commercial and artistic creativity meet at just the right time (late 40's/early 50's in early R&B circles, perhaps) but it seems to have done just that in Jamaica. Lee O'Neill -------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: Jamaica Copyright Law. Organization: Eskimo North (206) For-Ever Date: Mon, 29 May 1995 00:17:21 GMT papalee@ix.netcom.com (Lee O'Neill ) writes: >It's rare that commercial and artistic creativity meet at just the right >time (late 40's/early 50's in early R&B circles, perhaps) but it seems >to have done just that in Jamaica. It seems especially rare these days... I think that this also happened in the 50s with rock 'n roll and in the 60s with rhythm & blues... what I think makes Jamaica a special situation is that it is such a small place, so many producers being in hot competition combined with a lot of creative, talented & hungry singers resulted in a unique form of music being produced in such quantity... one reason that I think that music in JA has gone downhill in the 60s & 70s (just my opinion) is that all that talent is no longer concentrated in Kingston... now it's spread out all over the world - London, Toronto, Miami, LA, etc. After the political violence of the 70s & 80s, so many talented people left the scene, and it hasn't been the same since. The timing of this exodus fits neatly with the rise of computerized riddims and less melodic musical forms... as well as a sharp lowering of production values on many of the records being released since that time. Of course there are still talented youths coming up in JA today, but most of them aren't learning the type of musical skills in takes to be a great artist, IMHO. Of course it is the same in the U.S. where most kids now learn how to program beats and rap, rather than learning how to sing or play an instrument... Al -- Allen Kaatz (highnote@eskimo.com) *** "Enjoy yourself - it's later than you think!" (Prince Buster, 1963) *** ---------------------From: Brian Tremblay <btremblay@delphi.com> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Jamaica Copyright Law. Date: Tue, 30 May 95 22:45:45 -0500 Organization: Delphi (info@delphi.com email, 800-695-4005 voice) Allen Kaatz <highnote@eskimo.com> writes: REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 59 VOLUME ONE
  • 60. >>To conclude, how does a reissue label make sure that the artist gets t >>the money? > >They don't - it is not *legally* their responsibility, they are only leasing >the music from the legal owner, in a way. Whether or not there is a moral That's how I understood it to be. >Many rock stars do NOT own their own back catalogues... I remember when The I realize that. My point is that *only* a few do, because *only* a few are in a position to demand to retain control. The rest, as you stated, are unknown, desparate to sign a contract, and sign away their rights. -BTrem -----------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: Jamaica Copyright Law. Organization: Eskimo North (206) For-Ever Date: Sat, 3 Jun 1995 17:39:58 GMT rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) writes: (some deleted) >permutations of the Wailers, REvolutionaries, Skatalites, etc. it's still >mainly the same cadre of guys providing the riddims. It makes you wonder >if people like Sly and Robbie recorded 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for >the last 20 years. I once heard that there was something in the >neighborhood of 300-400,000 individual singles recorded since the ska >days. I think that in it's heyday, Studio One was a real music factory - they must have been recording around the clock to release the amount of material that they put out in the late 60s/early 70s. >Of course, riddims have always been recycled in J'can history. But would >you rather hear 10 songs on the Full Up riddim: one version by Roots >Radics, the other by Sound Dimension, another by the Revolutionaries, >etc. Or ten tunes all on the same computerized riddim. To me the real point is that through out the 60s (& to a lesser extent the 70s), new rhythms were being created everyday, compared to now, when at least 80% of the music is recycled... this is why I think of the decade of 1964 to 1974 as the real "golden age" of JA music, I'm not saying there haven't been a lot of great records made after that time, just that the original creative spark took place back in those days. I like to hear a killer re-cut of a great riddim as much as anyone... >I think technology has allowed for the increase in productivity at the >expense of originality. Definitely. Al -- Allen Kaatz (highnote@eskimo.com) *** "Enjoy yourself - it's later than you think!" (Prince Buster, 1963) *** ----------------------------From: papalee@ix.netcom.com (Lee O'Neill ) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Jamaica Copyright Law. Date: 2 Jun 1995 10:45:37 GMT In <3qj1ip$nj3@news.cc.utah.edu> rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) writes: >Of course, riddims have always been recycled in J'can history. Riddims haven't ALWAYS been recycled - I don't think it was a prevalent practice until the very late 60s or early 70s. Now covering songs and "stealing" musical ideas has been prevalent in all kinds of pop music for years and Jamaican musicians are no exception. >But would you rather hear 10 songs on the Full Up riddim: one version >by Roots Radics, the other by Sound Dimension, another by the Revolutionaries, etc. Or ten tunes all on the same computerized riddim. What I'd rather hear is a combination of fresh ideas applied to classic riddims and then some new riddims. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 60 VOLUME ONE
  • 61. >Yes, bring back the real musicians. Absolutely. I don't know if I object to the "sound" of computerized reggae, per se, but I really miss the personality of the musicians (as opposed to singers and DJs) coming through on records. Plus, while I don't want to dis the creativity of today's musicians playing synthesizers and computers (and there is a lot of creativity out there) I think that there is a world of difference between the kind of detail oriented technique that obsesses today's music and the spontaneous creativity you get when a half-dozen or so musicians interact in a studio. One Love Lee O'Neill -----------------------From: Brian Tremblay <btremblay@delphi.com> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Jamaica Copyright Law. Date: Mon, 5 Jun 95 21:36:24 -0500 Organization: Delphi (info@delphi.com email, 800-695-4005 voice) Robert Nelson <rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu> writes: >mainly the same cadre of guys providing the riddims. It makes you wonder >if people like Sly and Robbie recorded 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for Someone related to On-U Sound once mentioned how Style Scott would be in the recording studio virtually every day of his life. Considering all of his projects, it's easy to see why. -BTrem ------------------------From: rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Jamaica Copyright Law. Date: 1 Jun 1995 00:28:09 GMT Organization: University Of Utah Computer Center Allen Kaatz (highnote@eskimo.com) wrote: : : : : : : It seems especially rare these days... I think that this also happened in the 50s with rock 'n roll and in the 60s with rhythm & blues... what I think makes Jamaica a special situation is that it is such a small place, so many producers being in hot competition combined with a lot of creative, talented & hungry singers resulted in a unique form of music being produced in such quantity... It is truly incredible. An island of 2 million people. Yet I get these oldies lists with new artists and labels that I've never heard of. Plus the huge output of guys like Gregory and Dennis Brown. And with various permutations of the Wailers, REvolutionaries, Skatalites, etc. it's still mainly the same cadre of guys providing the riddims. It makes you wonder if people like Sly and Robbie recorded 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for the last 20 years. I once heard that there was something in the neighborhood of 300400,000 individual singles recorded since the ska days. How many other cities, much less countries, support so many recording studios. New York? London? Paris? Nashville? Makes me wonder what the total slice of the J'can GNP recorded music provides that country. one reason that I think that : music in JA has gone downhill in the 60s & 70s (just my opinion) is that : all that talent is no longer concentrated in Kingston... now it's spread : out all over the world - London, Toronto, Miami, LA, etc. This is a good point. I hadn't thought of it along those lines. : : : : scene, and it hasn't been the same since. The timing of this exodus fits neatly with the rise of computerized riddims and less melodic musical forms... as well as a sharp lowering of production values on many of the records being released since that time. I think that once the technology advanced to such a state, many producers realized they could program their casios and buypass the guitarist, bassist, hornsmen, drummer. Lowering his overhead. And then it is a matter of lining up how ever many singers or djs the producer wants to record. Of course, riddims have always been recycled in J'can history. But would you rather hear 10 songs on the Full Up riddim: one version by Roots Radics, the other by Sound Dimension, another by the Revolutionaries, etc. Or ten tunes all on the same computerized riddim. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 61 VOLUME ONE
  • 62. I think technology has allowed for the increase in productivity at the expense of originality. : : : : : Of course there are still talented youths coming up in JA today, but most of them aren't learning the type of musical skills in takes to be a great artist, IMHO. Of course it is the same in the U.S. where most kids now learn how to program beats and rap, rather than learning how to sing or play an instrument... Yes, bring back the real musicians. -Robert Nelson Smile Jamaica, Sat. 4-7 PM KRCL 91 FM / KZMU 89.7 FM Salt Lake City / Moab, Utah rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide #14 Robin Hood robbed from the rich cuz the poor man ain't got no money ---Dennis Alcapone ----------------------------- REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 62 VOLUME ONE
  • 63. WHO OWNS TREASURE ISLE? From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: Who Owns Treasure Isle? Organization: very little Date: Thu, 25 May 1995 18:29:20 GMT rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) wrote: >We've been talking a lot over the past several months about the question >of who controls the rights to the Treasure Isle catalog. >I was re-reading the Reggae Directory's excellent tribute issue to fallen >reggae heroes. And under Duke Reid, founder of Treasure Isle, it had this >to say about T.I.: "It was not until his death from cancer on 26 >September 1976 that a 'sale' of Treasure Isle was made by Reid's wife >Lucille to Sonia Pottinger of Tip Top Records, Gayfeet, Highnote, and >Disc Pressers Ltd. fame. Eventually a more formal transaction was made >with Coxsone Dodd of Studio One Records. Mr. Dodd owns Treasure Isle to >date." Well they say possesion is 9/10ths of the law, in which case Sonia has a lock on most of it... the only problem is that the tapes are all over the place, she doesn't have all of it. This is a problem for Chris Wilson, since everybody else who has any tape (and some who don't) is putting the stuff out too. The following people all are currently releasing Treasure Isle material: Studio One Heartbeat Sonic Sounds Kealin Beckford Esoldun/Lagoon Trojan Winston Riley/Techniques Seven different companies! ...what a lala... I'd say Lucille Reid has a major problem. If she cut a deal in 1976, I don't see how it can now be changed... I know that Reid & Dodd contested the agreement, but I think that they lost the decision to Ms. Pottinger. Of course Esoldun doesn't have tapes, but claim to have been given the rights by Mrs Reid to put out their wretched remasters of scratchy singles... Trojan doesn't pretend to be anything but pirate I guess... and the others must have masters that were stored with them at some point, and it's hard to say if they have cut Mrs. Reid in on anything - probably not. From what I've heard, Chris Wilson has the best of it, what he transferred from Sonia's masters... it's just too bad he is not putting much of it out so that we can hear it. Al ----------------------From: dotheska@aol.com (Dotheska) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Who Owns Treasure Isle? Date: 29 May 1995 22:26:40 -0400 Lots of Treasure Isle material has recently been made available by Esoldun/Lagoon through ROIR, but I can attest to the horrendous sound quality of at least some of it -- I picked up the "Treasure Isle Dub" disc with high hopes, and while the material is great, the sound really is awful. Buyer beware -- ROIR is charging big bucks for these titles. -Rick Anderson dotheska@aol.com ------------------------ REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 63 VOLUME ONE
  • 64. BOB MARLEY <<Subject: Marley on CNN From: cymru@art.ohiou.edu (Gwyneth) Date: Sun, 21 May 1995 15:09:23 GMT Message-ID: <D8xorn.Ixr@boss.cs.ohiou.edu> I don't watch the news much these days, but I happened to catch a CNN Headline News report last night on the attitude of the Russian people towards the war in Chechnya. There were two clips interviewing this guy in his late 20's/early 30's; he's talking about how people are tired of hearing about the war, and on the wall behind him to the left is an 8 X 10" photo of Bob Marley. It really jumped out at me. How Russian rooms have changed! Used to be they always had Lenin or Marx or some huge photo of the latest brutal, paranoid, fat-assed dictator on the wall. I found myself wondering if the camerahandler or interviewer purposely placed the photo in the clip, or if the interviewee insisted that it be in the shot, or if it was all just a cosmic coincidence. I felt so good, I left the room so the rest of the news wouldn't ruin the feeling. Love Ites, Gwyneth>> -----------------------From: lymeris@aol.com (Lymeris) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley on CNN Date: 27 May 1995 23:05:07 -0400 Wow. I know he is loved in a lot of countries, but how wonderful that Russian honored him and his music with a wall mural. And him in back of a man complaining about war was a humorous and cosmos-like touch. Thanks for posting it. -----------------------From: Dave TenHoor <dave.tenhoor@daytonOH.NCR.COM> Subject: Re: Marley on CNN Similarly, I was traveling thru Yugoslavia in '85 before the breakup of the USSR when this country was still non-aligned Socialist. I spent some time in the town of Split on the Adriatic, and found a wonderful little beach bar with wall-to-wall pictures of Bob Marley and the stereo playing a variety of Reggae. I often wonder what happened to the bar and it's owner given the current state of affairs in that once-beautiful country..... Dave -----------------------From: meus0001@maroon.tc.umn.edu (William E Meuse) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley on CNN Date: 2 Jun 1995 21:46:40 GMT Organization: University of Minnesota It remind I of the Sista Carol yant... Me hear seh dem love it in the USSR Dem a fe pack up ina a bus an pack up inna car Seh Reggae gon Internashinal.... JAH a de Field Marshal! Cool runnins ina HIM Name, Ras William I --------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley on CNN Date: 3 Jun 1995 16:17:52 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises Along this same vein, reggae in the background that is, I rented a couple of videos the other night, and each had a litle reggae in it. The first, Drop Squad, had a scene where a parking lot attendant was impersonating a jamaican and was listening to Jah music on the job. The second, The Professional, had a scene where the corrupt cops were searching this apartment, and one of them, a white guy with dreads, stops to check out some albums and finds a Burning Spear Album. When another guy tells him to get busy, he shouts "Bumba-Clot" at him. ------------------------REGGAE ON THE INTERNET EZ Noh, page 64 mike VOLUME ONE
  • 65. From: GRANT GODDARD <GRANT@grantg.demon.co.uk> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley on CNN Date: 4 Jun 1995 11:28:40 +0100 gwyneth here in moscow, you might like to know that bob marley's "legend" cd is one of the most popular titles on the market stalls that are covered with pirate music product. you can buy "legend" here for 14,000 rubels - less than US$3. the quality of the cd itself is fine, but the booklet is a bit badly printed. unfortunately, "legend" is the only marley cd the pirates consider worthy of counterfeiting. the other island/tuff gong reissues are only available as imports and carry the usual expensive price tag. big mountain's cd is also popular here, and there are numerous "reggae" compilation cassettes on sale here all of them illegal, all of them with a naked woman on the cover, and all of them throwing together several tracks that could not remotely be called "reggae". ub40 are also massive here, as they played moscow before the iron cutain fell. there is also a reggae club that has performances by local reggae acts such as "jah division" (cross my heart, this is the truth!) -grant e-mail:grant@grantg.demon.co.uk ---------------------------From: Evgenii Shtephan <johnny@iochem.irkutsk.su> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley on CNN Date: Tue, 06 Jun 95 19:10:35 +0900 Greetings, Oh, well, when I wrote "Marley is not *popular* here", I didn't even think about UB40 or something. Well, Boney M was a fantastic success in Russia. (By the way, some piece of them was touring here, including Siberia two months ago). Rivers of Babylon, No Woman No Cry. These songs are mostly known as songs by Boney M. UB40 tapes and video are widespread. "Sunshine Reggae", J.S.'s "To love somebody", they were real radio hits. But I should say. *True* reggae is mostly very underground, non-commercial music in Russia. There are some great bands over here. Jah Division is good, but you forgot Komitet Okhrani Tepla [~The Warmth Protection Commitee] - the very rasta-orthodoxal band, that can give 100 points to many Jamaican musicians [just do not be offended]. Unfortunately, the leader of the Commitee ("Oldie") is a drug addict, and I'm not even shure he's alive at the moment. And this is the main reason why they still have no any descent record, not even any listenable one. Well, and also they use Russian lyrics, excepting some "mantras", African and English ones, lika "will be forever lovin' Jah", and some *words*, ya know, ganja and such. Usually very gloomy, social lyrics. I would say there was a cult of Marley among our underground musicians, so, a lot of them tried to creat reggae songs, even in the early 80-th (the "golden age" of communist reaction). Aquarium was among them who succeeded. They sang: - Rutman, gde moya golova? ~= Rootman, where is my head? - Moya golova - tam gde Dzha... My head is where Jah lives... They also sang (in Russian too): I'm a-sittin' on the roof top and I'm very glad I'm a-sittin' on the roof top and I'm very glad Consumin' sensimilla like an aristocrat Sittin' on the roof top... ()() johnny ()()() ()() / / |/ / | //////////////// ----------------------------From: ken stuart <ken_stuart@macshasta.com> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Rastaman Vibration Date: 29 May 1995 15:01:07 +0100 Organization: MacShasta Consulting Hello, The first two songs on Bob Marley's "Rastaman Vibration" (and IMHO the best two songs) were written by someone named " V. Ford ". Who is V. Ford ? Please e-mail me directly in reply as I don't have read access to this newsgroup. :-( REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 65 VOLUME ONE
  • 66. Thanks, Ken ken@macshasta.com send errors/bounces to ken.stuart@tigerteam.org ---------------------------From: rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Rastaman Vibration Date: 29 May 1995 18:43:53 GMT Organization: University Of Utah Computer Center Vincent Ford was a friend of Bob's who was a paraplegic. There is a lot of controversy whether or not Ford wrote "No Woman No Cry". Marley's song publishing rights were controlled by Cayman Music - a company owned by Johnny Nash's manager Danny Sims. So any songs written by Bob would be controlled by Sims' company. And since Sims and Marley had a falling out, this must have been a constant thorn in Marley's side. Therefore any other songs "written" by Marley associates could be published by Bob Marley Music - and the royalties kept by Bob. This is why you see lots of songs with Rita, Skill Cole, Willie Pep and others credited with authorship. The second reason why Ford could have been given authorship credit was that as a disabled person, this was Bob's way of providing some assistance to his friend. Ford would get the royalties. However, I've heard that Ford is adamant that he actually did come up with the lyrics. The other song Ford wrote (or "wrote" as the case may be) was "Roots Rock Reggae". -Robert Nelson Smile Jamaica, Sat. 4-7 PM KRCL 91 FM / KZMU 89.7 FM Salt Lake City / Moab, Utah rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide #14 Robin Hood robbed from the rich cuz the poor man ain't got no money ---Dennis Alcapone -------------------------------From: rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Legend II suggestions Date: 29 May 1995 21:08:38 GMT If you read the previous post, it's pretty obvious that I think the new Marley release is a travesty. I have a modest Wailers rarities collection but here's what I would suggest as a "Legendary" release. I hope others will add their own versions of what should be on such a disk. With some of the collectors on this group, we ought to be able to come up with an excellent release of our own. (Then all we have to do is fly someone out to Italy and soon come we'll have "Rmr Presents The Legend of Bob Marley" vol. 1,2,3.... :-) 12 inches: *Buffalo Soldier 12" (tuff Gong) - a much different mix than what is on Confrontation. Features unique "woo woo" singing from the I threes *I Know 12" (Tuff Gong) *Natural Mystic 12" (Pushcart). Lee Perry mix. Also found with dub on the Upsetter Record Shop - the Rarities *Punky Reggae Party 12" (Tuff Gong). An obvious omission from Songs of Freedom. Lee Perry production, featuring members of Aswad and the Meditations. Marley's way of acknowledging the British punkers love of reggae. *Rainbow Country 12" (Daddy Kool). Also found on the Upsetter Record shop. Perry production. *Redemption Song 12" (Tuff Gong). This is the mix with the Wailers playing along. Not the acoustic tune that is on Legend or Uprising. *Reggae on Broadway 12" (Cotillion). Kind of a funky, screechy mess. *Trenchtown 12" (Tuff Gong) More Perry: *Concrete Jungle - a much more ominous mix than is on Catch a Fire. Hard to believe but true. Excellent. (Upsetter REcord Shop) *Screwface, Lovelight, Satisfy My Soul Jah Jah, Long Long Winter (Upsetter Record Shop). *Smile Jamaica 7" (tuff Gong). This single has two mixes of this tune. The weaker, more plodding version made it onto Songs of Freedom. This version has that sort of trademark galloping Perry sound. *Who Colt the Game, I know a Place, and some different mixes of songs from Confrontation. (From a bootleg CD of rehearsal tracks 1973-1980) REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 66 VOLUME ONE
  • 67. (Here are some other Marley/Perry tunes I don't have, but am trying to order on a bootleg CD: Jah Give Me Power, Falling Rain, Time Talking By) Other: Climb the Ladder 7" (Coxsone) - ska tune. These are songs I've got taped from Roger Steffens and Hank Holmes "Reggae Beat Int'l" syndicated show: Waiting in Vain 12" Buffalo Soldier - ska mix Send Me that Love Hold on to that Feeling I'm Like a Wounded Lion in the Jungle Your Love Let the Sunshine In Black Progress The Letter Sugar Sugar - the Archies tune! Where Will I find Jungle Fever. ============= Just the stuff from the Reggae Beat shows alone would be an incredible release. I wish Island would hire Roger Steffens to co-ordinate the Marley releases. He has devoted his life to finding the most obscure Marley tunes around. For him it would be a labor of love, not of selling albums. People are going to buy it no matter what songs are on it, as long as Marley is involved. So everyone's a winner. -Robert Nelson Smile Jamaica, Sat. 4-7 PM KRCL 91 FM / KZMU 89.7 FM Salt Lake City / Moab, Utah rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide #14 Robin Hood robbed from the rich cuz the poor man ain't got no money ---Dennis Alcapone -------------------------------From: al302@lafn.org (William Just) Subject: Re: Legend II suggestions Organization: The Los Angeles Free-Net Date: Tue, 30 May 1995 19:34:30 GMT In a previous article, rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) says: >12 inches: > >*Buffalo Soldier 12" (tuff Gong) - a much different mix than what is on > Confrontation. Features unique "woo woo" singing from the I threes also the king sporty mix released as a bonus 7" with the 3 likkle birds 7" single. this may be the same as the "ska mix"noted below... also the version that appeared on the usa original issue of legend. totally different (not necessarily better) mix than either the 12" or confrontation mix. (does anyone else out there know that the original usa release of confrontation contains 5 or so tracks that were remixed for that lp. again the remixes were not necessarily better than the originals, but they were significantly different. legend as it was released on cd and then again on tuff gong does not contain these remixes...just the original usa release on vinyl as far as i know...i think they were remixed by eric thorngren or someone) >*Punky > > > Reggae Party 12" (Tuff Gong). An obvious omission from Songs of Freedom. Lee Perry production, featuring members of Aswad and the Meditations. Marley's way of acknowledging the British punkers love of reggae. very long vocal/version mix b/w very long version as i remember... >*Rainbow Country 12" (Daddy Kool). Also found on the Upsetter Record > shop. Perry production. >*Redemption Song 12" (Tuff Gong). This is the mix with the Wailers > playing along. Not the acoustic tune that is on Legend or Uprising. _OR_ the island 12" single, i believe... not only that, but other side contains zion express, remix of zion train without i threes vocals and much rootsier mix than on lps. add in the 12" of live i shot the sheriff (was on back of redemption song i think) great version unavailable elsewhere i believe. -one love rasta4I jah bill -----------------------------REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 67 VOLUME ONE
  • 68. From: joachim@ee.uni-sb.de (Joachim Koenig) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Legend II suggestions Date: 1 Jun 1995 07:18:44 GMT Organization: University of Saarland, Computing Center, Germany. William Just (al302@lafn.org) wrote: : add in the 12" of live i shot the sheriff (was on back of redemption : song i think) great version unavailable elsewhere i believe. This song, although labeled as (from my head) 'Recorded live 1975 at the Lyceum' is actually the Rainbow 1977 Live version which you can find on the video of the same name. Joachim -email: joachim@ee.uni-sb.de University of Saarland, Germany, Europe phone: +49 681 3023043 suffering should be creative, fax: 2678 should give birth to something good and lovely <Ende der Fahnenstange> -------------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: Legend II suggestions Organization: very little Date: Sun, 4 Jun 1995 23:32:17 GMT rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) wrote: >Just the stuff from the Reggae Beat shows alone would be an incredible >release. I wish Island would hire Roger Steffens to co-ordinate the >Marley releases. Unfortunately, Roger hates Chris Blackwell (although at one time he worked for him, go figure), so that will never happen. Even with someone like Roger at the helm, finding the master tapes for some of the material could be very difficult. As long as you are making a wish list, I'll add on these titles: HURTING INSIDE, FIRE FIRE, DON'T ROCK MY BOAT, POUND GET A BLOW, FUNERAL, A FI GET A BEATEN, PLAY PLAY - these are all Wail n Soul m productions from 1967/68 that have not seen the light of day other than on JA singles. They feature the Wailers as a group, some songs are led by Rita, some by Peter, etc. RUN FOR COVER - an alternate vocal on the "Soul Rebel" riddim, Tuff Gong 7". MAN TO MAN - The outstanding original version of "Who The Cap Fit", cut for Lee Perry, so far only seen on poorly-pressed Upsetter 7". ROCK MY BOAT - The original Tuff Gong 7" version with the harmony vocals left on. There are also DJ versions of Craven Choke Puppy, Sun Is Shining, Don't Rock My Boat, and Dreamland, featuring Big Youth, Johnny Lover, etc. that came out on Tuff Gong 7" in JA that are worth re-releasing. On some of them the Waiers went in and recut the vocals along with the toasting of the DJ. Th Buffalo Soldier "Ska Mix" you refer to must be the uptempo disco/dance version mixed by King Sporty in Miami... it really rocks, and Bob's vocals are outstanding... I heard that Rita bought this tape from Sporty to supress it for some reason... this is just a rumour though. (It was available briefly on a low-fi bootleg 7".) If wishes were horses, beggars would ride, as folks used to say... Al -------------------------From: Micke Tsiparis <Some.One@inst.lu.se> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Long version of Get Up Stand Up at the Lyceum Date: 30 May 1995 11:33:18 GMT Organization: Karolinska universitetet i Lund Irie, Can any of you confirm or deny a rumour? An old version of the live at Lyceum CD is said to have the long version of Get Up Stand Up. It continues about three and a half minutes after the fading on the Lp. After the "woe yo"-section the text continues: REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 68 VOLUME ONE
  • 69. "Stand up for your rights Stand up for your rights Stand up for your rights Preacherman, preacherman There is a preacherman There was a preacherman He come telling me that heaven is under the earth But I know what life really worth I am living and feeling good We are alive and feeling good We are alive and feeling good We are alive and feeling good Jah (I Threes: Jah) Rastafari (I Threes: Rastafari) Stand up for your rights (x4) Jah (I Threes: Jah) Rastafari (I Threes: Rastafari) Stand up for your rights (x2) (x2) (x4) Jah Rastafari I-tinually blessings" I have it on tape but does it exist on CD? One Love Micke --------------------------------From: joachim@ee.uni-sb.de (Joachim Koenig) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Long version of Get Up Stand Up at the Lyceum Date: 31 May 1995 08:20:11 GMT Organization: University of Saarland, Computing Center, Germany. Not exact on the question, but I have a Lyceum CD with a long version of 'Lively up yourself', about 2 minutes longer, not at the end, but in the middle (but the same version, so this part has been cut out on the other CDs). There is also an additional small (~15 sec) guitar solo of Al Anderson in 'Get Up, Stand Up'. Joachim -email: joachim@ee.uni-sb.de University of Saarland, Germany, Europe phone: +49 681 3023043 suffering should be creative, fax: 2678 should give birth to something good and lovely <Ende der Fahnenstange> -----------------------------From: Bo Peterson <bo.peterson@iea.lth.se> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Long version of Get Up Stand Up at the Lyceum Date: 1 Jun 1995 10:39:16 GMT Organization: Lund Inst. of Technology, Ind. Electrical Engineering and Automation Micke, a while ago, a year maybe, Joachim Koenig, joachim@ee.uni-sb.de, wrote this on rmr about the live show at lyceum: > As far as I know, it was broadcast on radio in London, > but I only have a bad > copy of it with some songs missing, but: >"Stir it up", which can be found on "Babylon by Bus" > was definitely played there. > "Kinky Reggae", which was also played there, > is available as 12" and 7" > Island single (together with "No Woman, No Cry"). > So you can get at least 2 more songs of the concert officially! > There are also 2 different versions of "Live at the Lyceum"-CDs out there, > one identical to the LP and one with the following differences: > - "Lively up yourself" is more than 7 minutes long, obviously, they cut part > of it in the middle for the LP. > - "Get up stand" additionally includes a short guitar solo of Al Anderson > (10 secs) which is not on the LP. > BTW: Get Up Stand up is a lot longer on the radio show > Joachim Maybe Joachim has both versions of the live CD and can confirm the rumour? REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 69 VOLUME ONE
  • 70. /Bo P email: bo.peterson@iea.lth.se http://www.iea.lth.se/~ielbo/wailers.html ----------------------------------------From: rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Marley "Legend II"? Hardly Date: 29 May 1995 20:32:29 GMT Organization: University Of Utah Computer Center This year marks the 50th anniversary of Bob's birth. To commemorate this event we have seen the release of several books and a beautiful calendar. Musically, it has been nearly 2 and a half years since any "legitimate" Marley music has surfaced - the "Songs of Freedom" box set. So Island released "Natural Mystic - The Legend Lives On". Fifteen songs; nearly an hour of Bob. Well I must tell you, this release is a huge disappointment. Perhaps the most redundant release in the history of reggae music. On the same level as Trojan's constant rehash of all of the Lee Perry and late 60s Wailers recordings. It is most definitely NOT worthy to be spoken of as Legend II. This is a word that has been synonymous with Bob Marley. And the Legend release was truly a classic worthy of its name. Fourteen songs, beautifully packaged, taken from seven Wailers albums; spread out about 50-50 between conscious political tunes and love songs. It truly is one of the most inspired and exciting anthologies ever released; reggae or otherwise. When I think of what the word Legend means, it has two connotations. The first is exactly what the album "Legend" represents: documenting the life's work of the man who symbolizes what reggae is to most people. In much the same way that biographies would detail the lives of historical individuals such as Marcus Garvey or Malcolm X. I had dinner with some friends last week and they have a 13 year old daughter. When she found out I was a reggae dj, she ran into her bedroom and brought out her cassette of "Legend" that she had got as a birthday present the week before. She was so excited by Bob Marley that she wanted to know more about reggae and what other Bob titles she should buy. And for thousands of other neophyte reggae fans, isn't this how most of them got hooked into reggae -- by listening to a copy of "Legend"? But Legend also has a second meaning. The mystery and larger than life history of extraordinary figures. The US has a great tradition of this in such people as Billy the Kid or even ficitious heroes such as Paul Bunyan or Pecos Bill. Legend being used as a sort of mythology for events that aren't chronicled in musty old history books. How through an oral tradition, events become embellished into fantastical achievements. That which cannot be easily explained or documented takes on a life of its own. Now think of this in terms of Bob Marley's music. Haven't we all heard and wondered what a lot of these unrecorded demos and bootleg recordings and ultra-rare single releases sound like? Songs with great titles such as "I'm Like a Wounded Lion in the Jungle" or "Selassie is the Chapel", "Babylon Feel Dis One". That, to me, is what Legend II should consist of; the songs we've only been able to wonder about in our imaginations, brought onto disk for all to hear without spending hundreds of dollars on scratchy singles or passing around third and fourth generation bootlegs. In that regard Hearbeat's "One Love" release served that purpose for the Wailer's Studio One output. "Songs of Freedom" teased us. But "Natural Mystic" is an out and out ripoff foisted upon a buying public that would snatch up copies of Bob singing out of the Kingston phone book. Well I'll tell you, I'd rather hear Bob singing out of the phone book. At least that material would be new; "Natural Mystic" is nothing but a *fourth* milking of the Island catalog. "Natural Mystic" looks like it was put together in an hour's time. Any of us here could have come up with these tracks. There's none of the ingenuity that went into Legend. None of the concentration on the political rabble rousing from Rebel Music. And absolutely no rare music which made the first two disks of Songs of Freedom so great. In fact there are only two "new" songs here at all. One of the alternate mixes of Iron Lion Zion (found on the I.L.Z. CD single). And a modern remix of "Keep On Moving". Other than that, this release has a "scattershot" feel to it. And the packaging is mediocre. Some nice photos of Bob, the lyric sheets. A perfunctory one page of liner notes. Nothing mentioning the 50th birthday or how Marley has influenced music. Just the same tired cliches we've all read countless times before: Bob the rebel, Bob the prophet, Bob the musical genius. But no insights into Bob the man. And I tell you I am absolutely incensed that these sparse liner notes would even give credence to the notion that Bob was a reincarnation of Christ and his death of cancer is akin to the crucifixion. This is blasphemous to everyone: Christians, Rastas and I would wager even Bob would be furious over this. ================================== I did a little study over the weekend. I thought Rmr would be interested in a little statistical comparison of the Bob Marley anthologies: Legend, Rebel Music, Songs of REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 70 VOLUME ONE
  • 71. Freedom and Natural Mystic. From Catch a Fire through Confrontation, this is the number of songs anthologized onto one or more of these 4 releases: Catch a Fire Burnin' Natty Dread Live Rastaman Vibration Exodus Kaya Survival Uprising Confrontation 4 4 3 4 7 6 6 7 6 3 of of of of of of of of of of 9 tracks 10 9 7 10 10 10 10 10 10 Totals 50 of 95 tracks. Not including, "Babylon By Bus", a whopping 53% of Marley tracks have been reissued in their original form. Excessive by any means, considering that all of these above albums retail new for about $8 each. But it gets worse. Not only are 53% of these songs reissued. But many of these songs are reissued more than once!!! Crazy Baldhead - Rebel Music (RM), Songs of Freedom (SOF), Natural Mystic So Much Trouble - RM, SOF, NM Slave Driver - RM, SOF Get Up Stand Up - Legend, SOF Who the Cap Fit - SOF, NM War - SOF, NM Natural Mystic - SOF, NM Easy Skanking - SOF, NM Time will Tell - SOF, NM Africa Unite - SOF, NM One Drop - SOF, NM To complete the cycle, here's one more thing to chew on. Not only is more than 50% Marley song list anthologized, not only are 11 songs rehashed more than once. Many albums themselves have more than half of their songs on some of these releases. As praise as I heaped on Legend, it is interesting (in the way of foreshadowing) that Exodus was duplicated there. of the of the much half of Out of 78 songs contained on Songs of Freedom, 29 are taken straight from the Island releases. That's not including all of the alternate or 12" mixes. 37% of the songs, or 1 1/2 CDs worth, were already available elsewhere. Not only that, but Songs of Freedom contains half of the songs from Rastaman Vibration and an incredible 6 of the 10 songs off Survival. 2/3 of Disk 4 are totally padded with existing tracks. Now if you think Songs of Freedom is weighted down by existing tracks get a load of Natural Mystic. 13 of the 15 tunes are taken lock stock and barrel from the Island catalog. But 10 of those 13 remaining tunes were also on Songs of Freedom!!! And nearly half (4 of 10) of Rastaman Vibration is anthologized yet again. As you can see, Island has continually short changed the buying public and continues to treat us as chumps who will salivate over anything with Bob's name on it. Yet for some reason either aren't willing or organized enough to start releasing the mountain of unreleased tunes, Wail N Soul M era and dozens of bootleg shows. Well maybe if "Natural Mystic" only sold 50,000 copies, they'd get wise. And I tell ya, the pirates and bootleggers out of Italy are selling thousands of Cds that are infinitely more interesting and worthy than "Natural Mystic". Bob Marley deserves better, we as the reggae buying public deserve better. The Island catalog is milked bone dry. Let's hope the presence of all these illegal releases light a match under Blackwell's backside. If these pirates have access to this crucial stuff, just think what the legitimate estate must have gathering dust in their vaults. -Robert Nelson Smile Jamaica, Sat. 4-7 PM KRCL 91 FM / KZMU 89.7 FM Salt Lake City / Moab, Utah rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide #14 Robin Hood robbed from the rich cuz the poor man ain't got no money ---Dennis Alcapone ----------------------------------From: sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu (Bush Doktor) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley "Legend II"? Hardly Date: 31 May 1995 09:32:12 GMT Organization: University of Dreadlands Good post Robert. In a nut shell, Island is just capping on the good fortune of "Legend" on the charts (kool it now, bunny) and hoping to see more cash rolling in off Bob. It seems like this always happens to musicians who become bigger than the music. __ _____ __ __ ____ _____ ____ ____ ____ BUSH DOKTOR REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 71 VOLUME ONE
  • 72. __ / // _ // // / / __ / _ // __ / _// __ sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu / // // _' // _ / / _.' // _' // /_/ /_/ / / /_/ / Sundays 6 to midnight ___//_//_//_//_/ /_/ |_|/_//_//_____//___/ ____/ K.U.O.R. 89.1 fm. *************************************************** University of Dreadlands * RAW #343 * * Blowing the FULL watts over nineteen years! http://ebhon.jnst.uor.edu/Users/doktor for the home page -----------------------------------From: rlam@bgnet.bgsu.edu (Ronald E Lam) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley "Legend II"? Hardly Date: 31 May 1995 13:56:42 GMT Organization: Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH (USA) ...yes robert nelson, you get an A + for this "essay." watch out mr. norman reddington :-) between djing, visiting friends for dinner, and all dem tings you a do, here is what RMR is all about...when did you have time to do this paper, sir?...it a good ting reggae sunsplash na inna salt lake city, star...and inna serious vein, i man, roots-ee give nuff respec to the man call robert nelson for a very interesting essay as how some people, not all now, are 'celebrating' bob's 50 th... easy, RN -irie,one love,roots music...everytime with culture, from Errol, aka roots-ee 419-372-7903,voice mail...and de beat goes on...and on...and on...respec'... i am the small axe...sharp and ready...to cut you down...sharp and ready... ---------------------------------From: Erik Rensberger <erensberger@delphi.com> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley "Legend II"? Hardly Date: Sat, 3 Jun 95 02:53:37 -0500 Organization: Delphi (info@delphi.com email, 800-695-4005 voice) Of *course* "Legend II" has nothing for serious reggae fans. Did any of us expect it to? No, this package has one role and one role only: to be Marley CD #2 (or Reggae CD #2) fofolks who own _Legend_, mainly white classic-rock fans, I would guess. These folks probably don't even know what half the songs on the original _Legend_ are *about*. They don't need much in a second helping, just a handful of songs that they can have the discplayer shuffle... -- E.R. ----------------------------------From: paulh@usa1.com (Paul H.) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley "Legend II"? Hardly Date: Sat, 03 Jun 1995 17:26:53 -0500 Organization: HitBox Audio Definetely, when I first heard legend a few years ago, I was hooked. I went out and convinced people to let me DJ a reggae show in Europe(where the music was almost unheard of). Since coming to America I find that I knew nothing of reggae(all I could find there was what the local store had, not much). Now it is almost all I listen to. -----------------------------------From: rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley "Legend II"? Hardly Date: 6 Jun 1995 19:24:57 GMT Organization: University Of Utah Computer Center Erik Rensberger (erensberger@delphi.com) wrote: : Of *course* "Legend II" has nothing for serious reggae fans. Did any of us : expect it to? I most certainly did! : : : : : : : No, this package has one role and one role only: to be Marley CD #2 (or Reggae CD #2) fofolks who own _Legend_, mainly white classic-rock fans, I would guess. These folks probably don't even know what half the songs on the original _Legend_ are *about*. They don't need much in a second helping, just a handful of songs that they can have the discplayer shuffle ... -- E.R. Considering that all of these titles except Legend, Babylon By Bus and maybe Talking Blues are all sold as cut outs for $8. There's really no reason to print up a disk that they will be charging $14 bucks for that has so little new stuff. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 72 VOLUME ONE
  • 73. I think that this was Island's way of acknowledging the 50th Anniversary of his Bobness without having to actually do any work to commemorate it. It's no surprise really, RCA has done a pisspoor job with Elvis reissues. These people aren't fans of the music, they just want to turn a profit. Has anyone seen the Keep On Moving single stateside yet? -Robert Nelson Smile Jamaica, Sat. 4-7 PM KRCL 91 FM / KZMU 89.7 FM Salt Lake City / Moab, Utah rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide #14 Robin Hood robbed from the rich cuz the poor man ain't got no money ---Dennis Alcapone ---------------------------------From: pilgrim@xmission.xmission.com (Papa Pilgrim) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley "Legend II"? Hardly Date: 7 Jun 1995 23:34:28 GMT Organization: XMission Public Access Internet (801 539 0900) Say what you will about Legend II, say what you will about UB40-or Big Mountain-or Inka Inka. Comments such as explotive, too commercial, too "poppy" may all have some truth. know and I am not to judge motive or method. I don't Be that as it may, over the years I have had numbers, easily hundreds, of calls from listeners who were introduced and subsequently turned on to Reggae music by Legend, UB40, or poppy-commercial sounding non-Jamaican artists. Personally, if someone is "sold" on Reggae, whether by Marley or UB40, I say thank you to the artist. For me it was some guy singing about marijuana (Tosh), for you it may have been some guy covering a Dead tune (B. Spear or Loose Caboose). What counts is that for every convert to Reggae music we, all of we, are step closer to one another and maybe, just maybe, some of the words, concepts and knowledge that is the foundation of Reggae will sink in. When it does-we'll feel no pain (and have no fear) except a loving fear of Jah Almighty. Rastafari! -Papa Pilgrim <pilgrim@xmission.com> |"Nite Roots" |Tel:801-355-1405 Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide |KRCL 90.9FM |Fax:801-355-1405 Keep It Simple, Make It Fun |Salt Lake City |KISMIF ***"FORWARD THE REGGAE VIBE...EVERYTIME!*** -------------------------------------From: Tim Patterson <76262.1554@CompuServe.COM> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley "Legend II"? Hardly Date: 7 Jun 1995 04:39:32 GMT Organization: IDN While I can't argue with your point that Natural Mystic is a re-hash that all of us longtime Marley fans find redundant, I feel it has at least one valid point...and that is to introduce new fans to a wide spectrum of his music without having to fork up the $$ to buy his whole catalog.... -------------------------------------From: papalee@aol.com (Papa Lee) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Marley "Legend II"? Hardly Date: 9 Jun 1995 21:17:29 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Sorry, but I don't buy that argument for Natural Mystic at all. If someone has a limited amount of funds, Legend would be the logical choice, but Live would serve as a good sampler too. For that matter, if someone could only afford one CD and Legend was sold out, I'd recommend Live, Rebel Music, Talking Blues or one of the Lee Perry sets before I'd even consider Natural Mystic. As good as they are, the songs on Natural Mystic are NOT Marley's best or most representative, nearly all of them sound better in the context of their original release. One Love, Lee O'Neill ----------------------------------From: Joris van Drunen Littel <bas@iaehv.nl> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 73 VOLUME ONE
  • 74. Subject: Talkin' "Island" Blues Date: 1 Jun 1995 07:56:52 GMT Organization: Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands One of my favourite Bob Marley albums is Talkin' Blues, that's the Island release containing tracks from a broadcast of KSAN radio in San Francisco and three studio tracks and a live version of I Shot The Sheriff. Just recently (two months ago) I bought a bootleg at a record-fair in my home town. This bootleg, called Nyabinghi's Rastas, contains recordings of the same broadcast of KSAN in 1973. However there's a big difference. The bootleg features more tracks then on Talkin' blues. Anyone know why Island didn't include ALL tracks from the KSAN recordings? In the booklet of Talkin' Blues it simply says '.. the bulk of this session can now be heard on record.' In my opinion the best tracks were not on the Island release. Maybe Island keeps these songs to include on 'Songs Of Freedom II - from "Keep On Skanking" to "Am-A-Do"' or 'Legend III'...... Joris Joris van Drunen Littel The Netherlands bas@iaehv.nl Chris oh Chris, it's the rarities that I miss.... Nyabinghi's Rastas Teddy Bear Records 1994, TB 64 (Italy) - Rastaman Chant 6m11 - Send Down Low 4m19 NOT ON TALKIN' BLUES! (Bend Down Low) - Slave Driver 3m42 - You Can't Fool 3m55 (You Can't Blame The Youth) - Stop The Train 3m55 NOT ON TALKIN' BLUES! - Burning and Looting 6m16 - Kinky Reggae 5m02 - Get Up, Stand Up 4m30 - Lively Up Yourself 7m18 NOT ON TALKIN' BLUES! - Rude Boy Skank 3m19 (Walk The Proud Land) the cd also contains two live tracks recorded at the Quiet Knight Club. Talkin' Blues Tuff Gong/Island Records 1991, 261 313 (Germany) - Burnin' And Lootin' 6m36 - Kinky Reggae 5m08 - Get Up Stand Up 4m44 - Slave Driver 3m47 - Walk The Proud Land 3m30 - You Can't Blame The Youth 4m06 - Rastaman Chant 6m23 the cd also contains 3 studio tracks, 1 live track and an interview. -----------------------------------From: (relgov) Subject: Re: Talkin' "Island" Blues Organization: AA Date: Thu, 1 Jun 1995 13:14:24 GMT Perhaps my favorite Marley tune from a musical point of view has to be Lively Up Yourself (it has the coolest bass vamp ever) - but only the studio version. The two live versions (from Live & Babylon By Bus) are taken way too fast IMO. Is this version more like the album cut in tempo? One other version I like is the Lively Up Yourself snippet from the Marley videos widely available - that sounds like a killer (but cut) version. Lastly, I read somewhere (Wailers FAQ?) that there is a dub version of this song? Would love to know where to get that! Dean deanvo@comm.mot.com -------------------------------From: vrla@teleport.com (The Flag Guys) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Bob Marley flags Date: Fri, 9 Jun 1995 20:55:41 Organization: Teleport - Portland's Public Access (503) 220-1016 Greetings! We came across some Bob Marley flags. They are 3x5 feet, brightly colored. Bob Marley Bob Marley with a black background Bob Marley with "Freedom" REGGAE ON THE INTERNET We'd like to know if anyone would be into them. page 74 VOLUME ONE
  • 75. Bob Marley with "Walkin" Jamaican flag Rastafarian flag We think they're very cool. Do you? fax 286-0236 e-mail vrla@teleport.com ------------------------------------From: i.dread@ix.netcom.com (Stephen Macaleer) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Marvel Marley Date: 29 Jun 1995 14:41:21 GMT Organization: Netcom Does anyone know when "Zion", the third issue of the Bob Marley Marvel Comic book series, is going to be released? The first two issues are, appropriately enough, "Iron" and "Lion". If you haven't seen these, they are pretty interesting. The art work is fantastic while the portaryal of Bob, Jamaica and reggae is "commical" (not in a negative sense). I have found some errors in the facts presented, but overall it is entertaining. I also think it will be a collectors item someday (I hope). Check it out. ------------------------------------From: silval@asb.ic.gc.ca (Larry M. Silva) Subject: Marley playing for the Ottawa rough riders Organization: Industry Canada Date: Fri, 30 Jun 95 13:10:39 GMT i've been told by several people that bob marley's son plays for the ottawa rough riders (CFL football team).. is this true?? does bob even have a son.. if i'm way outta base, disregard this post. LMS REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 75 VOLUME ONE
  • 76. PRINCE BUSTER From: adisa@sirius.com (blackman@ghetto.edu) Subject: Prince Buster Question! Followup-To: rec.music.reggae Date: Sat, 27 May 1995 19:53:31 -0500 Organization: The Physical - Mental - Emotional - Spiritual MainFrame I-ight, I've had this question for years but I've never been able to pull it all together. I am dealing with 3 songs, all from the Judge Dread lp. Blue Beat 809: Judge Dread The Appeal Judge Dread Dance In JD he calls forth Rude Bwais Adolphus James, Emmanuel Zaccaraih Zaccepon, and Judge Grab & Flee. James gets 400 years Zaccepon gets 800 years Grab & Flee gets 400 years and 500 lashes However in The Appeal, when he gives two of the brothas "a sumbolic sentence" of 6000 years he fails to mention Adolphus James. What happened to that brotha? How come no one wrote in on his behalf? And on JD Dance he pardons Grab & Flee and James but makes no mention of James there (or the Barrister Dread Lock or Lock Dread or what (from Europe)) Where is Adolphus James? Is he still rotting in some JA prison??? I really need to know. My peace of mind depends on my getting some real answers. Inquiring minds want to know. PS. The Barrister deserved all that he got! -********************************** ** We didn't get ** ** Forty Acres and A Mule ** ** We got ****************************************** ** 40 Ounces With a Kick ***This author reserves the rights to all* ***********************************comments. No comments are to be * ** adisa@sirius.com ***published without my written approval.* ************************************************************************** ps. If You Ain't Working With The Youngstas, Don't Say Nuthin To Me! -------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: Prince Buster Question! Date: Mon, 29 May 1995 17:41:18 GMT Gee I'm sorry I can't help you out... I'm a big Buster fan, but don't have the answer... Zacepon is also mentioned in some other Buster tunes, "Train To Girlstown" is one of them I think. Interesting trivia department: When these songs first came out in JA, the stuffed-shirt "topanoris" judges were so offended that they had some thugs go beat up Prince Buster, putting him in the hospital... some people have no sense of humour. In fact it's really interesting how frightened the JA establishment was of the music of the "lower classes" in the slums of Kingston. Most of JA's homegrown popular music was not even on the radio for years... and many songs were banned, even in the calypso days... of course everybody could still hear them at the dance. >PS. The Barrister deserved all that he got! It's always hard to feel sorry for lawyers. Al -- Allen Kaatz (highnote@eskimo.com) *** "Enjoy yourself - it's later than you think!" (Prince Buster, 1963) *** REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 76 VOLUME ONE
  • 77. JAMMIN REGGAE ARCHIVES From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Jammin Reggae Archives Monthly Posting Date: 1 Jun 1995 15:39:00 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises This is the monthly posting for the Jammin Reggae Archives 1. WWW (World Wide Web) http://jammin.nosc.mil/jammin.html 2. Gopher Server - gopher jammin.nosc.mil 3. Anonymous FTP - To access the archives, ftp to ABEL.MATH.UGA.EDU and login with username anonymous, use your email userid and address as the password. After logging in and "cd"ing to the reggae directory, use the "dir" command to see what's there and the "get" command to download files. Don't forget to set binary transfer mode with the "bin" command before retrieving pictures or sound files. **** LOOKING FOR MIRROR SITES ***** I am always looking for mirror sites for the archives. If you are a system adminstrator and want to give me access to an ftp server and about 250MB of disk space, please contact me at: mikey@nosc.mil Files updated since last posting: lyrics/satisfy_my_soul lyrics/satisfy_our_souls lyrics/beat_yu_drums audio/wav/freedom.wav audio/wav/express.wav audio/wav/yaho.wav audio/wav/ras2.wav audio/wav/somitey.wav audio/wav/ras1.wav audio/wav/jahjahwk.wav audio/wav/stream.wav audio/wav/visndub.wav audio/wav/rasbiz.wav audio/wav/rudeshuf.wav audio/au audio/au/freedom.au audio/au/yaho.au audio/au/ras2.au audio/au/rasbiz.au audio/au/express.au audio/au/ras1.au audio/au/jahjahwk.au audio/au/rudeshuf.au audio/au/visndub.au audio/au/stream.au audio/au/somitey.au articles/rasta_history catalogs/heartbeat catalogs/one_drop discographies/dubwise_cds clubs radioshows faq patois.txt covers/dj_explosion.gif covers/mystic_miracle_star.gif covers/dread_beat_an_blood.gif covers/some_great_big_youth.gif covers/best_of_studio_one.gif covers/dread_inna_fine_style.gif covers/reggae_roundup.gif covers/soldering.gif covers/cry_tough.gif covers/more_hottest_hits.gif covers/some_like_it_hot.gif covers/the_ethiopian.gif covers/farover.gif covers/world_peace_3.gif covers/one_love.gif covers/reggae_time.gif covers/should_i.gif covers/up_life_street.gif covers/a_whole_heap.gif covers/reggae_xmas.gif REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 77 VOLUME ONE
  • 78. covers/s+c_studio_one.gif covers/swalk.gif covers/lion_rock.gif covers/run_come_celebrate.gif covers/satta_massagana.gif covers/world_should_know.gif covers/good_thing_going.gif covers/owner_fe_de_yard.gif covers/return_of_the_meditations.gif covers/swing_and_dine.gif covers/cosmic_force.gif covers/living_dub_v1.gif covers/living_dub_v2.gif covers/mojo_rock_steady.gif covers/full_up.gif covers/original_man.gif covers/trod_on.gif covers/zion_chant.gif covers/don_man.gif covers/hail_him.gif covers/michael_rose.gif covers/ram_dj.gif covers/dancehall_roughneck.gif covers/dub_poets_and_dub.gif covers/light_my_fire.gif covers/rebel_meets_silk.gif covers/deeper_roots.gif covers/marley_family.gif covers/power_of_the_people.gif covers/reggae_from_africa.gif dublist/how_to_subscribe dublist/faq shops raw/email_addresses books schedules/germany schedules/pablo_moses schedules/splash_usa schedules/inka_inka schedules/jimmy_cliff schedules/culture schedules/bad_brains The files available are: faq Frequently asked questions 0. Is there a Reggae Archives on the Internet? 1. Dub Recommendations 2. Can anyone recommend some books on reggae? 3. What is "Dub" music anyway? 4. Can anyone recommend some roots reggae? 5. Can you recommend live reggae recordings? 6. Who was Marcus Garvey? 7. Can you recommend some Dancehall? 8. Is there a newsgroup that caters to those of us who enjoy soca, zouk, salsa, or merengue? 9. Books on Rastafarianism? 10. What are the different reggae styles? 11. CARIBANA FAQ 12. Can anyone give me some info on the rasta culture? 13. Could anyone out there suggest to me any albums which combine reggae and jazz? 14. Carribean Clubs FAQ 15. What is the significance of the "Two Sevens"? 16. What's all this about Sound Systems, Clashes and Dubplates? 17. Is there a World Wide Web Server for Reggae? 18. Is there a Gopher Server for Reggae? 19. What is RAW (Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide)? 20. Why do purists look down on UB40? 21. Can anyone recommend good female reggae vocalists (not dancehall). ? 22. Please give an explanation of "One Drop" Style clubs Reggae Clubs Listing patois.txt Rasta/Patois Dictionary radioshows reggae radio shows magazines reggae periodicals mailorder reggae mailorder sources shops reggae record shops REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 78 VOLUME ONE
  • 79. articles directory get_riddim: Article in March 1993 PULSE Magazine marleys_ghost: Article in May 1994 PULSE Magazine rasta_history: First of Four Part History posted by Norman Redington rasta_thesis_proposal studio_one_riddims: Classic Studio One Riddims catalogs directory discographies directory lyrics directory interviews directory raw directory Information relating to Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide books reggae and rasta books dublist directory info on the dub mailing list periodicals directory pics directory Various graphic images covers directory stage names Album Cover Graphics Real names of artists audio directory au subdirectory - Sun audio files, look at file Index wav subdirectory - Windows sound files, look at file Index wav/zip subdirectory - ZIP compressed Windows sound files If you have any problems or anything to contribute, like radio shows in your local area or pics, post to rec.music.reggae or mail me at mikey@nosc.mil. Files may be uploaded to the archives by anonymous ftp to abel.math.uga.edu in directory Incoming. ----------------------------- Respect, Mike From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Jammin Reggae Archives Sound Sample File Monthly Posting Date: 1 Jun 1995 15:46:29 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises This is the monthly posting for the Jammin Reggae Archives sound sample files. The sound sample files contain audio information for recent CD releases. The first 15-20 seconds of each track are sampled in mono at a low sampling rate to keep the file size down. There are two formatsnad of sound sample files, Sun Sparc Audio format (.au), Windows Sound file format (.wav). You can access the files using a WWW browser such as Netscape via the Jammin Reggae Archives Home Page: http://jammin.nosc.mil/jammin.html or use the Gopher Server: gopher jammin.nosc.mil To download a file using the FTP (File Transfer Protocol) program login to ABEL.MATH.UGA.EDU anonymously, for example: ftp abel.math.uga.edu Connected to abel.math.uga.edu. 220 abel FTP server (Version 2.0WU(10) Mon Apr 12 14:13:35 EDT 1993) ready. Name (uga:mikey): anonymous 331 Guest login ok, send your complete e-mail address as password. Password: 230230-Welcome, archive user! This is an experimental archive at the 230-University of Georgia Math Department. We primarily have preprints 230-of papers by local authors. In each directory, you will (should :-) 230-find README files written by the authors. Check 'em out. 230230-The time now is Fri May 26 16:47:19 1995, and we're GMT-5 (as I recall). 230-This machine is in Athens, GA, USA in the Eastern Time Zone. If 230-possible, please limit your activity to non-business hours (1800-0600 230-local). If you have any problems or questions, please send them to 230-papers@abel.math.uga.edu and we'll look into it. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 79 VOLUME ONE
  • 80. 230230-If this looks like garbage, try using '-' as the first character of 230-your password. That will disable these messages; be sure to read all 230-of the README files! 230230230-Please read the file 000.READ.ME 230- it was last modified on Mon Aug 30 11:10:05 1993 - 634 days ago 230 Guest login ok, access restrictions apply. ftp> cd reggae 250-Please read the file README 250- it was last modified on Fri May 26 12:05:42 1995 - 0 days ago 250 CWD command successful. ftp> get faq 200 PORT command successful. 150 Opening ASCII mode data connection for faq (141474 bytes). 226 Transfer complete. local: faq remote: faq 144964 bytes received in 3.7 seconds (38 Kbytes/s) ftp> quit 221 Goodbye. MAC users can use SoundApp 1.5.1 or SoundMachine (.au) files. to play the SUN audio format SGI users can use the program 'sfplay' to play .au files or convert .au or .wav files to .aiff using the 'sox' program. Source for this program is available from jammin.nosc.mil in the pub/misc directory. You will probably notice a little noise when listening to these files, it is due to the low sampling rate which is used to keep the size of the files down. This noise is not present on the CDs. The sound sample directories currently contain the following files: ALBUMS classics Classics - Half Pint bustin Bustin' Out - Fleshy Ranks feelirie Feel 'n Irie - Ishmael & The Peacemakers andysong The Songs Of Bob Andy - Various Artists resone1 Respect To Studio One - Disc 1 mackadub Macka Dub - Featuring Carlton & "Family Man" Barrett hvyload Heavy Load - Jamaica Papa Curvin seemeyah See Me Yah - Gracy and the Herbman Band liftup Lift Up Your Head - Everton Blender 2for1 2 For 1 - Ninjaman pickadub Pick A Dub - Keith Hudson dubcrazy Dub Gone Crazy - The Evolution of Dub at King Tubby's marlyfam The Marley Family Album - Various Artists clasc90s Classic Reggae In A 90's Style - Various Artists waterhou Waterhouse Revisted - Various Artists djtrade If Deejay Was Your Trade - The Dreads at King Tubby's sweetluv Sweet Love - Cocoa Tea brkfree Breaking Free - Sugar Minott madprof It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Professor - Mad Professor vintclas Vintage Classics - Leroy Smart discrim Discrimination - Macka B blacklib Black Liberation Dub Chapter One - Mad Professor onrock On The Rock - Israel Vibration christa Soulfire - Christafari mikerose Michael Rose - Michael Rose ukroots dub Revolution - uk roots: high steppin' to the future nagiveup Na Give Up - Ark Band opengate Open The Gate (Greatest Hits Vol. 2) - Dennis Brown disdevil Clinton Fearon - Boogie Brown Band - Disturb The Devil dubparty Mikey Dread - Come To Mikey Dread's Dub Party atackdub Niney The Observor - Observer Attack Dub somereal Lazo - Something Real myth Myth Of The Machine - Inka Inka vault 2 Vault Classics Volume 2 - Various Artists dubfact3 Dub Factor 3 "In Captivity" Dub Chronicles worlda World A Music - Volume 1 - Various Artists stepforw Steppin Forward/Natural Elements Dub - Armagideon dreadusa Dread In America - Various Artists bestof3 Best Of The Best - Volume 3 - The Singers bestof4 Best Of The Best - Volume 4 - The DJs stream Stream Of Consciousness - Rasta Rafiki yaho Ya Ho - The Viceroys at Studio One express Expression - Beres Hammond and Derrick Lara ras1 Reggae Roots - the RAS Records Story - Disc One ras2 Reggae Roots - the RAS Records Story - Disc Two visndub Instrumental Healing - The Vision and Friends in Dub REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 80 VOLUME ONE
  • 81. rasbiz jahjahwk rudeshuf somitey freedom Selected cuts from Rasta Business - Burning Spear Jah Jah Works - The Lions Rudeboy Shufflin - Israel Vibration Mighty V - So Mighty Freedom - Neville Duncan ----------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Jammin Reggae Archives Home Page Date: 2 Jun 1995 16:17:53 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises I have been forced, at least temporarily, to move the Web Home Page for the Jammin Reggae Archives to: http://www-cse.ucsd.edu/users/ddiplock/jammin.html ----------------------------- EZ Noh, mike From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Jammin Reggae Archives Gopher Date: 6 Jun 1995 19:58:11 GMT I'm still looking for a home for the Jammin Reggae Archives gopher server. All that is required is a Unix system, very little disk space is required, all the gopher server does is point clients to the ftp server. Please contact me if you can help. EZ Noh, mike -----------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Jammin Reggae Archives Date: 23 Jun 1995 15:55:57 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises I've added a new section of links to the Jammin Home Page, "Singers and Players of Instrument". So far I have only "Strictly Root", "Inka Inka" and "UB40", I'm sure there are others out there, please send me your URLs. EZ Noh, mike ---------------------------------From: redrum@morgue.net (str8up killa) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: IRC channel #Reggae Date: Wed, 28 Jun 95 14:34:13 GMT Organization: redrum@211.187.911 There's a new channel on Internet relay chat. #Reggae Drop in to have live discussion on rec.music.reggae topics. If you're unsure on how to access IRC, please follow up to this posting and I will send you e-mailed instructions. There have been a few of you who have already stopped by. Respect ********************************************* You betta' AXE somebody! redrum@211.187.911 ********************************************* ----------------------------------From: gdwarner@intersource.com (Glen Warner) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: IRC channel #Reggae Date: 2 Jul 1995 01:47:50 GMT Organization: GlenTech Why not just post the instructions? Also ... interesting .sig ... --gdw ----------------------------------REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 81 VOLUME ONE
  • 82. From: stevie@pixi.com (Bruce Stevenson) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: #Reggae on internet chat Date: Thu, 29 Jun 1995 12:22:55 Organization: Pacific Information eXchange, Inc. ..still waiting on "breddahs" to join us in #reggae on IRC (internet relay chat). It's catching on a little, but we always have room for more...Need detail on accessing IRC? Follow-up to this on usenet or send e-mail...bye ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ stevie@pixi.com Bruce Stevenson Honolulu, Hawaii W-E-B P-A-G-E http://www.pixi.com/~stevie ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Hey! Don't I know you from IRC? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ---------------------------------From: sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu (Bush Doktor) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: IRC channel #Reggae Date: 7 Jul 1995 07:12:39 GMT Organization: University of Dreadlands In article <3th005$2sj@newsbf02.news.aol.com>, Evan C R <evancr@aol.com> wrote: > At least I got on a couple of channels for the first time. Loooked for >#reggae but didn't see a listing. What time are people usually chatting? Try typing... /join #reggae that should get you to the channel. As for what time,... anytime. Sometimes nobody is there, other times there are loads of people. Just be forwarned that depending on how you got to the irc, there can be alot of hang time between your sending a message & getting a response. Seems like when I wanna chat is when the time lag is worst. Also for a listing of the channels, type... /list I think that'll give you a listing of everything. __ _____ __ __ ____ _____ ____ ____ ____ BUSH DOKTOR RAW #343 __ / // _ // // / / __ / _ // __ / _// __ sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu / // // _' // _ / / _.' // _' // /_/ /_/ / / /_/ / Sundays 6 to midnight ___//_//_//_//_/ /_/ |_|/_//_//_____//___/ ____/ K.U.O.R. 89.1 fm. *************************************************** University of Dreadlands *http://ebhon.jnst.uor.edu/Users/doktor* Blowing the FULL watts twenty years! -----------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Jammin Reggae Archives Monthly Posting Date: 5 Jul 1995 17:16:54 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises This is the monthly posting for the Jammin Reggae Archives 1. WWW (World Wide Web) http://orpheus.ucsd.edu/jammin 2. Gopher Server - gopher jammin.nosc.mil (OUT OF ORDER) 3. Anonymous FTP - To access the archives, ftp to ABEL.MATH.UGA.EDU (128.192.3.2) and login with username anonymous, use your email userid and address as the password. After logging in and "cd"ing to the reggae directory, use the "dir" command to see what's there and the "get" command to download files. Don't forget to set binary transfer mode with the "bin" command before retrieving pictures or sound files. **** LOOKING FOR MIRROR SITES ***** I am always looking for mirror sites for the archives. If you are a system adminstrator and want to give me access to an ftp server and about 250MB of disk space, please contact me at: mikey@nosc.mil Files updated since last posting: audio/wav/notone.wav audio/wav/carnival.wav audio/wav/mission.wav audio/wav/afriswim.wav audio/wav/INDEX audio/wav/specreq.wav audio/wav/hapycarn.wav audio/wav/forever.wav audio/wav/geldmehr.wav audio/wav/happines.wav audio/wav/blackout.wav REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 82 VOLUME ONE
  • 83. audio/wav/natuvibe.wav audio/wav/rastabiz.wav audio/wav/dreaming.wav audio/au/happines.au audio/au/carnival.au audio/au/notone.au audio/au/afriswim.au audio/au/INDEX audio/au/dreaming.au audio/au/hapycarn.au audio/au/mission.au audio/au/rastabiz.au audio/au/specreq.au audio/au/natuvibe.au audio/au/forever.au audio/au/blackout.au audio/au/geldmehr.au artists/norma_fraser catalogs/heartbeat catalogs/highnote discographies/dubwise_cds radioshows faq patois.txt covers/bustin_out.gif covers/my_poor_heart.gif covers/open_rebuke.gif covers/ram_jam_a_gwaan.gif covers/culture_in_dub.gif covers/lift_up_your_head.gif covers/wailing_wailers.gif covers/wailing_wailers_1.gif covers/guess_whos_coming.gif covers/love_peace.gif covers/respect_studio_one.gif covers/top_ten.gif covers/a_luta_continua.gif covers/fittest.gif covers/slice_of_the_cake.gif covers/sufferers_choice.gif covers/inna_reggae_dancehall.gif covers/mikey_dread.gif covers/rebel_rock_reggae.gif covers/resistance.gif covers/bobby_bobylon.gif covers/born_to_love.gif covers/other_side_of_dub.gif covers/what_kind_of_world.gif covers/best_of_delroy_wilson.gif covers/do_the_rock_steady.gif covers/forevcer_version.gif covers/larry_marshall.gif covers/armagideon_time.gif covers/rub_a_dub_style.gif covers/showcase.gif covers/sunday_coming.gif covers/downbeat_the_ruler.gif covers/greatest_hits.gif covers/some_of_the_best.gif covers/thruths_and_rights.gif covers/good_of_man.gif covers/hi_bound.gif covers/love_devine.gif covers/taxi_fare.gif covers/african_soldier.gif covers/collecters_edition.gif covers/heartbeat_reggae.gif covers/manifestation.gif covers/authentic_ja_beat.gif covers/chicken_scratch.gif covers/on_the_right_track.gif covers/solid_foundation.gif covers/i_admire_you.gif covers/riding_musical_chariot.gif covers/slave_call.gif covers/upsetter_and_beat.gif covers/alton_and_hortense.gif covers/ghetto_child.gif covers/holy_ground.gif covers/my_number_one.gif covers/in_culture.gif covers/lord_god_muzick.gif covers/observation_station.gif REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 83 VOLUME ONE
  • 84. covers/soul_defenders.gif covers/explosive.gif covers/forward_ever.gif covers/happy_together.gif covers/rock_steady_intense.gif covers/bombastic.gif covers/mighty_2.gif covers/soundz_from_the_hotline.gif covers/truth_nad_rights.gif covers/dancing_floor.gif covers/fire_down_below.gif covers/kingston_town.gif covers/solid_gold.gif artists/boom_tali_posse artists/john_hural artists/irie_time shops mailorder interviews/annette_brissette schedules schedules/ark_band schedules/splash_usa schedules/Skatalites schedules/inka_inka schedules/sumfest schedules/warren_wayne schedules/rock_steady_posse schedules/austin_texas schedules/lucky_dube schedules/sunsplash schedules/vermont_festival schedules/california_reggae_splash schedules/reggae_on_the_river schedules/strictly_roots schedules/europe schedules/german_summer_jam schedules/burning_spear periodicals/addresses The files available are: faq Frequently asked questions 0. Is there a Reggae Archives on the Internet? 1. Dub Recommendations 2. Can anyone recommend some books on reggae? 3. What is "Dub" music anyway? 4. Can anyone recommend some roots reggae? 5. Can you recommend live reggae recordings? 6. Who was Marcus Garvey? 7. Can you recommend some Dancehall? 8. Is there a newsgroup that caters to those of us who enjoy soca, zouk, salsa, or merengue? 9. Books on Rastafarianism? 10. What are the different reggae styles? 11. CARIBANA FAQ 12. Can anyone give me some info on the rasta culture? 13. Could anyone out there suggest to me any albums which combine reggae and jazz? 14. Carribean Clubs FAQ 15. What is the significance of the "Two Sevens"? 16. What's all this about Sound Systems, Clashes and Dubplates? 17. Is there a World Wide Web Server for Reggae? 18. Is there a Gopher Server for Reggae? 19. What is RAW (Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide)? 20. Why do purists look down on UB40? 21. Can anyone recommend good female reggae vocalists (not dancehall). ? 22. Please give an explanation of "One Drop" Style clubs Reggae Clubs Listing patois.txt Rasta/Patois Dictionary radioshows reggae radio shows magazines reggae periodicals mailorder reggae mailorder sources shops reggae record shops articles directory get_riddim: Article in March 1993 PULSE Magazine REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 84 VOLUME ONE
  • 85. marleys_ghost: Article in May 1994 PULSE Magazine rasta_history: First of Four Part History posted by Norman Redington rasta_thesis_proposal studio_one_riddims: Classic Studio One Riddims catalogs directory discographies directory Artists directory lyrics directory interviews directory raw directory Information relating to Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide books reggae and rasta books dublist directory info on the dub mailing list periodicals directory pics directory Various graphic images covers directory stage names Album Cover Graphics Real names of artists audio directory au subdirectory - Sun audio files, look at file Index wav subdirectory - Windows sound files, look at file Index If you have any problems or anything to contribute, like radio shows in your local area or pics, post to rec.music.reggae or mail me at mikey@nosc.mil. Files may be uploaded to the archives by anonymous ftp to abel.math.uga.edu (128.192.3.2) in directory Incoming. ---------------------------------- Respect, Mike From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Jammin Reggae Archives Sound Sample File Monthly Posting Date: 5 Jul 1995 17:22:54 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises This is the monthly posting for the Jammin Reggae Archives sound sound sample files contain audio information for recent CD releases. The seconds of each track are sampled in mono at a low sampling rate to keep down. There are two formats types of sound sample files stored here, Sun format (.au), and Windows Sound file format (.wav). sample files. The first 15-20 the file size Sparc Audio You can access the files using a WWW browser such as Netscape via the Jammin Reggae Archives Home Page: http://orpheus.ucsd.edu/jammin or use the Gopher Server: gopher jammin.nosc.mil (OUT OF ORDER) To download a file using the FTP (File Transfer Protocol) program login to ABEL.MATH.UGA.EDU (128.192.3.2) anonymously, for example: ftp abel.math.uga.edu Connected to abel.math.uga.edu. 220 abel FTP server (Version 2.0WU(10) Mon Apr 12 14:13:35 EDT 1993) ready. Name (uga:mikey): anonymous 331 Guest login ok, send your complete e-mail address as password. Password: 230230-Welcome, archive user! This is an experimental archive at the 230-University of Georgia Math Department. We primarily have preprints 230-of papers by local authors. In each directory, you will (should :-) 230-find README files written by the authors. Check 'em out. 230230-The time now is Fri May 26 16:47:19 1995, and we're GMT-5 (as I recall). 230-This machine is in Athens, GA, USA in the Eastern Time Zone. If 230-possible, please limit your activity to non-business hours (1800-0600 230-local). If you have any problems or questions, please send them to 230-papers@abel.math.uga.edu and we'll look into it. 230230-If this looks like garbage, try using '-' as the first character of 230-your password. That will disable these messages; be sure to read all REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 85 VOLUME ONE
  • 86. 230-of the README files! 230230230-Please read the file 000.READ.ME 230- it was last modified on Mon Aug 30 11:10:05 1993 - 634 days ago 230 Guest login ok, access restrictions apply. ftp> cd reggae 250-Please read the file README 250- it was last modified on Fri May 26 12:05:42 1995 - 0 days ago 250 CWD command successful. ftp> get faq 200 PORT command successful. 150 Opening ASCII mode data connection for faq (141474 bytes). 226 Transfer complete. local: faq remote: faq 144964 bytes received in 3.7 seconds (38 Kbytes/s) ftp> quit 221 Goodbye. MAC users can use SoundApp 1.5.1 or SoundMachine (.au) files. to play the SUN audio format SGI users can use the program 'sfplay' to play .au files or convert au or .wav files to .aiff using the 'sox' program. Source for this program is available on the Internet. You will probably notice a little noise when listening to these files, it is due to the low sampling rate which is used to keep the size of the files down. This noise is not present on the CDs. The sound sample directories current contain the following files: ALBUMS hvyload Heavy Load - Jamaica Papa Curvin seemeyah See Me Yah - Gracy and the Herbman Band liftup Lift Up Your Head - Everton Blender pickadub Pick A Dub - Keith Hudson dubcrazy Dub Gone Crazy - The Evolution of Dub at King Tubby's clasc90s Classic Reggae In A 90's Style - Various Artists waterhou Waterhouse Revisted - Various Artists sweetluv Sweet Love - Cocoa Tea brkfree Breaking Free - Sugar Minott vintclas Vintage Classics - Leroy Smart discrim Discrimination - Macka B blacklib Black Liberation Dub Chapter One - Mad Professor onrock On The Rock - Israel Vibration mikerose Michael Rose - Michael Rose nagiveup Na Give Up - Ark Band opengate Open The Gate (Greatest Hits Vol. 2) - Dennis Brown disdevil Clinton Fearon - Boogie Brown Band - Disturb The Devil dubparty Mikey Dread - Come To Mikey Dread's Dub Party atackdub Niney The Observor - Observer Attack Dub somereal Lazo - Something Real myth Myth Of The Machine - Inka Inka vault 2 Vault Classics Volume 2 - Various Artists dubfact3 Dub Factor 3 "In Captivity" Dub Chronicles worlda World A Music - Volume 1 - Various Artists stepforw Steppin Forward/Natural Elements Dub - Armagideon bestof3 Best Of The Best - Volume 3 - The Singers bestof4 Best Of The Best - Volume 4 - The DJs stream Stream Of Consciousness - Rasta Rafiki yaho Ya Ho - The Viceroys at Studio One express Expression - Beres Hammond and Derrick Lara ras1 Reggae Roots - the RAS Records Story - Disc One ras2 Reggae Roots - the RAS Records Story - Disc Two visndub Instrumental Healing - The Vision and Friends in Dub jahjahwk Jah Jah Works - The Lions rudeshuf Rudeboy Shufflin - Israel Vibration somitey Mighty V - So Mighty freedom Freedom - Neville Duncan fromarch From The Archives - Tappa Zukie remand Remand Centre - Fire Facts happines Happiness - Mikey Spice afriswim Africans Swim - Presley mission Mission - Pablo Moses notone Not A One Man Thing - Gregory Isaacs blackout Blackout natuvibe Natural Vibe - Sevan Campbell specreq Special Request - JC Lodge forever Forever - Freddie McGregor carnival Carnival 95 - Various Artists hapycarn Happy Carnival - Superblue REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 86 VOLUME ONE
  • 87. geldmehr rastabiz dreaming Geld & Mehr - Ragga Frankie Rasta Business - Burning Spear Dreaming - Gregory Isaacs REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 87 VOLUME ONE
  • 88. ARK OF JAH COVENANT From: vaeddoe.fhsk@pi.se Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: ARK OF JAH COVENANT Date: 29 May 1995 22:03:26 GMT Could any one help I with facts about the resting place of the ARK OF JAH COVENANT. I study Ethiopian history, roots and culture. I know Ethiopia is the land of the Ark. But I need more information. Please e-mail if you have anything about this. I see the Conquring Lion on the top of Mount Zion ! RastafarI Liveth in the heart of InI ! SELAM Kiddus Martin -----------------------From: redingtn@athena.mit.edu (Norman H Redington) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ARK OF JAH COVENANT Date: 31 May 1995 06:28:02 GMT Organization: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Here is a synopsis of Ethiopian history; my apologies for any errors and for boring anyone... A SKETCH OF CHRISTIAN ETHIOPIAN HISTORY by Norman Hugh Redington The St. Pachomius Project AXUM: Ethiopian culture is descended from that of an ancient empire called Axum, which had ties to Nubia (Sudan), Egypt, and Yemen/South Arabia. According to Ethiopian tradition, Axum included Sheba, and the Biblical Queen of Sheba, Makeda, introduced Judaism to the country around 1000 BC. Secular scholars agree Axum became largely Jewish, although they say it happened later under Yemeni influence. THE QUEEN IN JERUSALEM: According to the ancient "Book of the Kings" (-Kebra Negast-), Makeda was an unmarried philosopher-queen who had devoted her life to seeking wisdom. She had heard that Solomon was the wisest man alive, and went to Jerusalem to visit him. Unfortunately, the once holy king and builder of the Temple was now in his decadent old age, corrupted by power, and he used trickery to coerce the virgin queen into sleeping with him before she returned to the South. The great Assyrian poet Mar Ephraim wrote of this: The Queen of Sheba Was a sheep that had come into the place of wolves; The lamp of truth did Solomon give her, Who also married her when he fell away. She was enlightened and went away, But they were dark, as their manner was. The bright spark which went down home With that blessed [Queen], Held on its shining amid the darkness, Till the new Day-spring came. The bright spark met with this shining, And illumined the place. THE ARK: Ethiopians believe that that the Ark of the Covenant was brought to Ethiopia by Negus (King) Menelik, the son of Makeda and Solomon, during the turbulence after Solomon's death. (Supposedly, many of the Jewish priests and nobles wanted Menelik to succeed to the throne of Jerusalem instead of Rehoboam, and when this didn't happen, they prefered to live under his rule in Axum, where they soon intermarried with the local population.) All Ethiopians believe the Ark is still in East Africa today, at the Cathedral of the Theotokos "Mary of Zion" in Axum City. (COMMENT ON "THE SIGN & THE SEAL": A very strange book by a well-known English writer, Graham Hancock, has argued rather convincingly that the Ark in Axum is indeed the Ark of the Covenant, but that it came several centuries later via the Jewish Temple known to have existed in Elephantine, Upper Egypt. This argument, like several others in the book (e.g. that Ethiopia had dealings with the Crusaders in the Thirteenth Century), is very interesting and plausible, though entirely speculative. Unfortunately, the book is quite seriously marred by the inexplicable inclusion of much bizarre and sensational material which is almost certainly false.) "FALASHAS": Judaism was a major force in Ethiopia for centuries, and even after the coming of Christianity there were sometimes Jewish rulers like the famous Queen Judith, and REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 88 VOLUME ONE
  • 89. independent Jewish feudal states. Judaism persists in Ethiopia to this day, although as a declining minority religion. "Falashic" Judaism differs from rabbinical but is close to that of the Old Testament, because the presence of the Ark in Jewish hands enabled Temple worship to continue. Monasticism is also practised, a Jewish custom mentioned by Philo. Recently most Falashas (or Israelites, as they prefer to be called: Falasha is derogatory) migrated to Israel, where however they came into conflict with the religious authorities over their unusual traditions. An attempt to get Ethiopian Israelites to formally "convert" to (rabbinical) Judaism resulted in a massive division of Israeli public opinion and a crisis for the government; it has now been abandoned. It should be noted that most Ethiopians, including Christians and Muslims, consider themselves to be of partly Hebrew descent, and to be "children of Abraham" along with white Jews and Arabs. THE ETHIOPIAN EUNUCH: Ethiopian tradition claims that a representative of the people went to Jerusalem three times a year to fulfill Exodus 23:17. The Eunuch of Acts converted by St. Stephen was such a representative. Stress is placed on the fact that he is not called a gentile, showing that Ethiopians were part of the Hebrew nation. EARLIEST AXUMITE CHURCH: The Eunuch converted (the) Kandake, Queen of Axum, and her court. (Secular scholars think the Kandake was ruler of Nubia; perhaps she was both). St. Matthew also preached in Ethiopia, although the meaning of the word "Ethiopia" is not automatically the same in ancient and modern sources; to the ancients, it connoted everything south of the Sahara. ABBA SALAMA: Frumentius, a Phoenician traveler shipwrecked in Eritrea, is the "St. Patrick" of Ethiopia who consolidated and extended the Church and was first bishop. He is called Abba Salama, the father of peace. This was in the reign of King Ezana, 320-356. CHALCEDON: The Council of Chalcedon in 451, which proclaimed that Christ has two natures, was considered Nestorian (heretical) by the Egyptian Coptic Church on which the Ethiopian Church depended. Since that time, a schism has existed between Chalcedonian and Cyrillian (so-called "Monophysite") Orthodoxy. In recent years, however, talks between the two groups (with strong support by Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie until he was overthrown) have pretty well ended the schism. (Ethiopians, Copts, and Armenians are Cyrillian Orthodox; Russians, Greeks, people from the Balkans, and many Christian Arabs are Chalcedonian.) TEWAHEDO: Both Cyrillian and Chalcedonian Orthodox believe that Christ is at once fully God and fully man. To the Chalcedonians, this means that He has "two natures" (human and divine), but to the Cyrillian Copts the same idea means He has "one nature", God-man. (A recognition that the word "nature" is being used two different ways here is the basis on which the two sides have now reconciled.) The concept of "oneness" or tewahedo is very important in Ethiopian philosophy, which stresses the interconnectedness and interpenetration of all things. KING CALEB: Despite Chalcedon, relations between Axum and Byzantium remained good. The Emperor Justinian requested the help of Ethiopia's King Caleb, also called Ellatzban, in ending the persecution of Arabian Christians; Ellatzban is a saint revered by Greeks (and by Roman Catholics) in spite of being non-Chalcedonian. He ended his days as a hermit. It is said that coffee was introduced to the outside world by his soldiers. THE LITURGY was developed at this time, when angels revealed the appropriate melodies to ST. YARED. The Liturgy is celebrated in Geez, the Axumite language, which has the same role in African history as Latin in Western European. It is based on the Egyptian Coptic service, but shows Jewish influence; a "copy" of the Ark (actually more like an ikon) must be present at every liturgy. ZAGWE: The Axumite Empire fell a little after the Roman and not much is known of the following centuries. A dynasty called Zagwe, which was descended from King David of Israel but not from Solomon and the Queen of Sheba as the Axumite royalty were, eventually reestablished the Empire in mediaeval times. LALIBALA was the greatest Zagwe emperor. He built the famous rock-hewn churches which are one of Ethiopia's scenic wonders. His dates are 1172-1212. THE RESTORATION: The Zagwe emperor Nakuto-Laab eventually became convinced that only a descendent of Solomon had the right to rule Ethiopia, and resigned the throne. The new Solomonic dynasty developed an extremely advanced culture which reminds me of the Japanese Shogunate; poet-emperors lived in splendid isolation studying philosophy while highly cultured but rather ferocious feudal lords ran local affairs. TAKLA HAYMANOT lived around this time; he is one of the main monastic figures. He is depicted in ikons with six wings and one leg, the other having fallen off during a fast. He is, however, an indisputably historical figure. GABRA MANFAS hermit whose figure. Heis his tears to hyaenas. QEDDUS, the other great saint of Ethiopia, is a quasi-immortal Egyptian sanctity was such that even in saints' lives he appears as a mysterious shown in ikons clad in his own long hair and beard, with a bird which drank stay alive during a drought. He was accompanied by large numbers of lions and REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 89 VOLUME ONE
  • 90. PHILIP was the first "echege". Before the Ethiopian church became autocephalous, the patriarch was always a Copt from Egypt, who often did not even know Amharic. The office of echege or chief-of-monks, always occupied by a native Ethiopian, was a bridge between the patriarch and people, and sometimes a balance against patriarchal power. PORTUGUESE arrived in Ethiopia in the 1400s. They played an important role in defeating the great Somali conqueror AHMED GRAGN (i.e. Ahmed the Left-Handed), who nearly destroyed the Empire. They then attempted to colonize and Catholicize the country they had saved from Islam. SUSENIOS, emperor in the early 1600s, converted to Catholicism under Jesuit influence and persecuted the Orthodox who resisted him. This eventually provoked a back-lash; Orthodoxy was re-asserted and the country was closed to foreigners (again reminding one of Japan). THEOLOGICAL CONTROVERSIES of all kinds erupted in the wake of the Jesuits; the Adoptionist and other ancient heresies were reinvented and gained influential supporters. The Emperor JOSHUA convened councils which re-asserted traditional Orthodox teaching, although both Roman Catholics and Adoptionists retained influence in some areas. (Adoptionists say that Jesus Christ was only an adopted son of God, rather than God by nature.) THEODORE: In the 1700s the Empire decayed into feudal microstates. These were re-united in the 1800s by a Robin-Hood like bandit-chief of royal blood, who was crowned under the name Theodore. In Ethiopian tradition, a King Theodore is supposed to appear to battle the Anti-Christ, so this was a messianic sort of name; Theodore later took on even more ambitious titles, implying equality with God. Rejected by the Church, he provoked a disastrous war with Britain which destroyed his empire and and led to his own suicide. He is, nevertheless, the builder of the modern state, a very great and tragic figure. THE MODERN EMPIRE: Apart from Theodore's War, European expansion in the Nineteenth Century, battle of Adua in the 1890s. Under Menelik II as a modern industrial nation, and some would of the Europeans themselves. the and and say Ethiopian Empire successfully resisted defeated Italian armies at the famous Haile Selassie, Ethiopia began to emerge to pursue colonial policies like those AUTOCEPHALY: Haile Selassie, who was a pious Orthodox Christian, involved himself in church affairs and even considered one of the main achievements of his reign to have been obtaining a "Tomos of Autocephaly": i.e., the Ethiopian Church ceased to be under Alexandria and became self-governing. THE ITALIAN OCCUPATION: In the '30s, as revenge for Adua, Italy invaded and brutally occupied Ethiopia. Graziani, in charge of the occupation, hated all religions and attempted to destroy the Orthodox Church in particular by bloody persecution, although he did not spare Muslims, Jews, or even Catholics from his fury. HAILE SELASSIE: The Ethiopian government-in-exile, betrayed by the weak-willed League of Nations, was recognized as one of the Allies during World War II, and the Emperor returned in triumph at the head of an Ethio-British army. After the war, he continued his policies of modernization and made Ethiopia a leader in the Pan-African and Non-Alligned movements. However, he was accused by his enemies of despotism, and of favouring the Amhara ethnic group over all others. THE REVOLUTION: A Communist revolution unseated Haile Selassie in the '70s. (Initially the Marxist military junta, known as the Dergue, claimed to rule in the Emperor's name while keeping him under house arrest; then it reportedly killed him.) The regime of Col. Mengistu Haile Maryam emulated that of Stalin, killing thousands of people and especially persecuting the Church. The bodies of the Orthodox patriarch and of a leading Protestant, as well as that of Haile Selassie himself, were allegedly buried in an unmarked grave under Mengistu's office so that the dictator could exult in his triumph. MODERN ETHIOPIA: In the '80s a counter-revolution overthrew the Communists. The particular group which accomplished this was composed of Tigreans, whereas both the Royal Family and the Marxist junta had been Amharas. Soon afterwards, the coastal region called Eritrea declared its independence, and various minority groups, especially the Oromo people, began to assert themselves politically. As a result, an ethnic dimension now is very prominent in Ethiopian politics, along with tensions over modernization and democracy. How these matters will be resolved, only time will tell. My apologies to Ethiopian/Eritrean readers if I, an ignorant foreigner, have misrepresented the past of your great nation. ---------------------------From: sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu (Bush Doktor) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ARK OF JAH COVENANT Date: 31 May 1995 10:43:38 GMT Organization: University of Redlands You're never boring Norman. A Ethiopian friend has told me that Haile Selassie rests in a Addis Ababa coat closet. As I remember him saying... You must travel to a hill over-looking Addis Ababa proper to a small square church, built in 1911. Beneath it is the mausoleum of Haile Selassie's REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 90 VOLUME ONE
  • 91. predecessor, Emperor Menelik II. There are no tours. One has to find a priest to open the church. Once inside, you go to a cellar door, which you squeeze through to reach a stone stairway into the crypt. There you'll find the bodies of Menelik and his wife intombed in marble. On one wall are a collection of 500 year old bibles and built into the another is a coat closet. The doors have been replaced with glass. On a stand inside, lying crosswise and covered in red velvet brocade, is a coffin. A very small coffin with only a photograph to proclaim the king of kings. How true this is, I can only guess, but he has no reason to lie. He holds Haile Selassie to the utmost highs. >My apologies to Ethiopian/Eritrean readers if I, an ignorant foreigner, >have misrepresented the past of your great nation. Eritrea is said to to be a very beutiful area. As for Ethiopia proper, his funniest comment was that if you visit, be sure to take a handle for rolling up windows in taxis. It seems none of the taxis have handles to roll up the windows, so it's easier for people to beg thru the window at intersections. The children may be hungrey, but they are not stupid! :-) __ _____ __ __ ____ _____ ____ ____ ____ BUSH DOKTOR __ / // _ // // / / __ / _ // __ / _// __ sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu / // // _' // _ / / _.' // _' // /_/ /_/ / / /_/ / Sundays 6 to midnight ___//_//_//_//_/ /_/ |_|/_//_//_____//___/ ____/ K.U.O.R. 89.1 fm. *************************************************** University of Dreadlands * RAW #343 * * Blowing the FULL watts over nineteen years! --------------------------------From: scjoseph@aol.com (SCJOSEPH) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ARK OF JAH COVENANT Date: 31 May 1995 09:53:25 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Greetings -Norman, you're a prince among men. :-) Ethiopia is one of the most beautiful countries I've ever visited, and one of the mose sacred. Standing on the shore of the red sea, I swear I saw the beginning and the end of time all at once. Many people feel that Ethiopia was the original Garden of Eden. After visiting, I know it's true. Peace, SCJ Sister Carol Joseph SCJoseph@aol.com Emancipate yourself from mental slavery -- none but ourselves can free our minds. Marley. In Jah Love. ---Bob ---------------------------From: rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ARK OF JAH COVENANT Date: 31 May 1995 18:30:54 GMT Organization: University Of Utah Computer Center Bush Doktor (sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu) wrote: : You're never boring Norman. I agree totally. I found these posts fascinating and totally relevant to rmr. : A Ethiopian friend : coat closet. has told me that Haile Selassie rests in a Addis Ababa That's better than the stories I've heard: that he was buried beneath the palace bathroom. Did they ever catch Haile Mariam? Or is he hiding out in another country? -Robert Nelson Smile Jamaica, Sat. 4-7 PM KRCL 91 FM / KZMU 89.7 FM Salt Lake City / Moab, Utah rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide #14 Robin Hood robbed from the rich cuz the poor man ain't got no money ---Dennis Alcapone -------------------------From: scjoseph@aol.com (SCJOSEPH) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ARK OF JAH COVENANT REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 91 VOLUME ONE
  • 92. Date: 5 Jun 1995 09:32:49 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Greetings -Jeremy wrote: <stuff deleted> >>Another question......so what is the deal with traveling to and in Ethiopia? I >>have looked all over NYC for travel guides, and none are in any map or travel >>stores, although they have them for most other African nations....is travel >>discouraged by U.S. authorities? Is it too dangerous for Americans? Are there >>places to stay in Addis Ababa? I want to go back home.......................... You probably won't find any good information on travelling to Ethiopia in your run-of-themill travel agencies. You have to go to someone who specializes in African travel, and caters to an African clientele. There are several good ones here in Washington, DC -- email me and I can look some up for you. As for safety, it's not recommended that Americans travel to Ethiopia. It hasn't been safe for years. When I was there, I was told by the embassy that I was on my own. If anything happened to me, I was SOL. I don't know if it's still as unsafe today, though. I ended up having a wonderful time, and not one bad thing happened to me. There are hotels in Addis. If you're used to the Ritz-Carlton, you'll be sorely disappointed. If you're used to Motel 6, you might do okay. :-) All in all, Ethiopia is a beautiful country. The people are friendly, and love American music (Aretha Franklin was really popular when I was there. I got out of many a sticky situation just by singing "Respect" and "Chain of Fools.") The food is wonderful, and if you go there with the right energy and mindset, you could possibly have the spiritual awakening of your life. Hope this helped! Peace, SCJ Sister Carol Joseph SCJoseph@aol.com Emancipate yourself from mental slavery -- none but ourselves can free our minds. Marley. In Jah Love. ---------------------------- REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 92 VOLUME ONE ---Bob
  • 93. MAGAZINES From: Micke Tsiparis <Some.One@inst.lu.se> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Distant Drum Wailers rootzine Date: 30 May 1995 11:44:15 GMT Organization: Karolinska universitetet i Lund The new issue (#5) of Distant Drum should be out in a couple of days. Issue 1 and 2 has been reprinted and issue 3 and 4 are still aviable. The magazine mainly focus on Bob Marley, The Wailers and the Wailers legacy but also covers some other reggae artists. It is also great for getting contacts to exchange tapes and to buy and sell records. Intereted? Send 2 pounds or 3 US dollars for one issue to: Distant Drum Cry Freedom Productions P O Box 23 Wolverhamption ENGLAND WV6 OYU One Love Micke ------------------------------From: getthebeat@aol.com (GETTHEBEAT) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Upsetter Magazine#2 Date: 31 May 1995 20:55:03 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) THIS IS...UPSETTING! Announcing.... The long-awaited second issue of The Upsetter, a very special collector's edition of the legendary magazine devoted exclusively to Jamaica's eccentric madman/genius, Lee Perry. Now in preparation, issue 2, subtitled "The Upsetter Rides Out," focuses on the important years 1969-70, in which Scratch breaks away from Joe Gibbs and establishes his own Upsetter label. It also features a look at his connection with the Wailers, an extensive discography of this period, exclusive photos and another visionary Lee Perry diatribe. Edited by obsessed reggae collectors H.W. Targowski and David Kats, this is certain to be the most UPSETTING collector's item of the decade. Now accepting inquiries regarding distribution, advertising and single-copy orders. Email, or write to The Beat, P.O. Box 65856, Los Angeles, CA 90065, or leave message at (818) 569-3061. Expected publication date: July 30, 1995. An Anachron/Koncrete Jungle Lion/Beat Co-production. HOT NEWS: A very limited number of copies of issue #1 are still available. Send $10 check or money order to Bongo Productions, c/o The Beat, at address above. (U.S. funds only, drawn on U.S. or Canadian band. Outside U.S., add $4 for airmail postage & handling.) ----------------------------------From: timras@aol.com (TIMRAS) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Upsetter Magazine#2 Date: 1 Jun 1995 12:19:10 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) RAS mailorder has an unlimitted supply, ok 200+, of volume 1 for $5 plus shipping. ---------------------------------From: al302@lafn.org (William Just) Subject: Re: Upsetter Magazine#2 Organization: The Los Angeles Free-Net Date: Thu, 1 Jun 1995 22:12:27 GMT maybe the beat would like to buy some? ;-} -one love rasta4I jah bill REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 93 VOLUME ONE
  • 94. ---------------------------------From: regpeg <74467.3070@CompuServe.COM> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Reggae Report seeks writers Date: 8 Jun 1995 03:25:39 GMT Organization: reggae report magazine Greetings! We are looking for writers to contribute articles on soca/caribbean artists, hip-hop and african too. Also, we are looking for djs or sound system selectors to contribute top 10 charts from cities like San Francisco, Chicago, L.A., New York, Atlanta and Houston. Anyone interested, or knows someone interested, please contact us by phone, fax, mail or e-mail. Thanks. One Love! -From the stage. . .to the page! M Peggy Q Reggae Report PO Bbox 2722 Hallandale FL 33008-2722 ph 305-933-1178 fx 305-933-1077 74467.3070@compuserve.com info on dist, advt, subs, calendars, t-shirts, tapes available -------------------------------------From: lstephe409@aol.com (LStephe409) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Date: 9 Jun 1995 20:12:52 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) How much are you willing to pay your writers? -------------------------------------From: cwturnr@ibm.net (Spinna) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: DUBCATCHER magazine still kickin' Date: 28 Jun 1995 02:03:32 GMT Organization: Ruff Kut Reggae Productions Dubcatcher magazine is still alive, but on a more undergound level still. The summer issue is being distributed now and features Mad Lion on the cover, an extensive article on Prince Buster and also something on Jungle Music. Dubcatcher's address is: 14 East 4th Street 3rd Floor New York, N.Y. 10012 Phone number situation not resolved yet... will post as available. /**************************************** * --Spinna-* * Ruff Kut Reggae * * The cutting edge of Reggae... * * On Cable TV * ****************************************/ ----------------------------From: pilgrim@xmission.xmission.com (Papa Pilgrim) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: RAW WWW & Fantra Zine offer Date: 4 Jul 1995 19:26:39 GMT Organization: XMission Internet (801 539 0900) UNDER CONSTRUCTION Sherry Milne, a Committed Reggae Fan (RAW #341) is constructing a RAW Home Page for the WWW. Check it out and provide constructive criticism directly too Sherry. URL is: http://www.xmission.com/~turq/RAW/home.html Thank you Sherry for what you've done and are doing. I recently received a post from Italy and the sender was hesitant about joining Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide because "I'm only a fan and I don't think I can be of help to RAW." Sherry's efforts and the efforts of many others who are "just a fan" are as much a help and assett as all the rest of us. Yes, thank you Sherry. ________________________ The following is reprinted from Dub Missive Magazine: "By outward appearances, Fantra Zine is more magazine than fanzine. Inside, it is ruff cut and hard core. Editorials hit hard, and the cut and paste collage motif is sometimes difficult to follow but the views and news of this underground publication, conceived in and reporting out of the ghetto, give ink to both established artists and those ignored by REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 94 VOLUME ONE
  • 95. the "big guys." Cover price is US$2.50 for 60 pages of rap, Reggae, rock and a whole heap more. Jamekee Communications, 267 Fifth Ave., Ste. 801, New York, NY 10016." Jamekee Communications is offering an advertising discount to members of Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide and will donate 20% of sales from this offer directly to RAW. They are planning a RAW Conference issue, deadline August 15th, 1995. Be ready to provide your RAW membership number when you contact Jamekee Communications, 267 Fifth Ave., Ste. 801, New York, NY 10016. Tel: 212-340-1034; fax 212-679-2310. -____ _____ _. __. / __ / _ /// _ / / ----papa pilgrim pilgrim@xmission.com 500 / _.' // _' ///_//_// Forwarding the Reggae Vibe...Everytime! X /_/ |_|/_//_/ __/__/ Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide! c95 ------------------------------From: sademock@newstand.syr.edu (Susann A. Democker-Shedd) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: x-news Date: 7 Jul 1995 17:59:27 GMT Organization: Syracuse University, Syracuse NY, USA Despite the girlios and the taloid scandals I think xnews is the best reggae update source going. Since it's weekly it really keeps me up on the latest from yard and NYC. I only wish it was available thru subscrips. I wouldn't mind getting it a week late even. Glad to hear Rodigan and others posting stories out of it that's important to those of us who can't pick it up every week. I usually see it about once a month when I get down to the city. Big up all X-news crew hope some day you'll get on line and i can print out the parts i like. respect. Sis Sue REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 95 VOLUME ONE
  • 96. LIVE REGGAE CONCERTS From: mwilliam@postoffice.wcl.american.edu (Mark Williams) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Ken Boothe in D.C. - A Review Date: 30 May 1995 20:05:12 GMT Organization: Washington College of Law This show took place on Sunday, May 28th, here in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. The event was a fundraiser for, roughly speaking, hospitals in the Caribbean, hence the $20 ticket price. The venue was a church hall at the Beth El Congregation of Bethesda, MD, a jewish congregation. Allright, with those details out of the way, let me say that this was about as magical a show as someone as myself (a 29yr old white guy with a passion for oldies) could hope for. Everything about the atmosphere leading up to Ken's arrival on stage was quaint and almost strangely subdued. The people gathered there were 90% Jamaican and pretty much over 40 years of age, all dressed up like they were going to church (well, that's where we were, actually), or maybe, just maybe, a dance. What made the whole evening so uniquely special was the wonderful feeling I could see on everybody's faces once Ken Boothe came on stage and started singing hit after hit after hit. We had been seated for almost two hours, listening either to speeches by the organizers about the terrible health and supply conditions in hospitals back home, or to some very competent young singers doing a combination of oldies and originals with the band for the evening, "Real Rock." So, when Ken finally burst onto the stage like a young prize fighter, the dance floor almost immediately filled up as he kicked into "Freedom Street." Everybody was dancing and/or mouthing the words to all the songs, and Ken's voice was in excellent shape, as was he, dancing all over the small stage with hardly a pause. All the songs were done in a rock steady rhythm, including Artibella. Other songs performed included "Train Is Coming," "Say You" (encore; the harmonies were done nicely by the band on this one)), and "Puppet On A String." If anybody lives in this area and missed this show, you really missed something; these older guys won't be around much longer. Nothing could possibly replicate the feeling this show had though, with all those expatriates reliving some fond memories of their yesteryear in the company of one of their favorite performers from 25-30 years ago. Excuse my loving tone, but it was a special show. ---------------------------From: al302@lafn.org (William Just) Subject: Re: Ken Boothe in D.C. - A Review Organization: The Los Angeles Free-Net Date: Wed, 31 May 1995 18:00:50 GMT this is the kind of thing that just renews my feelings about reggae altogether. what a great show i wish i had been there. i had a similar experience in about 1978 or so when culture played at a little church in oakland ca (why? dont know). mostly attended by parishners, very little publicity and a wonderful show with total audience/performer communication and just a great memorable set. i was probably the only white guy there, most attendees were middle aged or older black citizens of the neighborhood and most seemed to be attending church service. a very spiritual experience for me and i would assume the rest of the congregation. Ras Tafari kok lol ... felt a similar feeling when i happened to see al green in new orleans at a church as well. thanks for taking the time to give us the review -one love rasta4I jah bill ---------------------------From: s790013@aix2.uottawa.ca () Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Desmond Decker.....et al,. Date: 31 May 1995 04:09:46 GMT Organization: University of Ottawa a simple question....why don't any old rock steady and/or Old Ska artists come to Canada? There is quite a following here... I'm looking for a few suggestions.....and by the way if anybody out there is within 75 KM of ottawa tune into 89.1 CHUO wednesday afternoons for -----> ONE STEP BEYOND/RADIO FREE SKA <----- Hosted by me Blondi...... REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 96 VOLUME ONE
  • 97. chuo 89.1 fm -----------------------------From: "H. Hosny" <rooke6@access4.digex.net> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Desmond Decker.....et al,. Date: Wed, 31 May 1995 06:35:20 -0400 Organization: Express Access Online Communications, USA Actually, Leroy Bamboo. I can't there are quite migrated in the Sibbles lives up in Toronto and plays pretty often in clubs like The recall the names of artists I saw perform there, but I can assure you that a few artists who "hover" around there because they've got relatives that late 60s to the Toronto area... Jackie Mittoo passed away in a Toronto hospital, King Jammy was briefly based in Toronto, Michael Rose's brother lives up there, etc., etc., etc. If you get back to me in e-mail, I can compile a list of people that I know to be up there....and perhaps doing gigs. Hany ----------------------------From: reggaeruss@aol.com (ReggaeRuss) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Desmond Decker.....et al,. Date: 31 May 1995 13:22:00 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Greetings, Leroy Sibbles has been living back in Kingston for about 1 1/2 years now, and is doing shows with the Heptones this summer. Russell ----------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: Desmond Decker.....et al,. Organization: Eskimo North (206) For-Ever Date: Sat, 3 Jun 1995 17:45:26 GMT I was speaking on the phone with Winston Jarrett yesterday, & he informed me that there is a new club in uptown Kingston on Consant Springs Road in that features oldies acts - so far they have presented Ken Boothe, John Holt, The Heptones, and many other artists... something to check out if you are visiting Kingston. Al -- Allen Kaatz (highnote@eskimo.com) *** "Enjoy yourself - it's later than you think!" (Prince Buster, 1963) *** ----------------------------From: sl164be@e45-hrze.uni-duisburg.de (Beckhaus) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Summer Jam 1995 Review Date: 6 Jul 1995 16:29:57 GMT Organization: Gerhard-Mercator-Universitaet - Gesamthochschule Duisburg Summer Jam 1995 - a personal review by the German Internet Reggae Posse (Anne and Peter) Watch out for our special summer jam page with many photos...: http://www.biologie.uni-freiburg.de/data/reggae/sjam.html WOW! What a Jam! The 10th anniversary of the Summer Jam festival is over! For the second time on the former RAF - airport in Wildenrath, CONTOUR as the organising company managed it for the first time to provide a (nearly) perfect festival. Sometimes it was of course a little bit too perfect (or German) and some things went bad (like every years water- and toiletproblems) but all in all it was quite OK. So what were the musical highlights of the Jam? He was there! It was his second concert in Germany ever and it was absolutely fantastic! Bunny Wailer did a more than 2 hours show, he played many old Marley and 'Wailing Wailers' songs and the audience was absolutely enthusiastic! I think it was the best reggae show I ever saw! And the other Reggae highlights? Of course Burning Spear and Israel Vibration were great and Macka B did a fantastic show but all these bands were on the Jam for the second or third time, so my the real highlights besides Bunny Wailer were the Mystic REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 97 VOLUME ONE
  • 98. Revealers and of course Shinehead ('I'm a Jamaican in Wildenrath'). Both did the afternoon shows on Saturday and Sunday, when most of the audience is on the camp ground to have some rest. But both managed to captivate the remaining people: Shinehead with his extravagant show, the Mystic Revealers by bringing their culture live on stage. -------------------------------------------------------------------LIFE, LOVE and UNITY !! Words spoken by the great DJ Big Youth and mixed up into a gorgeous dub by Dreadzone ...arousing goose-fleshes ... For me Dreadzone from Britain was the big surprise of this year's Summer Jam! Heated up by the sun these rhythms (variing from roots up to trance) caused people to vibrate and feel like LIFE, LOVE and UNITY !! Anne (: -------------------------------------------------------------------And the Worldmusic? After last years boring show by Manu Dibango as the only 'worldmusic'act, Contour this year mixed a much better not-reggae-program: Youssou N'Dour did his 'the guide' -show for the third time in Germany, Angelique Kidjo did her first concert here (she was brilliant!) and Yothu Yindi (Aborigine band from down under) impressed the reggae-audience with their voices and their dijeridoos! Fantastic to see all these different music styles on one festival! Next years Jam will not be in Wilderath, because Siemens will build a big factory there ... Contour did not announce any other location yet! Keep in touch! Anne & Peter -Peter Beckhaus E-Mail: Beckhaus@Uni-Duisburg.de If you are interested in information on German Reggae and Roots (Afro, latin, folk, worldmusic) - Concerts just contact me! REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 98 VOLUME ONE
  • 99. FEMINIST REGGAE ARTISTS From: mrs@haven.ios.com (Margaret Saraco) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: feminist reggae artists Date: 30 May 1995 16:51:37 GMT Organization: Internet Online Services Hello. I am looking to compile a list of feminist reggae artists for an article I am writing on women in music for "on the Issues." Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. Margaret R. Saraco Please reply to me privately. MRS@haven.ios.com -------------------------------------From: rlam@bgnet.bgsu.edu (Ronald E Lam) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists Date: 1 Jun 1995 13:57:54 GMT Organization: Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH (USA) ...the sistas nah call themselves "feminist," with all due respect please explain what you mean by "feminist?' thanks i once did a presentation on "women in reggae" re songs by conscious reggae women artists -irie,one love,roots music...everytime with culture, from Errol, aka roots-ee 419-372-7903,voice mail...and de beat goes on...and on...and on...respec'... i am the small axe...sharp and ready...to cut you down...sharp and ready... ------------------------------------From: aracekis@freenet.columbus.oh.us (Andrew Racevskis) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists Date: 2 Jun 1995 13:10:11 -0400 Organization: The Greater Columbus Freenet roots-ee say: : ...the sistas nah call themselves "feminist," with all due respect : please explain what you mean by "feminist?' : thanks don' wan' start argument, but can try to clarify the term: 'feminist' is a problematic term because on one hand, feminists themselves come from various angles, and there is *not* one prevailing ideology- it's a diverse camp. On the other hand, the opponents have succeeded in making 'feminism' a *bad word*, so everyone throws up the red battle flags... Very generally and simply, feminism holds that, while internationally there are various forms of downpression pertaining to nationality, race, religion, and so forth, in almost every society HALF the people (i.e. the sistas, females) are marginalized, denied equal rights and opportunities. For one evidence just look at the directors of almost any big corporation or government: white male. (sorry anti-PC-ers 8^) as far as social action, feminists generally recommend dialogue and awareness of patriarchal oppression, from hiring practices to sexual abuse... and demand EQUAL RIGHTS (and justice). When you really get down to it, these concerns apply to all downpressed groups-- how to empower or emancipate them, and take back control from the elites... Much important, radical work is being done in feminist studies, and it is dismaying that they get such a bad rap. No one says men are evil, just that our sistas deserve RESPECT. --Re: feminist reggae, I dunno... Except insofar as Babylon is a male establishment... suckin the blood of the sufferers. Queen Latifah attacks sexism pretty direc-ly, good to hear in the hiphop genre... REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 99 VOLUME ONE
  • 100. Sorry if this upsets anyone; just trying to define the terminology. maximum respec to Errol and the RMR crew -Drew --------------------------------From: agl1@psuvm.psu.edu Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists Date: Sat, 3 Jun 1995 03:58:40 GMT Organization: Penn State - Earth and Mineral Sciences While I am not sure what your definition of feminist is, I can assist with the names of some Women in Reggae (I did a show on this last November). I tried to focus on the issues that concerned women. These were social and political issues, family responsibility, poverty and their relationship with the men in their lives (not as adversial as advocated by the more militant "feminist" I have met in the US). Here are some names: Marcia Griffith (Jamaica's first lady of Reggae) Rita Marley (Family, male-female relations, Rastafarianism Judy Mowatt (many songs uplifting and empathizing with her sisters, especially the album "Black woman"), _Solo or as the I-three's, these are powerful women Miss Lou (Louise Bennett, Jamaica's 1st lady of peotry, has set her poems to music, check out "Dutty tuff"- hard times in Jamaica) Dreadlocks Fay Bennett (early 'dub' poet, circa 1970) Phyllis Dillon (60s rocksteady star, male-female relations) Norma Frasier (male-female relations) Merlyn Weber ("Why life is so hard")-- Allen Kaatz has more info Sista Carol (Social, political, family issues, check "Jah Disciple") Queen Majeeda(Dub poetess, album "Conscious", includes "Oh Daddy" asking for more responsibility from fathers as well as political and environmental issues) Sophia George (80s star, "Young man, yu too girlie, girlie...") J.C. Lodge (Lover's rock) Carlene Davis (Social, political-"Welcome home, Mr. Mandela", Lover's rock) Shelley Thunder(DJ/Rap artist, Jamerican style, one militant "feminist" song, "Kuff"...sometime a man fe get kuff...) Patra (Yes, even Patra had one conscious song, "Poor people's song) Nadine Sutherland (child protege all grown up and dealing with mostly with male/female relations) Sista Audrey (Lover's rock) Pam Hall (ditto) International ------------Judy Boucher (Lover's rock, out-a-England) Dawn Penn (ditto) Lisa M. (Reggaespan~ol) La Diva (ditto) Queen Latifah (US rap artist/actress, some reggae sounds and social conscious theme as well as the party time stuff) Amazulu (Afro/Caribbean/European mix, check album "World dance party") Arlene Laing | 503 Walker Building | Penn State University | University Park PA 16802 | http://www.essc.psu.edu/~laing| "Ranny, where yu is? "Leaning up aghence a banana tree" "Which banana tree?" "De banana tree dat is leaning up aghence me" - Miss Lou & Mass Ran ----------------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists Date: 2 Jun 1995 18:33:43 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises One that comes to mind is Lillian Allen. ----------------------------------- EZ Noh, mike From: bg147@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (Matthew Moore) Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists Organization: The National Capital FreeNet, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Date: Fri, 2 Jun 1995 19:16:38 GMT I don't think there are any well known strictly "feminist" women reggae artists. -**** Matthew Moore **** Email: bg147@FreeNet.Carleton.CA REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 100 VOLUME ONE
  • 101. ---------------------------------From: rlam@bgnet.bgsu.edu (Ronald E Lam) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists Date: 2 Jun 1995 19:42:30 GMT Organization: Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH (USA) In a previous article, aracekis@freenet.columbus.oh.us (Andrew Racevskis) says: >roots-ee say: >: ...the sistas nah call themselves "feminist," with all due respect >: please explain what you mean by "feminist?' >: thanks >don' wan' start argument, but can try to clarify the term: >is dismaying that they get such a bad rap. No one says men are evil, >just that our sistas deserve RESPECT. ...yes, drew...i man can "live wid dat." so then the original poster would like rmr-ers to list some "feminist" songs/singers?...right? like bob marley, no woman, no cry... like the former, now defunct, reggae band, crucial DBC, woman unite... like judy mowatt, black woman...( can't remember title...words like ...just because we're woman...don't treat us inhuman...we're not weak...we are strong...) like yvonne dean and ichelle cole...rasta woman... and there are others...??? have a good weekend, drew at the arts fest down deh inna i-lumbus, :-) errol aka roots-ee -irie,one love,roots music...everytime with culture, from Errol, aka roots-ee 419-372-7903,voice mail...and de beat goes on...and on...and on...respec'... i am the small axe...sharp and ready...to cut you down...sharp and ready... ---------------------------------From: rlam@bgnet.bgsu.edu (Ronald E Lam) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists Date: 2 Jun 1995 19:53:41 GMT Organization: Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH (USA) ...lillian allen...(title?) and a push ...and a push...and a push...and di baby he a born... ...macka B...(title?) ...(di nine months a pregnancy...) -irie,one love,roots music...everytime with culture, from Errol, aka roots-ee 419-372-7903,voice mail...and de beat goes on...and on...and on...respec'... i am the small axe...sharp and ready...to cut you down...sharp and ready... ----------------------------------From: aracekis@freenet.columbus.oh.us (Andrew Racevskis) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists Date: 2 Jun 1995 16:12:00 -0400 Organization: The Greater Columbus Freenet Errol seh: : : : : : : : : so then the original poster would like rmr-ers to list some "feminist" songs/singers?...right? like bob marley,[ no, woman no cry ] like the former, now defunct, reggae band, crucial DBC, woman unite... like judy mowatt, black woman...( can't remember title...words like ...just because we're woman...don't treat us inhuman...we're not weak...we are strong...) like yvonne dean and ichelle cole...rasta woman... nice ones -- thanks Errol... I also dig where Tosh interjects the Get Up Stand Up chorus alternately with "brothers!" and "SISTERS!" Nah Give Up (the fight) Drew (yes i, a jam-pack Ark Band weekend here!) ---------------------------------From: rlam@bgnet.bgsu.edu (Ronald E Lam) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists Date: 2 Jun 1995 20:38:43 GMT REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 101 VOLUME ONE
  • 102. Organization: Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH (USA) ...cool star... like carlene davis...winnie mandela... like akabu...all african woman UK band...( caught dem live inna columbus at ( the old) skankland on fifth avenue...a whole lp i man have...) ( hey drew, i man a catch the ark band inna findlay on sunday at the arts festival deh...:-) respec... -irie,one love,roots music...everytime with culture, from Errol, aka roots-ee 419-372-7903,voice mail...and de beat goes on...and on...and on...respec'... i am the small axe...sharp and ready...to cut you down...sharp and ready... ---------------------------------From: upbeat@wink.io.org (UpBeat) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists Date: 3 Jun 1995 16:10:51 GMT Organization: Internex Online, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (416 363 3783) Sister Breeze writes & performs strong, confident & concise messages of reality. She had a release on Shanachie: Jean "Binta" Breeze and toured with the Women in Reggae tour (Sister Carol, Judy Mowatt) in 93. -upbeat@io.org Toronto, Canada ---------------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists Organization: very little Date: Mon, 5 Jun 1995 19:09:00 GMT Anyone interested in the topic of feminism & Jamaican women should try to find a book called "Lionheart Gal, Life Stories Of Jamaican Women" which is composed of true stories of Jamacan women's lives, told in their own words, compiled from a women's collective in Kingston called "Sistren". Also if you visit their collective in Kgn, they have some real nice crafts/folk art etc. for sale there. Beyond the feminist agenda, it's a great book on it's own merits. Published by: The Women's Press Ltd 34 Great Sutton St London ECIV 0DX England. "If she should all cook a chicken, we cyaan get di leg or none of dem nice part. always get de leg. Might be das why me grow up to a love chicken wing." Di man (from the book) Al --------------------------------From: evancr@aol.com (Evan C R) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists Date: 5 Jun 1995 09:11:01 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) I have the book Lionheart Gal and have been looking for other works by the Sistren Theatre Colllective. I had heard they had disbanded a few years ago and the book which i found used was marked out of print. If anyone finds out more info, or can confirm that the collective is still operating, I'd appreciate the info! Jah Guide evancr@aol.com -------------------------------From: agl1@psuvm.psu.edu Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: feminist reggae artists (Sistren Theatre) Date: Tue, 6 Jun 1995 20:24:21 GMT Organization: Penn State - Earth and Mineral Sciences Actually Sistren Theatre Collective has been busy producing a new video on the life of the Honourable Miss Lou, Louise Bennett-Coverley, Jamaica's first lady of poetry and a longstanding social critic (tek bad tings mek joke) and feminist. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 102 VOLUME ONE
  • 103. The video entitled "The Drums keep sounding" should have been released in May but I have not yet heard anything about it yet. Sistren also runs workshops for women groups. Kensington Crescent, Kingston 5. Arlene Laing | 503 Walker Building | Penn State University | University Park PA 16802 | http://www.essc.psu.edu/~laing| Their address is Sistren Research, 20 "Ranny, where yu is? "Leaning up aghence a banana tree" "Which banana tree?" "De banana tree dat is leaning up aghence me" - Miss Lou & Mass Ran --------------------------------------- REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 103 VOLUME ONE
  • 104. RASTAFARI From: kaya00@aol.com (Kaya00) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Rasatfari Date: 31 May 1995 19:31:18 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Does anyone have any literature on the Rastafari religion, I know alot about it but would like to further my knowing.... Peace, Prosperity, Jah, Rastafari ---------------------------------From: jregan@email.unc.edu (James Regan) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Rasatfari Date: 2 Jun 1995 15:55:52 GMT Organization: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Greetings, I found an excellent hompepage at http://www.nation.org/~reynolds/rasta. It is called Virtual Niahbingi. ---------------------------------- respectfully, JP From: Colin Christopher <cchristo@ibl.bm> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Rasatfari Date: 3 Jun 1995 00:29:44 GMT Organization: Internet (Bermuda) Limited Greetings, check out the VIRTUAL NIAHBINGI at ; http://info.nation.org/~reynolds/rasta Give praises Humble Tafari ----------------------------------From: vaeddoe.fhsk@pi.se Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: 12 TRIBES OF ISRAEL Date: 1 Jun 1995 09:38:42 GMT Is there anyone who can tell Iman about the Twelve Tribes Of Israel. I need all information I can get. History. How to get in contact. An More. Iman wannna get organized. RASTAFARI LIVETH Kiddus ----------------------------------From: Micke Tsiparis <Some.One@inst.lu.se> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: 12 TRIBES OF ISRAEL Date: 1 Jun 1995 10:12:02 GMT Organization: Karolinska universitetet i Lund Try a swedish book by Arvidsson how writes about the whole rastafari-movement. I don´t have the name here but I will return tomorrow and give it to you. One Love Micke, Lund ----------------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: 12 TRIBES OF ISRAEL Organization: very little Date: Fri, 2 Jun 1995 23:08:11 GMT Their headquarters is on Hope Road in Kingston, you may be able to get the phone number from dialing information to the 809 area code (800-555-1212)..they also have a headquarters in Brookln NY, you could try calling there too. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 104 VOLUME ONE
  • 105. Al ----------------------------------From: Bo Peterson <bo.peterson@iea.lth.se> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: 12 TRIBES OF ISRAEL Date: 2 Jun 1995 12:59:33 GMT Organization: Lund Inst. of Technology, Ind. Electrical Engineering and Automation Kiddus, Micke's newsreader is sleeping at the moment, so he asked me to post about this book. The name of the book is "Den Högsta Sången" (The Highest Song) by Jan-Arvid Hellström, and it's published by Zindermans 1981. /Bo P email: bo.peterson@iea.lth.se http://www.iea.lth.se/~ielbo/wailers.html PS many thanks to all those who have filled in the wwwailers Top 5 vote form. I listen to all the songs you vote for, it's great. Check out the www-site above if you haven't voted already. ----------------------------------From: rabuzzi@patch.tandem.com (Matthew Rabuzzi) Newsgroups: alt.usage.english,soc.culture.caribbean,rec.music.reggae Subject: Grounation, reggae, ska, calypso: etymology Date: 7 Jul 1995 20:30:11 GMT Organization: Tandem Computers Inc., Cupertino CA In _Roots of Rastafari_ by Virginia Lee Jacobs is the following definition: Grounation -- the affirmation of life through the earth; takes place annually on April 21 when the Rastas gather in the countryside to commemorate Haile Selassie's visit to Jamaica in 1966. First of all, is this definition correct? Does this event happen? No Webster's has the term, nor does the Oxford English Dictionary, nor does Mircea Eliade's massive Encyclopedia of Religion. Second, what does the word derive from? "Ground"/"grounding"? Third, the OED gives a speculative etymology of "reggae" from Jamaican English "rege-rege" = "quarrel". The terms don't seem at all semantically related to me. Anyone have a better theory? Fourth, "ska" and "calypso" no dictionary has a guess for, etymologically. (I think we can likely rule out connection with Odysseus for the latter.) Side note on the phrase "I and I": The Ethiopian Church, like the Armenian, Coptic, and Jacobite, split from "Western" Christianity sometime before 200 CE. This was the monophysite schism, which holds that Jesus' divine and human natures are fused into one, something denied by the Councils of Chalcedon and Nicaea. Rastaism is of course rooted in Ethiopia, and its brand of monophysitism (I don't know about the others) holds that necessarily human nature includes the divine. Thus God is physically present in everybody, which is why a Rasta refers to himself as "I and I" -- the God within me, and my own personal ego. ................. followups to alt.usage.english .................... One love, Matthew Rabuzzi -----------------------------From: carlolsen@dsmnet.com (Carl E. Olsen) Newsgroups: alt.usage.english,soc.culture.caribbean,rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Grounation, reggae, ska, calypso: etymology Date: Fri, 7 Jul 1995 20:06:33 Organization: Des Moines Internet The term "ground" as I heard it commonly used by Jamaicans, means roughly "to reach an understanding with someone" on any particular issue, but usually of a spiritual nature. assume that the word is derived from "ground" or "grounding" as you suggest, although I never heard any Jamaican I've ever met use the term "grounation". REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 105 VOLUME ONE I
  • 106. Sincerely, Carl Olsen ---------------------------------From: ldaniels@bilbo.bio.purdue.edu (Larry Daniels) Newsgroups: alt.usage.english,soc.culture.caribbean,rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Grounation, reggae, ska, calypso: etymology Date: 8 Jul 1995 03:22:05 GMT Organization: Purdue university it may be futile to try and find the roots of Jamaican Phrase and expressions from english.Apart from the contraction of english words,the word itself more often than not takes on a totally different meaning.I and I as a phrase has no historical connection to anything outside of Jamaica.Early Rastas used I or Dread as a prefix after contracting the original english word eg. Natural became Ital,and Coconut - Dreadnut. Rasta philosophy projects the I as the interconnectedness of Man - Environment - God.It's interesting to note that the philosophy has no rigid stucture and it was not bourne out of intellectual pursuits or from learned men - which makes it even more fascinating. JAH GUIDE.........Larry -"small minds discuss people,average minds discuss events,great minds discuss ideas"..." who the cap fit let them wear it " ---------------------------------From: libisama@aol.com (Libisama) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: HISTORIC RASTAFARI CDs Date: 8 Jul 1995 00:47:45 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) The following is being reposted for those who are interested, since a telephone number through which the cd can be ordered is now available. To order, or for further information, call 718 515-4156. It should be added that each cd comes with a 60-page introduction (the same introduction for both volumes), as well as a separate booklet (approximately 35 pages) containing transcriptions and photographs. These are included in the prices given below. FINALLY, THE VOICE OF THE ELDERS CAN BE HEARD! KULUNGU... Vols. 1-4 CD's (with Introduction and Transcripts) Learn the real cultural roots of the RASTAFARI from The People who founded the Movement KULUNGU TRADITIONAL RASTAFARI KUMINA SONGS, PRAYERS AND REASONING OF THE HOWELLITES THE FIRST RASTAFARI COMMUNITY Taped, Transcribed, Edited, Recorded, Produced by RAS E.S.P. McPHERSON B.A. (HONS.) May 1995 KULUNGU The CD Series Available for Sale Now! Vol. 1 The Initiation Learn first hand of the beginning and true meaning of Rastafari. prayers, conversation and declarations of faith. This CD includes songs, Vol. 2 The Howellites Meet the Nyahbinghi Two cultures, deeply rooted in our history, meet and blend. how both cultures survived. Understand how it began and Single CD - $20 Both CD's - $40 REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 106 VOLUME ONE
  • 107. Available Presale Vol. 3 The Howellites Meet the Nyahbinghi (cont'd.) The continuation of volume 2, Vol. 4 Pure Kumina Songs and Prayers The uninterrupted sound of uplifted voices, praising the Almighty. WHY KULUNGU? Our People MUST come to learn how a cultural fragment known as "KUMINA" -- the oldest form of African Religion on this post-emancipation plot, Jamaica -- was embraced by the Rastafari Culture, transformed and Rastaologized. We must come to appreciate the cultural continuity of this Ancestral Worship and Celebration of Life that began the Rastafari histography -- that today is not seen to be the cultural mode/norm that qualifies/characterizes the Rastafari Movement in the main. (It must be noted keenly that both Kumina and Rastafari -- as indigenous Black Churches -- rmain officially unincorporated, stigmatized and repressed by the state, "church," and educational system, in a futile effort to marginalize the African Personality and as such, the legacy of Our heritage.) "KULUNGU" gives full validity to the transatlantic transmission theory that holds that Our African Culture traveled with Us across "the salty sea," remained alive, tactically selectively adapted, and still LIVES immanent within Us, and evident in all the fragments of Africa made manifest in the African paradigms throughout the Diaspora. BRO. LEONARD PERCIVAL HOWELL (The First Announcer of the Rastafari Culture/Faith), and THE HOWELLITES collectively, skillfully utilized KUMINA as a strategy and A Way of Life. It was the beginning of an identification of cultural action with social change as a development imperative. Rastafari reached beyond European Christianity into the depth of their religiosity (psycho-cultural core) -- their spirituality -- and discovered TheDivine-within-Us. The Howellites (and the earliest Rastafari Founders and Organizations) gave expression to that Divinity, for it was Our Humanity. It was out of this expression that reformulated Africa-derived cultural expressions were to emerge. The expressions that emerged were our language, our music, our dance, our thought patterns [Reasoning], our laughter, our walk, our spirituality. These iconic forms were the vehicles through which the Howellites (Rastafari Community) expressed themselves in Jamaica/the Americas. The CD's, KULUNGU Vols. 1 and 2, can be obtained by writing to: Ras E.S.P. McPherson Co-Chairman, Ethiopia Jamaica Society N.Y. Chapter 430 Sterling Place, Suite 3B Brooklyn, NY 11238 Praises! (NOTE: Please do not reply to this message via email; replies sent to this e-mail address will not reach the author, and will receive no response.) REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 107 VOLUME ONE
  • 108. CHINESE LAUNDRY DUBS From: silval@ic.gc.ca (Larry M. Silva) Subject: chinese laundry dubs??? Organization: Industry Canada Date: Thu, 1 Jun 95 17:08:44 GMT Does anyone know where I can get some chinese laundry dubs??? i used to get mine in Toronto, ON but thier quite scarce now.. are they even making them anymore??? this is me first time posting seeen.. so dont be flammin' me if she dont come up right! thanx ease-up LMS -------------------------------From: al302@lafn.org (William Just) Subject: Re: chinese laundry dubs??? Organization: The Los Angeles Free-Net Date: Fri, 2 Jun 1995 16:12:55 GMT does anyone have the slightest idea what hes talking about? just wondering... -one love rasta4I jah bill -------------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: chinese laundry dubs??? Date: 2 Jun 1995 19:31:06 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises A year or two ago someone posted some "chinese laundry" mix sound sample files to the archives. They sounded like hard core ragga to me ... My office mate liked them and always asks me if I know where to find more. EZ Noh, mike -------------------------------From: jansson@cc.helsinki.fi Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: CHINESE LAUNDRY DUBS??! Date: 4 Jun 95 13:11:55 EET Organization: University of Helsinki Greets & how yuh goin people!! Well, I saw this postin concernin' some Chinese Laundry Dubs; Chinese Laundry comes from TRINIDAD, and it at least use to be a very popular group of local DJ who mix sounds real sweet!! They also did some dubs themselves; I have the lil drummerboy-version they did... I heard someting about them havin problems with the copyright-people after T&T got a bit more strict about these tings some years ago. Is a shame if the fellas are not in business any-more, gotta ask the relatives ab. it. Cousin George (Ling, nowadays residing in Canada: Hey G., remember me man??) knew these guys pretty well in them days (1989-90)...I never got to meet them myself. lookin at the 1992-93 phone directory of T&T, I noticed that under the recordstore listings there's an address & phonenumber for the Chinese Laundry recordshop, here it is: CHINESE LAUNDRY 123 Eastern main Rd., Barataria Tel. 674-5321 Wishin all de best to all Trini massive everywhere & especially the guys of Chinee landry; Yuh fellas made Dub sound SWEET...!!!! Mika Trini-Finny Connexxion ----------------------------------REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 108 VOLUME ONE
  • 109. From: cedmon01@fiu.edu (Christopher A. Edmonds) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: chinese laundry dubs??? Date: 4 Jun 1995 18:41:38 GMT Organization: Florida International University, Miami I think Tony (aka Chinese Laundry) is very busy in the a result is turning out a lot fewer tapes. I have #33, April, it really is quite boring by CL standards, very other guys are starting to improve their style though, Outlaws and Howie T. radio station biz right now, and as which was the most recent one as of little studio mixing, etc. Some in Tony's absence, like Downtown Good luck, |--/--| /-------/ || Christopher A. Edmonds - Dept of Electrical Eng. | |/__ __/ M A X I || Florida International University, Miami, Florida | |/| | | | T A X I || edmondsc@solix.fiu.edu cedmon01@servax.fiu.edu |_| |_| |__| || cedmon01@solix.fiu.edu "SOCA//REGGAE//HOUSE!!" -----------------------------------From: st1vl@rosie.uh.edu (Mr. Rony I. Perry) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: chinese laundry dubs??? Date: 4 Jun 1995 14:43 CDT Organization: University of Houston I picked up a wicked tape from Dr. Hyde when I down in T&T this past Christmas season. It has some good selections. Rony P. ----------------------------------From: pilgrim@xmission.xmission.com (Papa Pilgrim) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: chinese laundry dubs??? Date: 4 Jun 1995 20:02:18 GMT Organization: XMission Public Access Internet (801 539 0900) Will someone be kind enough to teach all of us a bit about CL Dubs? From what I've read this appears to be a T&T happening. I'd appreciate a bit more info just as a matter of curiousity. Thank you! -Papa Pilgrim <pilgrim@xmission.com> |"Nite Roots" |Tel:801-355-1405 Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide |KRCL 90.9FM |Fax:801-355-1405 Keep It Simple, Make It Fun |Salt Lake City |KISMIF ***"FORWARD THE REGGAE VIBE...EVERYTIME!*** ---------------------------------From: aries <lwatso1@zeus.towson.edu> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: chinese laundry dubs??? Date: Mon, 5 Jun 1995 10:31:46 -0400 Organization: University of Maryland, Baltimore County Well I guess the best person to do it would be someone from Trinidad... but Chinese Laundry, as Chris said, is a (was a ) Trini set that really used to mash up the place, They really were pretty good, and probably still are, but I haven't heard anything from them for a long time. In the late eighties, early nineties they used to come to Jamaica in the heat of the party going season (summer, xmas) to throw session an' ting, always well recieved and well attended... just sounds to me like they've entered the studio and are producing now is all, and judging from their prior record, their stuff may be good. Onelove Lisa REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 109 VOLUME ONE
  • 110. HUGH MUNDELL From: i.dread@ix.netcom.com (Stephen Macaleer) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Hugh Mundell Date: 4 Jun 1995 20:52:35 GMT Organization: Netcom I am listening to new disc, Hugh Mundell - Africa Must Be Free by 1983 and I like it a lot. I believe someone told me that this guy is no longer with us. What's the story? -----------------------------------From: grant <GRANT@grantg.demon.co.uk> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Hugh Mundell Date: 6 Jun 1995 10:23:16 +0100 Organization: Demon Internet News Service stephen hugh mundell. born 14 june 1962, kingston, ja. first recorded for joe gibbs in his teens on "where is natty dread". augustus pablo enlisted him to his rockers sound system. according to pablo: "Well, I know Hugh from when he was likkle, y'know, likkle bit 'im and Earl Sixteen. Through I saw 'im in the studio [Joe Gibbs] one day an' some musician was 'andle 'im a way, so I kinda defend 'im an' tek 'im away from them, an', y'know, 'im say 'im sing, an' when he mek me 'ear 'im music, I say 'Wha!' 'Im mus' 'ave to do some music for Errol T [Gibbs' resident engineer], ca' Errol did like 'im voice, but them wasn't really showin' that much interest. So I jus' tek 'im on from them, an' 'im songs were some dangerous reality. An' I jus' came an' rehearse one time an' from I rehearse 'im, he was goin' school still, y'know, 'im was 11 plus, an' he jus' stop goin' school an' start recordin'. I think it Stratch [Lee Perry] studio me carry 'im record firs', ca' them time I still 'ave a vibes with Scratch an' 'im jus' gi' me some free studio time [for] 'Let's All Unite', y'know? It was a nice tune to bring 'im on the scene. Then we recorded 'Africa Must Be Free' down at Channel One. I really made that riddim before as an instrumental, an' I jus' had it there, I never knew what I was g'wine do with it all time, an' 'im hear that riddim an' say, 'Yeah', 'im can fit in the lyrics 'pon it. To me that was his hit to the world, although it wasn't a number one tune in Jamaica, but it was jus' a number one to the world, the people in the world, the roots people too............Junior Read was in the car that day he died, y'know? Junior Reid jus' sittung inna the back an' the bullet pass Junior Reid an' hit Mundell in his head back." [interview by lol bell brown & the rootsman, dub catcher no. 8] ironically, it was "1983" when mundell died, sitting in his car after an argument over a fridge. mundell's 1978 lp "africa must be free" was a classic, with incredible production by pablo. mundell also recorded dj tunes for pablo under the alias "jah levi." in 1981, he tried producing himself with releases on the mun-rock label, financed by his father. then he recorded albums for prince jammy and henry junjo lawes. but his best songs were cut for pablo. try these albums: african must be free [ja:message 1978] re-issued cd: greensleeves grelcd 504 jah fire [uk:live & love lap 13 197?] time and place [ja:mun rock mmlp 001: 1981] mundell [uk:greensleeves grel 36: 1982] re-issued cd: grelcd 36 blackman's foundation [us:shanachie 43012: 1985] re-issued cd: shancd 43012 arise [uk:atra atralp 1007 1987] the sleevenotes of the latter album are more interesting than its below-average content (and innacurrate track listing): "Hugh Mundell was born in East Kingston, Jamaica on June 14 1962. He was born into a middle class family, his father Alvin Mundell being a well known lawyer. ....Whilst at Ardenne High School, at age 12, he started singing and writing lyrics. He used to hang out on Swansea where Wayne and Winston Mackinoff also used to hang out......Winston and Hugh, feeling confident and wanting to record, visited several studios in the hope of securing a contract.....It was at a subsequent visit to Joe Gibbs that Hugh first ran into Augustus Pablo, who defended him from the rudeness of a fellow musician. Hugh used to constantly visit Aquarius Studios but was constantly being reprimanded by Herman Chin-Loy, the proprietor, for not being at school. It was on one of these visits that he once again met Pablo, who asked him to audition for him......Hugh left three children and kept fit by jogging, playing football and exercising. Before his death, he produced his first artist, Junior Reid, on 'Speak The Truth' and made his first overseas tour to Bermuda in June 1981 to celebrate his 18th birthday." on the sleeve of "arise", mundell is photographed wearing a t-shirt from bermuda. he is smiling. it is an appalling tragedy that someone so talented and so gifted should be shot dead at such a young age. but mundell's music will live with us forever. buy and enjoy REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 110 VOLUME ONE
  • 111. "africa.....", "black man foundation" and, if you can find it in a secondhand vinyl shop, "time and place". they are all filled with classic reggae songs recorded over some of pablo's best ever rhythms. you wil also find these songs, and others under mundell's dj alias, on pablo's various artist compilations. salute hugh mundell - a young genius who deserved more time in this world. -grant e-mail:grant@grantg.demon.co.uk ------------------------------------From: aries <lwatso1@zeus.towson.edu> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Hugh Mundell Date: Wed, 7 Jun 1995 09:01:11 -0400 Organization: University of Maryland, Baltimore County Fi real, just heard Blackman's foundation album, some wicked Pablo an' ting. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 111 VOLUME ONE
  • 112. ON-U SOUND RECORDS From: lawrenc6@ix.netcom.com (Lawrence Jay BUCHALTER) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae,rec.music.ambient Subject: ON -U RECORDS MAILING LIST? Date: 5 Jun 1995 01:10:16 GMT Organization: Netcom hI how do i sign up please Larry:>) ----------------------------------From: cspot@netcom.com (Chris.Hilker) Subject: Re: ON -U RECORDS MAILING LIST? Message-ID: <cspotD9op2D.A6K@netcom.com> Organization: United Church of the Low End Date: Mon, 5 Jun 1995 05:11:00 GMT Mail majordomo@connect.com.au with "subscribe on-u" in the message-body. C. ----------------------------------From: grant <GRANT@grantg.demon.co.uk> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae,rec.music.ambient Subject: Re: ON -U RECORDS MAILING LIST? Date: 6 Jun 1995 10:23:17 +0100 Organization: Demon Internet News Service larry there is an on-u sound bulletin board on the net. more info from jrb@dir.mcc.ac.uk. on-u sound operate a mail-order service with regular updates mailed with new release info. snail mail to: on-u sound mail order, po box 1460, london n10 2dq, england. look out for these new releases: various: pay it all back volume 5 [released 10 apr 95] happy happer: cd/lp 77 [released 5 Jun 95] two bad card: leaving rome: vinyl 12": dp 33 [released 15 may 95] singers & players: volume 2: cd 76 [released mid-july 95] dub warriors: ep: cd/vinyl 12": dp 34 [released 12 jun 95] two bad card: hustling ability: cd/lp 78 [released winter 95] akabu: [untitled]: cd/lp [released winter 95] bim sherman: [acoustic]: cd/lp [released winter 95] also, on the pressure sound label for reggae re-issues: santic & friends: an even harder shade of black: ps cd/lp 001 [out 8 mar 95] price far i & the arabs: dub to africa: ps cd/lp 002 [out 17 apr 95] israel vibration: the same song: ps lp/cd 003 [out 5 jun 95] keith hudson: brand: ps lp/cd 004 [out 10 jul 95] various: sampler: ps lp/cd 005 [out sep 95] also, check keith leblanc's label "blanc" whose latest releases are: tackhead: power inc. volume 1: blccd 10 [out 30 may 95] tackhead: power inc. volume 2: blccd 11 [out 16 jun 95] these two cds compile all the singles that originally came out under the tackhead, fats comet, gary clail and doug wimbish names in the 1980s on various labels including rough trade, world, on-u sound. you can contact blanc records at: po box 3671, london nw8 0dz, england happy listening!! -grant e-mail:grant@grantg.demon.co.uk -----------------------------------From: M.R.Platts@sussex.ac.uk (Matthew Platts) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ADRIAN SHERWOOD:African Headcharge, Tackhead, Dub Syn,NEW AGE STEPPERS Date: Mon, 05 Jun 95 10:29:58 GMT Organization: University of Sussex Language Centre Take a look on the following FTP server, over here in the UK: REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 112 VOLUME ONE
  • 113. ftp://ftp.mcc.ac.uk/pub/on-u/ There's a thorough discography of On-U Sound recordings, press releases etc. held there. Hope that's what you're looking for... Cheers, Matt ---------Matthew Platts, Language Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, East Sussex BN1 9QN, England. E-mail: M.R.Platts@sussex.ac.uk http://www.sussex.ac.uk/langc/welcome.html REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 113 VOLUME ONE
  • 114. THE LEE PERRY TAPES From: sboyle822@aol.com (SBoyle822) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Abraham / Clocktower reissues Date: 5 Jun 1995 13:16:35 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Just saw the full page ad in the latest issue of THE BEAT for reissues of the Clocktower label on CD, including Scratch Perry's "Blackboard Jungle Dub" and Prince Jazzbo's Perryproduced "Ital Corner". My blanket assumption, based on their past releases, is that Abraham uses vinyl - often in poor condition - for the mastering source on their CD's. A few year's back, when RAS Records was selling copies of the "Ital Corner" lp, I phoned to ask whether it would be appearing on CD. The answer at the time was that the tapes were missing, and only the vinyl remained. ----------------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: Abraham / Clocktower reissues (Perry tapes) Organization: very little Date: Wed, 7 Jun 1995 17:22:14 GMT Where ARE Lee Perry's tapes, anyway? At one point I was talking to fellow collector Leroy Pierson about this, he told me that he had tried to talk to Scratch on several occasions about putting out his older material but that Perry seemed utterly untinterested in the older music. ...Did he destroy his tapes? It's seems hard to imagine that he could destroy them after all the effort he put into that music... al ----------------------------------From: al302@lafn.org (William Just) Subject: Re: Abraham / Clocktower reissues (Perry tapes) Organization: The Los Angeles Free-Net Date: Thu, 8 Jun 1995 16:43:01 GMT the story i heard a long time ago was that scratch started haveing serious problems with delusional paranoia and thought the "rastas were out to get him". his solution? burn down black ark studio with all the tapes inside. that oughta fix em. unfortunately, a heap of tapes disappeared leaving only those that were stashed with island or elsewhere. a total legacy up in acrid smoke. urban folklore? then where ARE the tapes? -one love rasta4I jah bill --------------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: Abraham / Clocktower reissues (Perry tapes) Organization: very little Date: Fri, 9 Jun 1995 19:33:06 GMT I've heard that story too - I just didn't want to believe it. questions on this subject the next time I go to JA in July. I am going to ask further Al ---------------------------------From: Brian Tremblay <btremblay@delphi.com> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Abraham / Clocktower reissues (Perry tapes) Date: Sat, 10 Jun 95 22:34:13 -0500 Organization: Delphi (info@delphi.com email, 800-695-4005 voice) I've read in a magazine much the same thing: material (except to sample it, I suppose). Scractch isn't real interested in his older I've always assumed the story about Perry destroying his studio was true. I'd be more than a little interested to hear what you learn about this. I guess I've always assumed it to be true because I've read it in fairly reputable sources. Fortunately, not all the tapes are mia. From what I know, Trojan has some, Island has some, and apparently, Perry himself has some, which have been used for the Heartbeat reissues like Lee Perry _Soundzs From the Hotline_ and The Mediations _Deeper Roots_ (for "Think So" and "No Peace"). Also, Wasn't King Tubby holding on to some of his tapes at REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 114 VOLUME ONE
  • 115. his studio before he was murdered? Lee? Weren't these tapes subsequently stolen? By Bunny -BTrem --------------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: Abraham / Clocktower reissues (Perry tapes) Organization: very little Date: Sun, 11 Jun 1995 17:15:37 GMT Brian Tremblay <btremblay@delphi.com> wrote: >Fortunately, not all the tapes are mia. From what I know, Trojan has some, >Island has some, and apparently, Perry himself has some, which have been >used for the Heartbeat reissues like Lee Perry _Soundzs From the Hotline_ >and The Mediations _Deeper Roots_ (for "Think So" and "No Peace"). Yes, these tapes were leased out by Perry before the fire or had been stored elsewhere, & so were not in Black Ark when the fire occurred. I have since found out that there are some Perry tapes floating around Kingston, that were stolen out of the Studio before the fire - but nobody wants to deal with that scene... so that music is in limbo - reportedly among these tapes is some Wailers' material. Al REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 115 VOLUME ONE
  • 116. REGGAE LYRICS From: gt45@ix.netcom.com (Jerrelle Williams) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: lyrics Date: 5 Jun 1995 21:09:32 GMT Organization: Netcom Anyone know where I can get reggae lyrics? --------------------------------From: silval@ic.gc.ca (Larry M. Silva) Subject: Re: lyrics Organization: Industry Canada Date: Tue, 6 Jun 95 12:54:35 GMT Try going to da Jammin Reggae Archives Home Page... JAMMIN REGGAE ARCHIVES Home Page,http://jammin.nosc.mil/jammin.html BiGUP! DaddY SiLVA.. ---------------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: lyrics Date: 6 Jun 1995 15:05:54 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises The Jammin Reggae Archives have been moved: WWW: http://www-cse.ucsd.edu/users/ddiplock/jammin.html Gopher: jammin.nosc.mil (OUT OF ORDER) Ftp: abel.math.uga.edu - reggae directory EZ Noh, mike ------------------------------From: reid@police.ec.usf.edu. (Marc Reid (EC)) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: lyrics Date: 8 Jun 1995 17:26:32 GMT Organization: Univ. of South Florida, College of Engineering if you have access to Netscape/Mosaic, you can find a nice lyrics selection at the Jammin' reggae Archives. Natty Surfin'! -++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +Marc Reid -"those who know know, those who don't better find out"++++++++++++++ +reid@suntan.eng.usf.edu, reid@groucho.usf.edu +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ------------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: lyrics Date: 8 Jun 1995 20:46:21 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises If you're just looking at text, you can also use 'lynx', the text-based Web browser. Of course, you can always use FTP. The addresses have changed recently: To access the archives: Anonymous FTP: abel.math.uga.edu - reggae directory Gopher: jammin.nosc.mil (OUT OF ORDER) WWW: http://www-cse.ucsd.edu/users/ddiplock/jammin.html EZ Noh, mike -------------------------------From: grant <GRANT@grantg.demon.co.uk> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 116 VOLUME ONE
  • 117. Subject: Re: lyrics Date: 7 Jun 1995 07:14:12 +0100 Organization: Demon Internet News Service jerrelle one entertaining source of reggae lyrics can be obtained from: jkn productions, po box 57066, nairobi, kenya. they produce a series of little printed booklets called "catch the words" that sell in music shops for 45 kenyan shillings. catch the words volume 29 includes the lyrics to bob marley's "legend" album. you'll be pleased to learn that "no woman no cry" includes the lines: say i remember when we used to sit in a government's yard in swedes town over over trampling people graves and they would mingle with the good people we meet. and "get up stand up" includes the memorable lyrics: preacher man only tell me heaven is only near i know you don't know what life is really worth he's as old as piece of gold after story i've never been told so now you see the right yea to stand up for your rights. and "waiting in vain" includes these immortal words of love: like i've said, there's a continuation sound knocking on your door and i still can knock some more uuuh girl uuuh girl is it easy going i wonna know now, for i do not want to mourn. on page 32 of this booklet is printed the disclaimer: "Every effort is made to ensure that all the information contained in the CATCH the WORDS is correct. However information can become out of date and author's or printers error(s) can creep in......." other volumes worth a look at are: bob marley's "uprising" [not numbered]; gregory isaacs' "night nurse" [volume 18]; and don carlos and gold's "raving tonight" [volume 24]. they all provide hours of unexpected entertainment. -grant REGGAE ON THE INTERNET e-mail:grant@grantg.demon.co.uk page 117 VOLUME ONE
  • 118. REGGAE ARGUMENTS From: DSMC70A@prodigy.com (Lester Stockel iii) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: ****WHAT AHPPENED TO REGGAE?***** Date: 7 Jun 1995 03:08:40 GMT Organization: Prodigy Services Company 1-800-PRODIGY Reggae has gone to crap. I love old school reggae, like bob and desmond. But look at it now. It's all sex and rap and horrible stuff. That's why i like ska, it kept the same attitude and hasn't changed. I think reggae should go back to the old ways. Just my humble opinion. -----------------------------------From: moonstar@well.com (Farmer Tea) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ****WHAT AHPPENED TO REGGAE?***** Date: Wed, 07 Jun 1995 14:42:52 -0400 Organization: Human Stop live in the past ... FORWARD!!!! Farmer Tea -Field of Green = http://www.pitt.edu/~tshst4/farmer.htm ------------------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ****WHAT AHPPENED TO REGGAE?***** Date: 8 Jun 1995 00:25:43 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises There is still plenty of good reggae coming out that you would probably like, check the recent releases by Everton Blender, Israel Vibration, Sugar Minott, Cocoa Tea, Lucky Dube, Jamaica Papa Curvin, Fire Facts, Annette Brissette, Mighty Diamonds ... I could go on. You may have to look further than Sam Goody or K-Mart though. :-) EZ Noh, mike ------------------------------------From: wayne burgess <wayne@ninga.demon.co.uk> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ****WHAT AHPPENED TO REGGAE?***** Date: 8 Jun 1995 15:26:58 +0100 Organization: None I agree, what about lovers Rock?, but we must move with the times, I am sure there are some people saying the same thing about the internet (What has happend to the postal system) the reggae music is now for the new generation. ------------------------------------From: reynolds@nation.org (Krishna Reynolds) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ****WHAT AHPPENED TO REGGAE?***** Date: 8 Jun 1995 16:34:40 GMT Organization: JAH IS TRUE & PERFECT MORE HOLY THAN MAN.... Maybe you are confusing the different genres. The dancehall is different in its basic assumptions than reggae. Although (coming from the same people you would expect similarities) -"..knowledge/ wisdom/ heavenly Father/ grant true wisdom from above........." ================ in arce sitam quis, ocultabit ================ krishna reynolds =========== reynolds@nation.org webkeeper of the VIRTUAL NIAHBINGI at http://www.nation.org/~reynolds/ ================================================== NOW WITH ANANSE STORIES====CARIBBEAN VIEWPOINT=== LAST UPDATE ON JUNE 7TH.. CHECK IT OUT++++++++ ---------------------------------------REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 118 VOLUME ONE
  • 119. From: "J.B. Jones" <jzjones@ucdavis.edu> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ****WHAT AHPPENED TO REGGAE?***** Date: 9 Jun 1995 08:27:19 GMT Organization: University of California, Davis Just my humble two-centsI lived in Jamaica for two years, from '90 to '92. When I got there I was surprised that the music I was hearing was not Bob, etc (the old stuff). I could hardly understand the lyrics, and even when I could I still wasn't sure what they were singing about. I was lucky enough to live and work throughout the island, from downtown Kingston to May Pen to Mo-Bay. I got to know the island, the people, and the culture pretty well, and I heard nuff music. I figured out what the music was about. Even though it sounds more like rap than like "Bob, Desmond, etc", I think alot of it that I heard and like still reflects the attitude and lifestyle that is uniquely Jamaican and that I fell in love with. I listen to it all, old and new, and somehow it makes the island not seem so far away... I agree, however, that slackness degrades any form of expression. RespectJB -----------------------------------From: hondas4u@aol.com (Hondas4U) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ****WHAT AHPPENED TO REGGAE?***** Date: 10 Jun 1995 19:51:40 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) What about Steel Pulse? They have very Funky, Intelligent, Strong Saw them at Long Beach Bob Marley Festival. Good Message content. It don't get any betta... Rusty Mon ----------------------------------From: Alan L. Sykes <74301.1066@CompuServe.COM> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ****WHAT AHPPENED TO REGGAE?***** Date: 12 Jun 1995 16:51:44 GMT Organization: Sykes Law Office I know the young like the dancehall. But it is a tragic loss. Marley was a great man. Preached honesty, love, understanding and self-worth. The dancehall stuff I have heard touts guns and hate. Something this world already has enough of. -Alan L. Sykes ----------------------------------From: moonstar@well.com (Farmer Tea) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: ****WHAT AHPPENED TO REGGAE?***** Date: Mon, 12 Jun 1995 14:02:20 -0400 Organization: Human That may have been the trend a few years back, but check the dancehall again. After Garnet Silk brought consciousness back to the dance, most artists are releasing conscious lyrics. Buju, Bounty, Beenie, Capleton, Louciano, Spragga, Shaggy ... all have messages of peace and love. Marley was the prophet, and now many have been called to carry on the message. Besides, most "gunshot" and "kill 'dem" references are towards other sound systems, not messages of causing bodily harm to other humans. Farmer Tea -Field of Green = http://www.pitt.edu/~tshst4/farmer.htm ------------------------------------From: hbowser@bianca.amd.com (Horace Bowser) Subject: Re: ****WHAT AHPPENED TO REGGAE?***** Organization: Advanced Micro Devices, Austin, TX, USA Date: Mon, 12 Jun 1995 19:31:43 GMT No shit... at least for no justifiable reason. Also remember that it was Bob Marley who originally entitled "I shot the Sheriff" as "I shot the Police", a title that didn't go over so well with the powers that be. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 119 VOLUME ONE
  • 120. And let's not forget such lyrics as "...we're gonna be burnign and a lootin tonight" or "...cause I feel like bombing a church". Were modern DJ's to utter original lyrics in that vien, they would be cursed and moaned. Where's the fairness? Ites and ting. -Horace horace.bowser@amd.com -----------------------------------From: rstolzoff@aol.com (RStolzoff) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Date: 22 Jun 1995 00:45:56 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Sister Carol wrote: >That's bull and you know it. Listen to any Burning Spear, Israel >Vibrations, or Lucky Dube CD and you'll never hear any filth. You must be >confusing reggae with dancehall, a mistake some people find offensive. >Roots and culture -- that's what it's all about. Not tits and ass. Sister Carol, you are mistaken in thinking or believing that Reggae and Dancehall are distinct categories. Roots and culture IS what it is all about to some, but not to all. And at the risk of ridicule, I would add that tits and ass are sometimes, for some people, part of the attraction. Isreal Vibration and Burning Spear while not very large in JA now are quite large on the international scene (two not entirely seperate categories), there are other "roots and culture" artists that are very big in the dancehall in JA. Everton Blender, Luciano, and the late Garnett Silk to name only a few, shun slackness entirely while other performers see fit and find no contradiction in mixing some "slack" lyrics with concsiousness and reality tunes. I propose that what we are dealing with here is taste and preference. These arguments will never be settled as long as we express our opinions in terms of absolutes, rights or wrongs. In the spirit of mutuality, Russell -----------------------------------From: al302@lafn.org (William Just) Subject: Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Organization: The Los Angeles Free-Net Date: Thu, 22 Jun 1995 17:51:14 GMT In a previous article, scjoseph@aol.com (SCJOSEPH) says: >That's bull and you know it. Listen to any Burning Spear, Israel >Vibrations, or Lucky Dube CD and you'll never hear any filth. well, there IS that line about "i scratch my nuts and then i say, 'why worry worry worry when i can play'" ... why worry, i vibe :-) -one love rasta4I jah bill -------------------------------------From: scjoseph@aol.com (SCJOSEPH) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Date: 22 Jun 1995 16:23:46 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Greetings -Russell wrote: >I propose that what we are dealing with >here is taste and preference. These arguments will never be settled as >long as we express our opinions in terms of absolutes, rights or wrongs. >In the spirit of mutuality, >Russell REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 120 VOLUME ONE
  • 121. Sounds good to me -- I was merely giving you my opinion, and that of a few friends. agree to disagree with you. :-) I'll Peace, SCJ Sister Carol Joseph SCJoseph@aol.com Emancipate yourself from mental slavery -- none but ourselves can free our minds. ---Bob Marley. In Jah Love. -----------------------------------From: reid@suntan.ec.usf.edu. (Marc Reid (EC)) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Date: 22 Jun 1995 18:41:28 GMT Organization: Univ. of South Florida, College of Engineering In article <3s98p5$jb3@newsbf02.news.aol.com> scjoseph@aol.com (SCJOSEPH) writes: >You must be >confusing reggae with dancehall, a mistake some people find offensive. >Roots and culture -- that's what it's all about. Not tits and ass. > >Peace, >>SCJ >Sister Carol Joseph >SCJoseph@aol.com That's it. I've had enough of this bullshit. Who the hell are you to try to castigate reggae from dancehall? I can no longer tolerate the arrogance of those around here who continue to make this preposterous comment. Yes, there is slackness in dancehall, but not all dancehall is slack. Since I love dance-hall, I take such insults as a personal iinsult, just as you would if I decided to dis your beloved Burning Spear. It is definitely an attack on my character, since I have repeatedly stated my distaste for blatant slackness and the seemingly innocent, "matey music"(which, btw, is a lot more common than slack-ness these days). In fact I can't remember the last truly 100% slack tune I've heard, even on dancehall cassettes. Reggae is too complex for any one person, or group to define what is and is not reggae. Your comments, therefore, are groundless. How do you classify reggae? Many of the earliest artists were not roots;the roots phenomena didn't grow until the late 60's and early 70's. So what is your point? An acappella gospel tune is rootical, yet would you call that reggae? By such rigid defin-ition, any tune which gives praises to jah should be considered reggae? Yet because it is done in patois, it suddenly is no longer reggae? If you choose to delve into and enjoy the pornographic aspects of the music, that's your business, because it's becoming increasingly evident that you must have some affinity for such tunes. Quite clearly, in your rush to judge and condemn, you and your ilk have chose to ignore the cultural side of dancehall. You have even chose the name "Sister Carol", shared by one of the preeminent cultural voices in dancehall, yet never include a disclaimer about her and others who promote positive vibes in your constant attacks of dancehall. And no, I'm not trying to insult you or anyone else who disagrees;I just want to open eyes, minds and ears, because remember, "an open mind always beats a closed fist"-Marc -++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +Marc Reid-"The Best cure for Arrogance is the bitter taste of Da Feet"+++++++++ +reid@suntan.eng.usf.edu homepage: http://www.bsn.usf.edu/~reid/page1.html++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ------------------------------From: chayles@aol.com (CHayles) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Date: 28 Jun 1995 21:08:27 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Russell, I beg to differ. Sister Carol is right. Reggae started out as the vehicle through which Jamaicans with a extreme sense of morality -- of what was right and wrong about the Jamaican society, expressed themselves. If you really listened to ealy reggae and ska very few of them contained any "slack" words or inuendos. Today's dancehall mix appeals only to a certain crowd -- those who "jumped" into the industry for the money and not because they had something to say. Go back and listen to Marley, The Wailers, Burning Spear, Toots and the Maytals, etc. As a native, born and raised in ska and reggae, it hurts to know there is such great ignorance REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 121 VOLUME ONE
  • 122. about Reggae music and its culture. Early reggae expresses love, intolerance to injustice, hate, discrimination, war and bad government. Dancehall music on the other hand appeals to the most primal urges -- sex, slothfulness and money!. Reggae began as an underground rebellion fostered and strengthened by the Rastafarians -a highly religious and moral sect. For God's sake, Russell, please don't combine the two. ----------------------------------From: papalee@aol.com (Papa Lee) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Date: 29 Jun 1995 21:29:40 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) I have to strongly disagree with this rebuttal. Reggae started out not as any kind of vehicle for anything but DANCING and PARTYING. The earliest songs were consistently designed for dancing, either a fast R&B shuffle or ska or else a smoochy lovers grine. Furthermore, for every spiritual song that surfaced in the 60s, there's a "Bedroom Mazurka," or "Wet Dream" or Prince Buster's endless stream of lasciviousness. In fact, one of the things I find most remarkable about 60s Jamaican music is how performers (and Buster is the classic in this regard, although John Holt, the Maytals, Heptones and a few others can fit in as well) moved effortlessly from love to black pride to sex to dancing to pure novelty. It wasn't until close to the mid-70s that reggae and Rasta and cultural awareness became synonomous and I suspect that a great deal of that perception has to do with just how dominant Bob Marley's music has become in our understanding of reggae history. First of all, Spear didn't even start recording until 1969 when the Jamaican recording industry was 10 years old. Secondly, while the Wailers recorded several fairly serious songs in the 60s, their popular output was really tilted towards love songs. Same thing goes for the Maytals. I don't find that much difference in the lyrical preoccupations of todays reggae performers when compared with the ska/rudeboy/rock steady era. Musically, there are huge differences, but lyrically I think the music has come 'round in a circle. One Love, Lee O'Neill -------------------------------Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Date: 30 Jun 1995 00:19:23 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) So what about DANCEHALL classics like SERIOUS TIMES......KINGLY CHARACTER.....JUST REALITY.....you don't need to know the artists if you don't know them all you need to know is that you are wrong......DANCEHALL's rise and evolution is a natural progression in JAMAICAN music......Reggae music in whatever form is too VERSATILE for me, you or anybody else to try to say it should be one way only......so stop all your righteous criticism for one second and look at Jamaican popular music on the whole.....LISTEN TO ALL OF IT....PICK WHAT YOU LIKE>>>>BUT DON'T DARE DIS THE OTHER STYLES<<< its not your place...."Every man do his thing a little way different"_Errol Dunkley.........................DANCEHALL IS WICKED so is roots, lovers, dub, hip hop reggae and even some JUNGLE ((did i say some??.....yeah i mean very few :)........ ))........so just chill out and enjoy the music man.....respect...... JUNIOR ----------------------------From: Allen Kaatz <highnote@eskimo.com> Subject: Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Organization: Eskimo North (206) For-Ever Date: Fri, 30 Jun 1995 07:22:46 GMT I agree with you Lee - I notice a tendency by non-Jamaican reggae fans to fragment Jamaican culture into separate pieces... when in reality all these elements (sex, rastafarian philosophy, political & cultural commentary & satire) exist together in Jamaican society/music without contradiction... in fact you can sometimes hear more than one element in the same song. I remember when the Gladiators toured the US in the mid 80s - the guys at Nighthawk records tried to talk Albert Griffiths out of performing "Hello Carol" on the tour because it didn't fit in with their politically correct idea of what "real Reggae" was all about. This song was the Gladiators first (& biggest) hit in JA (an early Coxsone production) but since it was a love song they wanted it out of the show. Fortunately ALbert ignored this idea and the song stayed in the set... it's funny, because when I saw their show in Seattle it was one of the songs that got the biggest response of the night. I think in the Caribbean sexual matters are viewed in a more relaxed & humorous way, something most first-worlders could stand to pick up on a bit, IMHO. While many in the Rastafarian community try to claim reggae music for their own, it is not so simple. As far as there not being any slackness in Ska or Rocksteady music, that is REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 122 VOLUME ONE
  • 123. indeed ridiculous - in fact conscious-lyric songs from this time period (early to mid 60s) are rare, and are sought after by collectors. 80% of the music in those days was love songs or slackness, as you say, music for dancing & entertainment. Al -X-Signature: Allen Kaatz * * * Allen Kaatz <highnote@eskimo.com * * * -------------------------------From: chayles@aol.com (CHayles) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Date: 7 Jul 1995 19:22:30 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Say no more. It's quite obvious you know nothing of Jamaica nor its culture. And where on God's green earth do you get your statitstics! Contact the Jamaica Federation of Music for the facts before you go spouting such nonsense. Their telephone number is 809/9523238. -------------------------------From: dotheska@aol.com (Dotheska) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Early reggae: conscious? ( Was Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Date: 29 Jun 1995 17:21:11 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Actually, reggae started out as ska, which was dance music. While it's true that the earliest reggae didn't contain much slackness, it may be stretching it a bit to present ska and early reggae as real vehicles of social consciousness. Most of what I've heard from Jamaica in the sixties was pop music, plain and simple. Apart from the occasional mild social message ("Simmer Down" comes to mind), most early ska and rock steady lyrics concerned themselves with themes of romantic love and partying. There are exceptions, of course, but for every one conscious vintage ska tune you can find five or six songs about being in a "dancing mood." The hardcore social elements, and Rastafarianism in particular, came along later. That's not meant as a criticism of either type of reggae -but I get a little impatient when people say that reggae "started out" as social commentary. -Rick Anderson dotheska@aol.com -------------------------------------From: teriyaki@ix.netcom.com (Joshua B) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Early reggae: conscious? ( Was Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Date: 2 Jul 1995 21:53:12 GMT Organization: Netcom For some early slackness check out "Push Wood" by Jackie Opel on the Heartbeat 2 CD set Ska Bonanza: The Studio One Ska Years. "She told me: Push wood in the fire Jackie, big wood..., strong wood..., long wood..., fat wood..., good wood..." -************************************************************ *** Respect due from Joshua B *** teriyaki@ix.netcom.com *** *** Heartbeat Records ** WMBR 88.1 FM ** Cambridge/Boston ** ************************************************************ -------------------------------------From: chayles@aol.com (CHayles) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae Report seeks writers Date: 7 Jul 1995 19:17:54 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) I think we differ here mostly because you believe that in 1969 the recording industry in Jamaica was ten years old. The first recordings were made by Stanley Motta on Hanover Street back in 1941 mostly mento of course, then a gentleman called Khouri opened a second recording studion in 1949 on West Queen Street. Records were pressed off the island until 1951 when the first pressing machine was introduced right after Hurricane Charlie on August 1, 1951. My job as a youth was to test the latest releases since my father was in the music business and distributed records countrywide. Dance halls only existed on a seasonal basis in Jamaica back in the early days of ska and reggae by that I mean dances were held on specifice holidays in various town halls in various towns. To say that reggae was written mostly for dance halls is at best, incorrect. However, if you still don't believer a word I'm saying contact the Jamaica Federation of Music in Montego Bay. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 123 VOLUME ONE
  • 124. I know the past president is Mr. Headley Jones, one of the island's leading jazz musician, and he would be able to discuss the matter with you in greater detail. The telephone number is 809/952-3238. I will be most happy to continue this discussion further. Until then, all praises to Jah! -------------------------------From: teriyaki@ix.netcom.com (Joshua B) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Freelance Magazine/roots singers Date: 11 Jun 1995 23:13:10 GMT Organization: Netcom In case anyone else feels that "most dancehall singers have completely *lost* their roots," please check for music by these artists. They all have recently recorded and released excellent music dealing with roots topics like being positive, praising God, dealing with suffering, poverty, etc. singers: Everton Blender Jack Radics Michael Rose Sanchez Beres Hammond Freddie McGregor Mikey Spice Luciano Kashief Lindo Yami Bolo DJs: Louie Culture Buju Banton Terror Fabulous Sizzla Capleton etc. There has always been slackness in Jamican music, including the old ska tune "Push Wood" by Jackie Opel. Ya undustan? -************************************************************ *** Respect due from Joshua B *** teriyaki@ix.netcom.com *** *** Heartbeat Records ** WMBR 88.1 FM ** Cambridge/Boston ** ************************************************************ --------------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Freelance Magazine/roots singers Date: 12 Jun 1995 03:50:43 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises How could you leave out Cocoa Tea? :-) EZ Noh, REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 124 mike VOLUME ONE
  • 125. BUJU BANTON From: teriyaki@ix.netcom.com (Joshua B) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Buju marketing plan Date: 7 Jun 1995 04:47:57 GMT Organization: Netcom Is anyone else worried with the marketing plan for Buju and his new project for Loose Canon? A "hush hush" press conference of sorts was called in Cambridge, MA recently, and almost nobody in the reggae industry was invited. It was all focussed at the hip-hop industry. I could go on and give details, but I'll keep this concise. Does anyone know why it seems that the record label is forgetting about the Caribbean community (Buju's fan base)? Supposedly this album is going to turn lots of heads. People are saying that if Bob Marley was a DJ this is the kind of album he would record. For real, this thing is supposed to be big. Buju seems personally engulfed with selling lots of records, and he'll do what it takes to do it. All comments concerning this matter are welcome. Let me finish by saying that I have respected Buju since I heard "How Massa God World a Run." He is a great talent, a strong youth, and has huge potential as a teacher and leader. -************************************************************ *** Respect due from Joshua B *** teriyaki@ix.netcom.com *** *** Heartbeat Records ** WMBR 88.1 FM ** Cambridge/Boston ** ************************************************************ -----------------------------------From: rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Buju marketing plan Date: 7 Jun 1995 23:34:32 GMT Organization: University Of Utah Computer Center This is an ill wind blowing I think: The Shabba single of Let's Get it On I got last month did not have a single reggae/dancehall beat on any of the versions. Supposedly this album is going : to turn lots of heads. People are saying that if Bob Marley was a DJ : this is the kind of album he would record. For real, this thing is : supposed to be big. Buju seems personally engulfed with selling lots of : records, and he'll do what it takes to do it. I don't know why record companies try to make things impossible for a new artist to live up to such expectations. That's a big weight on his shoulders, which if it doesn't live up to the record label's hype: Boom Bye Bye Buju! -Robert Nelson Smile Jamaica, Sat. 4-7 PM KRCL 91 FM / KZMU 89.7 FM Salt Lake City / Moab, Utah rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide #14 Robin Hood robbed from the rich cuz the poor man ain't got no money ---Dennis Alcapone ----------------------------------From: cwturnr@ibm.net (Spinna) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Buju marketing plan Date: 8 Jun 1995 05:02:14 GMT Organization: Ruff Kut Reggae Productions There's no better way to flop yourself than to alienate your fan base. Buju (& Germain) are smarter than that. What I expect is that Loose Cannon will try to market the album to the Yankee crowd as crossover or even market Buju as (gulp...) "The Next Bob Marley". Meanwhile, Penthouse will distribute the singles in yard and abroad and it will be biznezz as usual on the dancehall side. /**************************************** * --Spinna-* * Ruff Kut Reggae * * The cutting edge of Reggae... * * On Cable TV * ****************************************/ ----------------------------------------From: lstephe409@aol.com (LStephe409) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Buju marketing plan Date: 9 Jun 1995 20:26:28 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 125 VOLUME ONE
  • 126. Loose Cannon doesn't seem very interested in the Caribbean market right now. see Buju ignoring his grass roots no matter how much money he is making But I can't ----------------------------------------From: Simrete <76342.1663@CompuServe.COM> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Buju marketing plan Date: 9 Jun 1995 14:17:47 GMT Organization: Reggae Distribution That's the reason all his eggs are not in one basket,for example, his own label CB 321,& also nuff Penthouse recordings,to keep him well represented in the Caribbean & ethnic communities. As DJ's you should know that. Shabba does the same thing ie: Shang and Digital B. The big record companies need to know what made these artists huge in the first place. Another good example is Lt. Stitchie,one of the first to sign a Major contract,they literally shelfed him for 5 years, & right now he's one of the hottest DJ's in JA. Thank God he was able to regroup. Artists these days have more smarts than they are given credit for & always keep ties with their roots.That way, if the big companies drop them, it's no big thing.If LC drops Buju,do you think his popularity will wane? I don't think so. These artists are trying to reach several different markets at the same time, I don't blame them for trying to be versatile, it is the progressive artistry within them, however they have kept their links with the Reggae market as well. Sly & Robbie are a good example of versatility, without leaving or forgetting their roots.If a big label drops an artist, it doesn't mean we won't hear from them again. -Sim ---------------------------------From: moonstar@well.com (Farmer Tea) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Buju marketing plan Date: Mon, 12 Jun 1995 13:54:10 -0400 Organization: Human > > > > If a big label drops an artist, it doesn't mean we won't hear from them again. -Sim Well said, I was a little worried to hear of Capleton's major signing, but I still buy Super Cat, Shabba Ranks, Cocoa Tea and many other artists who have gone onto majors. Better distribution just means that it's more likely to find many good remixes. As artists get more product out there, the good artists make use of the resources and put out better sounds. No matter who puts out the choons, Buju and Capleton will still rule the dance! Farmer Tea -Field of Green = http://www.pitt.edu/~tshst4/farmer.htm ----------------------------------In article <3ru61l$2c4@newsbf02.news.aol.com> jrrodigan@aol.com (Jr RODIGAN) writes: >Greetings everyone....I had a few thoughts about all these artists on the >majors......if Buju's album comes out with only "EXCERPTS OF SONG LYRICS" >printed like the last time instead of the whole lyrics to each and every >tune then we should be writing LOOSE CANNON and asking why?????.....I hope >all the lyrics are printed specially since Buju is saying some serious >stuff.......the songs on this album are meaningful tunes but please don't >leave it up to the listener to TRY to figure out the lyrics...print >them......reggae in whatever form from dancehall to roots has something to >say.....yet it is in Patois which to many unfamiliar people may just as >well need translation...remember THE HARDER THEY COME had >subtitles!!!!!......most BOB MARLEY albums had the lyrics printed.....if >Buju's album doesn't have all of the lyrics printed i for one demand an >explanation as to why.....after the release of the last album i >interviewed Buju and asked him about why the lyrics weren't there......he >asked me why?.....let the people work them out for themselves, he >said..........i hope now he has more to say he demands that the people >READ what he has to say.........BUJU's album needs all our support so we >won't have to put up with DIANA KING's "SHY GUY" or such tunes as >reggae...but more importantly LOOSE CANNON should direct BUJU to do less >dubplates..and promote the album tracks.....doing dubplates for sound >systems who pay up to $400 to $500 US for one tune and only play half a >minute of it (all on the same boring riddim such as "SICK" or "DARKER >SHADE" etc.) is doing nothing for the future of reggae...its killing >dancehall.... if the top artists who make the hits stop making them then >it will leave the door for the exposure of new talent....That is just how REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 126 VOLUME ONE
  • 127. >Bounti bust out via dubs...but now he still does them for $500-700 US the >same lyrics same riddim just different sound name......and the new youths >can't even get the attention of a selector no more because all the >selectors want is the same dubs by the same top seven or eight people on >the same five rhytms....how bloody boring.....people like BUJU should lead >the way and rescue this before people at the hardcore level get tired of >this....it is killing the creativeness...the whole concept of dubplates >has been exploited and raped....they are not SPECIALS no more they are >nothing but expensive half produced half mixed songs that bore the >majority and take up the valuable time that a selector could be spending >playing and featuring some good new music......if you don't follow sound >system runnings very closely you'll not understand my point or concerns >and many who DO follow closely may disagree with me... but i am sure it is >doing harm to reggae when songs are played for crowds of 500+ people which >they can't go to any record store and buy cah dem ah exclusive...GROW >UP!!!!!!! sales figures could be a lot more stronger ...believe me......so >LOSSE CANNON please stop BUJU from doing this harm to himself and reggae >maybe the rest will follow.....they will make their money by other >means....sound systems will be less worried about killing another sound >boy and more concerned about listening to good tunes and programming them >in an entertaining manner >which will expose good tunes and make the music grow they way it did >during the 88 to 91 era when dub plates were not the ONLY thing you heard >in a dance.......to be continued.......my fingers are tired for now.....by >the way anybody know the exact street date for BUJU's "TIL >SHILOH"??????....the article in Billboard was good BUT it was inaccurate >so i guess it was not good.....IT COULD HAVE BEEN BETTER!!! oh >well.....respect to one and all................Junior...."fell it in the >One Drop "-BOB MARLEY O.M. --------------------------------From: reid@suntan.ec.usf.edu. (Marc Reid (EC)) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Buju marketing plan Date: 22 Jun 1995 00:09:45 GMT Organization: Univ. of South Florida, College of Engineering The translation idea is a good one. This should also be included in videos. Remember how when "Informer" by Snow blew up, MTV decided to include subtitles? This should be the norm, so listeners know what's going on;it makes it more accessibe. I don't see what's wrong with "Shy Guy";I don't think there has been an attempt to market the song as reggae;it's just an R&B crossover a la Shabba. Now for the dub plate ting. My biggest problem is the corruption surrounding the whole thing. I remember when shopping for dubs how it wasn't just how much dunza, but also how much ganga. From what I heard Buju makes at least $1000 if you are not a "namebrand sound";still, I feel dub plates cause the cream to rise to the top;the wickedest DJ's and singers always find a way to rise to the top. Your point of view seems to be pro label;what about the artists dem who a fi mek dubplate to eat food? It can be interesting to hear a song on a different riddim, and a truly wicked plate comes in like a completely different song. Plus, certain artists (Beres Hammond comes to mind) makes wicked dubs- they add creativity, and change up the lyrics from one sound to the next. If anything, dubs should increase record sales, because they usually only give listeners a taste of the tune, not the whole thing. A lot of times, the dubs sound wickeder than the original. Surprising, but true. What's more, most sounds play a lot of originals; they'll lick a lot of dubs then come back with some originals. I agree though, that the haul and pull business is annoying, especially when it's done over and over and over, yet the dub doesn't even reach the chorus. This is a problem artists have when they perform live as well. -++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ +Marc Reid-"The Best cure for Arrogance is the bitter taste of Da Feet"+++++++++ +reid@suntan.eng.usf.edu homepage: http://www.bsn.usf.edu/~reid/page1.html++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ---------------------------------From: teriyaki@ix.netcom.com (Joshua B) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Buju marketing plan Date: 23 Jun 1995 02:09:37 GMT Organization: Netcom Someone did write that Cocoa Tea had signed with a major. I say he has not. On another note: imagine if Sanchez signed with a major. Some big time producer wrote and produced at tune for him? Unlimited hit potential. -************************************************************ *** Respect due from Joshua B *** teriyaki@ix.netcom.com *** *** Heartbeat Records ** WMBR 88.1 FM ** Cambridge/Boston ** REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 127 VOLUME ONE
  • 128. ************************************************************ ----------------------------------From: jrrodigan@aol.com (Jr RODIGAN) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Buju marketing plan Date: 23 Jun 1995 01:59:19 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Greetings............ If any one is NOT pro label ((((major label))) it has to be me........but as a retailer, sound system selector and, more importantly, reggae music LOVER i can not bring myself to like what is happening. I see the dancehall biznis in Jamaica and markets like NY, MIAMI, BOSTON etc. -which are directly influenced by the yard runnings- killing dancehall itself. With a few exceptions, the new artists are no way near as good as the older ones when it comes to entertaining the crowd for any more than twenty minutes (which is about the longest it takes before the excitement dies off). So there goes the VALUE FOR MONEY stage show concept worsened by the fact that people like BOUNTI and those in his league want around $10,000 for a forty minute performance without a band....mostly accapella because no one can mix them down live.!!!!! RIP OFF yes 1000 plus people may go see him for a couple of years but every bad performance to an unfamiliar crowd is like ten steps back for LIVE dancehall's future........................As far as Dubplates go i must disagree with the point that it makes some artists eat food......in principle ,like i said before, it is supposed to. But the big league sound systems who tour the major markets for at least $2500+ a night clashing each other DO NOT (((((((((YES ......DO NOT)))))))) have dubs by the smaller artists who deserve the chance to break like how BOUNTI got the chance. Peer presuure and other reasons force them to just go voice the latest BEENIE and BOUNTI and BUJU and CAPLETON ((by the way each of these artists cost around $700 to $800 for one song on dub plate....no joke if you got the money you get the dub you don't even have to leave your house no more....there are dub plate brokers in Jamaica who will hook you up with almost any body))))...........any way this is getting too long ......all I am saying is they are not specials any more ....they are just VERY EXPENSIVE, HURRIEDLY (less than 15 min.) PRODUCED generic versions that any body can get once you have shown the card up your sleeve in a clash.....once they are exposed they are for sale to anyone from yard or foreign who got the dollars..........its like a mail order record store that sells you a tune made with your sound's name in it for BIG money.........how that is benefitting the BUSINESS and future of reggae is a mystery to me.......I wish we could get SLY DUNBAR on line....he has a lot to say about how unacceptable to new ideas the JAMAICAN market is close to becoming...........and i think the increase in the dubplate/sound clash has a lot to do with it................comments and critcisms are encouraged and welcome....P.S. I have played in Boston's Dancehall Clubs since 1987 with hardly any dub plates .... I try to programme my play list just as any Disc Jockey (((club or radio))) should...... I don't follow what I hear on live tapes from Yard or other places....the fact that I am still playing must , I HOPE :), mean that i am doing something right........and by the way when we play people DANCE and enjoy the vibes....not too much pull ups....not too much bragging.....not trying to dis another sound just to please a few friends in the audience......only dissing those elements who knowingly or unknowingly harm the Boston Dancehall scene.......with no apology......respect.JUNIOR -----------------------------------From: cwturnr@ibm.net (Spinna) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Buju marketing plan Date: 25 Jun 1995 04:40:15 GMT Organization: Ruff Kut Reggae Productions Yes poppa, I agree with you on the state of the dubplate bizness in general. The dubplate thing is getting out of hand but it's kinda ruff fe fight 'gainst something thats grounded so firmly in the history of dancehall. At any dance where there's a clash, or the people are into the vibe, the selector get's brave and announces: "No more tune... pure dubplate the rest of the night!" Or worse yet, if there's a clash the two sounds go "dub fi dub". Basically one special against another. Most of the time they just play the intro to the first chorus then mix to the next tune. Total elapsed time: a minute and a half. If the D.J. has something important to say in the second verse, no one ever hears it. I do respect certain sound systems that take their time with dubplates and actually go throught the trouble of arranging the music that's recorded instead of just having the D.J. sing over the version side. Big respect to Stone Love, Bodyguard and Kilamanjaro in that respect... but for the most part, the dubplate thing just gets boring after a while... What's the solution? Every foundation D.J. I ever spoke to has the same response: Bring back the live D.J.s at a dance. In the old days a D.J. would chat at a dance for the entire night. You HAD to have a bag of LYRICS to do that! This is how the foundation D.J.s (Burro Banton, Supercat, Early B, Rankin' Joe, etc.) got their training and that's what separates yesterday's stars from today's studio-enhanced one-tune specials.... /**************************************** * --Spinna-* * Ruff Kut Reggae * * The cutting edge of Reggae... * * On Cable TV * ****************************************/ REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 128 VOLUME ONE
  • 129. SUGAR MINOTT From: timras@aol.com (TIMRAS) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Greetings from Sugar Minott Date: 8 Jun 1995 12:24:41 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Sugar hails up all rmr massive. He has big plans for Youthman Promotion in 95 and was excited to see the wonders of internet newsgroups, especially this one. Many things in the works, further info later. cool Tim ---------------------------------From: al302@lafn.org (William Just) Subject: Re: Greetings from Sugar Minott Organization: The Los Angeles Free-Net Date: Thu, 22 Jun 1995 18:10:21 GMT In a previous article, deen@primenet.com (Deen Ipaye) says: >Isn't Sugar Minott rich enough to get some dental work done on him? >I don't mean any disrespect but, that gapping hole takes a little from >his looks! He wants to sell some albums, right? thats his trademark, he dont want no gold teeth front teeth ting...sugar is pure roots from yard and nah follow fashion... -one love rasta4I jah bill ---------------------------------From: sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu (Bush Doktor) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Greetings from Sugar Minott Date: 23 Jun 1995 10:04:01 GMT Organization: University of Dreadlands Deen Ipaye <deen@primenet.com> wrote: > >: Sugar Minott is leading the Favorite Dancehall section in votes >: on the Jah Radio Reggae poll at http://ebhon.jnst.uor.edu/Users/doktor > >Isn't Sugar Minott rich enough to get some dental work done on him? >I don't mean any disrespect but, that gapping hole takes a little from >his looks! He wants to sell some albums, right? Haha! Never thought about that. :-) My guess is that that guy, david letterman(?), saw Sugar and liked his dental work(?) so much that he copied it. And this letterman guy is dragging in even bigger $$$, so Sugar should be getting a cut of lettermans contract... appearrence fees or something! Anyway, Minott might not be a great looker, but he does sing sweet. :-) Bush Doktor doktor@ebhon.jnst.uor.edu ------------------------------------From: hbowser@bianca.amd.com (Horace Bowser) Subject: Re: Greetings from Sugar Minott Organization: Advanced Micro Devices, Austin, TX, USA Date: Mon, 26 Jun 1995 18:20:17 GMT Who cares about his looks... I always thought of that gap as an additional musical instrument. I'm not sure he'd sound the same without it. Who's that other artist with gap in the front of his mouth. Ever notice how he and Sugar sound alike. QED. :-) Of course, Sugar Minott is one of my all time favorites. Ites. -Horace horace.bowser@amd.com REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 129 VOLUME ONE
  • 130. REGGAE STORES From: Steve.Milstead@bigbend.com (Steve Milstead) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Reggae mail order Date: 10 Jun 95 10:27:44 CST Organization: <BigBend Internet> Can anyone recommend a reggae mail order outlet for CDs and tapes? I live 300 miles from the nearest record store, and even farther from any place with good selection of reggae. Much appreciated. Steve --------------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae mail order Date: 12 Jun 1995 00:48:49 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises From the Jammin Reggae Archives mail order file: Mailorder sources for reggae RAS Box 42517 Attn: Smitty Washington DC 20015 phone 301-588-5135 (This is the biggest and probably best source for reggae in the US). Outernational Box 399 Attn: Charlie Lakebay WA 98349 phone 206-884-2738 (carries new, rare 7" as well as albums RAS doesn't usually stock) Coxsone's Music City 3135 Fulton St. Brooklyn NY 11208 phone 718-277-4166 (source for Studio One and Treasure Isle. claims prompt mail order service, although that's not true from people I've talked to). ON U Sound Box 1460 London N10 2DQ England (carries most Adrian Sherwood productions which can be hard to find) Daddy Kool 9 Berwick Street London W1V 3RG England Dub Vendor 274 Lavender Hill Clapham Junction London SW 11 1lj England tel: 0181-758-2301 credit cards: 0181-758-6218 Roundup Records, PO Box 154, Cambridge, MA 02140-0900? They carry several labels including their own Heartbeat. Ernie B's Reggae PO Box 5019 El Dorado Hills, CA 95762-5019 916-9390691 FAX: 916-9390578 Excellent source of UK Imports I sell collectible JA vinyl singles from the 60's & 70's by infrequent (when I get around to it) mail-order auction lists... email me your snail-mail address if you want to get on my mailing list for this stuff. DUB VENDOR in England is a good source for current and reissued older music. Allen Kaatz 6920 Roosevelt Way NE #135 Seattle WA 98115 REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 130 VOLUME ONE
  • 131. USA fax me at: 206-525-1791 Allen Kaatz <highnote@eskimo.com> Imhoteps Records & Tapes/Cds 734 N.W. 62 St Miami, Fl 33150 PH (305)754-1624 fax(305)758-7617 PHONE ORDER (US) Tower Records: 1-800-648-4844 greensleeves mail order, unit 14, metro centre, st johns road, isleworth, middlesex tw7 6nj tel: 0181-758-2301 fax: 0181-758-0811 -------------------------------From: chayles@aol.com (CHayles) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae mail order Date: 23 Jun 1995 20:55:38 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Try Aquarius Records (Half Way Tree) Inc., now at 9487 SW Colonial Drive, Miami, FL . Tel 800-747-0760, fax 305/232-9845. 33157 -------------------------------From: cruclridim@aol.com (Cruclridim) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae mail order Date: 8 Jul 1995 22:04:36 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) We have a extensive listing of rare original reggae 7'' (most in mint or near new)condition as well as some older albums and 12'' singles. Please send e mail or snail mail to Crucial Riddims P.O.box 6116 Albany, Ca. 94706-0116. We mailed our latest Studio Dread catalogue just this week. -----------------------------From: pilgrim@xmission.xmission.com (Papa Pilgrim) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae mail order Date: 9 Jul 1995 13:56:51 GMT Organization: XMission Internet (801 539 0900) Welcome Crucial Riddims to CyberReggae and rmr. I am not a collector of records, just a collector of information and everything I've heard about Crucial Riddims has been positive. Welcome Crucial Riddims! -____ _____ _. __. / __ / _ /// _ / / ----papa pilgrim pilgrim@xmission.com / _.' // _' ///_//_// Forwarding the Reggae Vibe...Everytime! /_/ |_|/_//_/ __/__/ Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide! 500 X c95 ----------------------------------From: rooke6@access2.digex.net Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae mail order Date: Sun, 9 Jul 1995 21:11:34 -0400 Organization: Express Access Online Communications, USA For what it's worth, I'd like to put in my comments about Crucial Riddims... I've dealt with them 2 or 3 times and each experience was great; they are very professional and they get the stuff out to you just as soon as your payment reaches them. They're still reasonably priced considering the nature of the records and they have been good about getting back to me in email regarding technicalities and details of orders. A big thumbs up to Crucial Riddims. Hany Hosny Arlington, Virginia ---------------------------REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 131 VOLUME ONE
  • 132. From: timras@aol.com (TIMRAS) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Reggae mail order Date: 10 Jul 1995 13:34:36 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) After reviewing the second singles sales list from this company I must highly recommend them as a reasonably priced source for many hard to find, great "must have" records. Their sale list is a great deal ($2-3 each) and titles like "Turning Point" by Owen Gray or the Peter Tosh's "Ketchy Shuby" for around $10 are also a bargain. Check it out ! cool Tim ------------------------------From: LGKY57C@prodigy.com (David Hureau) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: GOING TO UK and NEED alil help from frnds Date: 29 Jun 1995 16:45:56 GMT Organization: Prodigy Services Company 1-800-PRODIGY I&I are going on a little trip to the UK to play football, and I was wondering if the Idren could give me names and locations of any shops stocked well in, or devoted to reggae. Getting solid reggae releases is tough where I come from, so any help would be greatly appreciated. I've heard that reggae is easier to get in the UK, yet maybe Babylon has tightened the grip. I will be in London, Newcastle, York, Edinborough, and around those areas. If I have Idren in those areas alert me as well. Many thanks. New Hampshire Dread ---------------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: GOING TO UK and NEED alil help from frnds Date: 29 Jun 1995 18:37:49 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises Included below is what I have in the Jammin Reggae Archives, please post any changes/additions you find there ... UK: LONDON: EZ Noh, mike If you go to Tower Records in Piccadilly Circus, you'll find most new 'full price' CD releases at between 12 and 14, with many priced at 12.99 and 13.99. That's $20 to $22. However, Tower does do regular special offers, and prices on some top items go down to 10.99 for a few days... The only other big shop I recommend is the main HMV on the eastern section of Oxford Street. Virgin Records seems to have cut back on stocks/space. Prices at independent shops are usually cheaper, and they sell vinyl too, but fewer CDs. There are dozens of small shops, several specialising in reggae/black music. Many are outside the centre. Off Oxford Street is Berwick Street, with Black Market Records (lots of vinyl and usually all latest CDs); Selecta Records (big shop with small reggae vinyl and CD sections); Reckless Records (used); and a cheap CD shop. There are also excellent dance/acid jazz/techno/Latin etc shops in the area. Outside the centre are Dub Vendor, Body Music, MPD, Honest Jons, Wax Unlimited... If anyone wants to know where these are, let me know. London also has several distributors and studios, such as Greensleeves, Jetstar and Ariwa (Mad Professor) - they have mail order lists. There are also record stalls in street markets, happy hunting grounds for vinyl people. London shops selling reggae. Version 1. 26 May 1995 UG = underground station Daddy Kools, at the Black Music Centre, 11 Berwick Street, W1. (It's in the market part of the street). Lot's of 12 and 7 inch; new releases; CDs. Has soul and jazz too. Nearest underground (UG): Piccadilly Circus or Oxford Circus. In Berwick Street, try also Selectadisc at no. 34, a great alternative shop, with some reggae CDs and vinyl; Reckless Records, a used record shop at no. 30; Mister CD for cheap CDs (has some reggae), opposite Reckless. Big shops: the best for reggae CDs are Tower Records at Piccadilly Circus and the big HMV at 150 Oxford Street (the one at no. 363 is not much good). Virgin by Tottenham Court Road UG has a limited selection, but check the street round the back, Hanway Street, which has several record shops, including the wonderful Vinyl Experience. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 132 VOLUME ONE
  • 133. (For African music try Stern's African Record Centre, 116 Whitfield Street, W1. NG: Goodge Street.) WEST Two shops are an absolute must. Dub Vendor, 150 Ladbroke Grove, W10. Reggae specialist. NG: Notting Hill Gate. Honest Jon's, 278 Portobello Road, W10. Reggae specialist plus other black music. NG: Notting Hill Gate. In this area, there are probably several other shops; ask around. Try the Music and Video Exchange for used records at 36 Notting Hill Gate. SOUTH WEST Dub Vendor, 274 Lavender Hill, SW11. Sister shop to the one in Ladbroke Grove. Not on the underground; go to Clapham Junction British Rail station. SOUTH Brixton. There are lots of shops in this area. Names not known at the moment. Try a walk thorugh Brixton market. UG: Brixton. NORTH EAST Dalston area M&D Record Centre, 36a Dalston Lane, E8. A great shop for vinyl and for listening before you buy. Has most of the latest 7 inches. Not on the UG. Best got to on the bus. Business Record Store, 17 Stoke Newington Road, N16. A funny shop that also sells wool. Not a big selection, but worth popping in. Not too far from M&D. New Edition Records, 216 Ridley Road, E8. Near M&D. Walk down Ridley Road market - there's also a few outlets on the side of the market that may have something. There's a nice shop in Bradbury Street (name to come), off Kingsland High Street. Again, near M&D. Clapton Regal Music Centre, 92 Lower Clapton Road, E5. Nowhere near a UG. Stoke Newington Wax Unlimited, 9 Northwold Road, N16. Excellent small shop. Near Stoke Newington British Rail. Best by bus no. 73 from town. Tottenham Body Music, 261 High Road, N15. Near Seven Sisters UG. Big shop with lot's of CDs. Possibly the biggest black music shop in London. NORTH Flash Forward, on the second floor of the Camden Lock Centre at the top end of Camden High Street. The person who runs this has 20 year's experience with finding stuff for collectors. NG: Camden Town In Camden, try also Rhythm Records, 281 Camden High Street and Out on the Floor, 10 Inverness Street (ask downstairs for the 7 inches; 12 inch upstairs). There's also a branch of the Music and Video Exchange at 229 Camden High Street. Look around the market areas too. ----------------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: GOING TO UK and NEED alil help from frnds Organization: very little Date: Fri, 30 Jun 1995 07:48:00 GMT I personally recommend both Dub Vendor and Honest John's - although I have been to neither place in place in person, I have dealt with both via the mail & telephone for years, both buying & selling records. Honest John's, run by Bob Brooks, has a lot of used & older collectors, records that you won't see available in most shops. Dub Vendor has both the latest stuff & lots of re-issues that are hard to find in the US. Al * * * Allen Kaatz <highnote@eskimo.com * * * ----------------------------------REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 133 VOLUME ONE
  • 134. From: rooke6@access2.digex.net Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Ska and Rocksteady 7" Pressings Date: Fri, 30 Jun 1995 15:36:20 -0400 Organization: Express Access Online Communications, USA In the last few weeks, there have bena handful of notes asking about mailorder/vinyl sources. Quite a few people followed up on my last posting of the below info. (back in April) and have been very pleased. So, once again, for those of you that missed it the first time, here it is: > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Greetings: This note is for the majority of us who live down the road from good sources of across a store in Front Royal, Virginia you'll understand why those exclamation with the music. don't have the good fortune to oldies on vinyl. I recently came (!!!) - if you've been there, points are there - that deals The guy there runs a place he calls Things Caribbean, out of which he sells a lot of vinyl and very few cds. What sets this guy apart from others is his willingness and sincerity to work very closely with his customers on their want-lists. He is very good at getting a sense of what you're about, deciding whether or not you're serious about honoring the commitment you make, and then showering you with surprises. Again, this might not be a big deal for those of you who live in parts of CA, in Brooklyn, etc., but for the record, here are some examples of the things he got me (within a week of my requesting them!): All 7" pressings: The Eternals, Marcia Griffiths, Cornell Campbell, Sugar Minott, (tons of) Prince Buster, Dennis Brown, Barry Brown, Alton Ellis, Silvertones, Heptones, Sound Dimension Band, Larry Marshall, Ernest Wilson, Delroy Wilson, Slim Smith, Mad Lads, etc. Most of what he has real quick access is on Studio One and Buster, but he's got things on Taxi, Sonic, Clinch, etc. Is this an ad? No. Is it a vote of confidence / endorsement? Yes, very much so. If you're interested in dealing with him, either call him at (703) 635 - 9958, or fax him at (703) 636 - 3939. Ask for Marcus. Hany Hosny Arlington, Va. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 134 VOLUME ONE
  • 135. KARIE RUSSELL SHOT DEAD From: rlam@bgnet.bgsu.edu (Ronald E Lam) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: *Reggae Reports Cruiser Shot in Kgn Date: 22 Jun 1995 23:41:44 GMT Organization: Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH (USA) In a previous article, 74467.3070@CompuServe.COM (regpeg) says: >Karie Russell, a Kingston born reporter for the Gleaner and our >long-time contributor and the man who wrote Yard Report under the >moniker -The Cruiser- was fatally shot in downtown Kingston last >Wednesday. He was approached by a gunman(men) who shot him while he >was waiting to pick up his mother. Our first report was that it was >a case of mistaken identity. The situation in certainn areas of Kgn >is dread with a reported 12 people dead in the last few weeks. The >army has been called out to assist police and a curfew has been >imposed on western Kingston. >Karie will be remembered as a friend and a truly great guy >responsible, disciplined, a witty and enthusiastic reporter. I will >be miss his presence, contribution and support. The Reggae community >has lost another worthy brother. Our heartfelt condolences are >offered to his family and friends. >From the stage. . .to the page! M Peggy Q >Reggae Report PO Bbox 2722 Hallandale FL 33008-2722 >ph 305-933-1178 fx 305-933-1077 74467.3070@compuserve.com >info on dist, advt, subs, calendars, t-shirts, tapes available ..please add the condolences of my posse,the ark band from columbus, ohio and me, errol lam... ..we are sorry for the loss of another brother's life...only jah know... -irie,one love,roots music...everytime with culture, from Errol, aka roots-ee 419-372-7903,voice mail...and de beat goes on...and on...and on...respec'... i am the small axe...sharp and ready...to cut you down...sharp and ready... ---------------------------------From: jrrodigan@aol.com (Jr RODIGAN) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: *Reggae Reports Cruiser Shot in Kgn Date: 27 Jun 1995 01:35:30 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Karie Russell also contributed to the short live BOOM! dancehall magazine out of Boston..........he will be missed.....our sympathies to all his family and friends.........but this backs up what i mentioned recently about violence in Western Kingston which was in response to why did JUNIOR CAT had a gun on him?..........GHETTO LIFE RUFF.........Karie......R.I.P. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 135 VOLUME ONE
  • 136. WHERE DID REGGAE ORIGINATE? From: bryan@umdnj.edu (BrYaN cRaIgH) Subject: Where did reggae originate? Summary: jamaica is the birthplace of reggae Keywords: reggae jamaica trinidad marley originate feud Organization: Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of NJ Date: Sat, 24 Jun 1995 14:02:42 GMT a friend and i are currently at odds about the origin of reggae music. he claims it originated in trinidad; i say jamaica! who is correct? ------------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? Date: 24 Jun 1995 17:43:43 GMT You are! EZ Noh, ------------------------------- mike From: shan0044@gold.tc.umn.edu (Robert S Shandu) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? Date: 25 Jun 1995 13:48:04 -0500 Organization: University of Minnesota "It doesn't matter now where it comes from. What matters is that we have seen it growing and we have seen it chanting down Babylon---L. Dube ******************************************************************************* Reggae music is the music that comes from creation, the music that comes from Divine inspiration. **************************************************** ------------------------------From: rlam@bgnet.bgsu.edu (Ronald E Lam) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? Date: 25 Jun 1995 19:53:05 GMT Organization: Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH (USA) ..it matters where reggae music comes from...from creation...and from divine inspiration as the i seh...and true...i and i see it growing...and i and i see it chanting down babylon and di babylonians...and as i man see it...a reggae music in inity will never be defeated...only jah know it... -irie,one love,roots music...everytime with culture, from Errol, aka roots-ee 419-372-7903,voice mail...and de beat goes on...and on...and on...respec'... i am the small axe...sharp and ready...to cut you down...sharp and ready... --------------------------------From: scottie@marcus.rice.edu (Scottie McDonald) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? Date: 26 Jun 1995 22:00:09 GMT Organization: Rice University I believe it's common knowledge that Toots and the Maytals (Jamaicans) `coined' the word for the first time with their single, "Do the Reggay". --------------------------------From: LGKY57C@prodigy.com (David Hureau) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? Date: 27 Jun 1995 03:47:10 GMT Organization: Prodigy Services Company 1-800-PRODIGY Toots would like to take credit for it with his hit " do the reggay", it evolved from rock-steady, in Jamaica. That of corse, is the explanation in Babylon terms, not exactly applicable to I and I. ---------------------------------REGGAE ON THE INTERNET New Hampshire Dread page 136 VOLUME ONE
  • 137. From: ras77ta@aol.com (RAS77TA) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? Date: 27 Jun 1995 15:03:54 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) some say it has some roots in trinidad some say it come from jamaica, but i-man have to agree with l.dube, let's just say it has it's roots in iration seen ---------------------------------From: sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu (Bush Doktor) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? Date: 28 Jun 1995 06:54:23 GMT Organization: University of Redlands Yeah, agreed. Mikey Dread was asked that question once and replied that reggae came from the musician's mind by way of a direct "pipe" line from Jah. One of the best answers I ever heard! Bush Doktor RAW#343 500 x c'95 ----------------------------------From: mwilliam@postoffice.wcl.american.edu (Mark Williams) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? Date: 28 Jun 1995 18:06:26 GMT Organization: Washington College of Law In article <3snal9$me9@larry.rice.edu>, scottie@marcus.rice.edu (Scottie McDonald) says: > I believe it's common knowledge that Toots and the Maytals > (Jamaicans) `coined' the word for the first time with their > single, "Do the Reggay". That explanation for the <<term>> reggae is the most commonest, but is by no means the only one. The bottom line in trying to do an etymological search on this is that there is no definitive answer based on irrefutable evidence from that era. One alternative explanation I heard once, for example, was from -- if memory serves me correct here -a Reggae Beat Int'l show in which Roland Alphonso said that someone at Studio One at the time was referring to the sound the keyboards were making in connection with a sound that was, one has to presume, no longer strictly rocksteady. That individual, and I don't recall who it was, told the keyboardist to make that "reggae reggae" sound again. And since it was at Studio One, what someone called something could conceivably become the official public term. As for the Trinidad vs. Jamaica question, I don't think there's much of an issue here. One can argue as to the roots of the rhythms that eventually made up early ska/blue beat type stuff, but the bottom line is that it was in Jamaica where the rocksteady beat was developed and then redeveloped into what later became known as reggae. -----------------------------From: rlam@bgnet.bgsu.edu (Ronald E Lam) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? Date: 28 Jun 1995 18:40:01 GMT Organization: Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH (USA) ..now to add to this discussion, here is what the oxford english dictionary says, for whatever it's worth... reggae...origin unknown...also known as reggay... first listed known use is in 1968...from the song title, do the reggay... then it appears again in 1969 in the Daily Mirror paper on October 19... the word 'reggae' appears to mean west indian music...and so on...through 1969 in the observer in nov, then the listener in december.. then in the 1970 ,melody maker.. 1971, advocate news, from barbados..in its guyana supplement... 1973, g. sims' book, or is it article? hunter's point, 1973, black world in january's issue 1975, globe and mail, toronto, in july 1976, telegraph in brisbane, australia on the 28 th april 1977, in mcknight and tobler's boobk, bob marley, on p. 42 1978, the sunday times, london, jan 29 1979, in the spectator, dec 1... hope this helps, and adds to the rmr massive knowledge,, cool? -irie,one love, roots music with culture...and di beat goes on...from errol REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 137 VOLUME ONE
  • 138. aka roots-ee...419-352-7143...a reggae music in inity will never be defeated...only jah know...what i n i are seeking is one world, one earth... -------------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? Organization: very little I don't know about the word "reggae", but I think 99% of the artists who originated the music came from West Kingston, Jamaica. Alton Ellis, Toots, Bob Marley, etc all were from Trenchtown originally. (I am talking abgout the music, not rasta philosiphy - it is still reggae even if the artist does not talk about Jah in the lyrics...) * * * Allen Kaatz <highnote@eskimo.com * * * ----------------------------------From: rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? Date: 30 Jun 1995 13:13:26 GMT Organization: University Of Utah Computer Center Wasn't it thought to be a derivative of "streggae"; which is term with rude connotations. I can't remember what this term supposedly meant tho. -Robert Nelson Smile Jamaica, Sat. 4-7 PM KRCL 91 FM / KZMU 89.7 FM Salt Lake City / Moab, Utah rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide #14 Robin Hood robbed from the rich cuz the poor man ain't got no money ---Dennis Alcapone -------------------------------From: del.haverkamp@hottips.com (Del Haverkamp) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae orig Date: Tue, 4 Jul 1995 03:46:00 GMT It referred to a hooker. del.haverkamp@hottips.com --* SLMR 2.1a #310 * Talk is cheap until you hire a lawyer -------------------------------From: DEernisse@fullerton.edu (Doug Eernisse) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? Date: Fri, 30 Jun 1995 10:47:14 -0700 Organization: CSUF Quoting from "Tougher than Tough" liner notes (to the 4 CD set): "New producers like Lee and Perry, together with men like Clancy Eccles, began to change the beat. They couldn't always get the best musicians since those men continued to work for Dodd and Reid, and the majors like Federal. So they often used musicians who were less experienced but were keen to make an impact. Players like the organist Glen Adams, the drummer Leroy 'Horsemouth' Wallace, and bands like The Hippy Boys, featuring Aston 'Family Man' Barrett and his brother Carlton, were all called on to work for the new men. They had no trouble making a completely new rhythm - fast, chugging and tight - which soon got a name. Clancy Eccles claims to have invented the name 'reggae' for this new beat, and whilst the story - Clancy making up the name reggae from the street slang for a loose woman, streggae - may be apocryphal, the music soon established itself. The major producers of ska and rock steady - Dodd, Reid, and Leslie Kong - soon found themselves copying their former employees." Doug -Doug Eernisse <DEernisse@fullerton.edu> Dept. Biological Science MH282 California State University Fullerton, CA 92634 ------------------------------From: alexb@freenet.vancouver.bc.ca (Alex Brosgart) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Where did reggae originate? REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 138 VOLUME ONE
  • 139. Date: 2 Jul 1995 01:04:43 GMT Organization: Vancouver Regional FreeNet Of course modern reggae originated from the ghetto crucible of late 60's Ja., but knowledgeble ethno-musicologists speak of age-old traditional West African 4 beat rhythms that accent the 2/4 backbeat. Others say the psalms (songs) of King David were roots rockers. There ain't no record on vinal but many of the psalms start with instructions that the lyrics be sent over to the chief musician. Praise him with the sound of the trumpet; praise him with the guitar and harp. Praise him with the tambourine and dance. Praise him with the stringed instruments and organs. Praise him upon the loud cymbals; praise him upon the high sounding cymbals. Let everything that has breath praise Jah. Psalm 150 REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 139 VOLUME ONE
  • 140. UNDER HEAVY MANNERS From: bg147@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (Matthew Moore) Subject: Manners / Heavy Manners Organization: The National Capital FreeNet, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Date: Sun, 25 Jun 1995 17:26:55 GMT I was just listening to a U Brown cut called "Manners" and he too sings the praises of socialism. I'm thinking about Prince Far I's "Under Heavy Manners" cut, too. What's the significance of the term 'manners' in this context? Curious, Matthew -**** Matthew Moore **** Email: bg147@FreeNet.Carleton.CA -----------------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: Manners / Heavy Manners Organization: very little Date: Mon, 26 Jun 1995 07:59:14 GMT It means, under heavy discipline or punishment... like when Kingston is under heavy manners, they have a curfew, or call out the army, etc... Al * * * Allen Kaatz <highnote@eskimo.com * * * -----------------------------------From: rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Manners / Heavy Manners Date: 26 Jun 1995 16:08:12 GMT Organization: University Of Utah Computer Center Isn't that referring to Manley's state of emergency in 1976? Under heavy manners being a term that parents use to discipine their kids. In this case Papa Manley and his "kids" Jamaica. So a betrayal of all those Rasta and ghetto youths who supported him? -Robert Nelson Smile Jamaica, Sat. 4-7 PM KRCL 91 FM / KZMU 89.7 FM Salt Lake City / Moab, Utah rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide #14 Robin Hood robbed from the rich cuz the poor man ain't got no money ---Dennis Alcapone -----------------------------------From: LGKY57C@prodigy.com (David Hureau) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: Manners / Heavy Manners Date: 27 Jun 1995 03:53:35 GMT Organization: Prodigy Services Company 1-800-PRODIGY I believe that "Under Heavy Manners" was the slogan of the JLP, at one time or another. This phrase was in one of Bob's songs leading up to his assasination attempt as many believed Bob was willing to go both ways in case the JLP won over the PNP in the upcoming election. I may be wrong, but I and I don't think so. New Hampshire Dread ------------------------------------ From: bg147@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (Matthew Moore) Subject: Re: Manners / Heavy Manners Organization: The National Capital FreeNet, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Date: Thu, 29 Jun 1995 02:13:07 GMT Thanks Allen and Robert for your insights. I was thinking 'heavy manners' might be kind of like 'downpression.' However you've given us a more precise definition and understanding of the term. -- Matthew **** Matthew Moore **** REGGAE ON THE INTERNET Email: bg147@FreeNet.Carleton.CA page 140 VOLUME ONE
  • 141. LUCIANO From: jrrodigan@aol.com (Jr RODIGAN) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: LUCIANO SAYS HE IS FINISHED WITH SINGING !!!!!!! Date: 26 Jun 1995 04:39:59 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) hey this piece of news is kinda scary .............I hope its not true but here it goes>>>>>>:::::::::and i quote:::: " The heaviest enertainment buzz out of Jamaican in the past week relates to Luciano's decision to take a break from singing. The announcement was made at a concert while the singer was performing at Sandy Bay in Hanover. The singer reprotedly told the audience that he wanted a break and would be going into the hills to cool out for a year.The decision reportedly took manager Fattis (EXTERMINATOR) by surprise and he had to be reassuring promoters that the artist would fulfill the dates he has with them. The artist since then has released a statement saying that it was God's decision for him to do what he intends and he can't go back"...END--------------now that was from the THE WEEKLY JAMAICAN STAR north America edition for June 24-30 page 13......in the previous week's X NEWS it actually says that LUCIANO said to the crowd he will not sing any more at all.....he is sick of all the negativity.......he is quoted by X NEWS as saying -on stage mind you.." Some of you out there right now don't understand what i am saying because you are too caked up to undersatnd. I am not motivated by money of self aggrandizement..."---X NEWS JUNE 15-21 editon page 3 to 5....................................................... like i said at the begining i hope its not true.........LUCIANO's new album is set to be released on ISLAND JAMAICA called "WHERE THERE IS LIFE" due in stores on AUGUST 14..................respect to all LUCIANO fans.......and to the man himself....if he really has stopped i for one would like to say "GOD BLESS..........and THANK YOU FOR THE MUSIC"........JUNIOR --------------------------------From: hbowser@bianca.amd.com (Horace Bowser) Subject: Re: LUCIANO SAYS HE IS FINISHED WITH SINGING !!!!!!! Organization: Advanced Micro Devices, Austin, TX, USA Date: Mon, 26 Jun 1995 13:39:28 GMT Yeah... but the homies chill out all the time. If this were a permanent thing (I didn't interpret it that way from the quote), then I'd be major concerned. But homeboy, kickin back in the hills for a year or two ain't no thang. Luciano has been a true delight and (I pray) he wouldn't leave us hanging high and dry like that. Nah... Just chillin' *fingers crossed*. Ites. -Horace horace.bowser@amd.com --------------------------------From: teriyaki@ix.netcom.com (Joshua B) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: LUCIANO SAYS HE IS FINISHED WITH SINGING !!!!!!! Date: 26 Jun 1995 23:17:40 GMT Organization: Netcom I heard that he is definately not going to stop singing. He is just goiing to "chill in the hills" for a couple days to prepare himself for what is to come. If Junior Rodigan would stop staying out so late playing on his sound, maybe he could get up Sunday morning and listen to Michael L on WZBC.:-) They do news from JA at about 9am. Luciano is just doing the righteous thing. -************************************************************ *** Respect due from Joshua B *** teriyaki@ix.netcom.com *** *** Heartbeat Records ** WMBR 88.1 FM ** Cambridge/Boston ** ************************************************************ -------------------------------From: jrrodigan@aol.com (Jr RODIGAN) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: LUCIANO SAYS HE IS FINISHED WITH SINGING !!!!!!! Date: 27 Jun 1995 01:21:26 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) If it was up to me LUCIANO would have his own studio in the hills or where ever he desires..... to work at his pace to give us wicked music like he has so REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 141 VOLUME ONE
  • 142. far.............Respect>>>>> JUNIOR. P.S..... when his album comes out please support it........its success is extremely important for the future of cultural dancehall music....so to all of you who don't like the slackness and the gun lyrics; it is CRUCIAL that you buy LUCIANO's album....also check out SPANNER BANNER's new CD/LP on ISLAND JAMAICA too..BOOM. ---------------------------------From: papalee@aol.com (Papa Lee) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: LUCIANO SAYS HE IS FINISHED WITH SINGING !!!!!!! Date: 27 Jun 1995 06:44:07 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) The name of the album is Chill and it is very strong. Banner has been a top singer for some time now but his RAS album didn't have terribly memorable backing tracks. On this one, Sly, Robbie, Gitsy, Clive Hunt and Robbie Lyn give Banner the kind of support he deserves. Good original songwriting and a solid cover version of Des'ree's "You Gotta Be." I'd also highly recommend the new one from Mikey Spice called Happiness. It's on RAS, licensed from RUNNetherlands and showcases another good new dancehall singer. Spice has a voice that is similar to Jack Radics' without being quite as extreme (i.e., you can listen to five or six songs in a row without getting irritated - I find my capacity with Radics is three songs max even though he is killer one at a time) and the rhythm tracks are solid. Also interesting is the broad mix of party songs, cultural material and love songs. One Love, Lee O'Neill -------------------------------From: rlam@bgnet.bgsu.edu (Ronald E Lam) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: LUCIANO SAYS HE IS FINISHED WITH SINGING !!!!!!! Date: 27 Jun 1995 13:52:16 GMT Organization: Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH (USA) ..i heard cuts from luciano's where there is life album, and i WILL definitely get it...( i man predict it album of di year, :-), yes i , it is very crucial...i man can't wait to get it...true...luciano has arrived... -irie,one love, roots music with culture...and di beat goes on...from errol aka roots-ee...419-352-7143...a reggae music in inity will never be defeated...only jah know...what i n i are seeking is one world, one earth... -------------------------------From: RF <102156.3064@CompuServe.COM> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: LUCIANO SAYS HE IS FINISHED WITH SINGING !!!!!!! Date: 3 Jul 1995 12:52:26 GMT Organization: via CompuServe Information Service Jr. Rodigan writes: >if he really has stopped i for one would like to say "GOD BLESS..........and THANK YOU FOR THE MUSIC" A lot of spiritual happenings in this time, Junior. I share the exact same sentiment as you about Luciano, Garnet Silk, and certain others. As our *bredren* Fituarari pointed out, (in his own way) the music business has an extremely evil side to it, and all who are not spiritually firm will find it extremely difficult to deal with it in this time. Luciano taking a spiritual hiatus is probably the best thing the brother could do for himself. I do know it is not even his choice, he has to do what his spirit beckons him to do. *If* he comes forward and decides to sing again, he will be as strong as the universe, and able to push forth spiritual lyrics with a passion, and also deal with the business from a strong spiritual status. If he doesn't sing again, then whatever he does, it will be what Jah wants him to do. The negativity in the business is overwhelming most of the time, and whatever Luciano decides to do, I am sure it will be for all the right reasons, with God at the helm, so I feel no way, is just Jah works. Nuff respect to Luciano for placing Jah first and foremost in his life, He can never lose because of that decision. "There's a natural mystic blowing in the air -- if you listen *carefully* then you will hear".........(Robert Nesta Marley) -RF "Who the cap fit, let them wear it" REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 142 VOLUME ONE
  • 143. SAMPLING CD'S From: notes@panix.com (Notes ) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae,alt.music.ska Subject: FS: Sampling CD: The "Bomb" Reggae Loops Followup-To: rec.music.reggae Date: Tue, 27 Jun 95 02:08:47 GMT Organization: PANIX Public Access Internet and Unix, NYC For all music makers out there.... This sampling CD was released worldwide last Thursday so it's sounds are very fresh. Besides, there have been very few pure raggae sampling CDs made to date, this is one of the first made indepedently by true Raggae Musicians with True Raggae instruments. I received it on Friday, completed my purpose with it (publishing a review), and it is for sale. *Most stores still don't have this available for sale but as this is an East West sampling CD...they do have them. The Bomb Reggae Loops: is the long awaited sampling CD featuring an array of styles of Reggae and Caribbean influenced grooves (loops, breakdowns, bass loops & vocals). Real Sounds played by Real Reggae musicians. For the record, I am not "selling" this sampling CD. I am "transferring the license of this sampling CD for a fee of $70 + shipping and I will send you a copy of the receipt (or in other words original license of purchase). Thanks M. Notes ----------------------------------From: sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu (Bush Doktor) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: FS: Sampling CD: The "Bomb" Reggae Loops Date: 27 Jun 1995 05:35:57 GMT Organization: University of Redlands Sly and Robbie supposedly put one out last year. I've seen the adverts for it, but have never heard it personally. It was made up by the same people who made George Clinton's sampler. My guess is that sly & robbie would be considered "true" reggae musicians also. :-) Bush ----------------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: FS: Sampling CD: The "Bomb" Reggae Loops Organization: very little Date: Tue, 27 Jun 1995 17:42:53 GMT Sly has also had some drumbeat sampling CDs out before that... some great beats played by one of the masters... Al * * * Allen Kaatz <highnote@eskimo.com * * * --------------------------------From: sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu (Bush Doktor) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: FS: Sampling CD: The "Bomb" Reggae Loops Date: 28 Jun 1995 06:27:00 GMT Organization: University of Redlands The one I spoke off was by sly only as you said. I just kinda naturally added the "and Robbie" out of habit. :-) ReggaeRuss has one by sly that ran about $100, so it looks like I may have to make a visit to him to get a listen! :-) Jr Rodigan has it also, but that's a heck of a drive seeing as he's back east. Bush ---------------------------------From: jrrodigan@aol.com (Jr RODIGAN) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: FS: Sampling CD: The "Bomb" Reggae Loops Date: 1 Jul 1995 04:24:33 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 143 VOLUME ONE
  • 144. Unless you are into producing or in a band which utilises samplers the SLY drum CD is useless.......however if you do fall into the above category its like a ticket to musical (((read REGGAE DRUM))) heaven every time you listen to it.....worth every penny of its $100.00 price tag and then some.....WICKED!!!!......PROOF POSITIVE THAT SLY DUNBAR IS NOTHING OTHER THAN A TOTAL>>>>>> GENUIS <<<<<< ..........respect to sly........JUNIOR ---------------------------------From: pilgrim@xmission.xmission.com (Papa Pilgrim) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: FS: Sampling CD: The "Bomb" Reggae Loops Date: 1 Jul 1995 13:19:49 GMT Organization: XMission Public Access Internet (801 539 0900) I am not a collector, club deejay, nor music maker. I am just a humble fan. Will someone please take the time to explain for me and others just what is a "sampler CD" and why are they so "valuable?" TIA -Papa Pilgrim <pilgrim@xmission.com> |"Nite Roots" |Tel:801-355-1405 Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide |KRCL 90.9FM |Fax:801-355-1405 Keep It Simple, Make It Fun |Salt Lake City |KISMIF ***"FORWARD THE REGGAE VIBE...EVERYTIME!*** ---------------------------------- DANCEHALL TAPES From: jrrodigan@aol.com (Jr RODIGAN) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Nuff New Dancehall session tapes 4 sale Date: 9 Jun 1995 03:35:05 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) Greetings to all hardcore dancehall fans.....If you are having trouble getting the latest GOOD quality recordings of the most up to date session tapes in yu area then look no further......just write or call me at:.....VIBES RECORD SHOP....1144 Blue Hill Avenue, Boston, Mass. 02124, USA.....(617)265-0929 or fax (617)265-1394.....we have tapes right now in stock from the last week of MAY including...JARO vs. EARTHRULER....BOUNTI KILLA at CACTUS CLUB with SIMPLETON, PECOS, GLAM. MURPHY, etc.....and nuff nuff more....they are guaranteed good quality and very reasonably priced....so please call....we also have a huge selection of the latest CDs/LPs/12"...and only the GOOD 7" tunes...so get pon yu celullar phone and call we B4 yu call simone....lada mercy...............respect JUNIOR RODIGAN REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 144 VOLUME ONE
  • 145. WAILING SOULS From: wailingj@aol.com (WAILING J) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: WAILING SOULS Date: 29 Jun 1995 18:34:56 -0400 Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) I AM FROM THE U.K. RASIED ON REGGAE WAS JUST INTRODED 1 YR AGO TO WAILING SOULS WOULD LIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THEM ---------------------------------From: highnote@eskimo.com (Allen Kaatz) Subject: Re: WAILING SOULS Organization: very little Date: Fri, 30 Jun 1995 17:18:56 GMT Some of their early history - two of the original members started recording back in the ska days when they were very young, making records for Prince Buster & Coxsone Dodd as "The Schoolboys". In the late 60s they formed the original four-man vocal group The Wailing Souls, & recorded quite a few tracks (at least two LPs worth) for Coxsone Dodd. Some of the songs came out in Jamaica under the name "The Classics" - Dodd thought that they should change their name so people wouldn't confuse them with the Wailers (who were also known as "The Wailing Wailers"). They also recorded two classic tracks in the early 70s for Bob Marley's Tuff Gong label, "Harbour Shark" and "Back Biter"... since that time they have worked with many other producers, putting out consistently good roots reggae... as far as their more recent history, I'll leave that up to some of the RMRers... Al * * * Allen Kaatz <highnote@eskimo.com * * * ----------------------------------From: David Wall <dwall> Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: WAILING SOULS Date: 1 Jul 1995 02:35:11 GMT Organization: GTE GSC NMO Stay with the older stuff. Their latest album isn't even reggae. But you must get Firehouse Rock and whatever that album/cd is with the song "Black Rose". ------------------------------------------------------------------------------David Wall GTE Systems Operations NMO Phone: (206) 487-8332 22027 17th Avenue SE Fax: (206) 487-8368 Bothell, WA 98021 Internet: dwall@nmo.gtegsc.com -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------From: rn3517@u.cc.utah.edu (Robert Nelson) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: WAILING SOULS Date: 6 Jul 1995 15:06:56 GMT Organization: University of Utah Computer Center I would say definitely pick up "Firehouse Rock" (Shanachie). Great harmony tunes like the title track Bandits Taking Over, See Baba Joe etc. Then get the Very Best of (Shan.) if nothing else to have Bredda Gravalicious and Jah Jah Give Us Life. I haven't seen this new album "face the Devil" on Trojan, but I wonder if it's the Jah Guidance release called Wailing: Linval Thompson produced, Roots Radix and Scientist mix. Great extendo mix stuff. If you still buy vinyl, I'd look for Inchpinchers. Good versions of Tings and Times, Mass Charley Ground and Oh What a Lie. The pop reggae release All Over the World is pretty modern stuff as well. The new one Live On has some nice things too. -Robert Nelson Smile Jamaica, Sat. 4-7 PM KRCL 91 FM / KZMU 89.7 FM Salt Lake City / Moab, Utah rnelson@alexandria.lib.utah.edu Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide #14 Robin Hood robbed from the rich cuz the poor man ain't got no money ---Dennis Alcapone REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 145 VOLUME ONE
  • 146. REGGAE AMBASSADORS WORLDWIDE From: pilgrim@xmission.xmission.com (Papa Pilgrim) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: RAW Update #11 Date: 4 Jul 1995 19:35:28 GMT Organization: XMission Internet (801 539 0900) RAW Update #11 Runnings from Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide by Papa Pilgrim Conference '95, the fourth gathering of Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide, will convene August 25th in Las Vegas, Nevada with the theme "RAW Networking Works," The first night will be a "Meet and Greet" session, showcase performances by RAW member artists, and conference registration at the Fremont Street Reggae & Blues Club. This year's focus is Education, Entertainment and Networking. Keynote speaker will be internationally renowned Marley authority, Roger Steffens. Presentations will include panel discussions and the sharing of information geared to inform the entire membership. If you have not received your Conference Information Flyer by the time you read this, contact me or Rastaman Nane' and it will be so. If you have the brochure, share the information with everyone you know. "Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide Volume 1" is a reality. This is a double CD featuring twenty-five tracks by as many RAW member artists. Maximum respect to King Benj-I and the Tronic 1 crew (#60) for putting this project together. The frustrations and obstacles leading to completion were many; often bringing to mind the thought, "What a plot." The wait has been worthwhile. The price is right at US$12 for RAW members and US$20 for all others. Make checks/money orders out to Tronic 1, 1318 Barton Ave., Point Pleasant NJ 08742. Retailers contact Tronic 1 for wholesale prices. Tel: 908- 892-4040; fax: 908-8266960 Brief Editorial: A friendly critic remarked that RAW seems to be more concerned with the growth of an organization than with promoting Reggae music. In a sense she was right. The stronger RAW is the more RAW is respected and accepted by the worldwide Reggae community, hence the more RAW can forward the vibe. However, let us remember the Mission and Vision of RAW and that the first word in RAW is "Reggae." Committed Reggae Fans and Performing Artists are the foundation of Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide. These two categories of members are equally important in sustaining the Reggae vibe and neither would exist without the other. The rest of us fall somewhere in between these two ends of the continuum. What's the point: just something that had to be said. Sort of a reminder to help each other, remembering that what helps one helps us all. Mission Statement: Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide is an international network of Committed Reggae Enthusiasts who have joined forces to spread the positive vibe of Reggae music. Daily we will move forward educating humankind about our music, always remembering the vision of One Love! The Vision of Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide is to be the primary reference for the Reggae Industry. I have another sort of a vision: that these RAW Updates will evolve into a full- fledged, self-financed trade journal. RAW (and I) are looking for a person (s) willing and able to take over writing and publishing the RAW Updates. Proceeding slowly, limited advertising space could be made available exclusively to RAW members. From there, a regular publication could evolve, perhaps something like "RAW Updates: Trade Journal and News of Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide." The RAW Journal would be a "stand alone" publication, that is, not an insert or "part of" another publication, perhaps modeled after the Independent Music Association's "Soundtrack Journal." If this "vision" intrigues you and you want to discuss this further, please contact me directly. RAW Business: Note Well: If your membership number is less than "304," and you have not paid your annual membership dues, this ***will*** be your last Update, RAW services will cease and you will be dropped from the RAWster prior to Conference '95. A number of artists and record labels have joined the RAWster since the last Update. At the risk of being accused of name dropping, Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide welcomes Christafari (#304), Upbeat Consultants and Warren Wayne (#306), 71 Records and Denroy Morgan (#308), Outa!/Hightone Records (#311), Sundance (314), Epiphany Records and Warren Smith (#327), ROIR Records (#305), Sundance (#314), Rasta Rafiki (#320), Zion Tribe (#323), Junglz Apart (#329), Irie Productions (#330), 2 Voices (#347), Chief Raa Records (#352), Equal Rights (#354), Irie Time (#355), Rula Brown (#359), Scorcher Music and Dennis "Scorcher" Williams (#362), TF Records (#365), Condition Four (#367), RAS Records (#370), Inka Inka (#371), Clinton Fearon & the Boogie Brown Band (#372), Root Awakening (#374), Akoben Reggae Band (#377), Sista Farika Fayola Berhane (#379), Ras Africa (#383), The Mighty Charge (#389), Flag Records (#392), Danny Browne and Main Street Records (#400), Red Di #5 (#402), Ras Midas & the Bridge (#405), Spenguy Music (#408), Norman St. John Hamilton (#416), Rhythm Doctor (#417), Stacy Greenberg of Capitol Records (#420) Al REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 146 VOLUME ONE
  • 147. Kirk & AKB (#421), Lee Milo & Tishan Band (#422),Burning Spear's Burning Music Productions (#424) and Mathew Bingy Jarvis (#425). A Humble and Heartfelt Thank You For the past several months Rastaman Nane' and I have been asking for practical and financial help with the day-to-day runnings of Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide. Heretofore, almost every keystroke struck, envelope sealed, and penny spent has come from the fingers, tongue and pockets of either Rastaman Nane' or me. Membership fees have not come close to meeting the expenses, yet the vibe continued. However, fingers tire, tongues dry and pockets empty, necessitating a call for help. Our call is being answered. Ambassadors are helping in many ways with financial contributions; donating computer and writing skills; organizing and presenting at Conference '95; copying and mailing nearly 2,000 Conference flyers. I must stop. The response has touched both Rastaman Nane' and me very deeply, and we thank you--to the max!!! Yet, the work and the need for help goes on. If you have skills to donate please contact Tom Pearson (#33). He will begin archiving a RAW Skills Bank, listing folks whom members can call upon when help is needed. If you can financially or practically assist in ongoing publicity for Conference '95, contact me and folks, if you can spare a dime, send it to Rastaman Nane'. There is a critical need for front money to purchase Conference '95 souvenirs. I know I'd love to have a bumper sticker, or tee shirt reading "Forward the Reggae Vibe...Everytime" with a mention of conference place and dates. For what is yet to come, thank you. Donations are a major source of financial support for RAW. Thanks go out to the following Ambassadors for their generous monetary support: Danny Fallon (#301), David Alert (#3),David Bauman (#5), Irie Productions (#330), Lush Records (#7), Kenneth Dalton (#246), Richard Miller (#409), The Rastamon Times (#381), Tom Pearson (#33), and Rocky Mountain Reggae (#51). Donations are always needed and much appreciated. Members Write: Judith Kalil of Irie Productions (#330): "I thank you for the positive impact RAW has on Jamaican musicians. The airplay that RAW members provide gives many of these musicians a sense of recognition and accomplishment that they do not often experience in Jamaica." Terence Arthur Jerome Lindo (#390): "I am privileged to have been accepted into your fraternity. I hope that I can be as useful as I should be and that we can all be one." Danny Fallon (#301) is in captivity. He writes: "...my plan is to establish a Rastafarian study group here at the prison for the spiritual benefit of those few of us dreads... I am humbly asking you to consider donating any such material as would lend itself to the Rastafarian/Reggae culture, ideals, and philosophies, including music/informational cassettes or videos, books, pamphlets, or other literature. Also, any catalogs covering this material would help for future reference." Donated articles should be addressed to Chaplain Lowell Entz, Sheridan Federal Prison Camp, PO Box 5001, Sheridan, OR 97378- 5001. Questions should be addressed to Danny Fallon, 83259-022, PO Box 6000- 6, Sheridan, OR 97378-6000. Wendy Russell (#124) a Fresno, CA promoter: "I LOVE BEING A RAW MEMBER! On my recent trip to Hawaii, I took my RAW membership list (aka RAWster) and called the RAW members on the islands I was visiting. Wonderful People! I could ask them questions about "Wus up" in their area. I made new friends. It was so uplifting and fun! Thanks RAW for the network/family." (I'd like to add that I never travel without a copy of the RAWster. It is my "Yellow Pages" to "Wus up" worldwide). PS: Wendy added: I have about 30 rubber RAW logo stamps (approx: 2 5/8" x 1") available to member at cost (about US$5-6). Call Wendy at 209-226-9280 for details. Robert Nelson (#14), a Salt Lake City radio deejay: "Thanks for the capsule reviews in RAW Update #10. I called a lot of artists yesterday and all of them I talked to agreed to send me promos. I hope you'll continue this practice in future updates. Fantastic service and very helpful!" TF Records, (#365) celebrating the success of their first Reggae release, Inka Inka's (#371) "Myth of the Machine", shared this in response to an e-mail inquiry asking, "What's in it for me, if I join RAW?": "The biggest benefit from joining RAW is the chance to network, communicate, share, etc. with reggae artists, labels, promoters, fans, clubs, records stores, etc. I am a part owner in a record label and RAW has been an invaluable source of information and support." Jah Lucky (#6), a Haitian deejay: "I am back home in Haiti, after almost three years in Nicaragua, hosting "Fe y, o˜ ak San" ("Leaf, Gold and Blood") in Haitian Creole. Roots Reggae, Haitian roots music and Creole Ragga are blossoming in Haiti. More and more people are getting conscious and joining the fight. The vibes are high and strong. Lucky's new USA address, which gets his mail to him overnight, is: Jah Lucky, c/o Anndex Courier, PO Box 591108, Miami, FL 33159. Norma Fraser (#16) is seeking management representation and a record deal for her new album Norma Fraser- Hot Again. Contact Norma at PO Box 14905, Albuquerque NM 87191. Tel: (505) 275-9326 or thru the Abengg Studios in Jamaica (809) 931-1324 Ambassadors at Work REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 147 VOLUME ONE
  • 148. Henceforth, Carter Van Pelt, (#105) will assist writing RAW Updates. Carter will be responsible for compiling "RAW Rhythms: recent release from RAW member artists & labels." These will be brief, descriptive mentions including complete contact information. If you want your recorded projects mentioned in the Updates and aired on Reggae radio (KZUM 89.3FM) in the Heartland of America, put Carter on your promo mailing list: RR 1 Box 169, Holland NE 68372. Tel: 402-792-2661. Mark Mohr of Christafari released by Epic records Christafari was selected Mohr gave partial credit (#304) advises that their debut album, Soul Fire, will be with a tentative in store date of June 20. When asked how to participate in the forty-six city tour with Sunsplash USA, to "a lot of R.A.W. airplay." Amy Levinson (#253) of Seattle's KAOS-FM "Evening Dread Posse" notes that their emphasis is "especially supportive of independently labeled Reggae musicians." Amy, another very busy Ambassador, also writes news, reviews and interviews for Forward (#309) and Dub Missive (#69) magazines. For more info contact Amy at 206-357-5806. Jimmy Dread (#112) is a Reggae radio deejay in Kapaa, Hawaii and proprietor of the Jamaican Style-Kauai Store. He encloses a RAW membership application blank with each of his store catalogs. Thanks to Jimmy's efforts, Small Axe Ranch, a vendor out of Perry, Michigan is RAW member #380. Thank you Jimmy and welcome Small Axe Ranch. Rasta Stevie, spokesperson for and founding member of Telluride, Colorado's 8750 Reggae Band (#103), is never far away from his address/contact book. Prior to playing a gig , Stevie makes sure that every area person on his list is aware that 8750 is coming to town. Deejays are asked to arrange interviews, announce the gig and hold ticket give aways, publications are given press releases, and fans are invited to the show. If you're not on Stevie's list, drop him a line at PO Box 1381, Telluride, CO 81435. Tel: 303-728-6913. Rasta Stevie will be one of the presenters at this year's Conference '95 in Las Vegas. His topic? "The Fun and Frustrations of Self Promotion," a how to do-it-yourself discussion about successful self promotion. Errol Lam (#214) is an ardent and energetic Committed Reggae Fan, especially of The Ark Band (#230) of Columbus, Ohio. Utilizing CyberReggae, Lam publishes every move made, every song sung, every gig played by his favorite band. Lam's medium is rec.music.reggae (aka "rmr"), one of many UseNet groups found on the Internet Hiway. Seldom a day passes that Lam does not announce something concerning his favorite group. Dave Andrews (#322) a truly Committed Reggae Fan can also be located on the Internet. Taking full advantage of CyberReggae, he e-mailed RAW applications to some 400 subscribers of America Online's Reggae forum. Thanks to a generous donation from The Beat magazine (#155) and the collaborative international efforts of three Ambassadors, RAW has a news page in each issue. Natasha Hanson of Upbeat Consultants (#306) and Nicky "Dread" Taylor of Crooked Beat Productions (#324) and CFRU 93.3 FM, are collaborating with Guam radio (KPRG 89.3 FM) deejay Tom "Jah Son" Pearson (#33) putting together information of and about RAW members and RAW activities. Send your news releases, tour schedules, press kits, and other newsworthy items & tidbits to Natasha for editorial consideration. Check for the first "RAW Home Page" in this year's tribute to Bob Marley issue in The Beat. A busy person Natasha. She also writes a monthly Reggae column for iMpulse Music Journal, an "online" publication. She writes: "Two RAW member artists were featured at the 1st Annual North by Northeast music festival, Toronto, Canada's answer to Austin, Texas' annual South by Southwest music fest. Amidst ultra-keen competition, The Ark Band (#230) and Upbeat Consultants' Warren Wayne (#306) won showcase positions at the mid-June NXNE. Congratulations! Late news: Zobop (#35), a Haitian roots band, was the third RAW member selected to participate in NXNE. Add Ande C to this year's list of award winners. His company, MJH Records (#197), garnered three at the recent Boston's Expose Production's Second Annual Caribbean Awards. The big night saw MJH Records gaining Best Producer (Ande C), best Male Vocalist, (Rachet), and best New Artist, (Daughter Rula). MJH Records, with a full package of roots and dancehall artists, is seeking Midwest gigs. Contact Ande C at MJH Records, 25 Bailey St, Dorchester, MA 02124. Tel/fax: 617-282-2880; pager 617-465-6225. Several online members are adding RAW information to their home pages and archives, providing ready access to "wired" Reggae fans. Details available from Mike Pawka (#94) <mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil>, the Cool Runnings Crew (#351) <coolcrew@interaccess.com> of Chicago's WHPK 88.5FM and KUOR's (89.1FM, Redlands, California) Bush Doktor (#343) <sppcarso@ultrix.uor.edu>. Joan Allen, photographer, deejay and CEO of A.D.Q. Connections (#159) has signed a "personal management contract" with the Live Up Band (formerly the Live Wire Band) of San Francisco. Send requests for press kits and promotional material direct to A.D.Q., PO Box 1131, Suisun City, CA 94585-1131, USA. People Productions (#350) is producing, promoting and booking for the Mateel Community Center (#21), and other Northern California venues. Mateel is host of one of the world's most irie (irie-ist?) outdoor Reggae festivals, Reggae-on-the-River. I've been to many and REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 148 VOLUME ONE
  • 149. RotR is my all time favorite outdoor event. Contact Carol Bruno and associates at PO Box 962, Redway, CA 95560, USA. Phone: (707) 923-4599; fax: (707) 923-4509. Distant Drums (#373), is a must for fans, collectors and everyone else interested in Bob Marley and his extended and extensive circle of family and friends. This "Rootzine" in jammed with news, reviews, interviews and discographies of and about the Wailers' . Regular "Roots and Branches" columnist Roger Steffens (Honorary Member) solicits questions from readers. Contact Cry Freedom Productions, PO Box 23, Wolverhampton WV6 0YU, ENGLAND "Forward" (#309) is the appropriately named "monthly cultural magazine featuring Reggae and African music." This "newbie" successfully fills a gap in the Pacific Northwest with informational schedules, irations, interviews and plenty of pictures. Forward, PO Box 22010, Seattle, WA 98119 USA. Chet Nunoo-Quarcoo (#293), a Washington, DC area deejay and entertainment legal consultant, has linked up with Chris Ntaka, former lead guitarist of Lucky Dube and the Slaves. Chris is versatile in production, arrangement and composition. If you're looking for a hot Reggae guitarist, link up with Chet. Newsletters continue to proliferate, especially in California. Topping the list is RBA Running's, a bi-monthly trade letter from the Reggae Business Association (#111). Like Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide, RBA is an idea whose time has come. Founded by Bobby Walton and Kaati and originally known as the California Reggae Business Association, international support and encouragement has led to worldwide expansion. RBA Running's is a Reggae trade publication with well-written, knowledgeable articles about "Protocol," "Contracts," "How to Get Free Publicity," and more. RBA also published and is distributing 50,000 copies of "California Reggae Festival Guide." This 30 page, magazine format directory is jammed with information about summer Reggae events in that state including lineups, ticket information and more. Thank you RBA for a much needed service. Though distributed free of charge, don't be ashamed to enclose a couple of bucks to help with the postage. Contact RBA, PO Box 50635, Reno, NV 89513. Tel/fax: 702-746-8134. for a sample copies and information about the Reggae Business Association. "Reggae Celebration" (#428) is a single sheet newsletter and that celebrates "the Heart and Soul of Reggae Music" This labor of love is free by sending a self addressed, stamped envelope to Reggae Celebration, PO Box 3114, Burbank, CA 91508-3114. The Independent Music Association (#232) continues publishing a more broad-based trade magazine, Soundtrack Journal. All Ambassadors are well-advised to contact IMA for membership & subscription information. Aimed at performing artists and retailers but a must for folks like me trying to learn more about the business of Reggae, subjects in the March/April issue include "Winning Back Retail Customers with Database Marketing" and "Marketing Music on the Internet" and heaps of information and networking tips. IMA, 317 Skyline Lake Dr., PO Box 609, Ringwood, NJ 07456. RAW Rhythms: Five from Funfundvierzig (#93) include two, a full length and EP, from Ragga Frankie ("Geld & Mehr ..." and "Herr Meier-Muller-Huber") and one each from The Lions ("Jah Jah Works"), Mighty V ("So Mighty") and mystic jamming Vision and Friends ("Instrumental Healing"). Ragga Frankie is both Ragga(muffin) and European. Rhythms are programmed and delivery is hard hitting. This second album by the German-based, multinational, African Lions is less rockers oriented than the first, but definitely militant. Rhythms cover most traditional Reggae styles with some Soukous thrown in for good measure. The Vision album is sixteen new age dub tracks by dubmasters Fe and General Skaface. Distributed in the US by Ernie B's Reggae (#113). [Funfundvierzig, Schmiedetwiete 6, 23898 Labenz, Germany]. The U.K. based Nubian (#187) label has issued a dub clash album mixed alternately by Mad Professor and Dub Judah. The 14 track album, "Dub Chronicles 3," is (obviously) the third in a Nubian series. The mixes are of various Black Steel, Drumtan, Senouci Hardy and Black Roots cuts. Definitely in the progressive roots revivalist category. Also from Nubian is a sound system compilation from Armagideon Sounds. Inconspicuously packaged with black and white artwork, "Steppin Forward" and "Natural Elements Dub" are two full albums in one. Armagideon can't be described any other way but "progressive" -- very forward thinking material -- not unlike material by The Vision. [Nubian Records, 148 Ashley Road, Montpelier, Bristol BS6 5PA, England]. Mathew Jarvis (#425) sends his independently produced cassette "Come Home," 12 tracks of unique vocal styling. Getting the most airplay with me: "Dancehall Papa." Of course. [Bingy Recording Studio, PO Box 1062, Cruz Bay, St. John VS, VI 00831]. Four from Heartbeat Records (#240) include another in the Studio One reissue series, the Viceroys "Ya Ho". "Long awaited" is a fitting understatement for self-titled Michael Rose's solo album. With rhythms by Sly and Robbie and Mafia and Fluxie, this album is rooted firmly in the past and the present. No Black Uhuru re-visitations on this one, except for Rose's trademark vocal techniques which are, as is said, "often imitated, never duplicated." "Expression," by Beres Hammond and Derrick Lara is a product of the relationship between Star Trail label and Heartbeat. This is a singer's album with smooth vocals and rhythms that are contemporary and crisp. [Heartbeat Records, One Camp St, Cambridge MA 02140]. RAS Records (#370) continues distributing the hits with two recent releases on Carlton Livingston's ( #219) Grapevine Records (#168). "World A Music, Vol. 1" and "Vault REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 149 VOLUME ONE
  • 150. Classics Vol. 2" are various artists albums a Reggae generation apart and produced by Clive Jarrett. "From the Archives" is a compilation of early Tappa Zukie material. Tappa, the deejay, riding the classic rhythms of Scientist and Jammy. If you haven't heard about Israel Vibration's "On The Rock" album, then you must be under a rock. J.C. Lodge's "Special Request," Gregory Isaacs' "Not A One Man Thing," Freddie McGregor's "Forever My Love," "Mission" from Pablo Moses and "Happiness" by Mikey Spice are all recent outings from RAS. The later album was released in Europe by RUNNetherlands (#288). [RUNNetherlands Music, Hornestraat 37, 6224 TE Maastricht, The Netherlands]. Lastly, RAS fans will delight in "Reggae Roots: the RAS Records Story," a twenty-two track double CD chronicling fifteen years of Forwarding the (RAS) Reggae Vibe. [RAS Records, PO Box 42517, Washington DC 20015] Self-described as a "...a fair, family-oriented and open company," Spenguy Music (#408) enters the Reggae arena with a series of 7" singles. Striving to build a stable of reliable, well-rounded artists willing to learn all there is to know about the entertainment business, Spenguy leads off with Conroy Smith ("Rude Boy"), Terrorist ("Danger Zone), and Marcus Dandy ("Bun and Cheese"). [Spenguy Inc., PO Box 311147, Jamaica, NY 11434]. Sweden's Lush Records (#7) has issued Wendy Shaw's respected and critically acclaimed "Passing Through the Flames," previously released in the USA by Issa-Char Productions (#122). A stellar example of RAW networking at work, this is the second Lush European release of a RAW member American artist, affording wider exposure for the artist and an easier opportunity for European fans to check some of America's best Reggae offerings. [Lush Records, Landsvagsgatan 11, S413 04 Gošteborg,Swede]. Two exciting new issues from ROIR (#328). From dubmaster Gato Negro (the Black Cat) comes "Vital Force Dub." Obvious influences of Lee Perry and King Tubby prevail as Negro weaves unusual rhythms featuring "bass/percussive roots-psychedelic style." Mikey "Dread at the Controls" Dread's first new release in almost four years, "Dub Party," is described as "all new Dread material. [ROIR Records, 611 Broadway Suite #411, New York NY 10012]. Congo Ashanti Roy (#100) comes on strong with "Big City," a roots to the bone release featuring a re-do of "Ark of the Covenant." Backed by the Jah Power Band, Ashanti's 13 tracks are stylistically of the 70's with a decidedly 90's flavor. On the German-based Red Arrow label and distributed by SPV GbmH, PO Box 1147, 30531 Hannover, Germany. For booking information contact Hakeem (#68) and Khalmari Promotions, PO Box 6322, Pittsburgh, PA15212. The Blakamix (#216) "singing queen," Special A. comes forth with her debut album featuring material either previously unavailable or on hard-to-find singles. "Special A. Encounters Mixman" is seven vocal tracks and seven more with Dennis "Mixman" Bedeau dubbing the controls. Distributed in the US by RAS and Ernie B's Reggae and in the UK & Europe by Jetstar, Roughtrade and Semaphore. [Blakamix International, 126 Gladstone St., Bedford MK41 7RT, England]. The Ark Band (#230) is riding high on the acclaim and acceptance of their debut release "Na Give Up." Respected Reggae Report (#118) reviewer Lee O'Neil (#245) wrote that this album is "one of the best American releases I've ever heard...comparing favorably with Aswad, Inner Circle and Third World." This heady compliment is well-deserved. [Amerisound, 1331 Chesapeake Ave., Columbus, OH 43212]. For the latest Reggae weather news from Guam, check Condition Four's (#367) "Reggae Music by Storm." Four's multiethnic, multicultural roots prevail throughout ten strong tracks of Reggae from the Islands. [Lauaki Musical Productions, 535 Chalan Pale RH, Suite116-138, Yigo, Guam 96929]. FLC Productions' (#121) newest outing, "Freedom," by Neville Duncan is a welcome surprise. Duncan, a founding member of the South Florida's Jahpostles band, provides strong vocals and conscious lyrics backed by tight instrumentation. This album will be on my playlist for months to come. [VibbesuoH Records, PO Box 551890, Miami FL 33055]. Former Gladiator Clinton Fearon & the Boogie Brown Band (#372) come forward with "Disturb the Devil." Addressing a wide gamut of social evils, from gang bangers to international conflicts, Fearon tells us "(Mi) Nah Forget Mi Roots," and he doesn't. Fearon is an artist rooted in the history of Reggae music and the culture of Rastafari and the two come together on this one. [Boogie Brown Productions, 1412 SW 102nd, #239, Seattle, WA 98146]. "Guard the Honor" by Fenton and the Reggae Angels (#162), was released on cassette in 1993. Now available on CD, with two added dub tracks, "Honor' features Jamaican and San Francisco Bay area musicians backing Fenton through twelve cuts of reality and culture. Licensing agents are being sought to provide wide spread distribution. Contact Madison King, Esq. (310-815- 0993) for licensing discussions and for more info write Reggae Angels, PO Box 3505, Oakland CA 94609. Inka Inka (#371) and TF Records (#365) are a winning team with a winning album. "Myth of the Machine" is a strong album with what one reviewer described as a sound that left him "warm all over!" The success of this album augers well for this band on the way to the top. [T.F. Records, 101 First Street Ste #648, Los Altos CA 94022]. A freebie worth writing for is "WordReggae Addendum" by Bob Riley and the Fishers (#263). Psalms and chapters from Revelation set to crucial rhythms are a cassette prelude to a soon come CD. [Jairus Trust, 121 Banyan Dr., Hilo, HI 96720]. REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 150 VOLUME ONE
  • 151. Twelve inch singles predominate for singers/producers Rula Brown (#359) and Ande C (#197). Both artists perform (Rula with "Memories of You" and "Without Love;" Ande on "Me No Care" and "Sukiaki") and produce others. Rula's stable houses newcomers Singing Prince, Little Kirk, Lukie D and Millaman. Ande brings forth Sunta Africa, Velvet, Ernie Lee, Terrorist and Daughter Rula. Rula's BeeCat and Ande's MJH Records are distributed by VP Records. [Bee Cat Records, 9 Frair Lane, Manalapan, NJ 07726]. [MJH Records, 25 Bailey St., Dorchester, MA 02124]. A reminder, henceforth this section will be written by Carter Van Pelt. written by me with an assist from Carter. This issue was Self serving note: Another reminder. I am a Reggae radio deejay and writer/reviewer for Dub Missive (#69) magazine. In my column, "Pilgrim's Perspective," I feature news, views and reviews from independent artists, labels and publications. Send products and projects directly to me at Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide, 1057 Denver St., Salt Lake City, UT 841114732. Statistics: RAW members are in 21 countries including 34 American States, the District of Colombia, Guam and the Virgin Islands. One hundred and two members live in California, 27 in Michigan, 20 in Florida, 19 in New York and Utah, 15 in Colorado, 13 in Ohio and , and 11 in Arizona, Maryland, and Texas. Fifty-six members reside outside the USA with Germany (11) topping the list. 143 members are Performing Artists, 85 are Deejays, 77 are Committed Reggae Fans, 48 are promoters or producers, 36 are Record Labels, 23 are shops or vendors, 15 are Publications and/or Publishers or Writers and Reviewers. Rastaman Nane's Corner: By now I'm sure you've memorized the tale of how Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide first began: Co-founder/writer/radio personality Papa Pilgrim had a chance meeting by phone with yours truly. That was 1992. We started with 2! You know the continuation of the story. Reggae music has been popular in America since the 1970's. It's fans are a cross section of primarily (though by no means exclusively) baby boomers who discovered syncopating rhythms and One-World philosophy in the music of Bob Marley and the Wailers, Steel Pulse, Peter Tosh, Black Uhuru and others. So pervasive is the style that Western artists as diverse as Eric Clapton, Sting, Stevie Wonder, and Lionel Richie have adapted it's scintillating beat. Today Reggae music is a staple of college and alternative radio stations and is found in the record collections of discerning (i.e.: non-mainstream/with disposable income) listeners. Most Reggae fans attribute their first exposure to Reggae music to their college years. Smart marketers prefer college educated consumers as they tend to be in the higher income categories. Reggae fans take this benefit another step further: they are open minded and progressive by nature, finding favor with those who support "their" music and lifestyle. Reggae Ambassadors members must seize the opportunity to capitalize on the need for positive Worldwide vibes. You can remember when you alone wore many hats (promoter, DJ, financier, etc.). Being a member of Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide can relieve you from wearing some of those hats. If you need a writer: use the RAWster, If you need an artist: use the RAWster. If you need help in promoting your music: use the RAWster. The RAWster is the Key that Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide provides to open the doors that may help you achieve your goals. With increasing membership, over 400 (!) as I write, comes increasing costs of maintaining and serving the RAW members. For those who sent in financial donations, my heartfelt thanks to you. Funding and donations are continually needed. The funding has primarily been by meager membership dues, and by Papa Pilgrim and myself. Remember Networking does work. Daily I receive letters and phone calls about Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide helping each other: "How great it is to belong," "It is the best network ever," "Keep up the good work." Before closing, I hope to see you in Las Vegas in August. and remember: "WHEN STARTING OUT, DON'T WORRY ABOUT NOT HAVING ENOUGH MONEY. LIMITED FUNDS ARE A BLESSING NOT A CURSE. NOTHING ENCOURAGES CREATIVE THINKING IN QUITE THE SAME WAY." Keep It Simple, Make It Fun (KISMIF) and Forward the Reggae Vibe...Everytime! Rastaman Nane' RAW Co-Founder/radio personality/promoter Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide -____ _____ _. __. / __ / _ /// _ / / ----papa pilgrim pilgrim@xmission.com 500 / _.' // _' ///_//_// Forwarding the Reggae Vibe...Everytime! X /_/ |_|/_//_/ __/__/ Reggae Ambassadors Worldwide! c95 REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 151 VOLUME ONE
  • 152. HUH? From: alexb@freenet.vancouver.bc.ca (Alex Brosgart) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Apology to Blood & Fire Records Date: 5 Jun 1995 07:29:27 GMT Organization: Vancouver Regional FreeNet We apologise to Blood & Fire Records for mistakingly accusing them of releasing an unauthorized Yabby You CD titled "Prophesy Of Dub." In fact Blood & Fire Records obtained this music through a legitimate contract and "Prophesy of Dub" is an authorized release. We are sorry for any inconvenience we may have caused. This mistake happened because Yabby You has been one of the most pirated reggae artists who is still being pirated in the UK and we received erronious information. We are thankfull to see such a well done package and we encourage reggae lovers to support this Blood & Fire production. Alex Brosgart Yabby You Shuggy Milligan --------------------------------------From: rvaldez@inf.utfsm.cl (Rina Valdez) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: latinos_reggae Date: 8 Jun 1995 15:52:36 -0400 Organization: Depto. de Informatica, UTFSM. Es primera vez que posteo por estos lados.....me gustaria saber si aqui postean latinos o personas que hablen espan~ol y que les encante el reggae como a mi.... cualquier e-mail dirigirlo a : rvaldez@inf.utfsm.cl -------------------------------------From: alexb@freenet.vancouver.bc.ca (Alex Brosgart) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Greetings From Yabby You Date: 13 Jun 1995 03:12:52 GMT Organization: Vancouver Regional FreeNet The following is posted for Yabby You: Greetings to everyone in the way of Love and Righteousness; Equal rights and Justice. And remember to live in peace and love - Seen - because that can carry us thru these evil times. Give thanx Watch & Pray Yabby You -------------------------------------From: rvaldez@inf.utfsm.cl (Rina Valdez) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: reggae.......ok!!! Date: 12 Jun 1995 16:54:01 -0400 Organization: Depto. de Informatica, UTFSM. Lo que pasa es que me gustaria obtener articulos y publicaciones de reggae....me podrian enviar direcciones o personas con las que pudiera conversar para obtenerlas??......me ayudan??..... -********************************************************************* * Nunca te olvides de mi, pero no vivas *Rina Daniela Valdes G. * * de recuerdos; porque vivir de recuerdos * rvaldez@inf.utfsm.cl * ***es morir de nostalgia.******************************************** --------------------------------------From: timras@aol.com (TIMRAS) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Junior Reid hails up rmr Date: 1 Jul 1995 03:12:09 -0400 REGGAE ON THE INTERNET page 152 VOLUME ONE
  • 153. Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364) All the best from Mr Reid, state side with "visa" in hand. He wants all to ckeck for his new duets release "& the Bloods" and is busy recording his own songs and many many other artists at his JA studio. Also in town to discuss future touring plans, our fingers are crossed that all the details can be worked out. -------------------------------------From: sademock@newstand.syr.edu (Susann A. Democker-Shedd) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: moldie posts Date: 29 Jun 1995 18:13:21 GMT Organization: Syracuse University, Syracuse NY, USA my computer only goes back yea far in terms of earlier articles. What happens to the older posts? are they deleated into cyberspace shredded by ollie north, is there any way to access them? jus wonderin. --------------------------------------From: mikey@monkfish.nosc.mil (EZ Noh Mikey) Newsgroups: rec.music.reggae Subject: Re: moldie posts Date: 29 Jun 1995 20:26:46 GMT Organization: Nice Up Enterprises Your news server only saves articles so far back, it depends on how much disk space the server has and how it is configured, after that the articles are deleted. Unless someone who reads that group is archiving them on their own, that's it. EZ Noh, REGGAE ON THE INTERNET mike page 153 VOLUME ONE

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