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How to write Positioning Statements
 

How to write Positioning Statements

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How to Write a Brand Positioning Statement. The elements include Target Market, Benefits, Reason to Believe and the Brand DNA.

How to Write a Brand Positioning Statement. The elements include Target Market, Benefits, Reason to Believe and the Brand DNA.

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    How to write Positioning Statements How to write Positioning Statements Presentation Transcript

    • How to write a Brand Positioning Statement
    • A Beloved Brand is an idea that’s worth Loving As a brand generates more love, it gains a positional power versus market forces. It can leverage that power to drive higher rates of growth and higher profits. © Beloved Brands Inc.
    • There are 5 ways a Brand can Generate more Love. We’ll look at the Promise and Story Telling The Brand The Consumer How well does the brand benefit connect to the consumer How well does the brand experience live up to and consistently deliver the promise? How well does the brand stay fresh and on top of trends with consumers? Promise Experience Freshness Positioning Innovation Culture & Operations What focused choices does the brand make to drive growth and profits? Strategy Brand Plan T h e r e a r e 5 S o u r c e s o f C o n n e c t i v i t y What are the factors that drive a consumers’ love with a Brand? © Beloved Brands Inc. 3 How well does the brand communicate their differences and move consumers Story Communication
    • “You’ve got to start with the customer experience and work backwards to the technology. You can't start with the technology and then try to figure out Where you're going to sell it" Steve p. Jobs
    • A Beloved Brand is an idea that’s worth Loving As a brand generates more love, it gains a positional power versus market forces. It can leverage that power to drive higher rates of growth and higher profits. © Beloved Brands Inc.
    • The Brand Promise is the way You’ll Position the Brand that’s Unique from your Competitors. The Brand The Consumer How well does the brand experience live up to and consistently deliver the promise? How well does the brand stay fresh and on top of trends with consumers? Experience Freshness Innovation Culture & Operations What focused choices does the brand make to drive growth and profits? Strategy Brand Plan T h e r e a r e 5 S o u r c e s o f C o n n e c t i v i t y What are the factors that drive a consumers’ love with a Brand? © Beloved Brands Inc. 6 How well does the brand communicate their differences and move consumers Story Communication How well does the brand benefit connect to the consumer Promise Positioning
    • The Brand Positioning helps Set up the Communication Strategy The Brand Positioning should answer the following four key questions. 1. Who Do We want to sell to? (Target) 2. What are we selling? (Benefit) 3. Why should they believe us? (Reason To Believe) 4. What’s the long range feeling the brand evokes (Brand DNA) 7© Beloved Brands Inc.
    • Beloved Brands know who their Target customer is. Core Target Not Our Target 8 Every Potential Customer While it’s tempting to sell to everyone. Focus your resources on those most likely to buy. 1 Who is the core target? • Start with a segmentation that divides your target into 4-8 distinct segments on the way they live, behave or believe in relationship to your category. • If you don’t have access to a segmentation study, try separating the market using a 2x2 matrix on the two most important elements in the buying decision. • Describe the demographics of the target and potential bulls-eye target. A bulls-eye should have a specific age or range of 5 years maximum. Is there a difference between the buyer and the user? • Use a buying system to map out what consumers go through at each stage in relation to your brand and competitor brands. Match up to a brand funnel. Not Our Target Target
    • You have to matter the most to those who really care.
    • 10 Drive Consumer Insights that can serve as a Connection point between Brand and Consumers. • The dictionary definition of the word Insight is “seeing below the surface”. To get deeper, keep asking yourself “so what does that mean for the consumer” until you have an “AHA moment”. What are the beliefs, attitudes or behaviors that help explain how they think, feel or act in relationship to your brand or category. • It’s not just data, trends and facts are insights. Facts are merely on the surface—so they miss out on the depth of the explanation of the underlying trends or feelings that caused the data. (e.g. In 1964, US teenagers saw the Beetles as an escape after the JFK assassination) • Insights help tell the story, paint the picture or inspire the creative juices. Insights need to be interesting or intriguing. My challenge is to think beyond specific category insights and think about Life Insights or even Societal Trends that could impact changing behaviour. Insight Tip: Try to start insights with quotations and the word I, which forces you into the consumer’s voice. See if it works for you. Examples that May Help: • For a Bank: “I am so busy driving my kids around, I can never get to the bank during banking hours. I wish there was a bank that worked around my life, rather than me working around the banks’ life”. • Quit Smoking: “I know I should quit. I’ve tried to quit so many times, it’s ridiculous., I’m not myself, I’m grouchy, irritable and feel out of control. Quitting Smoking Sucks.” 1 Target
    • Insight comes to life when it’s told in such a captivating way that makes consumers stop and say “hmm, I thought I was the only who felt like that”.
    • 12 Beloved Brands help consumers counter a problem in their life. Who is the Enemy of your consumer? What’s the Consumer problem we are Addressing? Be a little bit creative in how you frame the enemy, but it helps the creativity know what they are using the brand to solve. Brand Enemy Starbucks Hectic Life Nike Losing Apple Frustration Listerine Losing your teeth Claritin Allergy Stuck inside Special K Jeans too tight Picking the enemy gives your brand focus and another way of bringing insight into your brand positioning. 1 Target
    • Develop a Customer Value Proposition that forces a focus on benefits—both rational and emotional. Emotional Benefit Product Features Rational Benefits Consumer Insight Step 3: Match the insights to your features and form Rational Benefits: • Matching the features up against the need states, in the consumer’s voice answering “so, what do I get?”. Step 1: layer in the Consumer Needs, insights, enemies • Key life or category insights that frame the need states of the target Step 2: Map out your top Product Features: • Product focused strengths, claims, points of difference or unique offerings. Step 4: Emotional Benefits: • Dialing up the rational benefit by tapping into “so how does that make me feel?” Most brand purchases are a 50/50 split to rational and emotional, yet brands still get stuck talking features only. 2 Benefit Step 4 Step 2 Step 3 Step 1 13 © Beloved Brands Inc.
    • The Most Beloved Brands are Different, Better or Cheaper. Or not around for very long.
    • 15 Match up your Brand Assets to the Consumer Needs2 Benefit
    • Challenge Yourself to Find a Point of Difference where you can win against your competitors. 16 2 Benefit • Keep pushing yourself until you can find something in the winning zone. Get yourself out of the features mindset and explore emotional benefits. • If in the risky space, you have to innovate or find ways to bring it to market in a different way. Challenge Yourself: this is a very difficult exercise. © Beloved Brands Inc.
    • Here’s an emotional zone cheat sheet can help you map the emotional needs into your benefits Welcoming Friendly Happy Nurtured Compassion Comfort Family Oriented Honest Relaxed Interested Excited Alive Motivated Inspired Special Trust Safe Respect Trendy Playful Popular Accepted Wisdom Smarter I Seek Out Knowledge I want to be in control I Feel Optimistic I want to Feel free I want to be noticed I want to feel Liked I’d like to be comfortable I feel I can be myself Competent Reliable Interesting Down to earth Successful Likeable Easy GoingCool Using Hotspex Research Methodology, Consumers have different eight different need states they need to satisfy with the variety of brands in their lives. Match up your consumer insights to one specific area in how they might feel when using your brand. Leverage those words into your benefits 2 Benefit © Hotspex Inc
    • • Agencies use so many tricks to get it down to the ONE THING. And whatever works for them or you, the better. If it’s a postcard, a bumper sticker, “what would you say to get someone to marry you”. Find your own way to get to your one thing. • My favourite seems to be the “SHOUT FROM THE MOUNTAIN”. It forces you to want to scream just ONE THING about your brand—keep it simple. • Once you are close on the brief, challenge yourself to take out 5-15 words and the brief gets better. • Or if your mathematical, try a simple function, where the probability of success (P) directly linked to the inverse of the numbers of messages (M) you have P = 1 2m What Are We Selling? ONE main message The chances of success increases as the number of messages goes down. 18 2 Benefit Volvo has been shouting “Safety” for 30+ years. * If you don’t understand this, that’s ok. You’re probably more focused than those that do.
    • • Rational Truths (what the head says): what the consumer thinks about the brand. 1. Attributes: these are the non-negotiable attributes about the brand. These can be claims, known facts about the brand, deep perceptions, trends on the brand or elements that are obvious. 2. Associations: top of mind associations that are owned or ownable by the brand. When you think about a brand, what do you automatically link that brand with? • Emotional Truths (what the heart says): how consumer feels about the brand. 1. Values: what does the brand stand for. If the brand were a person, what qualities would you put to it. 2. Personality: how the brand behaves, the style it projects or the way it communicates with consumers. • Be Honest: Because these are Truths, you have to be as honest as you can be. It’s so tempting to lie or see through rose coloured glasses. But like every person, every brand has flaws. But like every person, knowing yourself in an honest way, helps you stay true to yourself. Brand Truths: Why Should they Believe us?3 RTBs 19
    • No one ever wanted a quarter inch drill. They just wanted a quarter inch hole to hang something nice up. Sell the benefit, not the feature.
    • The Brand’s DNA should be the driver of everything connected to the brand. 21 Beloved Brands have a clear articulation of their Brand DNA and use the DNA to drive every part of the organization—most importantly driving planning, communication, culture and product roadmap 4 DNA © Beloved Brands Inc. *First Exposed to DNA Tool at Level5 Strategy
    • Once you know your brand’s DNA, it should drive every aspect of the Brand’s Workflow. Everything that touches the brand, should feed off the DNA of the brand. Let it guide every decision © Beloved Brands Inc. 4 DNA
    • Grays Cookie is the… To… That … That’s Because … (category frame of reference) Tasty low fat cookie (Target Market) Healthy Proactive Preventers, 25-40, who want to do as much for overall health as they can (Rational/emotional benefit/promise) gives you the best tasting yet guilt free pleasure so you can stay in control of your health. • In blind taste tests, Grays Cookies matched the market leaders on taste, but only has 100 calories and 2g of fat. (Reasons to believe) With the target, benefit and reason to believe, you’ve created a great Positioning Statement. • In a 12 week study, consumers using Grays once a night as a desert were able to lose 5lbs. • Grays uses all natural ingredients. 23 Positioning Statement
    • A Brand Concept should best reflect what you might put into the market place. 24 Positioning Concept • Too many brand leaders write elaborate concepts that include everything. In reality, you won’t be able to execute everything. Narrow it down to one simple benefit and 2 RTBs.(reasons to believe) • There’s no value in getting a concept to pass a test and then be unable to execute.
    • How to turn your Brand Positioning Statement into a Best in class Concept that’s ready for testing. 25 Positioning Concept Main headline should capture the big idea of your brand. Connect quickly with consumers by starting with their enemy or insight. Main benefit in a promise statement. Support points with maximum of 2 Reasons to Believe Motivating call to action to prompt purchase intent Support visual that helps summariz e the concept
    • Summary for Positioning • A best in class positioning statement has four key elements: Target Market, Definition of the market you play in, the Brand Promise (emotional or rational benefit), the Reason to Believe (RTB) the brand promise. • Pick a focused target, know who is in and NOT in your target. Build in consumer insights. Insight comes to life when it’s told in such a captivating way that makes consumers stop and say “hmm, I thought I was the only who felt like that” • Don’t get stuck at the feature stage. Push for rational benefits by asking “so what do I get?” and emotional benefits by asking “how does that make me feel?”. Push yourself for richer answers. • The Most Beloved Brands are Different, Better or Cheaper. Or not around for very long. Find a space you can own, where it matches the consumer needs against what you offer/own. Make sure its where you can do it and your competitor can’t. • Beloved Brands have a clear articulation of their Brand DNA and use the DNA to drive every part of the organization—most importantly driving planning, communication, culture and product roadmap • A Brand Concept should best reflect what you might put into the market place. Keep it as tight as you would a creative brief. 26
    • We make Brands better and Brand Leaders better
    • Beloved Brands  We provide advice to help Brands find their way to higher growth  We provide brand leadership training to help Brand Leaders reach their full potential
    • Grays Cookie is the… To… That … That’s Because … (category frame of reference) Tasty low fat cookie (Target Market) Healthy Proac ve Preventers, 25-40, who want to do as much for overall health as they can (Ra onal/emo onal benefit/promise) gives you the best tas ng yet guilt free pleasure so you can stay in control of your health. • In blind taste tests, Grays Cookies matched the market leaders on taste, but only has 100 calories and 2g of fat. (Reasons to believe) With the target, benefit and reason to believe, you’ve created a great Posi oning Statement. • In a 12 week study, consumers using Grays once a night as a desert were able to lose 5lbs. • Grays uses all natural ingredients. Posi oning Try the new Visa Card, it gives the power back to you. • Are you red of black outs and seat restric ons from all those points you’ve earned?. • No Other Card Beats the x Visa. X Visa is the card that lets you use your points on more travel ac vi es! Use your points on any travel ac vity, anywhere you want and whenever you want to go. x helps you “beat the old, red travel points system”. Unlike most other travel credit cards, if you can charge it on your x Visa, you can redeem it with your points. With the new Visa, you can go wherever and whenever you want. Concept Positioning Statement Brand Concept These tools can kick-start your team on the pathway to achieving your brand’s full potential. Brand Plan Strategic Road Map Brand Assessment Ask us how we can help your brand find its way to more growth Where We Can Help You • Brand Positioning Statement • Brand Concepts for Testing • Creative Briefs ready for agency • Brand DNA and Big Idea • Deep dive Brand Assessment • Brand Strategic Road Map • Brand Plans • Coaching through Execution Beloved Brands Inc. 55 Bridewell Cres., Richmond Hill, ON Canada L4C 9C3 T: 416-885-3911 E: graham.robertson@beloved-brands.com CREATIVE BRIEF FOR GRAY’S COOKIES 1. Why Are We Advertising · Drive awareness and consideration of the new Grays Cookies as “The Healthy Choice to Snacking” brand positioning. 2. What’s the Consumer Problem We are Addressing · Cookies are my enemy. I’m always watching what I eat. And then BAM, I see a cookie and I’m done. As much as I look after myself, I still like to sneak a cookie now and then. 3. Who are you talking to? · “Proactive Preventers”. They do whatever it takes to stay healthy, they run, workout and eat right. Women, 25-45 with bulls-eye target of 35-40. For many, Food can be a bit of a stress-reliever and escape even for people who watch what they eat. 4. Consumer Insights · “I have tremendous will-power. I work out 3x a week, watch what I eat and maintain my figure. But we all have weaknesses and cookies are mine. I just wish they were less bad for you” · “I read labels of everything I eat. I stick to 1500 calories per day, and will find my own ways to achieve that balance. If I eat a 400 calorie cookie, it may mean giving something up.” · “I shop at Whole Foods and love to explore the new items. The last few years, there have been some tremendous advances in making great tasting options—in a healthy package.” 5. What does our consumer think now? · I’ve never heard of Grays Cookies. But I’d likely need to try it and see if I like it. If it really does taste that good, it’s something I might consider as a snack. 6. What do you want your consumer to think/feel/do? (Desired Response) · We want them to try Grays and see if they like the great taste. 7. What should we tell them? (Stimulus: benefit) · Grays Cookies are the best tasting yet guilt-free pleasure so you can stay in control of your health. You have to try it to believe it. 8. Why should they believe us? · Grays combines the great taste in a low fat and calorie sensible cookie. In blind taste tests, Grays Cookies matched the market leaders on taste, but only has 100 calories and 2g of fat. · In a 12 week study, consumers using Grays once a night as a desert were able to lose 5lbs. · Grays uses all natural ingredients. 9. Tone and Manner · Successful. Motivated. Reliable. In Control. Natural. 10. Media Options · Main creative will be in specialty health magazines, event OOH signage and in-store. Want to carry the idea into digital, social media and a microsite. 11. Mandatories · The line: “best tasting yet guilt-free pleasure” must be included in the spot. · 25% of Print must carry the Whole Foods logo as part of our listing agreement. · Legal disclaimer on the taste test and the 12-week study. Vision & DNA Creative Brief
    • • What is it that makes someone strategic and how to use strategic thinking in the role of a Brand Leader? • Brand Leaders will learn the elements of good strategic thinking: focus, early win, leverage and gateway. You will look at strategy in three ways: 1) consumer/customer 2) competitive view and 3) visionary strategy. • Hands-on workshops let you try out concepts on your own brands with hands-on coaching to help you improve. Menu of Available Brand Training Workshops for your Brand Leaders • Brand Leaders learn how to do a deep dive on their Brand an how to turn data into analytic stories. • We look at brand funnels, SWOT analysis, the wealth and health of the brand. We show how to write an analytical presentation and a best-in-class monthly report. • Through hands-on workshops, you’ll develop a Key Issues presentation using your own brands. • Brand Leaders learn how to write Brand Plans, whether a long-range strategic roadmap or one year brand plan. • We take you through each element of the Plan: vision, purpose, analysis, key Issues, strategies and tactics. The key take away is a very tight one page Brand Plan summary document for all to follow. • The workshop can be a great kick off to helping Brand Leaders frame their thinking on their own brand. • Brand Leaders learn the classic way to write a Brand Positioning Statement. A good positioning statement includes the target market, benefits, reason to believe (RTBs) in a tightly worded statement. We will show how it fits into a brand concept statement that can be ready for research testing. • The hands-on workshop can include writing of positioning statements, with live coaching. • Brand Leaders will help take the elements of Strategy (from the Brand Plan) and the Positioning (from the Brand Positioning Statement) and distill those down into a very succinct 1 page Creative Brief. • The hands-on workshop is a great tool for developing creative briefs on your brand, looking at objectives, target, consumer insights, stimulus and response. • Brand Leaders rely on many types of agencies to take their strategy and create work to express the strategy. • We teach an effective technique for judging advertising work regardless of the medium. It’s the ABC’S of Advertising: how well does the advertising drive Attention, Branding, Communication and Stickiness? • You’ll also learn effective ways for giving feedback, with hands-on role playing and critiquing. Strategic Thinking Positioning Statements Creative Briefs Judging Advertising Brand Analytics Brand Plans
    • How to contact Beloved Brands: Graham Robertson President and CMO Phone: 416 885 3911 Email: graham.robertson@beloved-brands.com Twitter: @grayrobertson1
    • 32 This presentation is solely for the use of client personnel, students or attendees of the presentation. No part of it may be circulated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution without prior written approval from Beloved Brands Inc. This material was developed by Beloved Brands Inc., for the sole purpose of an oral presentation; it is not a complete record of the discussion. The Brand Love Curve is a Trademark owned by Beloved Brands Inc. © Beloved Brands Inc.