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An example of what a best in class key issues deck looks like.

An example of what a best in class key issues deck looks like.

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Key issues Deck Presentation Transcript

  • 1. How to write a Key Issues Presentation
  • 2. Better and bigger answers come from asking better and bigger questions
  • 3. Use the key issues presentation to ask very big strategic questions
  • 4. 1. Start with ‘straw dog’ Vision Statement to help frame where you want to go. 2. Analysis: look at top 3 Drivers, Inhibitors, Risk & Opportunities. 3. Summarize the brand analysis with a Brand Health vs. Wealth, looking at Internal and External. 4. Looking at vision as a beacon of where you want to go and the analysis to explain what’s happening. Brainstorm all the things getting in the way of you achieving your vision. 5. Vote to Narrow to the top 3-5 Key Issues, asking in question format. Conducting a Key Issues Analysis 4
  • 5. • Vision: End in Mind Achievement. What do you want the brand to become? Think 10 years out: if you became this one thing, you would know that you are successful. Ideally it is Qualitative (yet grounded in something) and quantitative (measurable) It should be motivating and enticing to get people focused. Vision and Mission help to Frame the Overall Brand Plan 5 1 Vision Brand Vision Example To be the first ‘healthy cookie’ to generate the craving, popularity and sales of a mainstream cookie. Make Gray’s a $100 Million brand by 2020.
  • 6. Things that Make a Good vision: 1) Easy for employees and partners to understand and rally around 2) Think about something that can last 5-10 years or more 3) Balance between aspiration (stretch) and reality (achievement) 4) It’s ok to embed a financial ($x) or share position (#1) element into it as long as it’s important for framing the vision. The watch outs for vision statements: 1. It’s not a positioning statement 2. Make sure we haven’t achieved it already 3. Don’t put strategic statements 4. Try to be single minded: tighten it—don’t include everything!!! What Makes for Good Vision Statement 6 1 Vision
  • 7. 93% 87% 63% 16% 2% 25% 94% 77% Awareness Familiar Consider Purchase Repeat Loyal12% • Brand Funnels help you analyze where your brand stands, whether looking at absolute scores, ratios, comparisons with competitors or tracking over time. Funnel helps identify where you are on the Brand Love Curve:  Indifferent: skinny funnels throughout. Fuel awareness to kick start the funnel.  Like It: Funnel narrows at purchase. Close leak by getting message closer to sale.  Love It: Robust funnels, but may have a leak at loyal.  Beloved Brands have ideal funnels, but should track. 82% 91% Use Brand Funnels as your underlying measurement of brand health and leaks that need closing. 95 87 82 63 16 25% Brand x 91% 98 96 85 73 88% 86% 35 48%98% 94% 77% Aware Familiar Consider Purchase Repeat Loyal 2 12% 20 63% -7 +6 -9 -23 -51 Gaps at Purchase—Repeat—Loyal suggests a Like It brand up against a Loved brand. Brand Y 2 Analysis 7
  • 8. Force Field: Drivers, Inhibitors, Opportunities, Threats •factors of strength or inertia that are helping to accelerate your brand’s growth. Could be something within the brand’s make up or control, or it could be a factor of the market place. •What are the things that are directly driving your brand growth? Drivers •Weaknesses or friction that is slowing your brand down, or a leaky hole that needs fixing. These are things that are happening right now. •What is holding you back or getting in your way from achieving the growth? •A leak in your Brand Funnel. Where are you exposed, Achilles heal? Inhibitors •Areas you could take advantage, which would accelerate our growth. They have to be real, or exploratory areas. No pipedreams! Unfulfilled needs, new technologies, regulation changes, removal of trade barriers. Opportunities •Outside of your control. They are real, but have not happened yet. If they did, they would be an inhibitor. No laundry lists. •Changing consumer needs, threat of substitutes, barriers to trade, customer preference, or attacking your weaknesses. Threats 8 Helps Frame what the brand is facing as well as set up the Key Issues for the Brand Plan. Is happening Now Could happen 2 Analysis
  • 9. 9 Laying out your story in a Slide Driver #1: Taste drives a high conversion of Trial to Purchase (65% vs. norm of 50%). 19 • In a blind taste test, Gray’s performed equal to the consumer’s regular cookie. When Consumers found out it was a low fat, low calorie op on, they said they would make it their regular cookie. • In the market, Gray’s has a very high conversion to purchase bea ng the norm (65% to 50%) and considerably higher than the other two ‘healthy’ cookies (Dad’s and Sarah’s) • Gray’s taste helps drive a high repeat %, bea ng norm 40% to 25%. 19 Conversion % to Purchase Repeat % 0 20 40 60 80 Gray's Norm Dad's Sarah's 65 50 38 33 0 10 20 30 40 Gray's Norm Dad's Sarah's 40 25 22 33 Con nue to look to opportuni es to drive trial, because of the high conversion to purchase. Your analytical conclusion What you recommend Doing as a result of the analysis The story in 2-3 key pointsSupporting visuals To tell the story 2 Analysis
  • 10. Where you are helps to set up what you need to do, to get where you want to go? 10 Continue/Enhance • Stay focused on things going right, accelerate against them. Continuous improvement. Minimize/Reverse • Close the leaks, develop turnaround plans or re-focus the team against the trend. Take Advantage of • Build plans to mobilize the brand to see if the opportunity is a winning space for the brand. Avoid/Contingency • Identify and measure the risk, explore plans to avoid. Fill the gap before a competitor. Helps to Frame the Key Issues Facing the Brand Analysis 2 What’s Driving the Growth? What’s Inhibiting the Growth? What are the untapped Opportunities? What are the Threats?
  • 11. Looking beneath the surface to see the Health, which is a signal to the future Wealth of the Brand. 11 Brand Health Just like with humans, we can’t always tell the health of someone from the outward appearance. Things like cholesterol and high blood pressure are like Brand Funnel scores, VOC and satisfaction. Analysis 3 Brand Wealth Sales Market Share ROI Profit Stock Price Brand Funnel Competitive Advantages Voice of Customer Growth Rate Price Premium Share Position Regulatory Satisfaction Scores New Products Internal Alignment Market Trends
  • 12. Uncover hidden issues by looking at the Health and Wealth of the Brand both internally and externally. External Brand Wealth Brand Health Internal Internal Health: What is the internal beacon that helps all employees get it and live it. The idea of the brand has to be embedded right into the culture in a consistent manner. They have to realize their impact on the end customer. Internal Wealth: Everyone focused on Profit and Value. Assets, IP, culture, contracts, ownership. Lining up and delivering the brand promise to a clear set of objectives, helps employees see that they are contributing to and sharing in the brand wealth. Everyone should understand where and how they impact profitability. External Wealth: Healthy win in the marketplace. Beloved Brands can leverage success into power and drive wealth. Beloved Brands are more efficient, higher sales, lower costs, better margins, higher over all profits. External Health: Connecting with consumers is a source of power for brands. Understand the brand funnel and It’s impact on the results. How your consumer sees your brand, starting at awareness, trial, repeat all the way down the brand funnel to brand loyalty. Build on your strengths and attack your weaknesses 12 3 Analysis
  • 13. • Start by looking at the Vision and Analysis and ask: what are the things getting in our way of achieving that Vision? • As a guideline, there should be 3-5 key issues per brand. The crucial part of key issues is getting to the right level. If you have less, you are likely not detailed or specific enough, and if you have more…you should try to elevate some up to see if you can capture the bigger picture. Play around with it, until it feels at the right level. Key Issues Identify the Areas of Focus for Your plan 13 Example: Key Issues for The US War in Iraq. Too Low: How do we get more helicopters into Iraq? This is too specific or too small. Think about it, if there are other ways to get to the same goal (e.g. you could get more tanks) then the issue is too small. Too High: How do we drive Peace in the Middle East? This is aspiration, but unrealistic. If it feels too much to chew off, then it’s too big of an issue. Just Right: What’s the most effective way to change Regimes in Iraq? This talks closer to the overall objective…but with enough room to give strategic alternatives 4 Key Issues
  • 14. Case Study Gray’s Cookies © Beloved Brands Inc.
  • 15. • Gray’s Cookies is based on a 40 year old family recipe that had been used for years in a local coffee shop in Stowe Vermont. Gray’s was a local favorite and even among tourists, famous for it’s Chocolate Chip and Peanut Butter flavors. • No on realized it was also a healthy treat—low in fat, low in calories. With the growing health trend in the 1990’s, the Gray family decided to capitalize and launched Gray’s on a regional basis in New England and received moderate success. • In 2005, one of Boston’s internationally known diet expert came out with a glowing review of Gray’s. Other dieticians also backed up Gray’s. The brand was now receiving national attention and demand. Robert Gray, grandson of the original recipe holder took the brand national. • Using the regional sales results, Gray’s was able to gain a national listing at Whole Foods in 2006. Other food retailers took notice and Gray’s secured listings at Safeway, Super-Valu, Kroger, Tops and A&P. Gray has a strong listing base at food, but limited in other channels. Case Study: Gray’s Cookies Page 1 of 3 15 Case Study
  • 16. • Gray’s launched one new product every second year, with Oatmeal in 2007, Peanut Butter in 2009 and Cranberry in 2011. Only Peanut Butter is meeting current sales thresholds. • Gray’s success came from “proactive preventers” consumers, who claim to work out 3+ times per week and ‘read labels before eating’. Gray’s is loved among the very tight niche, but has yet to be embraced by mainstream consumers. The brand’s awareness is soft, trial is fair, and conversion to purchase is very strong because of the taste. • Gray’s recently conducted a blind taste study that shows Gray’s is as good as the market leaders. On top of that, watching what Special K was doing, they did a study that showed if you used Gray’s as a Desert replacement, consumers could lose 5lbs over 12 weeks. • The big question for Gray’s is how do you gain a broader audience for Gray’s? How do we use Advertising to drive more awareness? What role does gaining a broader distribution play? And while there’s been mixed success using innovation, what’s the plan going forward? Case Study: Gray’s Cookies Page 2 of 3 16 Case Study
  • 17. 17 • The current customer value proposition is targeting Healthy Proactive Preventers. Arguably, Gray’s is a beloved brand already among that niche target. Where else can they go, in order to get a broader mainstream audience. Case Study: Gray’s Cookies Page 3 of 3 Case Study • Main benefit is balance of taste and health. Emotional connection is the guilt-free zone, allowing consumers to cheat, yet stay in control of their diet. • Reason to believe is one backing up of the taste and the other the health. Natural ingredient is a bit of a throw away re-enforcement, maybe for the packaging.
  • 18. Key Issues Deck Gray’s Cookies © Beloved Brands Inc.
  • 19. Brand Vision • To be the first ‘healthy cookie’ to generate the craving, popularity and sales of a mainstream cookie. Make Gray’s a $100 Million brand by 2020. 2013 Goals Gray’s Cookies Key Issues for 2013 19 Goals 2012 2013 Comments Sales $25MM $30MM Continue 20% growth rate Share 0.8% 1.2% New triple chocolate 0.5% share Distribution 62% 72% Increase coming mainly from fixing specialty. Awareness 33% 42% Below norm, 80% among niche, < 20% overall Purchase 10% 12% Brand promise & sampling helps drive trial. Repeat 4% 5% High quality Taste converts high repeat
  • 20. Drivers • Taste drives a high conversion of Trial to Purchase (65% vs. norm of 50%). • Strong Listings has driven strong Distribution in Food Channels (95%) • Exceptional brand health scores among Early Adopters (“Proactive Preventers”) making it a highly Beloved Brand among the niche. Inhibitors • Awareness among mainstream target (20%) held back due to weak Advertising scores. Low Attention scores and Brand Link scores. • Low distribution at specialty stores at only 16%. Poor sales coverage. • Low Purchase Frequency (2.2 boxes per year vs. norm of 7.3) even among the most loyal early adopters. Gray’s Cookies Drivers and Inhibitors 20
  • 21. Driver #1: Taste drives a high conversion of Trial to Purchase (65% vs. norm of 50%). 21 • In a blind taste test, Gray’s performed equal to the consumer’s regular cookie. When Consumers found out it was a low fat, low calorie option, they said they would make it their regular cookie. • In the market, Gray’s has a very high conversion to purchase beating the norm (65% to 50%) and considerably higher than the other two ‘healthy’ cookies (Dad’s and Sarah’s) • Gray’s taste helps drive a high repeat %, beating norm 40% to 25%. 21 Conversion % to Purchase Repeat % 0 50 100 Gray's Norm Dad's Sarah's 65 50 38 33 0 20 40 Gray's Norm Dad's Sarah's 40 25 22 33 Continue to look to opportunities to drive trial, because of the high conversion to purchase.
  • 22. • In the food channels, Gray’s has 90% distribution compared to 60% to Dad’s, our nearest ‘healthy’ cookie competitor. • However, Gray’s has an over-reliance on the Food channel, with 73% of the business coming from the Food channel, compared with 40% of Dad’s, who have a much more balanced distribution. The category norm is 38%. Driver #2: Strong Listings has driven strong Distribution in Food Channels (90%) 22 0 50 100 Gray's Dad's 90 60 Gray's Dad's 0 50 100 Gray's Dad's Category 73 40 38 Food Distribution Share of Business from Food Need to maintain strength at Food, even while looking at new distribution points.
  • 23. Driver #3: Exceptional brand health scores among Early Adopters (“Proactive Preventers”) making it a highly Beloved Brand among the niche. 23 0 20 40 60 80 Awareness Familiar Consider Purchase Repeat Loyal 80 70 50 40 15 7 33 20 15 10 2 0.5 60 48 40 20 5 2 Preventers Overall Norm • Gray’s is very healthy among “Preventers” with strong awareness at 80% and all related Brand Funnel scores significantly above norm. However, that strength has not carried over to the overall market, where Gray’s is significantly under- developed in the overall market. Brand Funnel Scores Preventers vs. Overall Explore ways to leverage Love from Preventers, as early adopters, to influence the rest of the market.
  • 24. Inhibitor #1: Awareness among mainstream target (20%) held back due to weak Advertising scores. Low Attention scores and Brand Link scores. 2424 33% 20% 10% 2% 0.5% 20% 75% 66% Awareness Familiar Consider Purchase Repeat Loyal12% • Skinny Brand Funnel shows a lot of gaps, pointing to the lack of marketing success in generating awareness, • Year 6, Gray’s still has very low Brand Awareness (33% vs. 60% norm). • Poor Ad tracking shows low Attention (30% vs. norm of 50%) and poor Brand Link ratio (.32 vs. .55 norm) 15% 66% 33 20 15 10 4 40% Gray’s 66% 60 48 40 20 83% 50% 5 25%80% 75% 66% Aware Familiar Consider Purchase Repeat Loyal 0.5 12% 2 40% - 14 - 8 +16 +20 -28 Poor execution on advertising holding back Awareness. Low emotional connection holding back repeat/loyalty. Norm 24 Brand Funnel Ratios Both ends of funnel need fixing. Need to choose between either building awareness or driving loyalty.
  • 25. Inhibitor #1: Awareness among mainstream target (20%) held back due to weak Advertising scores. Low Attention scores and Brand Link scores. 2525 • The latest Ad (“Back Home Again”) failed to break through (Aided Recall of only 38% vs. 62% norm). • The Brand Link was considerably off at only 33% vs. 50% norm. • On the positive, the brand appears highly unique suggesting the concept is strong. • For those who are engaged, the purchase intention scores in line with norms. 25 Tracking Results Gray’s Norm Aided Recall 38 62 Unaided Recall 30 46 Brand Recognition 10 23 Brand Link .33 .50 Main Message 64 60 Uniqueness 38 22 Purchase Intent 10 9 Ad Tracking Need better execution of Advertising. Focus on driving stronger recall and brand link to push awareness.
  • 26. • While Gray’s is exceptionally strong in Food, it is equally weak in the Specialty channels, with only 16% distribution compared to Dad’s at 72%. • In Specialty, Gray’s focuses on national listings but there are very few national accounts. Dad’s uses 210 part time merchandisers to reach the Specialty channel. Inhibitor #2: Low distribution at specialty stores at only 16%. Poor sales coverage. 26 0 20 40 60 80 100 Food Drug Mass Specialty Overall 90 72 70 16 6260 72 44 72 62 Gray's Dad's Distribution % By Channel Explore options to reach the specialty market, which could add incremental sales volume.
  • 27. • Gray’s is under-developed on usage frequency, vs. the category norm and vs. Dad’s the nearest competitor. If we could match the norm, we could triple our business. Even amongst the most loyal consumers, most use it as a treat (4x per year) rather than a usual brand. Inhibitor #3: Low Purchase Frequency (2.2 boxes per year vs. norm of 7.3) even among the most loyal early adopters. 27 Usage Frequency 0 2 4 6 8 Gray's Norm Dad's 2.2 7.3 6.8 Gray's Norm 5 18 45 32 weekly monthly 4x per year 1x per year Frequency among Loyalists Leverage Brand love among loyalists to drive frequency. Achieving category norm would triple the business.
  • 28. Gray’s Cookies is at a cross-road of where to find the next stage of growth External Brand Health Internal Internal Health: Divided team on whether to go after new users or drive frequency among core users. Advertising programs has not created awareness. Channel strength has not reached beyond Food. Innovation has not been consistent. Internal Wealth: Gray’s has a unique recipe. With marketing investment, profit margins have fallen from 12% to 9%, without seeing the growth ROI from the programs. Debate on whether Gray’s should focus on channel growth vs. marketing led programs. External Wealth: Gray’s has a strong growth rate at +20% CAGR. Sales of $25Million with a 48% gross margins, above category norm of 42%. Gray’s has achieved a 3.3% share at grocery but only 0.4% in the other channels. External Health: Gray’s is a beloved brand among a core niche (“Preventers”) but relatively indifferent and unknown among broader audience. Even among loyalists, frequency is very weak and Gray’s is considered a special treat rather than a usual brand. 28 Brand Wealth Strategic Focus Options: Should the focus be on frequency among users or gaining new users? Should it be Marketing driven or Channel driven? What’s the role of advertising vs. Innovation?
  • 29. Risks • Mainstream cookie brands could enter the ‘health’ segment through R&D or Acquisition. Rumors that Pepperidge Farms will launch in Q1 2014, and Nabisco Q3 2014. • De-listing of our 2 weakest skus (Oatmeal and Cranberry) because of POS thresholds, could weaken our in-store presence down to 3 skus. • Legal Challenge to “tastes as good as your favorite cookie”. Opportunities • R&D has 5 new flavors in development. Could launch Peanut Butter in Q4 of 2013 (top 15% in testing), Chocolate Chunks in Q2 of 2014 (top 50%) • Specialty Sales Broker could specifically target Specialty Stores, which are in high growth mode (+15% per year) • Explore social media options as a vehicle for converting strong loyal following into a more mainstream mass appeal. Gray’s Cookies Risks and Opportunities 29
  • 30. 1. What’s the priority for growth?  Drive usage frequency among loyalists or find new users to broaden Gray’s consumer base? 2. Where should the investment/resources focus and deployment be to drive our awareness and share needs for Gray’s? • Marketing: Advertising, Sampling, Innovation • Sales: Closing Distribution Gaps at Specialty Stores • R&D: optimized portfolio mix 3. How will we defend Gray’s against the proposed Q1 2014 ‘healthy cookie’ launches from Pepperidge Farms and Nabisco? Gray’s Cookies Key Issues 30
  • 31. We make Brands better and Brand Leaders better
  • 32. Beloved Brands  We provide advice to help Brands find their way to higher growth  We provide brand leadership training to help Brand Leaders reach their full potential
  • 33. Grays Cookie is the… To… That … That’s Because … (category frame of reference) Tasty low fat cookie (Target Market) Healthy Proac ve Preventers, 25-40, who want to do as much for overall health as they can (Ra onal/emo onal benefit/promise) gives you the best tas ng yet guilt free pleasure so you can stay in control of your health. • In blind taste tests, Grays Cookies matched the market leaders on taste, but only has 100 calories and 2g of fat. (Reasons to believe) With the target, benefit and reason to believe, you’ve created a great Posi oning Statement. • In a 12 week study, consumers using Grays once a night as a desert were able to lose 5lbs. • Grays uses all natural ingredients. Posi oning Try the new Visa Card, it gives the power back to you. • Are you red of black outs and seat restric ons from all those points you’ve earned?. • No Other Card Beats the x Visa. X Visa is the card that lets you use your points on more travel ac vi es! Use your points on any travel ac vity, anywhere you want and whenever you want to go. x helps you “beat the old, red travel points system”. Unlike most other travel credit cards, if you can charge it on your x Visa, you can redeem it with your points. With the new Visa, you can go wherever and whenever you want. Concept Positioning Statement Brand Concept These tools can kick-start your team on the pathway to achieving your brand’s full potential. Brand Plan Strategic Road Map Brand Assessment Ask us how we can help your brand find its way to more growth Where We Can Help You • Brand Positioning Statement • Brand Concepts for Testing • Creative Briefs ready for agency • Brand DNA and Big Idea • Deep dive Brand Assessment • Brand Strategic Road Map • Brand Plans • Coaching through Execution Beloved Brands Inc. 55 Bridewell Cres., Richmond Hill, ON Canada L4C 9C3 T: 416-885-3911 E: graham.robertson@beloved-brands.com CREATIVE BRIEF FOR GRAY’S COOKIES 1. Why Are We Advertising · Drive awareness and consideration of the new Grays Cookies as “The Healthy Choice to Snacking” brand positioning. 2. What’s the Consumer Problem We are Addressing · Cookies are my enemy. I’m always watching what I eat. And then BAM, I see a cookie and I’m done. As much as I look after myself, I still like to sneak a cookie now and then. 3. Who are you talking to? · “Proactive Preventers”. They do whatever it takes to stay healthy, they run, workout and eat right. Women, 25-45 with bulls-eye target of 35-40. For many, Food can be a bit of a stress-reliever and escape even for people who watch what they eat. 4. Consumer Insights · “I have tremendous will-power. I work out 3x a week, watch what I eat and maintain my figure. But we all have weaknesses and cookies are mine. I just wish they were less bad for you” · “I read labels of everything I eat. I stick to 1500 calories per day, and will find my own ways to achieve that balance. If I eat a 400 calorie cookie, it may mean giving something up.” · “I shop at Whole Foods and love to explore the new items. The last few years, there have been some tremendous advances in making great tasting options—in a healthy package.” 5. What does our consumer think now? · I’ve never heard of Grays Cookies. But I’d likely need to try it and see if I like it. If it really does taste that good, it’s something I might consider as a snack. 6. What do you want your consumer to think/feel/do? (Desired Response) · We want them to try Grays and see if they like the great taste. 7. What should we tell them? (Stimulus: benefit) · Grays Cookies are the best tasting yet guilt-free pleasure so you can stay in control of your health. You have to try it to believe it. 8. Why should they believe us? · Grays combines the great taste in a low fat and calorie sensible cookie. In blind taste tests, Grays Cookies matched the market leaders on taste, but only has 100 calories and 2g of fat. · In a 12 week study, consumers using Grays once a night as a desert were able to lose 5lbs. · Grays uses all natural ingredients. 9. Tone and Manner · Successful. Motivated. Reliable. In Control. Natural. 10. Media Options · Main creative will be in specialty health magazines, event OOH signage and in-store. Want to carry the idea into digital, social media and a microsite. 11. Mandatories · The line: “best tasting yet guilt-free pleasure” must be included in the spot. · 25% of Print must carry the Whole Foods logo as part of our listing agreement. · Legal disclaimer on the taste test and the 12-week study. Vision & DNA Creative Brief
  • 34. • What is it that makes someone strategic and how to use strategic thinking in the role of a Brand Leader? • Brand Leaders will learn the elements of good strategic thinking: focus, early win, leverage and gateway. You will look at strategy in three ways: 1) consumer/customer 2) competitive view and 3) visionary strategy. • Hands-on workshops let you try out concepts on your own brands with hands-on coaching to help you improve. Menu of Available Brand Training Workshops for your Brand Leaders • Brand Leaders learn how to do a deep dive on their Brand an how to turn data into analytic stories. • We look at brand funnels, SWOT analysis, the wealth and health of the brand. We show how to write an analytical presentation and a best-in-class monthly report. • Through hands-on workshops, you’ll develop a Key Issues presentation using your own brands. • Brand Leaders learn how to write Brand Plans, whether a long-range strategic roadmap or one year brand plan. • We take you through each element of the Plan: vision, purpose, analysis, key Issues, strategies and tactics. The key take away is a very tight one page Brand Plan summary document for all to follow. • The workshop can be a great kick off to helping Brand Leaders frame their thinking on their own brand. • Brand Leaders learn the classic way to write a Brand Positioning Statement. A good positioning statement includes the target market, benefits, reason to believe (RTBs) in a tightly worded statement. We will show how it fits into a brand concept statement that can be ready for research testing. • The hands-on workshop can include writing of positioning statements, with live coaching. • Brand Leaders will help take the elements of Strategy (from the Brand Plan) and the Positioning (from the Brand Positioning Statement) and distill those down into a very succinct 1 page Creative Brief. • The hands-on workshop is a great tool for developing creative briefs on your brand, looking at objectives, target, consumer insights, stimulus and response. • Brand Leaders rely on many types of agencies to take their strategy and create work to express the strategy. • We teach an effective technique for judging advertising work regardless of the medium. It’s the ABC’S of Advertising: how well does the advertising drive Attention, Branding, Communication and Stickiness? • You’ll also learn effective ways for giving feedback, with hands-on role playing and critiquing. Strategic Thinking Positioning Statements Creative Briefs Judging Advertising Brand Analytics Brand Plans
  • 35. How to contact Beloved Brands: Graham Robertson President and CMO Phone: 416 885 3911 Email: graham.robertson@beloved-brands.com Twitter: @grayrobertson1
  • 36. 36 This presentation is solely for the use of students, client personnel or attendees of the presentation. No part of it may be circulated, quoted, or reproduced for distribution without prior written approval from Beloved Brands Inc. This material was developed by Beloved Brands Inc., for the sole purpose of an oral presentation; it is not a complete record of the discussion. The Brand Love Curve is a Trademark owned by Beloved Brands Inc. © Beloved Brands Inc.