Contradictions and dilemmas - developing a framework for professional development for trainers <ul><li>Graham Attwell </li...
<ul><li>Lifelong learning is leading to wider contexts and processes of learning including work based learning, informal l...
<ul><li>There is a diffusion of the training process with increasing numbers of people responsible for some form of traini...
Professional trainers have new roles and responsibilities
<ul><li>Traditional structures and systems have failed to keep up with the changes </li></ul>
There is a need for opportunities for CPD - linked to practice
<ul><li>Professionalisation requires opportunities for Continuing Professional Development and recognition of competencies...
<ul><li>Our focus: Trainer, tutors, and others in enterprises who integrate training and education functions in to their j...
A focus on practice <ul><li>On the one hand the trainers themselves can be regarded as the experts on learning and trainin...
to what extent do existing “train-the-trainers” provision, policies and practices and the way of their recruitment corresp...
<ul><li>Pre-training biography/experiences;  </li></ul><ul><li>Initial take-up of training functions; </li></ul><ul><li>Th...
One goal of our project is to identify typical problems and challenges (across the different contexts of our study) that w...
Trainers of continuing VET: in firms <ul><li>They are members of the firm (in the majority of the cases managers ) </li></...
Trainers in firms: Characteristics <ul><li>Secure jobs </li></ul><ul><li>Good wages </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching duties are ...
Important findings <ul><li>No specific professional trainers employed full time by the firms </li></ul><ul><li>Firms tend ...
Contextual contradictions and dilemmas
Professionalisation versus the wider contexts and opportunities for learning
<ul><li>Formal versus informal learning </li></ul>
<ul><li>Identity as a trainer versus identity as a (skilled) worker </li></ul>
<ul><li>Pedagogic skills versus technical skills </li></ul>
<ul><li>Individual versus organisational learning </li></ul>
Regulation versus innovation
Certification versus the  practice  of training
Frameworks for learning versus Frameworks for qualification
one of the keys to promoting learning organisations is to organise work in such a way that it is promotes human developmen...
but studies in work and work practices are seldom related to training and still less to the training of trainers
<ul><li>Developing Communities of Practice </li></ul>
<ul><li>What it is about – its joint enterprise as understood and continually renegotiated by its members. </li></ul><ul><...
 
 
Promote a culture of knowledge sharing and exchange
<ul><li>The completeness of a job. A complete/holistic job offers learning opportunities because it allows workers to prep...
<ul><li>Difficulty. A confrontation with problems is a prerogative for an </li></ul><ul><li>opportunity to learn </li></ul...
<ul><li>The number of short-cycle tasks in a job. Acquiring occupational qualifications requires that the job has a variet...
<ul><li>Autonomy, or ‘regulation capacities’ in a job </li></ul>Rik Huys Katleen De Rick Tom Vandenbrande
<ul><li>Contact opportunities. Social contacts allows one to learn from others and to solve difficulties together with oth...
<ul><li>Organisational tasks. Insight into the functional interdependence between workers in organisations helps to reveal...
<ul><li>Information supply. Without information and feedback on one’s own work it is difficult to learn from work and mist...
<ul><li>New Pontydsygu web site - www,pontydysgu.org </li></ul>Graham Attwell Thank you for watching
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Contradictions and dilemmas - developing a framework for professional development for trainers

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Presentation by Graham Attwell at Trainers in Europe Conference, Leiden, October 2007

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Contradictions and dilemmas - developing a framework for professional development for trainers

  1. 1. Contradictions and dilemmas - developing a framework for professional development for trainers <ul><li>Graham Attwell </li></ul><ul><li>Pontydysgu </li></ul>
  2. 2. <ul><li>Lifelong learning is leading to wider contexts and processes of learning including work based learning, informal learning and e-learning </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>There is a diffusion of the training process with increasing numbers of people responsible for some form of training </li></ul>
  4. 4. Professional trainers have new roles and responsibilities
  5. 5. <ul><li>Traditional structures and systems have failed to keep up with the changes </li></ul>
  6. 6. There is a need for opportunities for CPD - linked to practice
  7. 7. <ul><li>Professionalisation requires opportunities for Continuing Professional Development and recognition of competencies </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Our focus: Trainer, tutors, and others in enterprises who integrate training and education functions in to their jobs with varying degrees </li></ul>
  9. 9. A focus on practice <ul><li>On the one hand the trainers themselves can be regarded as the experts on learning and training at the workplace. On the other hand workplace trainers are experts on the “local knowledge” of work processes, tasks and functions. Training workers exhibit, develop, transfer and covey the knowledge useful at work, i.e. the so-called work process knowledge (Boreham, Fischer & Samurcay, 2002). </li></ul>
  10. 10. to what extent do existing “train-the-trainers” provision, policies and practices and the way of their recruitment correspond to the “internal logic of training” at the workplace?
  11. 11. <ul><li>Pre-training biography/experiences; </li></ul><ul><li>Initial take-up of training functions; </li></ul><ul><li>The everyday practice of learning support; </li></ul><ul><li>Changes and developments with regard to this role (e.g. expansion in terms of content or time; promotion etc.). </li></ul>A model of practice
  12. 12. One goal of our project is to identify typical problems and challenges (across the different contexts of our study) that workplace trainers encounter during their professional development ‘circle’. Such problems can be seen as the major incidents of making professional development necessary and setting it off.
  13. 13. Trainers of continuing VET: in firms <ul><li>They are members of the firm (in the majority of the cases managers ) </li></ul><ul><li>In few cases (>10%) professional trainers are working in specialized training firms </li></ul><ul><li>Professionals from consultant firms work occasionally as specialists but also as trainers </li></ul><ul><li>CONSEQUENCE: DICHOTOMY of professional situation (identity NOT as trainers) </li></ul>
  14. 14. Trainers in firms: Characteristics <ul><li>Secure jobs </li></ul><ul><li>Good wages </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching duties are PART (small) of overall working duties </li></ul><ul><li>Very elaborated knowledge of firm + staff </li></ul><ul><li>Often training (in didactical techniques etc.) for becoming good trainers </li></ul>
  15. 15. Important findings <ul><li>No specific professional trainers employed full time by the firms </li></ul><ul><li>Firms tend to train their employees exclusively by people of their own staff </li></ul><ul><li>Only for specific subjects (e.g. ‘Effective Press Relations and Media Interview Training’, ‘Crisis Management’ and ‘Management of Change’) cooperation with specialized training firms </li></ul>
  16. 16. Contextual contradictions and dilemmas
  17. 17. Professionalisation versus the wider contexts and opportunities for learning
  18. 18. <ul><li>Formal versus informal learning </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>Identity as a trainer versus identity as a (skilled) worker </li></ul>
  20. 20. <ul><li>Pedagogic skills versus technical skills </li></ul>
  21. 21. <ul><li>Individual versus organisational learning </li></ul>
  22. 22. Regulation versus innovation
  23. 23. Certification versus the practice of training
  24. 24. Frameworks for learning versus Frameworks for qualification
  25. 25. one of the keys to promoting learning organisations is to organise work in such a way that it is promotes human development. In other words it is about building workplace environments in which people are motivated to think for themselves so that through their everyday work experiences, they develop new competences and gain new understanding and insights. Thus, people are learning from their work - they are learning as they work Barry Nyhan
  26. 26. but studies in work and work practices are seldom related to training and still less to the training of trainers
  27. 27. <ul><li>Developing Communities of Practice </li></ul>
  28. 28. <ul><li>What it is about – its joint enterprise as understood and continually renegotiated by its members. </li></ul><ul><li>How it functions - mutual engagement that bind members together into a social entity. </li></ul><ul><li>What capability it has produced – the shared repertoire of communal resources (routines, sensibilities, artefacts, vocabulary, styles, etc.) that members have developed over time. </li></ul>Dimensions of a Community of Practice
  29. 31. Promote a culture of knowledge sharing and exchange
  30. 32. <ul><li>The completeness of a job. A complete/holistic job offers learning opportunities because it allows workers to prepare and support work autonomously </li></ul>Rik Huys Katleen De Rick Tom Vandenbrande
  31. 33. <ul><li>Difficulty. A confrontation with problems is a prerogative for an </li></ul><ul><li>opportunity to learn </li></ul>Rik Huys Katleen De Rick Tom Vandenbrande
  32. 34. <ul><li>The number of short-cycle tasks in a job. Acquiring occupational qualifications requires that the job has a variety of tasks that belong to this occupation </li></ul>Rik Huys Katleen De Rick Tom Vandenbrande
  33. 35. <ul><li>Autonomy, or ‘regulation capacities’ in a job </li></ul>Rik Huys Katleen De Rick Tom Vandenbrande
  34. 36. <ul><li>Contact opportunities. Social contacts allows one to learn from others and to solve difficulties together with others and learn from </li></ul><ul><li>these solutions. It thereby allows for the development of social communicative </li></ul><ul><li>qualifications; </li></ul>Rik Huys Katleen De Rick Tom Vandenbrande
  35. 37. <ul><li>Organisational tasks. Insight into the functional interdependence between workers in organisations helps to reveal the innovative potential of workers </li></ul>Rik Huys Katleen De Rick Tom Vandenbrande
  36. 38. <ul><li>Information supply. Without information and feedback on one’s own work it is difficult to learn from work and mistakes made. </li></ul>Rik Huys Katleen De Rick Tom Vandenbrande
  37. 39. <ul><li>New Pontydsygu web site - www,pontydysgu.org </li></ul>Graham Attwell Thank you for watching

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