C2 cn fablab_karel
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

C2 cn fablab_karel

on

  • 662 views

Presentation FabLab practice during the expert seminar in Leuven, July 13th 2010.

Presentation FabLab practice during the expert seminar in Leuven, July 13th 2010.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
662
Views on SlideShare
662
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
38
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Reducing the weight of a long range aircraft by 100kg results in a 1.3 MtCO 2 eq saving over the lifetime of the aircraft, the equivalent of saving $2.5 million worth of fuel
  • Reducing the weight of a long range aircraft by 100kg results in a 1.3 MtCO 2 eq saving over the lifetime of the aircraft, the equivalent of saving $2.5 million worth of fuel
  • Reducing the weight of a long range aircraft by 100kg results in a 1.3 MtCO 2 eq saving over the lifetime of the aircraft, the equivalent of saving $2.5 million worth of fuel
  • restricted world - recognizeboundaries
  • restricted world - recognizeboundaries
  • restricted world - recognizeboundaries

C2 cn fablab_karel Presentation Transcript

  • 1. C2C{Network Study visit Fablab Leuven – July 13, 2010 Additive production technology and sustainability: challenges and opportunities Prof. Karel Van Acker, K.U.Leuven Materials Research Centre
  • 2. context: Plan C
    • Flemish Transition Network Sustainable Materials Management
    strategic visions 2030 closing the circle tailor-made materials service economy conscious society green plastics phase 1 phase 3 phase 2 learning & upscaling
    • Long term vision as framework for short term actions
    • Room for high risk experiments in niche sectors
    • System innovation approach
    • Active role of all relevant actors
    visionary leitbild 20xx 2009 experiments
  • 3. context: Plan C knowledge/control material flows extended materials responsibility reverse logistics design for cycle biomimetic materials biobased materials 2030 smaller transparant material cycles 2008 uncontrollable, obscure, global material flows 1:1 production 1000:1 production revalue local production neighbourhood labs bottom-up production just-in-need production modular production closed material loops technosphere biosphere
  • 4. Material wasting production mining production use phase End-of-Life resources waste
  • 5. production
    • e.g. aerospace industry
      • classical machining
        • buy to fly ratio up to 15:1
        • cooling lubircants (Germany: 75 ktonnes/yr)
      • casting
        • energy consumption of holding molten materials
        • tooling
      • molding
        • tooling
        • cooling and mold release components
        • design restrictions
  • 6. what is additive manufacturing? (3D printing, rapid manufacturing)
    • polymers
      • Stereolithography (e.g. photopolymers)
      • Selective Laser Sintering (e.g. nylon powder)
      • Fused Deposition Modelling (e.g. extrusion of ABS)
    • metals/ceramics
      • Selective laser sintering/melting
      • 3D fibre deposition
  • 7. Materials used
    • General: High density polyethylene (HDPE), low density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), unplasticised polyvinylchloride (UPVC), ABS, polylactic acid (PLA) and polycapralactone (PCL) steel, titanium, aluminium, …
    • Can the materials cycle be closed?
  • 8. Materials used
    • Can the materials cycle be closed?
      • process waste can be recycled
      • use of bio-based materials
        • PLA
        • starch
        • sugar, clay
  • 9. Materials used
    • Can the materials cycle be closed?
      • process waste can be recycled
      • use of bio-based materials
        • PLA
        • starch
        • sugar, clay
      • use of recycled materials
        • glass
  • 10. Strenghts of additive production
    • material effectiveness
    • use of biobased and recycled materials – underway
    • waste/emission minimisation during production
  • 11. source: ATKINS rapport, Loughborough University, 2007
  • 12. Strenghts of additive production
    • material effectiveness
    • use of biobased and recycled materials – underway
    • waste/emission minimisation during production
    • freedom of design
      • further reduction of material need + very complex geometries possible
      • make use phase efficient e.g. complex lightweight constructions
  • 13. Strenghts of additive production
    • material effectiveness
    • use of biobased and recycled materials – underway
    • waste/emission minimisation during production
    • freedom of design
    • repair of components
      • transport of bytes instead of materials reduce logistical requirements by shortening the supply chain and minimising the need for waste material disposal or recycling;
  • 14. Strengths of additive production
    • material effectiveness
    • use of biobased and recycled materials – underway
    • waste/emission minimisation during production
    • freedom of design
    • repair of components
      • transport of bytes instead of materials
      • economic
      • stock can be reduced to low value raw material
      • local production, since labour cost is not decisive
    • social
      • personalised products – more added value ??
      • you can make almost everything yourself  Fablab
  • 15. Weaknesses of additive production
    • Energy consumption
    • Technological drawbacks
      • slowness
      • poor surface precision
      • cost
  • 16. Weaknesses of additive production
    • Energy consumption
    • Technological drawbacks
    • Closing the loop
      • there is a huge potential to use this technology for C2C, however still a lot of research has to be done
  • 17. Weaknesses of additive production
    • Energy consumption
    • Technological drawbacks
    • Closing the loop
    • Potential rebound effect 3D printing = gadget printing?
  • 18. Weaknesses of additive production
    • Energy consumption
    • Technological drawbacks
    • Closing the loop
    • Potential rebound effect 3D printing = gadget printing?
    • Need for new business models
  • 19. www.additivemanufacturing.be
  • 20. A system innovation approach
  • 21. To conclude
    • material effectiveness
    • use of biobased and recycled materials – underway
    • waste/emission minimisation during production
    • freedom of design
    • repair of components
      • transport of bytes instead of materials
      • economic
      • stock can be reduced to low value raw material
      • local production, since labour cost is not decisive
    • social
      • personalised products – more added value ??
      • you can make almost everything yourself  Fablab
    • Energy consumption
    • Technological drawbacks
    • Closing the loop
    • Potential rebound effect 3D printing = gadget printing?
    • Need for new business models
  • 22. To Conclude
    • Additive manufacturing bears the opportunity to be a truly supportive technology for C2C, BUT also to be a new source of unsustainable production
    • The transition of production technologies towards this (and other kinds of) personalised production is ongoing
    • How will we make this transition growing into a sustainable direction?
  • 23. Prof. Dr. ir. Karel Van Acker K.U.Leuven Research & Development c/o department MTM Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 BE-3001 Leuven tel. +32 16 321271 e-mail: [email_address] Prof. Dr. ir. Ignaas Verpoest chairman Leuven MRC department MTM Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 BE-3001 Leuven +32 16 321306 [email_address] contact: www.leuvenmrc.be
  • 24. realisations @KULeuven Quality control by industrial X-ray CT Production of metal components by SLM