• Save
SGP Crime Forensics Presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

SGP Crime Forensics Presentation

on

  • 1,598 views

Criminal Investigation Senior Graduation Project

Criminal Investigation Senior Graduation Project

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,598
Views on SlideShare
1,595
Embed Views
3

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 3

http://www.slideshare.net 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Crime scene tape. Jacksonville University. Web. 4 Mar. 2010.      .
  • Crime has sadly become part of our world and society. In our society we do not like to have criminals wander our streets potentially hurting other people therefore since early times there have been laws set in place as well as a justice system. Forensic science when applied to crime scenes helps catch the person responsible for the crime and therefore taking out another criminal from our streets. "Expanded Homicide Data Figure." Chart. Federal Bureau of Investigation. FBI,      Web. 4 Mar. 2010. .
  • Forensic Science encompasses more than just the study of crime scenes, it can include the study of an event, artifact, or another physical item that is authenticated what the object “purports” to be or is said to be. Example: Paleontologists may seek to prove that some bones belonged to a said animal and therefore forensics may be used to identify it correctly.For my purposes I will be using the phrase “Forensic Science” and “Forensics” interchangeably as well as the phrases “Forensic Investigator” with “Crime Scene Investigator."Crime Scene Unit." Philadelphia Police Department. Web. 4 Mar. 2010.      .
  • 1248His Duan Yu is published and is now considered the first book on forensic science. The title of the book translates to “The Washing away of Wrongs.” Advice given in book stills helps forensic investigators today. Example: Tips on identifying cases of strangulation from damage to the neck cartilage are given in this book.18th Century French doctor, Antoine Louis, performs work which leads to the ability to identify causes of death. Helps distinguish murder victims from suicide.
  • 1813 Spanish born, MathleuOrfila, a chemistry teacher in Paris, publishes Traite de Poisons or ToxicologieGenerale. Book includes the first scientific study on identifying poisons. Orfila goes on to become the “Father of Forensic Toxicology,” a sub-division of forensic science.1840 First case of forensic science being used in court. Orfila uses his research on identifying poisons to conclude that Madame Lafarge, a French woman, poisoned her husband with arsenic. Orfila found traces of arsenic in the man’s organs where prior chemical test had failed and had been inconclusive.
  • 1843-1879Files are made with identifying information on criminals and saved for later easing the process of identifying a criminal. This process is improved over this time period being started by the police in Belgium. Expanded to include mug shots, and measurements of various parts of the criminals body. A system is also established that “universalizes” the way that measurements are taken.1892 Francis Galton publishes “Fingerprints,” which establishes statistical evidence for fingerprint uniqueness and methods of analyzing fingerprints still in use today.
  • 1901 University of Vienna professor, Dr. Karl Landsteiner, discovers that blood falls into different groups labeled as type A, B, AB and O (Helps narrow down blood identification as well as improve identifying capabilities”20th Century Frenchman Edmund Locard proposes the concept known as “Locard’s Exchange Principle.” This principle states that by touching any surface the criminal leaves evidence but also takes some evidence.
  • 1910 Albert Osborn publishes Questioned Documents for handwriting analysis and becomes the greatest handwriting analyst of the early 20th century1915Leon Lattes improves the method of identifying blood types from dried blood and later uses his technique to link a murderer to a crime by testing bloodstains from his coat.
  • 1920 U.S. Army Colonel Calvin Goddard perfects the technique used to identify markings left on bullets by the gun from which they were shot. By perfecting this technique various bullets can be linked to different guns with possibly different criminals1985 Alec Jeffrey discovers that each person has unique DNA forever changing how forensic science is performed.
  • Arriving on scene the Crime Scene Investigator first confirms that the scene has been secured by the police, which are the first on scene. The CSI must possibly make alterations to the secured area if evidence of a wider crime scene is found, such evidence might be a blood trail going further than the immediate scene. It is also helpful to increase the originally secured site since as it is said in the field “it is easier to decrease the size of the secured area than to increase it.” Even before the CSI begins to start the investigation and logging the possible evidence he/she must first acquire a search warrant. By acquiring a search warrant they will be sure that the evidence they collect will have been legally obtained and may not be attacked by the defense attorney later in court.Securing the crime scene is a very important base to start the investigation. Evidence might soon be further disturbed the by the presence of police and further detectives. Evidence must be specially be secured if unprotected from the elements as rain, wind and the sun might quickly deteriorate the evidence crucial to later linking the criminal to the crime.------The first signs of documenting a crime scene starts with the CSI’s first walk through the scene via a pre-planned route that will hopefully disturb the least evidence. This initial walk-through will have hopefully started as soon as possible since it will help the CSI log the things that can change immediately, such as weather, light conditions, time, smells, and sounds. The CSI will also take note of hazards within the crime scene such as gas leaks or an agitated pet that may be guarding the victim and pose a dangers to others around the crime scene.The CSI might call any needed tools or specialists that will make his job easier later. Evidence in trees will require a lift or a ladder while some kind of crime scenes may require a specialist on that subject.Example: Blood Spatter specialistsAfter the CSI’s first walkthrough he/she might speak to the police or detectives on scene for any witness reports or to log if they have touched anything. Witness reports might point the CSI to a particular room where they can more thoroughly search for clues. Example: If a neighbor heard running water before police arrived it might indicate the criminal was attempting a clean-up which would have left blood traces wherever he has washed.Layton, Julia.  "How Crime Scene Investigation Works."  02 December 2005. HowStuffWorks.com.  04 March 2010.Students studying forensics on field. University of Kent. Web. 4      Mar. 2010. . Man wearing the Advanced Personal Protection Kit. EVIDENT Crime Scene      Products. Web. 4 Mar. 2010.      .
  • -- CSI follows a pre-planned route in order to not disturb the scene-- Notes taken of weather, time, smells, and sounds as well as any potential hazards such as gas leaks or an agitated pet (that may guard a victim if present)-- CSI will see if any tools or specialists are needed in order to collect evidence at the scene -- Lift or ladder to collect evidence on roof or tree; specialists in order to analyze a victim or physiologists to help victims and further obtain information-- At the end of this quick walkthrough the CSI will obtain information from the police department first at the crime scene -- Such a witness might point the CSI to a particular room or provide evidence that there was an attempted clean up---------------------------------------The first signs of documenting a crime scene starts with the CSI’s first walk through the scene via a pre-planned route that will hopefully disturb the least evidence. This initial walk-through will have hopefully started as soon as possible since it will help the CSI log the things that can change immediately, such as weather, light conditions, time, smells, and sounds. The CSI will also take note of hazards within the crime scene such as gas leaks or an agitated pet that may be guarding the victim and pose a dangers to others around the crime scene.The CSI might call any needed tools or specialists that will make his job easier later. Evidence in trees will require a lift or a ladder while some kind of crime scenes may require a specialist on that subject.Example: Blood Spatter specialistsAfter the CSI’s first walkthrough he/she might speak to the police or detectives on scene for any witness reports or to log if they have touched anything. Witness reports might point the CSI to a particular room where they can more thoroughly search for clues. Example: If a neighbor heard running water before police arrived it might indicate the criminal was attempting a clean-up which would have left blood traces wherever he has washed.
  • -- Once the first walkthrough is complete the second walkthrough can take place -- The second walkthrough is where the CSI creates a visual record -- A visual record will allow prosecuting attorneys and investigators piece together what happened at the crime scene-- A CSI has - Forensic Photography - Sketches - Notes - VideoAt hand in order to record the crime scene-At the end of the 2nd walkthrough the CSI will also create a hypothesis of what happened ----------------------------------------The second walkthrough is where the scene documentation takes place. The goal of this walkthrough is to create some kind of visual record that will allow the prosecuting attorney and investigators to later piece together what happened at the crime scene. The CSI uses digital and film cameras with different types of film, a mix of lenses, flashes, filters, along with a tripod, sketchpad, graph paper, notepad and of course writing utensils. After the second walkthrough the CSI will make a preliminary hypothesis as to what happened at the crime scene.-----United States. U.S. Dept. of Justice. Crime Scene Investigation.Technical Working Group on Crime Scene Investigation, 2000. Print.
  • -- Overview pictures are one of the three type of forensic photography-- A picture of the building, entrances, and exits. It also includes pictures of the room (if applicable). Pictures taken from the four corners off the ground with a wide-angled lens----------------------Overviews is one of the three types of forensic photography. It includes the picture of the buildings, its entrances and exits as well as images that place the building in relation to its surroundings. It also includes images of rooms taken from the top of the roof in the four corners or possibly from the ground up if there is blood spatter. Overview pictures also includes spectators at scene.Sarah, Dowdey. "How Crime Scene Photography Works." HowStuffWorks. 12 May 2008. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. . Nikon. Nikon D5000. N.d. Nikon. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Mar. 2010.      .
  • -- Mid-range photography is a closer shot to the evidence itself. -- It might be a photograph of a suspected weapon and this distance allows to the object to later be seen with perspective -------------------------------------------Mid-range photography is a more focused shot of the evidence itself. It may take a picture of the suspected murder weapon and place it in perspective with other things in the room, from furniture or blood stains.
  • -- The last type of photography is a close-up. With a close-up of the crime scene detail is easier to be seen later on. This type of photography is also used to document a victim if necessary. -- Pictures are used to see scars on subjects, bruises or serial numbers on other possible evidence. -- Some close-up shots use measuring devices in order to give perspective of the objects size. -- Photographer will take duplicate images in order to have one with and one without the measuring device for court in case it is blocking something underneath.-- A log is taken at the same time the photographs are taken in order to help organize the photographs. The log includes picture number, type of lens filters and any other information that the camera does not add. -- The camera adds time, date, location and type of lens-------------------Close-up images is the final type of shot that the forensic photographer performs. In close-ups it is possible to see the detail of the object or the evidence. It can include scars on the subjects as well as bruises to serial numbers on other possible evidence. Close up shots also use a measuring device to give perspective as well as the size of the object, however, the photographer will take a duplicate image without the measuring device for protection in court.With all of these pictures taken it would be impossible to later recreate the actual scene if it was not for a log that the photographer keeps. The log may include things such as the picture number, type of filters applied (if any) and any other relevant data that the camera does not automatically add to the individual picture. A camera automatically adds the lens, time, date, and location.Forensic photographers must adhere to strictly set criteria when taking their photographs. They must use the correct exposure, achieved by using a “gray card,” use sharp focus, and use a maximum depth of field. The image may not be taken in a way that will change the way the crime scene is portrayed through the photograph.Sarah, Dowdey. "How Crime Scene Photography Works." HowStuffWorks. 12 May 2008. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. . Nikon. Nikon D5000. N.d. Nikon. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Mar. 2010.      .
  • A CSI documents a scene with a sketchA sketch can be a rough draft while on the fieldA sketch allows the CSI and other investigators to know exactly where a piece of evidence was located in comparison to other objects in the roomDocumentation is very important for the later stage of a crime scene and if the criminal is caughtCSI testify in court and defense attorney attacks the evidence therefore the CSI must be very organizedSketches are also done through the second walkthrough of the crime scene. These sketches are another useful tool aside from photographs because it allows a blueprint kind of view of the entire crime scene. Using the logs from the first walkthrough as well as the photograph logs it is easy to pinpoint the evidence to its original location. Baldwin, Hayden B. "Crime Scene Sketching." Forensic Enterprises Inc. Apr. 09. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. . TheDutelle, Aric W. "Sketching and Mapping the Scene." Crime Scene Investigation.      N.p.: Jones and Bartlett, 2010. N. pag. Evidence Technology Magazine. Web.      4 Mar. 2010. .
  • New 3D software is making for more accurate sketches of a crime scene, it can also allow animation in order to recreate a crime scene This new software allows investigators to see a crime scene like they were there The software allows an investigator to see whether a witness had a clear enough line of sight of the crime scene. Only downside is that it requires someone knowledgeable with the software and technology----------------------------New 3D software is allowing investigators to create a more immersive recreation of a crime scene.An investigator is able to enter the bullet’s trajectory and see the shot “reenacted,” which can help them locate the position of the attacker. Virtual environments can also help to test hypothesis by allowing investigators to animate characters and “reenact” the crime scene. A virtual reality sketch can solidify or debunk witness statements. They can see if the witness had a clear enough line of sight. It can also help a witness who may not remember every detail “refresh” his/her mind. It can help in training new forensic investigators and also as evidence in court and as a visual in a briefing prior to court.The only negative aspect of current virtual reality software is that for some of the advance features, such as bullet trajectory and scene simulation, require a technician that is knowledgeable with software.
  • Collecting evidence is the stage where the CSI touches the scene in order to preserve it for future study in the lab.-- Tagging is just putting an identification tag on the evidence
  • -- The CSI logs the evidence with the number given before
  • --They at last pack the evidence in a secure bag or box with the identification number and send it to the lab---------------------------------Trace Evidencecan include paint residue, broken glass, chemicals, drugs and gunshot residue. Impressions which includes fingerprints, footprints, and tool marks and can be used to further link a criminal by his possessions. A latent fingerprint is a 2-dimensional impression recovered using powder and tape and seen with lasers or UV light. Footwear impressions can be used to compare footprints from the victims location to what shoes the suspect owns as well as help identify what tools were used for the crime. Body fluids include blood, semen, saliva, vomit and even body waste. Body fluids are collected with smear slides, sterile cloth squares, they may also cut a small piece of the clothing to submit for lab testing. If there was a struggle the victim might have DNA from the other suspect from scratching. Questioned documents such as diaries, notes, and electronic documents like answering machines and caller ID units are also considered strong evidence. Technicians in the lab can later put documents together even from burned scraps. These documents are used to compare handwriting and possibly where it was printed from. Hair and fibers might also be used to link the a suspect to a crime from comparing fibers from shoes or clothes to those from where the victims were located. Weapons and firearms are strictly picked up by the barrel with gloves on. The firearm is placed in its own bag. The weapon can provide a serial number and make it easier to match bullets in the scene with that gun. CSI will use a laser trajectory to determine where the weapon was fired from, and if the bullet is embedded in the wall they will try to cut a piece of the wall out containing the bullet.They must tag the evidence to later be identified and log it as well. Using the sketches they also record where the evidence has been taken from.CSI finally packs the evidence in order to transport it to the lab safely to be further analyzed.
  • The crime scene investigator will usually start collecting evidence spreading from the body at a crime scene (if there is one.) The CSI can either start an “quick” examination on the spot checking for bruising or damage to tissue or wait until the body arrives at the morgue. Throughout this process the CSI will still be taking picture and logs of and around the body. Some details that may later prove noteworthy would be any marks on clothing, body position as well as position of clothes, fluids present near body, blood patterns, and insect activity.The CSI makes sure that both sides of the body are checked and may also take the body temperature comparing it to ambient temperature for a very rough estimate on time of death. The CSI will take fingerprint analysis. Once done documenting any evidence with the body it is wrapped in a white cloth and with paper bags covering the hands and feet in order to protect any trace evidence on the victim. Since the body will be further analyzed with an autopsy a CSI may opt to attend the event and log any evidence that may ensue. Tissue samples are especially important for suspected poisoning.
  • Collecting evidence from the room might take different approaches depending on the situation and on how many people are working the scene.A lone CSI is more likely to opt for a spiral search pattern which ensures the maximum coverage in the least amount of time. The spiral patterns might either be inward or outward and is usually depends on what the CSI prefers.CSI will look everywhere; floors, walls and ceiling for evidence. Even a different angle of a light source may provide a new set of evidence.Layton, Julia.  "How Crime Scene InvestigationWorks."  02 December 2005.  HowStuffWorks.com. 04 March 2010.Grid. 2005. HowStuffWorks. Web. 4 Mar. 2010.      . Inward Spiral. 2005. HowStuffWorks. Web. 4 Mar. 2010.      . Outward Spiral. 2005. HowStuffWorks. Web. 4 Mar. 2010.      .Parallel. 2005. HowStuffWorks. Web. 4 Mar. 2010.      .
  • When there is more than one CSI, the members can choose to work as a team in various patterns. In the “Parallel” pattern the line up and cross the room logging and collecting evidence along the way.
  • A “Zone” search is when the team divides themselves into individual zones keep searching for evidence as well as collect it. They may then trade or change zones and search again in order to ensure a complete coverage.
  • A “Grid” is another option which is the “Parallel” pattern but with another pass starting from a wall adjacent to the first
  • -- The evidence is once again photographed from a set position -- All the evidence is carefully scrutinized by a specialists.-- Fingerprints are run through an Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) which uses the FBI database to compare fingerprints-- Evidence is likely to pass a number of technicians in the lab each with their own special area. -- Everyone that handles the evidence keeps a log and writes their own report then sent to the head CSI who compiles all the results-------------Inthe crime lab, evidence that was collected from the crime scene is processed and examined to help identify the suspect and the events that occurred at that crime scene. To identify firearms technicians may opt to test firearms in order to establish the barrel pattern and link the bullets to said firearm. In the crime lab they will of course analyze in body fluid recovered at the scene in order to run DNA analysis. Fingerprints and impressions will be analyzed and run through the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) which also uses the FBI database which compares the prints to millions of others. It is not unlikely that a piece of evidence will pass through more than one technician in the lab. Each person that analyzes the evidence writes their own report, the head CSI will then compile all of the results and send them to whoever is in charge of the case. Sanchez, Erin. Technisian analyzing foot impressions. N.d. Candgnews. N.p., n.d.      Web. 4 Mar. 2010. . Forensic Lab Photocameras. HowStuffWorks. 2005. Web. 4 Mar. 2010.      .
  • -- A CSI must go to court in order to defend his work. This is the reason organization skills are they key to being successful. -- Clear information and notes will not give any opening for the criminal’s attorney to attack the evidence-- It can sometimes be the hardest part of the job because another person is getting paid to prove your work wrong.--------Afterthe crime scene investigation has been complete the investigator must still present his findings in a court of law. This is the sole reason that so many logs and photographs play an important role in the full investigation. The defense attorney will continually try to attack the evidence that the CSI will provide in court. The logs and various photographs will provide set evidence that the defense attorney will not be able to attack. This is one reason that a CSI will need some kind of debate skills or speaking skills.Gratz, Joe. Courtroom One Gavel. 23 Mar. 2006. Flickr. Yahoo! Inc, 23 Mar. 2006. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. . Witness stand in a court room. N.d. University of Louisville. N.p., n.d. Web. 4      Mar. 2010. .
  • In order to be a Forensic Investigator one must be able to work long and flexible hours. A CSI is always on-call and may be called away from any personal events. A CSI must have amazing organizational skills to organize all of the evidence and logs that they must keep during a crime scene investigation. A good characteristic to have is gracefulness. It will help the CSI keep as much of the scene undisturbed until it is ready to be collected for evidence. Attentiveness will help to pick out any small evidence from the scene, what might become a very important part of the case later on."Crime Scene Unit." Philadelphia Police Department. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Mar. 2010.      .

SGP Crime Forensics Presentation SGP Crime Forensics Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Forensics
    Fernando Gomez
  • Thesis
    Crime has been part of our society for as long as humans have existed with forensic science on the battlefront against the criminals. Forensic Scientists use various methods and technology to provide public safety and peace.
  • Crime
    "Expanded Homicide Data Figure." Chart. Federal Bureau of Investigation. FBI,      Web. 4 Mar. 2010. <http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/cius2008/offenses/      expanded_information/homicide.html>.
  • Purpose of Forensic Science
    Aid investigators in the understanding of a crime scene
    “Forensic Science” is not only about crimes
    "Crime Scene Unit." Philadelphia Police Department. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Mar. 2010.      <http://www.ppdonline.org/hq_profile_crimescene.php>.
  • His Duan Yu
    Cause of Death
    Src: http://www.cbsnews.com/htdocs/forensics/timeline.html
  • Poisons
    Forensics in Court
    Src: http://www.cbsnews.com/htdocs/forensics/timeline.html
  • Police Records
    Fingerprints
    Src: http://www.cbsnews.com/htdocs/forensics/timeline.html
  • Locard’s Exchange Principle
    Blood Types
    Src: http://www.cbsnews.com/htdocs/forensics/timeline.html
  • Dry Blood
    Handwriting
    Src: http://www.cbsnews.com/htdocs/forensics/timeline.html
  • Unique DNA
    Bullet Identification
    Src: http://www.cbsnews.com/htdocs/forensics/timeline.html
  • Arriving on Scene
    CSI confirms the scene is secure
    Obtains Search Warrant
    Layton, Julia.  "How Crime Scene Investigation Works."  02 December 2005.  HowStuffWorks.com. <http://science.howstuffworks.com/csi.htm>   04 March 2010.
  • 1st Walkthrough
    General Overview
  • Documenting (2nd Walkthrough)
    2nd Walkthrough
    Forensic Photography
    Sketches
    Notes
    Video
    Preliminary “hypothesis”
    United States. U.S. Dept. of Justice. Crime Scene Investigation. : Technical Working Group on Crime Scene Investigation, 2000. Print.
  • Documenting(2nd Walkthrough -Photography)
    Overview
    Sarah, Dowdey. "How Crime Scene Photography Works." HowStuffWorks. 12 May 2008. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. <http:/science.howstuffworks.com/ crime-scene-photography.htm>.
  • Documenting(2nd Walkthrough -Photography)
    Mid-range
    Sarah, Dowdey. "How Crime Scene Photography Works." HowStuffWorks. 12 May 2008. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. <http:/science.howstuffworks.com/ crime-scene-photography.htm>.
  • Documenting(2nd Walkthrough -Photography)
    Close-ups
    Sarah, Dowdey. "How Crime Scene Photography Works." HowStuffWorks. 12 May 2008. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. <http:/science.howstuffworks.com/ crime-scene-photography.htm>.
  • Documenting(2nd Walkthrough -Sketches)
    CSI documents crime scene with drawings
    Dutelle, Aric W. "Sketching and Mapping the Scene." Crime Scene Investigation.      N.p.: Jones and Bartlett, 2010. N. pag. Evidence Technology Magazine. Web.      4 Mar. 2010. <http://www.evidencemagazine.com/      index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=184&Itemid=9>.
    Baldwin, Hayden B. "Crime Scene Sketching." Forensic Enterprises Inc. Apr. 09. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. <http:// www.feinc.net/>.
  • Documenting(2nd Walkthrough -Sketches)
    The future of sketches – virtual reality
    United States. U.S. Dept. of Justice. Crime Scene Investigation. N.p.: Technical Working Group on Crime Scene Investigation, 2000. Print.
  • Collecting Evidence(3rd Walkthrough)
    Tagging
    Deedrick, Douglas W. "Hairs, Fibers, Crime and Evidence." Forensic Science
    Communication 2.3: n. pag. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. <http://www.fbi.gov/hq/
    lab/fsc/backissu/july2000/deedric4.htm>.
  • Collecting Evidence(3rd Walkthrough)
    Logging
    Deedrick, Douglas W. "Hairs, Fibers, Crime and Evidence." Forensic Science
    Communication 2.3: n. pag. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. <http://www.fbi.gov/hq/
    lab/fsc/backissu/july2000/deedric4.htm>.
  • Collecting Evidence(3rd Walkthrough)
    Packing
    Deedrick, Douglas W. "Hairs, Fibers, Crime and Evidence." Forensic Science
    Communication 2.3: n. pag. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. <http://www.fbi.gov/hq/
    lab/fsc/backissu/july2000/deedric4.htm>.
  • Collecting Cadaver Evidence(3rd Walkthrough)
    Deedrick, Douglas W. "Hairs, Fibers, Crime and Evidence." Forensic Science      Communication 2.3: n. pag. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. <http://www.fbi.gov/hq/      lab/fsc/backissu/july2000/deedric4.htm>.
  • Collecting Room Evidence(3rd Walkthrough)
    Layton, Julia.  "How Crime Scene Investigation Works."  02
    December 2005.  HowStuffWorks.com. <http:// science.howstuffworks.com/csi.htm> 04 March 2010.
  • Collecting Room Evidence(3rd Walkthrough)
    Layton, Julia.  "How Crime Scene Investigation Works."  02 December 2005.  HowStuffWorks.com. <http:// science.howstuffworks.com/csi.htm> 04 March 2010.
  • Collecting Room Evidence(3rd Walkthrough)
    Layton, Julia.  "How Crime Scene Investigation Works."  02 December 2005.  HowStuffWorks.com. <http:// science.howstuffworks.com/csi.htm> 04 March 2010.
  • Collecting Room Evidence(3rd Walkthrough)
    Layton, Julia.  "How Crime Scene Investigation Works."  02 December 2005.  HowStuffWorks.com. <http:// science.howstuffworks.com/csi.htm> 04 March 2010.
  • Collecting Room Evidence(3rd Walkthrough)
  • Crime Lab
    Evidence analyzed
  • After Investigation
    Court
    Defend their work
    Sarah, Dowdey. "How Crime Scene Photography Works." HowStuffWorks. 12 May 2008. Web. 4 Mar. 2010. <http:/science.howstuffworks.com/ crime-scene-photography.htm>.
  • Job
    Good Note taker
    Long hours
    Attentive
    Organization
    "Crime Scene Unit." Philadelphia Police Department. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Mar. 2010<http://www.ppdonline.org/hq_profile_crimescene.php>.