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Top Tips To Deliver Quality Mobile Web And App Experiences To Smartphone Users
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Top Tips To Deliver Quality Mobile Web And App Experiences To Smartphone Users

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Are you delivering quality web and app experiences to your mobile customers? …

Are you delivering quality web and app experiences to your mobile customers?

With mobile websites and applications your customers expect quick, anytime transactions that work flawlessly. Failure to deliver quality end-user experiences through slow or malfunctioning mobile websites and applications will result in lost customers and revenue.

Charles Golvin, Principal Analyst from independent research firm Forrester Research, Inc., and Compuware APM CTO Steve Tack describe:

• What growing mobile web and application adoption and rising customer expectations mean for mobile service owners
• Why smartphone owners are the key to your mobile success
• Common challenges that prohibit companies from capitalizing on the mobile market opportunity
• Best practices to deliver quality mobile web and application experiences to smartphone users

Published in: Technology, Business

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  • 1. d d d  Y Dt  d^ hK ^  ^ d W & Z dK  WD
  • 2. The Ubiquitously Connected ConsumerCharles S. Golvin, Principal AnalystPrepared for GomezMay 25, 20112 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited 2009
  • 3. AgendaThe proliferation of connectionsThe changing smartphone marketDelivering mobile experiences3 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 4. AgendaThe proliferation of connectionsThe changing smartphone marketDelivering mobile experiences4 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 5. Think about these phrasesDial a telephoneSounds like a broken recordWatch your P’s and Q’sCarriage returnCarbon copy (cc)Ring up a saleThis too will fall into the same category: Go online5 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 6. The Net is rapidly becoming an omnipresent, invisible source for communication, content, commerce, and comfort — a different experience of online.6 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 7. Three forces are at work1. The expanding range of devices connected to the Net2. Consumers’ growing reliance on the Net3. Networks’ increasing ability to deliver the Net7 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 8. Home connectivity’s evolution8 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 9. New entertainment devices exploit the NetDumb stuff’s getting connected, too9 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 10. The ultimate portable’s getting connected too10 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 11. 11 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 12. 12 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 13. And all manner of new connections when on the go13 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 14. Most online adults have multiple connected devices Types of connected devices 9+ 8+ 7+ 6+Millions of 5+ 4.5 8.0 13.3 22.1 37.0 57.7 79.3 105.3US adults 4+ 3+ 2+ Base: 3,990 US online adults Source: North American Technographics® Consumer Technology Online Benchmark Recontact Survey, Q2 2010 (US) 14 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 15. Connections beget more desire for connections Access wireless Internet on a PC outside of home or work "I like the idea of being connected to the Internet no matter where I am in town" (Those answering 4 or 5 on a scale of 1 "Strongly disagree to 5 "Strongly agree") 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9+ Number of types of connected devices the respondent owns Base: 3,990 US online adults Source: North American Technographics® Consumer Technology Online Benchmark Recontact Survey, Q2 2010 (US)15 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 16. More devices on the network? Sounds great $18 billion $32 billion So what?16 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 17. Here’s the situation An expanding range of devices that deliver the Net at home, in the car, and everywhere else. Consumers increasingly hungry for and expectant that the Net is available any time, anywhere, on any device. And wide-reaching, high-speed networks continuing to evolve and enrich the experience of the Net, irrespective of location.17 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 18. Agenda The proliferation of connections The changing smartphone market Delivering mobile experiences18 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 19. Our phone taxonomy has three components Smartphones – Defined by the software platform: iOS, Android and other Linux variants, BlackBerryOS, Windows Phone, WebOS, PalmOS, and Symbian – Profile: male, high income, tech optimist, career motivated (early adopter) Quick messaging devices – Has a hard QWERTY keyboard and/or a touchscreen, but not a high-level OS – Profile: young, low income, tech optimist, heavy messaging user Feature phones – Everything left over – Profile: older, tech pessimist19 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 20. At YE 2009, 1 in 3 US adults had a high-end phone The EU number was “What kind of mobile phone do you own?” nearly identical 17% 17% Quick Messaging Device (QMD) Smartphone 11% 9% 7% 5% YE 2007 YE 2008* YE 2009† Base: 41,249 US adult mobile subscribers Base: 37,327 US adult mobile subscribers * † Base: 30,453 US adult mobile subscribers Source: North American Technographics® Benchmark Surveys, 2008-201020 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 21. Smartphones will become the US majority in 201421 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 22. Clearly this growth forecast implies some changes In particular, this can’t be an accurate profile of a 2014 smartphone owner: – male, high income, tech optimist, career motivated (early adopter) This growth has to come from a migration of more mainstream mobile subscribers, implying an emerging segmentation of smartphone owners We already see this segmentation emerging…22 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 23. There are three types of smartphone owners23 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 24. Those upgrading from basic phones are less advanced in their behavior24 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 25. One-third of those upgrading from basic phones haven’t used any apps in the past three months Categories of applications used in the past 3 months25 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 26. Agenda The proliferation of connections The changing smartphone market Delivering mobile experiences26 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 27. Apps versus the Web? It’s a false dichotomy With a range of different customers, different devices, different use models, and different needs across each, both are necessary.27 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 28. One framework for drawing the distinction • One more measure: passion28 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 29. One-third of subscribers access the mobile Net “How frequently do you access the mobile Internet?” 87% At least daily 10% At least weekly At least monthly 26% 36% 37% 6% 8% 52% 12% 13% 7% 19% 3% 15% 2% 2% Feature phone QMD Smartphone All mobile Base: 4,582 US online mobile phone owners Source: North American Technographics® Online Omnibus Survey, Q1 2011 (US)29 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 30. Most app users also employ other methods “Thinking about the companies/brands you are able to interact with on your primary cell phone, which methods of interactions have you used?” 6% 6% 7% 9% Browser and SMS 13% Browser only App and browser None One or more 20% App only 72% 28% App and SMS All three SMS only 40% 69% of US and 78% of EU subscribers say they don’t use apps. Base: 3,866 US adults who own a mobile phone Source: North American Technographics® Benchmark Recontact Survey, Q3 2010 (US, Canada)30 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 31. Apps and the browser are complementary “What type of content do you access on your cell phones browser?” “What type(s) of applications do you have on your cell phone?” Index of Web usage among app users vs non-app users Index of app usage among Web users vs non-Web users Index of app usage among Web users vs all Geo-location games/services Education Health/Fitness Finance Travel An index value of 100 Shopping means that the two Social networking groups are equally likely Mapping/navigation to engage in the activity. News Weather Games 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Base: 1,159 US online adults who own a mobile phone Source: North American Technographics® Benchmark Recontact Survey, Q3 2010 (US, Canada)31 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 32. What is this?32 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 33. 33 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 34. 34 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 35. 35 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 36. How’s that? Sensors! 1. GPS 2. Accelerometer 3. Gyroscope 4. Camera 5. Light sensor 6. Microphone 7. All them radios36 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 37. And more are on the horizon NFC facilitates connections between mobile devices and places/things in the real world, providing orientation beyond location Additional sensors will take in other aspects of meatspace, such as barometric pressure, air quality Personal health sensors too — blood alcohol level, blood sugar level37 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 38. Sensors enable new mobile experiences Interpret the visual world Annotate the visual world Inform and assist in context Simulate an experience38 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 39. Summary Consumers are becoming ubiquitously connected. The market is changing as smartphones go mainstream. Apps and the Web are both critical to delivering mobile experiences to this mainstream audience.39 © 2011 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
  • 40. Thank youCharles S. Golvin+1 415.848.1311cgolvin@forrester.comwww.forrester.com © 2009 Forrester Research, Inc. Reproduction Prohibited
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