The economic, social community–based and productive model of Bolivia and its results
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The economic, social community–based and productive model of Bolivia and its results Presentation Transcript

  • 1. ESTADO PLURINACIONAL DE BOLIVIA September 10, 2013 MINISTERIO DE ECONOMÍA Y FINANZAS PÚBLICAS THE ECONOMIC, SOCIALTHE ECONOMIC, SOCIAL COMMUNITY-BASEDCOMMUNITY-BASED AND PRODUCTIVEAND PRODUCTIVE MODEL OF BOLIVIA ANDMODEL OF BOLIVIA AND ITS RESULTSITS RESULTS SANTA CRUZ - BOLIVIASANTA CRUZ - BOLIVIA
  • 2. 2 I. THE CRISIS OF CAPITALISM
  • 3. 3 • The world is currently living the following crisis: 1) A financial crisis 2) An environmental crisis 3) An energy crisis 4) A food crisis 5) A water crisis 6) A macroeconomic policies crisis 7) An institutional crisis • In this context it is possible to talk about a structural crisis of capitalism. • We spotted and identified this crisis since 2006. THE SEVEN CRISIS OF CAPITALISM ENVIRONMENT CRISIS ENERGY CRISIS FOOD CRISIS
  • 4. 4 II. THE NEW ECONOMIC MODEL IN BOLIVIA
  • 5. 5 THE BASIS OF THE NEW MODEL 3. MODEL FOR THE REDISTRIBUTION OF INCOME: The economic surplus must be redistributed especially among people with very low income. Cash conditional transfers (Juancito Pinto, Bono Juana Azurduy and Renta Dignidad bonds), public investment, inversely proportional increases in salaries, cross subsidization and others. 2. APPROPRIATION OF ECONOMIC SURPLUS: With the recuperation of natural resources, now economic surplus remains in the country and it is redistributed towards other sectors that generate income and employment. 1. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT BASED ON MAKING THE MOST OF NATURAL RESOURCES FOR THE BENEFIT OF BOLIVIAN PEOPLE: Larger economic surplus. 4. REDUCTION OF SOCIAL INEQUALITIES AND POVERTY: The model also has a social vision.
  • 6. 6 Neo-liberal Economic Model Social, Community-Based, Productive Economic Model Free market. The market is the mechanism that allocates resources and corrects unbalances. Hypothesis of the efficient market. The State intervenes to correct failures in the market (non existent redistributing of wealth and transnational monopoly of strategic companies) 1. 1. Guardian State. Watch over State. The market is the mechanism that auto regulates the economic process. 2. Active participation of the State in the economy. The State must intervene in the economy in seven ways: Planning, business, investment, regulating, benefactor, promoting, banking. 2. Privatizing State, that transfers surplus outside the country and doesn’t take care of natural resources. Nationalization and control of strategic natural resources. 3. 3. Pattern of Exporting Primary Development 4. Pattern of Industrialization and Productive Development 4.
  • 7. 7 Neo-liberal Economic Model Social Community-Based Productive Economic Model Concentration of income, larger sectors excluded in society. Inverted sense of redistribution that favors increasing earnings for entrepreneurs thus cutting back salaries. 5. State that redistributes income. De-colonizing, that incorporates the demands of social sectors in decision making processes. 5. 7. 7.Growth exclusively related to external demand. Growth related to both external and internal demands. Economy focused in private endeavors, reducing to the minimum intervention in the public sector and increasing private earnings. 6. State that promotes plural economy (State, private sector, cooperative social economy and community-based economy) 6. 8. 8.Dependence of external savings for investment, increasing national debt and fiscal deficit. Generation of internal resources for investment, less national debt and fiscal surplus.
  • 8. 8 Neo-liberal Economic Model Social Community-Based Productive Economic Model To preserve macroeconomic stability as a social legacy and promote economic development and social as well as economic growth with balanced redistribution of income. 9. 9.Blockage, poverty, inequalities in wealth and opportunities. Larger development, redistribution and generation of employment. Macroeconomic stability as a goal in itself. The fight against inflation is the center of the economic policy putting aside both growth and employment. 10. 10. 11. Recuperation of sovereignty and independence in the making of economic policy (fiscal, monetary and rate policies). Both fiscal surplus and the “bolivianization” of the economy have been achieved since 2006. Dependency on economic formulas of the Washington Consensus (IMG and WB) 11.
  • 9. 9 Neo-liberal Economic Model Social Community-Based Productive Economic Model Fiscal and monetary policies non- existent (continuous fiscal deficits and high level of dollarization of the economy). Recuperation of sovereignty and independence in the elaboration of economic policy (fiscal, monetary and rate policies) thanks to the fiscal surplus, the “bolivianization” of the economy and the dynamics of internal demand respectively. 12. 12.
  • 10. STRATEGIC SECTORS THAT GENERATE SURPLUS SECTORS THAT GENERATE INCOME AND EMPLOYEMENT • Hydrocarbons • Mining • Electricity • Environmental resources • Industry, manufacturing and craftsmanship • Tourism • Agricultural development • Housing • Commerce, transportation and other services Surplus SOCIAL COMMUNITY-BASED PRODUCTIVE ECONOMIC MODEL 10 • Bono Juancito Pinto • Renta Dignidad • Bono Juana Azurduy • Poverty reduction REDISTRIBUTION OF INCOME: SOCIAL PROGRAMS REDISTRIBUTING STATE INDUSTRIALIZATION
  • 11. PLURAL ECONOMY 11 Promover la integración de las diferentes formas económicas de producción, con el objeto de lograr el desarrollo económico y social Función del Estado PRIVADA COMUNITARIA SOCIAL COOPERATIVA ESTATAL CRECIMIENTO ECONÓMICO CON REDISTRIBUCIÓN DEL INGRESO
  • 12. 12 III. RESULTS
  • 13. Bolivia: Growth of real Gross Domestic Product GDP 1985 - May 2013 (in percentage) (p) Preliminary Source: National Statistics Institute (INE) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) 13 From 1985 - 2005 3,0% From 2006 - 2012 4,8% IGAE
  • 14. Bolivia: Influence of internal demand and net exportations in the GDP 1999 – 2012 (p) (in percentage) (p) Preliminary Source: National Statistics Institute (INE) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) 14
  • 15. Bolivia: Gross Domestic Product per Capita 1986 – 2012 (p) (in USD) 15 (p) Preliminary Source: National Statistics Institute (INE) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF)
  • 16. 815 1.400 2.011 2.240 3.483 2.107 2.984 4.112 5.871 0 3.108 3.7561.158 1.159 2.074 2.427 1.861 1.498 1.521 1.062 794 1.628 1.672 3.324 2.262 1.840 1.505 1.654 1.331 1.124 945 950 525 923 741 1.090 1.215 1.108 1.246 1.320 6.933 5.400 6.902 11.794 6.966 9.146 4.822 4.088 2.867 2.195 6.162 0 1.000 2.000 3.000 4.000 5.000 6.000 7.000 8.000 9.000 10.000 11.000 12.000 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2012 2013 MillonesdeUS$ Agropecuaria Industria Manufacturera Extracción de Minerales Extracción de hidrocarburos 78%78% of all importations are intermediate products and capital goods Bolivia: Exportations and Importations 1990 – 2012(p) January - July 2012 – 2013(p) (in millions of USD) 16 (p) Preliminary Note: Doesn’t include personal effects or re-exportations. Source: National Statistics Institute (INE) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF)Fuente: Instituto Nacional de Estadística (INE) Jan - Jul 29% 12% Exportations Importations Jan - Jul 4% 10% In 2012 exportations in the agricultural sector and the manufacturing industry increased in 53%53% and 47%47% respectively in comparison with 2011 524 490 837 1.119 928 1.201 1.817 1.752 926 862 997 1.281 1.467 1.770 2.599 2.305 2.803 3.844 4.127 2.053 611 946 952 1.315 1.274 1.545 2.245 910 779 374 359 403 1.953 1.245 2.330 524 458 504 1082 703 1.130 1.196 1.657 2.451 2.020 1.832 3.588 5.100 4.235 3.847 4.577 5.604 1.920 2.926 2.440 8.281 7.936 0 1.000 2.000 3.000 4.000 5.000 6.000 7.000 8.000 9.000 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2012 2013 MillonesdeUS$ Bienes de Capital Materias Primas y Productos Intermedios Bienes de Consumo Otros
  • 17. 253 -357 -72 -654 -1.126 -457 -16 345 508 1.306 1.958 909 1.982 1.704 -361 -545 1.448 1.280 3.687 -2.000 -1.000 0 1.000 2.000 3.000 4.000 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2012 2013 MillonesdeUS$ Bolivia: Commercial Balance 1990 - 2012 (p) January - July 2012 - 2013 (p) (in millions of US) 17 (p) Preliminary Note: The estimation includes personal effects or re-exportations. Source: National Statistics Institute (INE) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) 16%188% Jan - July Latin America: Commercial balance First semester 2013 (in percentage of GDP) -1,4% -0,3% -0,4% -0,1% 0,5% 0,9% 1,0% 2,4% 6,0% -2,4% -4,0% -2,0% 0,0% 2,0% 4,0% 6,0% Paraguay Uruguay Peru Ecuador Brasil Colombia Chile Argentina Venezuela (1) Bolivia
  • 18. Bolivia: Net International Reserves of the Bolivian Central Bank (BCB) 1976 - 28 August 2013 (in millions of USD) Source: Bolivian Central Bank (BCB) and other countries central banks. Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) 18 LATIN AMERICA: INTERNATIONAL RESERVES JULY 201 (in percentage of the GDP) 4 7 7 11 13 14 15 19 29 31 51 0 20 40 60 Ecuador Venezuela Argentina Colombia México Chile Brasil Paraguay Uruguay Perú Bolivia *
  • 19. 28.535 23.918 37.563 32.392 24.134 24.097 22.995 18.353 15.786 13.546 8.814 6.475 12.111 8.996 6.744 6.465 6.644 5.954 5.497 37.349 30.392 49.674 41.388 30.879 30.562 29.639 24.308 21.283 15.874 11.243 8.2307.8906.916 4.8673.515 2.349 1.277 0 6.000 12.000 18.000 24.000 30.000 36.000 42.000 48.000 54.000 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2012 2013 IDH Impuestos sin IDH Jan-Jul 19 34%34% 22%22% 3%3% 14%14% 34%34% 20%20% Source: National Taxes Service (SIN), National Customs of Bolivia (ANB) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) Bolivia: Taxes collection, 1990 – 2012 January – July, 2012 - 2013 (p) (in millions of Bolivianos) 23%23%1%1%
  • 20. -6,4 -1,8 4,5 -22,3 -30,6 1,7 1,7 -8,8 -6,1 -8,3 0,8 4,8 0,1 -4,7 3,2 1,8 -36,0 -30,0 -24,0 -18,0 -12,0 -6,0 0,0 6,0 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 (p) Preliminary Source: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances and Central Bank of Bolivia (BCB) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) Bolivia: Surplus (deficit) of Non-Financial Public Sector (SPNF) 1980 – July 2013(p) (in percentage of the GDP) 20 Ene-Jul Superávit (déficit) del TGN 2000–Julio 2013 (En porcentaje del PIB) Ene-Jul -2,9 -5,0 -6,0 -4,8 -2,6 -0,9 0,3 1,5 1,2 -0,5 3,1 0,03 -0,2 1,0 -8,0 -6,0 -4,0 -2,0 0,0 2,0 4,0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
  • 21. 7.671 9.850 11.949 6.959 8.578 6.193 7.8693.200 2.443 3.964 4.636 6.758 6.924 4.640 4.573 4.208 3.075 4.800 5.359 4.745 4.048 2.135 1.773 2.228 2.007 1.152 1.567 1.767 2.072 2.698 2.212 14.539 12.978 11.762 15.285 12.940 10.330 23.019 18.741 3.7303.618 3.006 13.575 6.669 4.711 2.696 0 4.000 8.000 12.000 16.000 20.000 24.000 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2012 2013 Universidades Gobernaciones Municipios (p) Preliminary (*) Data to July 2012 and 2013 it doesn’t include earnings of forest resources. Source: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances. General Directorate of Fiscal Accounting (DGCF) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) 21 18% 23% Bolivia: Departmental royalties and transfer (departmental governments, municipalities and universities) 1994 – 2012 To July, 2012 – 2013* (p) (in million of Bolivianos) Until July
  • 22. 22 Updated to August 22, 2013 Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) Bolivia: Transfers, departmental royalties (departmental governments, municipalities and universities) and balance in cash and banks 2005 – 2013 (in million of Bolivianos) Until July 18%18% 20%20% 041 4.992 6.297 6.994 5.955 15.827 19.429 669 10.330 11.762 13.575 12.978 23.019 15.285 16.194 8.109 12.365 12.940 18.741 14.539 005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2012 2013 Saldo en caja y bancos Transferencias y regalías departamentales
  • 23. 202 255 247 238 246 296 301 281 327 461 511 690 1.157 1.530 2.169 113 106 112 123 159 97 96 202 266 493 423 409 504 669 797 120 143 186 121 92 118 142 326 357 324 398 271 344 484 709 96 78 94 102 3 90 90 71 55 73 107 100 125 128 62 531 583 639 585 500 602 629 879 1.005 1.351 1.439 1.521 2.182 2.874 3.807 0 500 1.000 1.500 2.000 2.500 3.000 3.500 4.000 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Administración Central Administración local Administración departamental Cofinanciamiento Regional Universidades 23 Bolivia: Public Investment executed by economic sector 1999 - 2013 (in millions of USD) (p) Preliminary Source: Vice-Ministry of Public Investment and External Financing (VIPFE) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) Ppto 496 744 121 178 106 183 792 1.191 0 200 400 600 800 1.000 1.200 2012 2013 Executed Public Investment Jan – Jun 2012 - 2013 (in millions of USD) 50% 34% 22% 26% 107% 31%
  • 24. 24 (p) Preliminary Source: Bolivian Central Bank (BCB) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) Bolivia: Public External Debt of medium and long terms 1980 – July 2013 (p) -11% In millions of USD In percentage of the GDP
  • 25. 25 (p) Preliminary Source: Bolivian Central Bank (BCB) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) -11% In millions of USD In percentage of the GDP Bolivia: Internal Public Debt of the National General Treasure (TGN), 2000 – July 2013 (p)
  • 26. 26 Source: Supervision Authority of he Financial System (ASFI) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) 20% 27% 48% 4% 21% 34% 40% 5% Bolivia: Deposits of the public in the Financial System 2005 – July 2013 (in millions of USD) 2005 US$ 3.711 millones Jun Julio 2013 US$ 13.545 millones
  • 27. 27 Source: Supervision Authority of he Financial System (ASFI) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) Bolivia: Number of deposits in the Financial System, by amount category 2005 – July 2013 (in thousands of deposits)
  • 28. 28 Bolivia: Gross Portfolio of the Financial System by objective of credits, 2005 – July 2013 (in millions of USD) Source: Supervision Authority of he Financial System (ASFI) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF)
  • 29. 29 Source: Supervision Authority of he Financial System (ASFI) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) Bolivia: Bolivianization of deposits and credits in the Financial System 1995 – July 2013 (in percentage) Jul
  • 30. Bolivia: Urban open unenloyement rate 2001 – 2012 (p) (in percentage) 30 (p) Preliminary Source: Unit for the Analysis of Economic and Social Policies (UDAPE) based on the Homes Survey of the National Statistics Institute (INE) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) 8,5 8,7 8,7 8,2 8,0 7,7 4,4 4,9 3,8 3,2 11,1 12,0 12,3 12,1 11,3 9,5 10,2 11,0 7,9 2,0 4,0 6,0 8,0 10,0 12,0 14,0 2001 2002 2003 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2011 2012 INE-UDAPE CEDLA
  • 31. Bolivia: Active and creation of new companies 2002 - 2012 To July 2012 - 2013 (p) (in number of companies) Note: During the first months of each year the amount of companies tends to increase considerably, the depuration process is carried out in December of each year which makes date vary from January to December of a particular year. Source: Fund for Entrepreneurial Development (FUNDEMPRESA) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) 31 38.74 0 Julio
  • 32. Bolivia: Extreme poverty levels 1999 – 2012 (p) (in percentage) (p) Preliminary Source: National Statistics Institute (INE) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) 32
  • 33. 33 (a): Urban Areas Source: Economic Commission for Lain America and the Caribbean (CEPAL) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) Latin America: Extreme Poverty Level, 2005 and 2011 (in percentage) 2005 2011 3,1 6,1 6,3 10,1 10,7 11,7 12,4 20,9 1,9 28,0 1,1 0,0 5,0 10,0 15,0 20,0 25,0 30,0 Uruguay (a) Argentina (a) Chile Brasil Perú Ecuador (a) Colombia Venezuela México Bolivia Paraguay -17,3 pp 2005 2011 4,1 9,1 10,6 11,7 15,9 17,1 17,4 20,2 32,1 38,2 3,2 0,0 10,0 20,0 30,0 40,0 Chile Uruguay (a) Argentina (a) Brasil México Venezuela Ecuador (a) Perú Colombia Paraguay Bolivia From 2011,From 2011, Bolivia is noBolivia is no longer thelonger the poorest countrypoorest country in Southin South AmericaAmerica
  • 34. 34 Income comparison between the richest 10% and the poorest 10% at a national level, 1996 - 2012 (number of times) 113 28 79 128 35 157 46 18 89 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 Nacional Urbana Rural 1996 2005 2012(p) (p) Preliminary Source: Unit for the Analysis of Economic and Social Policies (UDAPE) based on the Homes Survey of the National Statistics Institute (INE) Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF)
  • 35. 35 Bolivia: Population that benefits with direct conditional cash transfers until July 2013(p) (in number of beneficiaries and percentage) (p) Preliminary Source: Ministry of Education, Fiscal Authority and Rent and Insurnce Control and Ministry of Health and Sports Elaboración: Ministerio de Economía y Finanzas Públicas, Red de Análisis Fiscal (RAF) 1.761.057 beneficiaries Bono Juancito Pinto (2012) 3.588.257 beneficiaries 33,0% of the total Bolivian population Rest of the population 67,0 % 16,3% 992.450 beneficiaries Renta Dignidad (July 2013) Bono Juana Azurduy (2012) 834.750 beneficiaries 7,7% 9,0%
  • 36. 36 IV. GENDER EQUALITY
  • 37. 37 Respect to our basic rights as human beings and tolerance towards our differences as women and men. Equal opportunities in all important sectors and in every field (social, cultural, political). In terms of the economy, it is also very important to achieve gender equality. Restrictions in the access to the productive field or limited employment opportunities for women generate increasing poverty. Gender Equality in the State General Budget (PGE)
  • 38. 38 In the context of the implementation of public policies to prevent discrimination, the Ministry of Economy and Public Finances (MEFP) contributed to the following achievements: Inclusion of specific guidelines regarding “Promotion and Gender Policies” and Defense and Protection of Children and Families” in the structure of the programs of Autonomous Territorial Entities.. Inclusion of the Expense Qualifier by Goal and Function and the 10.9 Code “Gender Equality and Other Services to Eliminate Inequalities and Achieve Social Protection”. Accountability of the Maximum Instances (MAEs) of public services for the allocation of resources and inclusion of actions in AOPs to contribute to fight against racism and all forms of discrimination. Allocation of Resources in the PGE for Gender Equality
  • 39. Supreme Decree 24864, the State guarantees equality in the rights of men and women in the political, economic, social and cultural spheres, as well as the inclusion of gender mainstreaming contents in public policies to achieve real gender equality. Departmental Governments and Municipalities must be accountable for this in terms of their specific competencies. Law Nº 348, protection programs and services for the attention and recuperation of women victims of violence will be organized, coordinated and strengthened in each municipality with the corresponding allocation of resources in their annual budgets as permanent support instances trough Integrated Municipal Legal Services, Home Shelters and Temporary Shelters. Allocation of Resources for Gender Equality in the PGE in Autonomous Territorial Entities
  • 40. Resources Allocated for Gender Issues at the Central Level of the Government, 2009 - 2013 (in Millions of Bolivianos) The chart includes the ministries of Labor, Justice, Autonomies and, the Ministry Health and Sports. 99% belongs to the Ministry of Health and Sports for the allocations assigned trough the Bono Juana Azurduy bond. In 2013, 84% is financed with resources of the National General Treasure (TGN). The average execution is 64%. Source: SIGMA Elaborated by: MEFP-VPCF-DGPGP +233%
  • 41. Budget Assigned to Gender Issues, 2013 Municipal Autonomous Governments (GAM) (in Millions of Bolivianos and percentages)  66% corresponds to municipalities in the main departments of Bolivia.  The resources allocated for these policies account for 2,5% of the Total Budget of GAM.  72% correspond to resources for the SUMI.  The average execution is 33%. Source: SIGMA Elaborated by: MEFP-VPCF-DGPGP
  • 42. Budget Allocated to Gender Issues, 2013 Departmental Autonomous Governments (GAD) (in Millions of Bolivianos) Source: SIGMA Elaborated by: MEFP-VPCF-DGPGP  63% is concentrated in the GADs of Tarija, Beni, La Paz and Santa Cruz.  The resources allocated for these type of policies represent 0,09% of the Total Budget of the GADs.  The average execution to date is 14,3%.
  • 43. Thank you… 43
  • 44. 44Elaborated by: Ministry of Economy and Public Finances, Fiscal Analysis Network (RAF) FINANCIAL CRISIS In 2001 to reduce the effect of the crisis the FED lowered the type of interests to stimulate the economy. In the euphoria of a continuous increase of home prices, credits were granted to American poor workers. HIGH RISK CREDITS BANKSFEDERAL RESERVE  2002 and 2006: Mortgage credit boom  2007: Banks declare bankruptcy, the estimated losses are between 50 and 100 million USD  2007-2009: The FED grants a financial rescue worth close to 7,8 billon USD  2010 - 2011: Financial rescue to Ireland worth 85.000 million Euros and Portugal for 78.000 million Euros  2010-2012: Financial rescue to Greece worth 110.000 million Euros  2012: Financial rescue to Spain worth 100.000 million Euros  April 2013: Financial rescue to Cyprus worth 10.000 million Euros  August 2013: Germany acknowledges that Greece needs a new financial rescue VolverVolver
  • 45. 45 ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS Fuente: Agencias de Noticias Internacionales Elaboración: Ministerio de Economía y Finanzas Públicas, Red de Análisis Fiscal (RAF) VolverVolver Floods in China (19 August 2013) It severely damaged 50.000 homes, caused the death of 130 people and the disappearance of 102. The number of people displaced from their homes was over 300.000 and about 3,7 millions were directly affected by this phenomenon. Floods in Russia (21 August 2013) 23 thousand people has been evacuated and there is an extended threat of eventual epidemics of diseases. 500 kilometers of roads have been destroyed as well as bridges and the access to 38 towns. Over 43% of carbon reserves for winter have been spoiled. Tornado in Japan (1 September 2013) There are at least 63 people injured, including 7 girls from a primary school which roof top was completely destroyed. The tornado also affected the electric services leaving 33 thousand homes without electricity.
  • 46. 46 ENERGY CRISIS • India, August 2012, in one of the worst black-outs of history, more than 600 million people have lost electric supply due to the increasing demand of energy in the country (about 9% annually). • Contrary to the elevated consumption of energy in developed countries, Latin American countries have implemented programs for the efficient use of electricity and to save this type of energy. WORLD CONSUMPTION OF ENERGY BackBack
  • 47. 47 FOOD CRISIS INCREASING PRICES OF FOOD AROUND THE WORLD Fuente: Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI) y Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Alimentación y la Agricultura (FAO) Elaboración: Ministerio de Economía y Finanzas Públicas, Red de Análisis Fiscal (RAF) Jun-13 Índice de precio de alimentos MALNUTRITION IN THE WORLD (in millions of people) 884 871 867 868 869 905 908 900 896 885 870 857 852 852 852 898 922 923 915 910 14 14 14 15 16 16 17 16 15 14 820 840 860 880 900 920 940 2000-02 2001-03 2002-04 2003-05 2004-06 2005-07 2006-08 2007-09 2008-10 2009-11 Mundo Países en desarrollo Países desarrollados FAO Report (2009): “How to feed the World in 2050” The world population in 2050 will be 9,100 million. To feed this population, food production (excluding food used for the production of bio-fuels) must increase by 70%. FAO – OECD Report (2012): “Agricultural perspectives 2012 - 2021” The agricultural production must increase by 60% over the next 40 years to meet the growing demand for food. However, the potential for expansion of global agricultural land is limited. Is expected to increase arable land only 5% by 2050. The additional production will come from increased productivity. BackBack
  • 48. 48 (e) Estimado Fuente: Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI) Elaboración: Ministerio de Economía y Finanzas Públicas, Red de Análisis Fiscal (RAF) Germany France China India Spain Italy Economic growth in selected countries, 2005 – 2013 (e) First trimester 2013 (in percentage) EEUU Grecia -0,3 0,6 -0,4 -0,1 -4,2 5,7 7,78,0 -2,3 -1,5 -2,0 -1,6 1,81,9 -10,0 -5,0 0,0 5,0 10,0 15,0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013e I Trim 2013 Alemania Francia Grecia India China Italia España Estados Unidos MACROECONOMIC POLICIES CRISIS
  • 49. 49 Fuente: Eurostat Elaboración: Ministerio de Economía y Finanzas Públicas, Red de Análisis Fiscal (RAF) France Portugal Spain Euro Zone Unemployment rates in selected countries January 2005 – June 2013 (in percentage) EEUU Greece MACROECONOMIC POLICIES CRISIS
  • 50. 50 Fuente: Eurostat Elaboración: Ministerio de Economía y Finanzas Públicas, Red de Análisis Fiscal (RAF) France Italy Japan Germany Spain Selected countries: Public debt in percentage of GDP 2000 – 2012(p) (in percentage) EEUU Greece MACROECONOMIC POLICIES CRISIS BackBack
  • 51. 51 WATER CRISIS Fuente: Departamento de Asuntos Económicos y Sociales Naciones Unidas (ONU – DAES) Elaboración: Ministerio de Economía y Finanzas Públicas, Red de Análisis Fiscal (RAF) BackBack • Throughout the last century, water use and consumption grew at twice the rate of population growth. • As the world's population has surpassed 6,000 million people, some countries have exceeded the limits of their water resources. • About 1,200 million people, nearly a fifth of the world's population, live in areas of physical water scarcity. • With the current climate change scenario by 2030 almost half of the world's population will live in areas with high water problems. • Water scarcity is caused mainly by human action
  • 52. RESOURCES ALLOCATED TO PROGRAM 25 “PROMOTION AND GENDER POLICIES” IN AUTONOMIC MUNCIPAL GOVERNMENTS (in Bolivianos) Year 2013 52 Departament 25- Promotion and Gender Policies Current Budget Executed % Exec. CHUQUISACA 4.428.129 2.026.438 45,76% LA PAZ 13.925.949 4.783.150 34,35% COCHABAMBA 18.523.459 4.139.631 22,35% ORURO 1.715.279 160.162 9,34% POTOSÍ 3.996.519 555.035 13,89% TARIJA 4.568.234 1.938.276 42,43% SANTA CRUZ 31.353.244 11.563.486 36,88% BENI 4.087.641 1.476.839 36,13% PANDO 1.324.019 517.776 39,11% Total 83.922.473 27.160.793 32,36% Source: General Directorate of Fiscal Accounting Elaborated by: DGPGP – UET
  • 53. RESOURCES ALLOCATED TO PROGRAM 26 “DEFENSE AND PROTECTION OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIES” IN AUTONOMIC MUNCIPAL GOVERNMENTS (in Bolivianos) Year 2013 53 Departamento 26 - Defensa y Protección de la Niñes y Familia Ppto. Vigente Ejecutado % Ejec. CHUQUISACA 8.750.557 3.038.375 34,72% LA PAZ 31.524.256 12.848.576 40,76% COCHABAMBA 19.632.856 4.858.562 24,75% ORURO 3.151.424 594.464 18,86% POTOSÍ 7.939.271 2.299.580 28,96% TARIJA 7.327.275 3.523.997 48,09% SANTA CRUZ 9.957.797 3.952.932 39,70% BENI 4.850.415 2.129.693 43,91% PANDO 2.947.995 1.337.260 45,36% Total 96.081.846 34.583.439 35,99% Source: General Directorate of Fiscal Accounting Elaborated by: DGPGP – UET
  • 54. RESOURCES ALLOCATED TO UNIVERSAL MOTHER AND CHILD INSURANCE (SUMI) IN AUTONOMIC MUNCIPAL GOVERNMENTS (In Bolivianos) Year 2013 54 Departament UNIVERSAL MOTHER AND CHILD INSURANCE (SUMI) Current Budget Executed % Exec. CHUQUISACA 39.697.824 20.020.111 50,43% LA PAZ 63.700.709 10.059.836 15,79% COCHABAMBA 113.546.128 28.118.383 24,76% ORURO 35.397.036 4.483.116 12,67% POTOSÍ 34.951.656 3.413.744 9,77% TARIJA 27.427.371 12.083.952 44,06% SANTA CRUZ 123.979.709 50.844.344 41,01% BENI 20.089.606 7.259.810 36,14% PANDO 3.005.933 1.975.639 65,72% Total 461.795.972 138.258.935 29,94% Source: General Directorate of Fiscal Accounting Elaborated by: DGPGP – UET
  • 55. TOTAL EXECUTION OF GENDER RESPONSIVE BUDGETS IN MUNICIPAL AUTONOMIC GOVERNMENTS (in Bolivianos) Until September 2013 55 Department 25- Promotion and Gender Policies 26 – Defense and Protection of Children and Families Universal Mother and Child Insurance (SUMI) Current Budget Executed % Exec. Current Budget Executed % Exec. Current Budget Executed % Exec. CHUQUISACA 4.428.129 2.026.438 45,76% 8.750.557 3.038.375 34,72% 39.697.824 20.020.111 50,43% LA PAZ 13.925.949 4.783.150 34,35% 31.524.256 12.848.576 40,76% 63.700.709 10.059.836 15,79% COCHABAMBA 18.523.459 4.139.631 22,35% 19.632.856 4.858.562 24,75% 113.546.128 28.118.383 24,76% ORURO 1.715.279 160.162 9,34% 3.151.424 594.464 18,86% 35.397.036 4.483.116 12,67% POTOSÍ 3.996.519 555.035 13,89% 7.939.271 2.299.580 28,96% 34.951.656 3.413.744 9,77% TARIJA 4.568.234 1.938.276 42,43% 7.327.275 3.523.997 48,09% 27.427.371 12.083.952 44,06% SANTA CRUZ 31.353.244 11.563.486 36,88% 9.957.797 3.952.932 39,70% 123.979.709 50.844.344 41,01% BENI 4.087.641 1.476.839 36,13% 4.850.415 2.129.693 43,91% 20.089.606 7.259.810 36,14% PANDO 1.324.019 517.776 39,11% 2.947.995 1.337.260 45,36% 3.005.933 1.975.639 65,72% Total 83.922.473 27.160.793 32,36% 96.081.846 34.583.439 35,99% 461.795.972 138.258.935 29,94% Source: General Directorate of Fiscal Accounting Elaborated by: DGPGP – UET
  • 56. GENDER RESPONSIVE RESOURCES VS. TOTAL BUDGET (in Bolivianos) Year 2013 56 Source: General Directorate of Fiscal Accounting Elaborated by: DGPGP – UET Description Current Budget % of Representation 25- Promotion and Gender Policies 83.922.473 0,33% 26 – Defense and Protection of Children and Family 96.081.846 0,37% Universal mother and Child Insurance (SUMI) 461.795.972 1,80% Gender Sub-Total 641.800.291 2,50% Other programs 25.074.787.926 97,50% General Total 25.716.588.217 100%
  • 57. RESOURCES ALLOCATION TO GENDER ISSUES IN AUTONOMIC DEPARTMENTAL GOVERNMENTS (in Bolivianos) Year 2013 57 ENT. DESCRIPTION ENT. Current Budget Executed % Exec. 901 CHUQUISACA 195.607 0 0,00% 902 LA PAZ 1.560.817 694.229 44,48% 903 COCHABAMBA 933.129 151.588 16,25% 904 ORURO 413.863 0 0,00% 905 POTOSÍ 0 0 0,00% 906 TARIJA 2.933.668 891.090 30,37% 907 SANTA CRUZ 1.500.000 0 0,00% 908 BENI 1.797.924 565.697 31,46% 909 PANDO 85.471 5.471 6,40% Total 9.420.479 2.308.075 24,50% Source: General Directorate of Fiscal Accounting Elaborated by: DGPGP – UET