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Sell, Sell, Sell, AtlasCamp US 2012
 

Sell, Sell, Sell, AtlasCamp US 2012

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Dave Meyer, Product Marketing Specialist for Marketplace ...

Dave Meyer, Product Marketing Specialist for Marketplace

Find out what we've learned from the first three months selling plugins in the Atlassian Marketplace. We'll give you an update, and show you some tips and tricks about how make sure your plugin makes a great impression in the store, and in the product.

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  • Hi everyone, I’m Dave. I’m the one man marketing show for the Atlassian Marketplace. Today I’m going to talk to you about selling paid add-ons on the Atlassian Marketplace. If it’s alright with you, I’d like to change the title of my talk...it was preselected for me. Selling in the Marketplace isn’t as easy as “sell sell sell”. (click) Having a great marketing strategy, whether you have a paid add-on on the Marketplace, are considering building one, or just want to encourage adoption of a custom plugin in your company...It’s not beyond the ability of anyone here. I’m going to cover the concrete steps you can take and the small details you should pay attention to in order to find the most success.\n
  • Hi everyone, I’m Dave. I’m the one man marketing show for the Atlassian Marketplace. Today I’m going to talk to you about selling paid add-ons on the Atlassian Marketplace. If it’s alright with you, I’d like to change the title of my talk...it was preselected for me. Selling in the Marketplace isn’t as easy as “sell sell sell”. (click) Having a great marketing strategy, whether you have a paid add-on on the Marketplace, are considering building one, or just want to encourage adoption of a custom plugin in your company...It’s not beyond the ability of anyone here. I’m going to cover the concrete steps you can take and the small details you should pay attention to in order to find the most success.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • A little more about me. I’ve worked in product marketing for Atlassian for about 6 months in total. I joined the Marketplace team a couple months ago to do one thing: help you. You want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. I measure my success by how many of your add-ons we sell. So I’m looking at weekly sales reports and evaluation totals and thinking through how to up your conversion rate and sharpen your product messaging. Basically I’m trying to come up with ways for you to improve your customer experience and improve your message to help you sell. I’m here for you.\n\nLet me go in to a couple of the ways I do this. We have a weekly blog series that features add-ons in the Marketplace. I’m proud to announce that this week we sent out our first Marketplace email newsletter. It was sent to all active Atlassian customers. We’re hopeful that delivering an email full of visual links to Marketplace add-ons will drive more people to the Marketplace in general and get more customers exploring the Marketplace. We’re looking forward to featuring even more add-ons in the newsletter as we develop this project further. We tweet, we just published two case studies this week and will hopefully do more. If you’re interested in learning more about the Marketplace experience, I definitely recommend you check them out on our blogs, they feature Zephyr and Valiantys. We put out a press release this week talking about Marketplace growth. All of these efforts have the goal of supporting you, our vendors.\n
  • But I have a problem. This is you. No wait actually there are quite a lot of you. When I made this slide I felt like the blue and silver people kind of followed the Apple OS X color scheme and that’s not really fair to you Windows and Linux people, so here you go.\n\nBut my problem is that this is me. Not that I still have my graduation cap on...that’s just because I’m young. That’s me and I want to help all of you. I really want to have a relationship with every developer on the Marketplace. If my goal is to help you sell more add-ons and fine tune your message, I want to have some knowledge about each one of your products. I’ve been in email contact with many of you, and I’ve gotten to meet a bunch of you yesterday and today, and hopefully even more tonight and tomorrow. I’m putting myself out there as available for you and there’s never been a better time to pick my brain or get some feedback or get on my calendar. \n\nBut there are a lot of you and only one of me and I don’t want to end up like this. (click) So...(click)\n
  • But I have a problem. This is you. No wait actually there are quite a lot of you. When I made this slide I felt like the blue and silver people kind of followed the Apple OS X color scheme and that’s not really fair to you Windows and Linux people, so here you go.\n\nBut my problem is that this is me. Not that I still have my graduation cap on...that’s just because I’m young. That’s me and I want to help all of you. I really want to have a relationship with every developer on the Marketplace. If my goal is to help you sell more add-ons and fine tune your message, I want to have some knowledge about each one of your products. I’ve been in email contact with many of you, and I’ve gotten to meet a bunch of you yesterday and today, and hopefully even more tonight and tomorrow. I’m putting myself out there as available for you and there’s never been a better time to pick my brain or get some feedback or get on my calendar. \n\nBut there are a lot of you and only one of me and I don’t want to end up like this. (click) So...(click)\n
  • But I have a problem. This is you. No wait actually there are quite a lot of you. When I made this slide I felt like the blue and silver people kind of followed the Apple OS X color scheme and that’s not really fair to you Windows and Linux people, so here you go.\n\nBut my problem is that this is me. Not that I still have my graduation cap on...that’s just because I’m young. That’s me and I want to help all of you. I really want to have a relationship with every developer on the Marketplace. If my goal is to help you sell more add-ons and fine tune your message, I want to have some knowledge about each one of your products. I’ve been in email contact with many of you, and I’ve gotten to meet a bunch of you yesterday and today, and hopefully even more tonight and tomorrow. I’m putting myself out there as available for you and there’s never been a better time to pick my brain or get some feedback or get on my calendar. \n\nBut there are a lot of you and only one of me and I don’t want to end up like this. (click) So...(click)\n
  • But I have a problem. This is you. No wait actually there are quite a lot of you. When I made this slide I felt like the blue and silver people kind of followed the Apple OS X color scheme and that’s not really fair to you Windows and Linux people, so here you go.\n\nBut my problem is that this is me. Not that I still have my graduation cap on...that’s just because I’m young. That’s me and I want to help all of you. I really want to have a relationship with every developer on the Marketplace. If my goal is to help you sell more add-ons and fine tune your message, I want to have some knowledge about each one of your products. I’ve been in email contact with many of you, and I’ve gotten to meet a bunch of you yesterday and today, and hopefully even more tonight and tomorrow. I’m putting myself out there as available for you and there’s never been a better time to pick my brain or get some feedback or get on my calendar. \n\nBut there are a lot of you and only one of me and I don’t want to end up like this. (click) So...(click)\n
  • But I have a problem. This is you. No wait actually there are quite a lot of you. When I made this slide I felt like the blue and silver people kind of followed the Apple OS X color scheme and that’s not really fair to you Windows and Linux people, so here you go.\n\nBut my problem is that this is me. Not that I still have my graduation cap on...that’s just because I’m young. That’s me and I want to help all of you. I really want to have a relationship with every developer on the Marketplace. If my goal is to help you sell more add-ons and fine tune your message, I want to have some knowledge about each one of your products. I’ve been in email contact with many of you, and I’ve gotten to meet a bunch of you yesterday and today, and hopefully even more tonight and tomorrow. I’m putting myself out there as available for you and there’s never been a better time to pick my brain or get some feedback or get on my calendar. \n\nBut there are a lot of you and only one of me and I don’t want to end up like this. (click) So...(click)\n
  • But I have a problem. This is you. No wait actually there are quite a lot of you. When I made this slide I felt like the blue and silver people kind of followed the Apple OS X color scheme and that’s not really fair to you Windows and Linux people, so here you go.\n\nBut my problem is that this is me. Not that I still have my graduation cap on...that’s just because I’m young. That’s me and I want to help all of you. I really want to have a relationship with every developer on the Marketplace. If my goal is to help you sell more add-ons and fine tune your message, I want to have some knowledge about each one of your products. I’ve been in email contact with many of you, and I’ve gotten to meet a bunch of you yesterday and today, and hopefully even more tonight and tomorrow. I’m putting myself out there as available for you and there’s never been a better time to pick my brain or get some feedback or get on my calendar. \n\nBut there are a lot of you and only one of me and I don’t want to end up like this. (click) So...(click)\n
  • But I have a problem. This is you. No wait actually there are quite a lot of you. When I made this slide I felt like the blue and silver people kind of followed the Apple OS X color scheme and that’s not really fair to you Windows and Linux people, so here you go.\n\nBut my problem is that this is me. Not that I still have my graduation cap on...that’s just because I’m young. That’s me and I want to help all of you. I really want to have a relationship with every developer on the Marketplace. If my goal is to help you sell more add-ons and fine tune your message, I want to have some knowledge about each one of your products. I’ve been in email contact with many of you, and I’ve gotten to meet a bunch of you yesterday and today, and hopefully even more tonight and tomorrow. I’m putting myself out there as available for you and there’s never been a better time to pick my brain or get some feedback or get on my calendar. \n\nBut there are a lot of you and only one of me and I don’t want to end up like this. (click) So...(click)\n
  • But I have a problem. This is you. No wait actually there are quite a lot of you. When I made this slide I felt like the blue and silver people kind of followed the Apple OS X color scheme and that’s not really fair to you Windows and Linux people, so here you go.\n\nBut my problem is that this is me. Not that I still have my graduation cap on...that’s just because I’m young. That’s me and I want to help all of you. I really want to have a relationship with every developer on the Marketplace. If my goal is to help you sell more add-ons and fine tune your message, I want to have some knowledge about each one of your products. I’ve been in email contact with many of you, and I’ve gotten to meet a bunch of you yesterday and today, and hopefully even more tonight and tomorrow. I’m putting myself out there as available for you and there’s never been a better time to pick my brain or get some feedback or get on my calendar. \n\nBut there are a lot of you and only one of me and I don’t want to end up like this. (click) So...(click)\n
  • But I have a problem. This is you. No wait actually there are quite a lot of you. When I made this slide I felt like the blue and silver people kind of followed the Apple OS X color scheme and that’s not really fair to you Windows and Linux people, so here you go.\n\nBut my problem is that this is me. Not that I still have my graduation cap on...that’s just because I’m young. That’s me and I want to help all of you. I really want to have a relationship with every developer on the Marketplace. If my goal is to help you sell more add-ons and fine tune your message, I want to have some knowledge about each one of your products. I’ve been in email contact with many of you, and I’ve gotten to meet a bunch of you yesterday and today, and hopefully even more tonight and tomorrow. I’m putting myself out there as available for you and there’s never been a better time to pick my brain or get some feedback or get on my calendar. \n\nBut there are a lot of you and only one of me and I don’t want to end up like this. (click) So...(click)\n
  • But I have a problem. This is you. No wait actually there are quite a lot of you. When I made this slide I felt like the blue and silver people kind of followed the Apple OS X color scheme and that’s not really fair to you Windows and Linux people, so here you go.\n\nBut my problem is that this is me. Not that I still have my graduation cap on...that’s just because I’m young. That’s me and I want to help all of you. I really want to have a relationship with every developer on the Marketplace. If my goal is to help you sell more add-ons and fine tune your message, I want to have some knowledge about each one of your products. I’ve been in email contact with many of you, and I’ve gotten to meet a bunch of you yesterday and today, and hopefully even more tonight and tomorrow. I’m putting myself out there as available for you and there’s never been a better time to pick my brain or get some feedback or get on my calendar. \n\nBut there are a lot of you and only one of me and I don’t want to end up like this. (click) So...(click)\n
  • Help me, help you.\n\nSorry, couldn’t resist. But seriously, this talk is all about going over the information, tools, and suggestions that I think can apply to everyone in this room. At Atlassian, we like to think of marketing as a tool. It’s a tool for you to get the most out of the time-investment you make in developing add-ons for our product. And I know that sales and marketing is a time investment too. So this talk is all about things you can do to get the most bang for your time-investment buck.\n
  • Quick overview. Today I’m going to start with data. Not a lot, but there are some numbers that I’d like to point out that you should be keeping in mind as you approach marketing your addon. It’s not like your social security where you need to memorize them exactly. They are more general figures that you should keep in the back of your mind, kind of like your wife’s birthday. \n\nThen I’m going to jump into 5 steps you can take to make your add-on a best seller in the Marketplace. Getting a lot of sales isn’t magic. It’s science. A great product + effective marketing = money in your pocket. You could spend all day building your product, or all day selling it. Neither of which would get you very far in the long run. So maximize your ROI on marketing with these 5 tips.\n\nIf we’re lucky, I’ll have time for some questions at the end.\n
  • Quick overview. Today I’m going to start with data. Not a lot, but there are some numbers that I’d like to point out that you should be keeping in mind as you approach marketing your addon. It’s not like your social security where you need to memorize them exactly. They are more general figures that you should keep in the back of your mind, kind of like your wife’s birthday. \n\nThen I’m going to jump into 5 steps you can take to make your add-on a best seller in the Marketplace. Getting a lot of sales isn’t magic. It’s science. A great product + effective marketing = money in your pocket. You could spend all day building your product, or all day selling it. Neither of which would get you very far in the long run. So maximize your ROI on marketing with these 5 tips.\n\nIf we’re lucky, I’ll have time for some questions at the end.\n
  • Quick overview. Today I’m going to start with data. Not a lot, but there are some numbers that I’d like to point out that you should be keeping in mind as you approach marketing your addon. It’s not like your social security where you need to memorize them exactly. They are more general figures that you should keep in the back of your mind, kind of like your wife’s birthday. \n\nThen I’m going to jump into 5 steps you can take to make your add-on a best seller in the Marketplace. Getting a lot of sales isn’t magic. It’s science. A great product + effective marketing = money in your pocket. You could spend all day building your product, or all day selling it. Neither of which would get you very far in the long run. So maximize your ROI on marketing with these 5 tips.\n\nIf we’re lucky, I’ll have time for some questions at the end.\n
  • First number. There are 111 add-ons in the Marketplace that are transacted through Atlassian. When we hit number 100, pretty much everyone at the company was really really excited. So Jay Simons, Atlassian’s president, suggested that we celebrate in true Atlassian fashion. By getting t shirts. And the 100th add-on was particularly special because it was written by a guy named Bob Swift. Bob is a bit of a legend in Atlassian plugin development. I’m pretty sure that he started writing plugins for Confluence when I was still in high school. And he didn’t just write one plugin. (click) He has 11 plugins for sale in the marketplace. I really liked Jean Michel’s scrolling effect earlier, so I’m going to do it with Bob’s plugins. So we want to officially present Bob with a 100 Add-ons Marketplace t shirt for his contribution. Bob, can you come up here? I want to also bring up Nick Wade, the Marketplace group manager, to present him with his shirt.\n\nI also want to announce that the NEXT marketplace t shirt will go to whoever manages to take a picture of Rick Manalang taking an Instagram photo for the AtlasCamp stream.\n
  • First number. There are 111 add-ons in the Marketplace that are transacted through Atlassian. When we hit number 100, pretty much everyone at the company was really really excited. So Jay Simons, Atlassian’s president, suggested that we celebrate in true Atlassian fashion. By getting t shirts. And the 100th add-on was particularly special because it was written by a guy named Bob Swift. Bob is a bit of a legend in Atlassian plugin development. I’m pretty sure that he started writing plugins for Confluence when I was still in high school. And he didn’t just write one plugin. (click) He has 11 plugins for sale in the marketplace. I really liked Jean Michel’s scrolling effect earlier, so I’m going to do it with Bob’s plugins. So we want to officially present Bob with a 100 Add-ons Marketplace t shirt for his contribution. Bob, can you come up here? I want to also bring up Nick Wade, the Marketplace group manager, to present him with his shirt.\n\nI also want to announce that the NEXT marketplace t shirt will go to whoever manages to take a picture of Rick Manalang taking an Instagram photo for the AtlasCamp stream.\n
  • First number. There are 111 add-ons in the Marketplace that are transacted through Atlassian. When we hit number 100, pretty much everyone at the company was really really excited. So Jay Simons, Atlassian’s president, suggested that we celebrate in true Atlassian fashion. By getting t shirts. And the 100th add-on was particularly special because it was written by a guy named Bob Swift. Bob is a bit of a legend in Atlassian plugin development. I’m pretty sure that he started writing plugins for Confluence when I was still in high school. And he didn’t just write one plugin. (click) He has 11 plugins for sale in the marketplace. I really liked Jean Michel’s scrolling effect earlier, so I’m going to do it with Bob’s plugins. So we want to officially present Bob with a 100 Add-ons Marketplace t shirt for his contribution. Bob, can you come up here? I want to also bring up Nick Wade, the Marketplace group manager, to present him with his shirt.\n\nI also want to announce that the NEXT marketplace t shirt will go to whoever manages to take a picture of Rick Manalang taking an Instagram photo for the AtlasCamp stream.\n
  • First number. There are 111 add-ons in the Marketplace that are transacted through Atlassian. When we hit number 100, pretty much everyone at the company was really really excited. So Jay Simons, Atlassian’s president, suggested that we celebrate in true Atlassian fashion. By getting t shirts. And the 100th add-on was particularly special because it was written by a guy named Bob Swift. Bob is a bit of a legend in Atlassian plugin development. I’m pretty sure that he started writing plugins for Confluence when I was still in high school. And he didn’t just write one plugin. (click) He has 11 plugins for sale in the marketplace. I really liked Jean Michel’s scrolling effect earlier, so I’m going to do it with Bob’s plugins. So we want to officially present Bob with a 100 Add-ons Marketplace t shirt for his contribution. Bob, can you come up here? I want to also bring up Nick Wade, the Marketplace group manager, to present him with his shirt.\n\nI also want to announce that the NEXT marketplace t shirt will go to whoever manages to take a picture of Rick Manalang taking an Instagram photo for the AtlasCamp stream.\n
  • This is a breakdown of the sales channels that add-on purchases come through in terms of total units sold. As you can see, more than 3/4ths of all add-on purchases come through either the Marketplace or UPM, meaning that this is where you need to be concentrating the majority of your marketing efforts. This means you should really focus your marketing strategy on your add-ons Marketplace profile, your banner, screenshots, and so on. For most purchases, this is the information they are using to make their purchasing decision.\n
  • Notice that an even greater share of gross sales come through the marketplace. This means that customers that are making big purchasing decisions with a lot of money are using the extra information included in the Marketplace profile before they click the buy button. That means your profile needs to look the best it can, especially if you want to target large enterprise customers.\n
  • These version distribution charts for JIRA and Confluence on the next slide will hopefully give you an idea where our customer base lies and where you should focus the majority of your development and support efforst. These data represent every customer with a Marketplace-enabled UPM, which is about 75% of our install base. So you can see that JIRA customers are mostly on the two most recent versions of JIRA. \n\n
  • Confluence customers on the hand are a little more distributed. Most of them, however, are at least running Confluence 4 or higher. Notice that a decent number are already running 4.3, which was released a couple weeks ago. This underscores my point that you really need to make sure that you update your plugins to be compatible with the latest versions of parent product releases.\n\nAlright. So before I go on to the next slide, raise your hand if you’ve developed plugins for JIRA. Confluence? FishEye? Crucible? Stash? Crowd? Angry Nerds?\n
  • This is the distribution of all add-ons sold (not for sale, but actually sold) in the Marketplace by parent product. There are dozens of Atlassians in the room who would love to help you you develop plugins for Stash, Bamboo, FishEye, Crucible, and more. And thousands of customers who are just looking for the right plugin to buy.\n
  • This is how JIRA add-on sales break down by license tier. So for JIRA that vast majority of sales are starter licenses, with a decent amount of smaller tier sales and far fewer at the larger tiers.\n
  • When you switch to gross sales, rather than units, the graph skews a little differently. You see the bulk of dollars coming in the medium sized licenses and much greater shares for the large enterprise licenses. \n
  • For Confluence, it’s a slightly different story. You still have a lot of Starter licenses sold, but it’s not as heavily weighted, and you see a lot of sales coming in at the 500 user level.\n
  • For gross sales, it’s even more clear that Confluence add-ons do particularly well with larger deployments, with most of the money coming in at the 500, 2000, and 2000+ user tiers. It’ll be interesting to see how these numbers change when the Confluence pricing changes take effect on November 3. We expect that breaking up the larger deployments into more license tiers will allow you to target larger deployments more effectively and bring in more revenue.\n
  • Finally, this is the weekly average sale price. For the last couple months, it’s hovered right around $450 across all add-ons for all products at all tiers. Obviously this varies for individual products, but it’s a good estimate for how much each sale on the marketplace is worth.\n
  • So that’s the numbers part of my presentation. The next section deals with tips for selling your add-on. You don’t need a sexy salesman like that guy. Or me.\n\nSince I feel like I’m almost certainly old enough to give all of you advice on relationships, think about your marketing and sales in terms of wooing someone and convincing them to begin a relationship with you. First you need to make a great first impression. You want them to like you right off the bat. Then they need to know you’re available, within their reach. Third, welcome them in. Show them what your plugin has to offer. At this point they’ve gone from checking out your add-on to evaluating it, so you need to take that evaluator and seal the deal. You also want to stay in touch and follow through to really make sure they’re convinced. Finally, show them you’re invested in the relatinoship for the long haul. Large enterprise customers are looking to make sure you’ll be around in 1 year, 2 years, 5 years, 10 years. Professional-looking sales and marketing shows that you will be and makes your development all the more worthwhile.\n
  • So that’s the numbers part of my presentation. The next section deals with tips for selling your add-on. You don’t need a sexy salesman like that guy. Or me.\n\nSince I feel like I’m almost certainly old enough to give all of you advice on relationships, think about your marketing and sales in terms of wooing someone and convincing them to begin a relationship with you. First you need to make a great first impression. You want them to like you right off the bat. Then they need to know you’re available, within their reach. Third, welcome them in. Show them what your plugin has to offer. At this point they’ve gone from checking out your add-on to evaluating it, so you need to take that evaluator and seal the deal. You also want to stay in touch and follow through to really make sure they’re convinced. Finally, show them you’re invested in the relatinoship for the long haul. Large enterprise customers are looking to make sure you’ll be around in 1 year, 2 years, 5 years, 10 years. Professional-looking sales and marketing shows that you will be and makes your development all the more worthwhile.\n
  • So that’s the numbers part of my presentation. The next section deals with tips for selling your add-on. You don’t need a sexy salesman like that guy. Or me.\n\nSince I feel like I’m almost certainly old enough to give all of you advice on relationships, think about your marketing and sales in terms of wooing someone and convincing them to begin a relationship with you. First you need to make a great first impression. You want them to like you right off the bat. Then they need to know you’re available, within their reach. Third, welcome them in. Show them what your plugin has to offer. At this point they’ve gone from checking out your add-on to evaluating it, so you need to take that evaluator and seal the deal. You also want to stay in touch and follow through to really make sure they’re convinced. Finally, show them you’re invested in the relatinoship for the long haul. Large enterprise customers are looking to make sure you’ll be around in 1 year, 2 years, 5 years, 10 years. Professional-looking sales and marketing shows that you will be and makes your development all the more worthwhile.\n
  • So that’s the numbers part of my presentation. The next section deals with tips for selling your add-on. You don’t need a sexy salesman like that guy. Or me.\n\nSince I feel like I’m almost certainly old enough to give all of you advice on relationships, think about your marketing and sales in terms of wooing someone and convincing them to begin a relationship with you. First you need to make a great first impression. You want them to like you right off the bat. Then they need to know you’re available, within their reach. Third, welcome them in. Show them what your plugin has to offer. At this point they’ve gone from checking out your add-on to evaluating it, so you need to take that evaluator and seal the deal. You also want to stay in touch and follow through to really make sure they’re convinced. Finally, show them you’re invested in the relatinoship for the long haul. Large enterprise customers are looking to make sure you’ll be around in 1 year, 2 years, 5 years, 10 years. Professional-looking sales and marketing shows that you will be and makes your development all the more worthwhile.\n
  • So that’s the numbers part of my presentation. The next section deals with tips for selling your add-on. You don’t need a sexy salesman like that guy. Or me.\n\nSince I feel like I’m almost certainly old enough to give all of you advice on relationships, think about your marketing and sales in terms of wooing someone and convincing them to begin a relationship with you. First you need to make a great first impression. You want them to like you right off the bat. Then they need to know you’re available, within their reach. Third, welcome them in. Show them what your plugin has to offer. At this point they’ve gone from checking out your add-on to evaluating it, so you need to take that evaluator and seal the deal. You also want to stay in touch and follow through to really make sure they’re convinced. Finally, show them you’re invested in the relatinoship for the long haul. Large enterprise customers are looking to make sure you’ll be around in 1 year, 2 years, 5 years, 10 years. Professional-looking sales and marketing shows that you will be and makes your development all the more worthwhile.\n
  • So that’s the numbers part of my presentation. The next section deals with tips for selling your add-on. You don’t need a sexy salesman like that guy. Or me.\n\nSince I feel like I’m almost certainly old enough to give all of you advice on relationships, think about your marketing and sales in terms of wooing someone and convincing them to begin a relationship with you. First you need to make a great first impression. You want them to like you right off the bat. Then they need to know you’re available, within their reach. Third, welcome them in. Show them what your plugin has to offer. At this point they’ve gone from checking out your add-on to evaluating it, so you need to take that evaluator and seal the deal. You also want to stay in touch and follow through to really make sure they’re convinced. Finally, show them you’re invested in the relatinoship for the long haul. Large enterprise customers are looking to make sure you’ll be around in 1 year, 2 years, 5 years, 10 years. Professional-looking sales and marketing shows that you will be and makes your development all the more worthwhile.\n
  • Everyone knows first impressions are everything. It’s important to make a good first impression with your banner and screenshot. They’re the largest visual element in your Marketplace profile. The best banners and screenshots look professional-invest the time and effort to show customers that this isn’t a side project that they can’t rely on, it’s a real product that you’re committed to building, selling, and supporting.\n\nThis is the profile page for Behave for JIRA, which was our Best Marketplace-paid Add-on winner in the Codegeist 2012 plugin development competition. Congrats to Alan Parkinson and Jack Bastow, who I believe are here. I want to take you through some of the things I think they do really well. First, they have a great looking, professional banner. It has a nicely designed logo, a few screenshots, and a couple short bullets on key product features. You don’t have to blow anyone away with your design, but I suggest you try to avoid being eye-catchingly ugly.\n\nNext, they use a video. Videos are a great way to demonstrate how your plugin functions dynamically. (keep talking)\n\nFinally, their screenshots clearly demonstrate core product features. This is really critical for them to be effective. A lot of the screenshots we see don’t really show off the product. Screenshots really are worth 1,000 words about your plugin. Great screenshots show the plugin in action and don’t need explanation.\n\n
  • Everyone knows first impressions are everything. It’s important to make a good first impression with your banner and screenshot. They’re the largest visual element in your Marketplace profile. The best banners and screenshots look professional-invest the time and effort to show customers that this isn’t a side project that they can’t rely on, it’s a real product that you’re committed to building, selling, and supporting.\n\nThis is the profile page for Behave for JIRA, which was our Best Marketplace-paid Add-on winner in the Codegeist 2012 plugin development competition. Congrats to Alan Parkinson and Jack Bastow, who I believe are here. I want to take you through some of the things I think they do really well. First, they have a great looking, professional banner. It has a nicely designed logo, a few screenshots, and a couple short bullets on key product features. You don’t have to blow anyone away with your design, but I suggest you try to avoid being eye-catchingly ugly.\n\nNext, they use a video. Videos are a great way to demonstrate how your plugin functions dynamically. (keep talking)\n\nFinally, their screenshots clearly demonstrate core product features. This is really critical for them to be effective. A lot of the screenshots we see don’t really show off the product. Screenshots really are worth 1,000 words about your plugin. Great screenshots show the plugin in action and don’t need explanation.\n\n
  • Everyone knows first impressions are everything. It’s important to make a good first impression with your banner and screenshot. They’re the largest visual element in your Marketplace profile. The best banners and screenshots look professional-invest the time and effort to show customers that this isn’t a side project that they can’t rely on, it’s a real product that you’re committed to building, selling, and supporting.\n\nThis is the profile page for Behave for JIRA, which was our Best Marketplace-paid Add-on winner in the Codegeist 2012 plugin development competition. Congrats to Alan Parkinson and Jack Bastow, who I believe are here. I want to take you through some of the things I think they do really well. First, they have a great looking, professional banner. It has a nicely designed logo, a few screenshots, and a couple short bullets on key product features. You don’t have to blow anyone away with your design, but I suggest you try to avoid being eye-catchingly ugly.\n\nNext, they use a video. Videos are a great way to demonstrate how your plugin functions dynamically. (keep talking)\n\nFinally, their screenshots clearly demonstrate core product features. This is really critical for them to be effective. A lot of the screenshots we see don’t really show off the product. Screenshots really are worth 1,000 words about your plugin. Great screenshots show the plugin in action and don’t need explanation.\n\n
  • Everyone knows first impressions are everything. It’s important to make a good first impression with your banner and screenshot. They’re the largest visual element in your Marketplace profile. The best banners and screenshots look professional-invest the time and effort to show customers that this isn’t a side project that they can’t rely on, it’s a real product that you’re committed to building, selling, and supporting.\n\nThis is the profile page for Behave for JIRA, which was our Best Marketplace-paid Add-on winner in the Codegeist 2012 plugin development competition. Congrats to Alan Parkinson and Jack Bastow, who I believe are here. I want to take you through some of the things I think they do really well. First, they have a great looking, professional banner. It has a nicely designed logo, a few screenshots, and a couple short bullets on key product features. You don’t have to blow anyone away with your design, but I suggest you try to avoid being eye-catchingly ugly.\n\nNext, they use a video. Videos are a great way to demonstrate how your plugin functions dynamically. (keep talking)\n\nFinally, their screenshots clearly demonstrate core product features. This is really critical for them to be effective. A lot of the screenshots we see don’t really show off the product. Screenshots really are worth 1,000 words about your plugin. Great screenshots show the plugin in action and don’t need explanation.\n\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Below your banner and screenshots is your product overview and pricing. Behave for JIRA has concise feature descriptions. They focus on the features that they believe add the most value to their customers, rather than trying to list every detail about the product.\n\nIncluding a few sentences of product overview is your opportunity to be the marketer. In plain English, you can explain what the plugin does and why it makes JIRA or Confluence or a dev tool even more valuable to a potential customer.\nFinally, Behave for JIRA’s pricing is simple. I’ll talk about pricing more in a second, but just notice that there’s no eyepopping large numbers and that prices, at first glance, seem to flow smoothly from one tier to the next.\n\n(what the page doesn’t have...you know this!)\n
  • Beautiful marketing looks professional. This means that you need to really need to focus on design when it comes to everything about your plugin. Sam Thebridge came up before me and talked about how to improve the design of your plugin. Take those principles, perspective, and initiative and apply that to every part of the process. Trust me, the payoff is worth it if you invest time in making your marketing material as good as your code.\n
  • Beautiful marketing looks professional. This means that you need to really need to focus on design when it comes to everything about your plugin. Sam Thebridge came up before me and talked about how to improve the design of your plugin. Take those principles, perspective, and initiative and apply that to every part of the process. Trust me, the payoff is worth it if you invest time in making your marketing material as good as your code.\n
  • Beautiful marketing looks professional. This means that you need to really need to focus on design when it comes to everything about your plugin. Sam Thebridge came up before me and talked about how to improve the design of your plugin. Take those principles, perspective, and initiative and apply that to every part of the process. Trust me, the payoff is worth it if you invest time in making your marketing material as good as your code.\n
  • Beautiful marketing looks professional. This means that you need to really need to focus on design when it comes to everything about your plugin. Sam Thebridge came up before me and talked about how to improve the design of your plugin. Take those principles, perspective, and initiative and apply that to every part of the process. Trust me, the payoff is worth it if you invest time in making your marketing material as good as your code.\n
  • Beautiful marketing looks professional. This means that you need to really need to focus on design when it comes to everything about your plugin. Sam Thebridge came up before me and talked about how to improve the design of your plugin. Take those principles, perspective, and initiative and apply that to every part of the process. Trust me, the payoff is worth it if you invest time in making your marketing material as good as your code.\n
  • Pricing your add-on is all about showing you’re available. I want to talk about how to price your add-on for a few minutes. The key thing to remember about pricing is that it’s unique for each addon. Anything that I say here is a general guideline and the whole way to correctly price your add-on is to think about what makes sense for your individual product. I’m going to run through a few numbers really quickly and then offer some more general tips. So here is the average price, by license tier, for top selling JIRA addons. So this is an average of the prices for the top 15 JIRA add-ons by units sold, so it’s not weighted by the actual prices, but instead is the total number of sales across all editions. As you can see, they stick with the $10 for 10 users starter license price and then follow abour $10 per user from there for small and medium size companies. For larger enterprise deployments, you’re looking at a few thousand dollars.\n
  • Confluence is pretty much the same story although it’s priced slightly higher per user. Just remember that these are general averages and you definitely shouldn’t be rushing to change your pricing based on these ballpark numbers.\n
  • So let me jump into some general pricing tips. The first rule is that there are no rules. There are only tips. Every add-on is unique and should be priced uniquely based on a wide variety of factors and feedback.\n\nThe most important thing to do is listen to your customers. If you have a customer who says they would pay $500 for your add-on .... etc\n\nAnother way to approach pricing your product is to consider it in the context of the parent product. For example, imagine your building a Confluence add-on. Think about how much value Confluence offers a customer. Then think about how much value your plugin adds as a proportion of Confluence. For example, if you think your plugin makes Confluence 50% more valuable, then consider pricing your add-on at half the price of Confluence.\n\nYou know the rest...\n
  • So let me jump into some general pricing tips. The first rule is that there are no rules. There are only tips. Every add-on is unique and should be priced uniquely based on a wide variety of factors and feedback.\n\nThe most important thing to do is listen to your customers. If you have a customer who says they would pay $500 for your add-on .... etc\n\nAnother way to approach pricing your product is to consider it in the context of the parent product. For example, imagine your building a Confluence add-on. Think about how much value Confluence offers a customer. Then think about how much value your plugin adds as a proportion of Confluence. For example, if you think your plugin makes Confluence 50% more valuable, then consider pricing your add-on at half the price of Confluence.\n\nYou know the rest...\n
  • So let me jump into some general pricing tips. The first rule is that there are no rules. There are only tips. Every add-on is unique and should be priced uniquely based on a wide variety of factors and feedback.\n\nThe most important thing to do is listen to your customers. If you have a customer who says they would pay $500 for your add-on .... etc\n\nAnother way to approach pricing your product is to consider it in the context of the parent product. For example, imagine your building a Confluence add-on. Think about how much value Confluence offers a customer. Then think about how much value your plugin adds as a proportion of Confluence. For example, if you think your plugin makes Confluence 50% more valuable, then consider pricing your add-on at half the price of Confluence.\n\nYou know the rest...\n
  • So let me jump into some general pricing tips. The first rule is that there are no rules. There are only tips. Every add-on is unique and should be priced uniquely based on a wide variety of factors and feedback.\n\nThe most important thing to do is listen to your customers. If you have a customer who says they would pay $500 for your add-on .... etc\n\nAnother way to approach pricing your product is to consider it in the context of the parent product. For example, imagine your building a Confluence add-on. Think about how much value Confluence offers a customer. Then think about how much value your plugin adds as a proportion of Confluence. For example, if you think your plugin makes Confluence 50% more valuable, then consider pricing your add-on at half the price of Confluence.\n\nYou know the rest...\n
  • So let me jump into some general pricing tips. The first rule is that there are no rules. There are only tips. Every add-on is unique and should be priced uniquely based on a wide variety of factors and feedback.\n\nThe most important thing to do is listen to your customers. If you have a customer who says they would pay $500 for your add-on .... etc\n\nAnother way to approach pricing your product is to consider it in the context of the parent product. For example, imagine your building a Confluence add-on. Think about how much value Confluence offers a customer. Then think about how much value your plugin adds as a proportion of Confluence. For example, if you think your plugin makes Confluence 50% more valuable, then consider pricing your add-on at half the price of Confluence.\n\nYou know the rest...\n
  • Putting out a welcome mat is all about the initial evaluator experience. At this point, a customer has looked at your marketing material and made the decision to try out your plugin. You need to make sure that the evaluation goes fantastic. That’s how you convert evaluators into customers. How do you achieve fantastic evaluation experiences? You get everyone on board using your product. You guys are all great developers writing great code. So help evaluators start using your plugin and let it sell itself.\n\nThe best way to do this is to have a getting started page for your add-on. It does a number of key things. First, it helps get administrators from installing the plugin to configuring it. Imagine you’re an administrator and you’ve just installed your plugin. You’re left looking at the UPM and asking yourself “Now What”. The getting started page answers that question.\n
  • I’m going to use Tempo here as an example of a getting started page. They started by using a post-install hook to direct users to the page. Looking at the page itself, here are some things to note.\n\nThings to note:\n-in product (no context switching)\n-simple layout\n-includes directions for configuration\n-share emphasizes getting an organization on board\n-quick access to resources\n\nAnnounce that we’re going to have a template available for people to fill out in their .xml\n\n
  • I’m going to use Tempo here as an example of a getting started page. They started by using a post-install hook to direct users to the page. Looking at the page itself, here are some things to note.\n\nThings to note:\n-in product (no context switching)\n-simple layout\n-includes directions for configuration\n-share emphasizes getting an organization on board\n-quick access to resources\n\nAnnounce that we’re going to have a template available for people to fill out in their .xml\n\n
  • I’m going to use Tempo here as an example of a getting started page. They started by using a post-install hook to direct users to the page. Looking at the page itself, here are some things to note.\n\nThings to note:\n-in product (no context switching)\n-simple layout\n-includes directions for configuration\n-share emphasizes getting an organization on board\n-quick access to resources\n\nAnnounce that we’re going to have a template available for people to fill out in their .xml\n\n
  • Sticking the landing is all about the next step in the evaluation process. If you take away one thing from my talk, remember that the best way to convert an evaluator to a customer is to get the entire team on board using your plugin. There are a number of actions you can take to increase the likelihood that this happens. This means take advantage of our post-install and post-upgrade hooks, have great documentation, and include contextual help.\n
  • Sticking the landing is all about the next step in the evaluation process. If you take away one thing from my talk, remember that the best way to convert an evaluator to a customer is to get the entire team on board using your plugin. There are a number of actions you can take to increase the likelihood that this happens. This means take advantage of our post-install and post-upgrade hooks, have great documentation, and include contextual help.\n
  • Use post install actions to redirect users to the getting started page you created, or to configuring your add-on, or documentation. Essentially, help bridge the gap and answer the now-what question even faster. It’s also a great way to get release notes in the hands of customers after they upgrade.\n
  • Take a look at Zen’s documentation here. They do a great job having highly visual, clear documentation. They allow you to jump right to the part of the documentation that’s most relevant to you. That means having separate sections for Installation, Configuration for administrators, and usage for users. This applies to most every plugin out there. They do a great job using their own plugin for Confluence to make their documentation look fantastic. It has a clear visual layout, it’s well organized, includes lots of pictures and has simple steps.\n
  • Take a look at Zen’s documentation here. They do a great job having highly visual, clear documentation. They allow you to jump right to the part of the documentation that’s most relevant to you. That means having separate sections for Installation, Configuration for administrators, and usage for users. This applies to most every plugin out there. They do a great job using their own plugin for Confluence to make their documentation look fantastic. It has a clear visual layout, it’s well organized, includes lots of pictures and has simple steps.\n
  • Take a look at Zen’s documentation here. They do a great job having highly visual, clear documentation. They allow you to jump right to the part of the documentation that’s most relevant to you. That means having separate sections for Installation, Configuration for administrators, and usage for users. This applies to most every plugin out there. They do a great job using their own plugin for Confluence to make their documentation look fantastic. It has a clear visual layout, it’s well organized, includes lots of pictures and has simple steps.\n
  • Take a look at Zen’s documentation here. They do a great job having highly visual, clear documentation. They allow you to jump right to the part of the documentation that’s most relevant to you. That means having separate sections for Installation, Configuration for administrators, and usage for users. This applies to most every plugin out there. They do a great job using their own plugin for Confluence to make their documentation look fantastic. It has a clear visual layout, it’s well organized, includes lots of pictures and has simple steps.\n
  • Tempo includes an awesome contextual “Evaluation Support” footer on each of its plugin pages. The footer has links to their support, documetnation, contact, and pricing. It’s also a great way to remind evaluators that they’re using an evaluation version of your plugin. If I’m evaluating your plugin and I’m having a really great experience, then I’ll be more inclined to buy when I’m reminded that I’m using an evaluation version.\n
  • Nurture\n-add screenshots with new versions, show off new features\n-iterate on description and text elements\n\nUp to date\n-check compatibility with new versions of JIRA and Confluence\n
  • Nurture\n-add screenshots with new versions, show off new features\n-iterate on description and text elements\n\nUp to date\n-check compatibility with new versions of JIRA and Confluence\n
  • Nurture\n-add screenshots with new versions, show off new features\n-iterate on description and text elements\n\nUp to date\n-check compatibility with new versions of JIRA and Confluence\n
  • If none of my tips sound feasible, let me offer one last alternative marketing strategy. Be Don Draper.\n
  • If none of my tips sound feasible, let me offer one last alternative marketing strategy. Be Don Draper.\n
  • \n

Sell, Sell, Sell, AtlasCamp US 2012 Sell, Sell, Sell, AtlasCamp US 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • Sell, sell, sell!Making an impression in theDave Meyer @d_meyer 1
  • Making an impression in theDave Meyer @d_meyer 1
  • This is meDave Meyer @d_meyer 2
  • This is meYou want to sell your add-on. Dave Meyer @d_meyer 2
  • This is meYou want to sell your add-on. I want to help you. Dave Meyer @d_meyer 2
  • This is meI want to help you. • Blog posts • Email newsletter • Case studies • Webinars • Press releasesDave Meyer @d_meyer 2
  • This is meI want to help you. • Blog posts • Email newsletter • Case studies • Webinars • Press releasesDave Meyer @d_meyer 2
  • This is meI want to help you. • Blog posts • Email newsletter • Case studies • Webinars • Press releasesDave Meyer @d_meyer 2
  • This is meI want to help you. • Blog posts • Email newsletter • Case studies • Webinars • Press releasesDave Meyer @d_meyer 2
  • This is meI want to help you. • Blog posts • Email newsletter • Case studies • Webinars • Press releasesDave Meyer @d_meyer 2
  • This is meI want to help you. • Blog posts • Email newsletter • Case studies • Webinars • Press releasesDave Meyer @d_meyer 2
  • This is meI want to help you. • Blog posts • Email newsletter • Case studies • Webinars • Press releasesDave Meyer @d_meyer 2
  • blem roThe P This is you Dave Meyer @d_meyer 3
  • blem roThe P This is you Dave Meyer @d_meyer 3
  • blem roThe P This is you Dave Meyer @d_meyer 3
  • blem roThe P This is you Dave Meyer @d_meyer 3
  • blem roThe P This is you Dave Meyer @d_meyer 3
  • blem roThe P This is you Dave Meyer @d_meyer 3
  • Dave Meyer @d_meyer 4
  • OverviewDave Meyer @d_meyer 5
  • Overview1. Useful DataDave Meyer @d_meyer 5
  • Overview1. Useful Data2. 5 steps to a best-selling add-onDave Meyer @d_meyer 5
  • Overview1. Useful Data2. 5 steps to a best-selling add-on3. Q&ADave Meyer @d_meyer 5
  • Update 111 Total Add-onsDave Meyer @d_meyer 6
  • Update 11 by Bob SwiftDave Meyer @d_meyer 6
  • Update 11 by Bob SwiftDave Meyer @d_meyer 6
  • Update Other 17% Marketplace 44% Universal Plugin Manager 39% Sales channels by units soldDave Meyer @d_meyer 7
  • Update Other 23% Marketplace 52% Universal Plugin Manager 25% Sales channels by gross salesDave Meyer @d_meyer 8
  • Update <= 4.3 4.4 5.1 5.0 JIRA version distribution (Marketplace-enabled UPM)Dave Meyer @d_meyer 9
  • Update 4.3 <= 3.5 4.0 4.2 4.1 Confluence version distribution (Marketplace-enabled UPM)Dave Meyer @d_meyer 10
  • Update JIRA 67.5% Confluence 32.3% Cross-product 0.3% Distribution of Add-ons Sold by ProductDave Meyer @d_meyer 11
  • Update Starter 25 Users 50 Users 100 Users Units Sold 500 Users 500 Users E 2000 Users E 10,000 Users E 10,000+ Users E Distribution of Add-ons Sold by License Tier - JIRADave Meyer @d_meyer 12
  • Update Starter 25 Users 50 Users 100 Users Gross Sales 500 Users 500 Users E 2000 Users E 10,000 Users E 10,000+ Users E Distribution of Gross Sales by License Tier - JIRADave Meyer @d_meyer 13
  • Update Starter 25 Users 50 Users Units Sold 100 Users 500 Users 2000 Users 2000+ Users Distribution of Add-ons Sold by License Tier - ConfluenceDave Meyer @d_meyer 14
  • Update Starter 25 Users 50 Users Gross Sales 100 Users 500 Users 2000 Users 2000+ Users Distribution of Gross Sales by License Tier - ConfluenceDave Meyer @d_meyer 15
  • Update $450 Weekly Average Sale PriceDave Meyer @d_meyer 16
  • 5 Tips for Selling Your Add-on(without a sexy salesman)Dave Meyer @d_meyer 17
  • 5 Tips for Selling Your Add-on(without a sexy salesman)1. Make a great first impressionDave Meyer @d_meyer 17
  • 5 Tips for Selling Your Add-on(without a sexy salesman)1. Make a great first impression2. Show them you’re availableDave Meyer @d_meyer 17
  • 5 Tips for Selling Your Add-on(without a sexy salesman)1. Make a great first impression2. Show them you’re available3. Put out a welcome matDave Meyer @d_meyer 17
  • 5 Tips for Selling Your Add-on(without a sexy salesman)1. Make a great first impression2. Show them you’re available3. Put out a welcome mat4. Stay in touchDave Meyer @d_meyer 17
  • 5 Tips for Selling Your Add-on(without a sexy salesman)1. Make a great first impression2. Show them you’re available3. Put out a welcome mat4. Stay in touch5. Be in for the long haulDave Meyer @d_meyer 17
  • 1. First impressions attractive & highlights key featuresDave Meyer @d_meyer 18
  • 1. First impressions includes a videoDave Meyer @d_meyer 18
  • 1. First impressions screenshots clearly demonstrate core featuresDave Meyer @d_meyer 18
  • Dave Meyer @d_meyer 19
  • concise feature descriptions Dave Meyer @d_meyer 19
  • brief product overviewconcise feature descriptions Dave Meyer @d_meyer 19
  • brief product overview simple pricingconcise feature descriptions Dave Meyer @d_meyer 19
  • What this page doesn’t have• excessively long feature list• usage instructions• news/version historiesDave Meyer @d_meyer 19
  • What this page doesn’t have• excessively long feature list• usage instructions• news/version histories• a pirate ninja unicornDave Meyer @d_meyer 19
  • Avoid bad designDave Meyer @d_meyer 20
  • Avoid bad design Beautiful = professionalDave Meyer @d_meyer 20
  • Avoid bad design Beautiful = professional BannersDave Meyer @d_meyer 20
  • Avoid bad design Beautiful = professional Banners ScreenshotsDave Meyer @d_meyer 20
  • Avoid bad design Beautiful = professional Banners Screenshots Plugin designDave Meyer @d_meyer 20
  • 2. Pricing your add-on update these numbers day Average(ish) Price of a Top Selling JIRA Add-on before 10 Users $10 25 Users $300 50 Users $550 100 Users $1000 500 Users $2000 500 Users Enterprise $2200 2000 Users Enterprise $2900 10,000 Users Enterprise $3400 10,000+ Users Enterprise $3800 100+ Users Legacy $3000Dave Meyer @d_meyer 21
  • Pricing your add-on update these numbers day Average(ish) Price of a Top Selling Confluence Add-on before 10 Users $10 25 Users $250 50 Users $480 100 Users $700 500 Users $1300 500 Users Enterprise $1300 2000 Users Enterprise $2500 10,000 Users Enterprise $3700 10,000+ Users Enterprise $3700 2000 Users Legacy $2500 2000+ Users Legacy $3600Dave Meyer @d_meyer 22
  • Pricing tipsDave Meyer @d_meyer 23
  • Pricing tips• No hard and fast ruleDave Meyer @d_meyer 23
  • Pricing tips• No hard and fast rule• Listen to your customersDave Meyer @d_meyer 23
  • Pricing tips• No hard and fast rule• Listen to your customers• Context of the parent productDave Meyer @d_meyer 23
  • Pricing tips• No hard and fast rule• Listen to your customers• Context of the parent product• Benchmark with other add-onsDave Meyer @d_meyer 23
  • Pricing tips• No hard and fast rule• Listen to your customers• Context of the parent product• Benchmark with other add-ons• IterateDave Meyer @d_meyer 23
  • 3. Put out a welcome mat• Solve the “now what?” question• Remind evaluators about features• Quickly orient new users• Help evaluators find resourcesDave Meyer @d_meyer 24
  • Dave Meyer @d_meyer 25
  • Dave Meyer @d_meyer 25
  • Dave Meyer @d_meyer 25
  • 4. Stick the landingDave Meyer @d_meyer 26
  • 4. Stick the landing • post-install actions • documentation • contextual helpDave Meyer @d_meyer 26
  • Bridge the gapDave Meyer @d_meyer 27
  • Bridge the gapDave Meyer @d_meyer 27
  • Make your docs beautifulDave Meyer @d_meyer 28
  • Dave Meyer @d_meyer 28
  • Dave Meyer @d_meyer 28
  • Dave Meyer @d_meyer 28
  • Add contextual helpDave Meyer @d_meyer 29
  • 5. The long haulDave Meyer @d_meyer 30
  • 5. The long haul • Nurture your Marketplace profileDave Meyer @d_meyer 30
  • 5. The long haul • Nurture your Marketplace profile • Keep your add-on up to dateDave Meyer @d_meyer 30
  • 5. The long haul • Nurture your Marketplace profile • Keep your add-on up to date • Respond to commentersDave Meyer @d_meyer 30
  • @d_meyer dmeyer@atlassian.com bitbucket.org/dmeyerDave Meyer @d_meyer 31
  • @d_meyer dmeyer@atlassian.com bitbucket.org/dmeyerDave Meyer @d_meyer 31
  • @d_meyer dmeyer@atlassian.com bitbucket.org/dmeyerDave Meyer @d_meyer 31
  • Thanks!Dave Meyer @d_meyer 32