Building Effective Customer Feedback Loops, AtlasCamp US 2012
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Building Effective Customer Feedback Loops, AtlasCamp US 2012

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Sherif Mansour, Senior Product Manager ...

Sherif Mansour, Senior Product Manager

Building an add-on or extending an Atlassian product? Capturing customer feedback is essential for ensuring you're building the right thing, bringing your customers closer to you, and enabling you to get a good understanding of customer problems. This talk will walkthrough several tips for building, capturing and scaling feedback loops for plugin developers with practical examples of what we've learnt in the Confluence, Team Calendars and Integration teams at Atlassian.

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  • \n
  • But before we begin, a little about me.\n\nAs Nick said, I’m Sherif Mansour. Engineer turned product manager and since then: I’ve been the Confluence product manager for a couple of years now, most notably through it’s biggest change to date (animate drop RIP Wiki markup), I also helped launch the add-on Team Calendars for Confluence and am the current Product Manager for that as well. \n\nAnd most recently, I’ve been the PM for the “Confluence Inbox” feature you guys saw in the keynote. \nThroughout all these projects, I’ve learnt a lot about building feedback loops - and a lot of what I share with you today has been a learning from each of these projects. \n
  • But before we begin, a little about me.\n\nAs Nick said, I’m Sherif Mansour. Engineer turned product manager and since then: I’ve been the Confluence product manager for a couple of years now, most notably through it’s biggest change to date (animate drop RIP Wiki markup), I also helped launch the add-on Team Calendars for Confluence and am the current Product Manager for that as well. \n\nAnd most recently, I’ve been the PM for the “Confluence Inbox” feature you guys saw in the keynote. \nThroughout all these projects, I’ve learnt a lot about building feedback loops - and a lot of what I share with you today has been a learning from each of these projects. \n
  • But before we begin, a little about me.\n\nAs Nick said, I’m Sherif Mansour. Engineer turned product manager and since then: I’ve been the Confluence product manager for a couple of years now, most notably through it’s biggest change to date (animate drop RIP Wiki markup), I also helped launch the add-on Team Calendars for Confluence and am the current Product Manager for that as well. \n\nAnd most recently, I’ve been the PM for the “Confluence Inbox” feature you guys saw in the keynote. \nThroughout all these projects, I’ve learnt a lot about building feedback loops - and a lot of what I share with you today has been a learning from each of these projects. \n
  • But before we begin, a little about me.\n\nAs Nick said, I’m Sherif Mansour. Engineer turned product manager and since then: I’ve been the Confluence product manager for a couple of years now, most notably through it’s biggest change to date (animate drop RIP Wiki markup), I also helped launch the add-on Team Calendars for Confluence and am the current Product Manager for that as well. \n\nAnd most recently, I’ve been the PM for the “Confluence Inbox” feature you guys saw in the keynote. \nThroughout all these projects, I’ve learnt a lot about building feedback loops - and a lot of what I share with you today has been a learning from each of these projects. \n
  • But before we begin, a little about me.\n\nAs Nick said, I’m Sherif Mansour. Engineer turned product manager and since then: I’ve been the Confluence product manager for a couple of years now, most notably through it’s biggest change to date (animate drop RIP Wiki markup), I also helped launch the add-on Team Calendars for Confluence and am the current Product Manager for that as well. \n\nAnd most recently, I’ve been the PM for the “Confluence Inbox” feature you guys saw in the keynote. \nThroughout all these projects, I’ve learnt a lot about building feedback loops - and a lot of what I share with you today has been a learning from each of these projects. \n
  • But before we begin, a little about me.\n\nAs Nick said, I’m Sherif Mansour. Engineer turned product manager and since then: I’ve been the Confluence product manager for a couple of years now, most notably through it’s biggest change to date (animate drop RIP Wiki markup), I also helped launch the add-on Team Calendars for Confluence and am the current Product Manager for that as well. \n\nAnd most recently, I’ve been the PM for the “Confluence Inbox” feature you guys saw in the keynote. \nThroughout all these projects, I’ve learnt a lot about building feedback loops - and a lot of what I share with you today has been a learning from each of these projects. \n
  • But before we begin, a little about me.\n\nAs Nick said, I’m Sherif Mansour. Engineer turned product manager and since then: I’ve been the Confluence product manager for a couple of years now, most notably through it’s biggest change to date (animate drop RIP Wiki markup), I also helped launch the add-on Team Calendars for Confluence and am the current Product Manager for that as well. \n\nAnd most recently, I’ve been the PM for the “Confluence Inbox” feature you guys saw in the keynote. \nThroughout all these projects, I’ve learnt a lot about building feedback loops - and a lot of what I share with you today has been a learning from each of these projects. \n
  • So for the next 8 minuets, I’m going to go through:\n\n* The importance of feedback in your build, measure, learn product development cycle\n* Take a look at six practical tips for creating effective feedback loops, mostly derived from the lessons I’ve learnt on the projects I mentioned earlier\n* and then I’m quickly going to touch on what to do (and not do) once you have a lot of feedback coming through.\n\nSo the Build, measure learn cycle... \n\n
  • Eric Ries talks about a product lifecyles in his book in his book, “The Lean Startup”. Anyone read this book? \n\n(Hands up)\n\nIn this book, he describes a “lean startup” cycle for product development. This typically goes through a loop that looks something like this..\n\n\n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • (animate)\nYou start with your product team\n\nThey start building something, produce some artefacts\n\nThen comes measuring the impact of those changes. \n\nFrom the analytics you then formulate your learnings and come up with ideas, changes, new proposals for ways of doing this.\n\nThe whole idea is to go through this loop as fast as possible.\n\nNow a large part of this loop is all about measure and learn. Measuring typically comes through such things in-product product analytics and also through general customer feedback (animate drop)\n\nThere is a whole talk for analytics, I’m more going to focus on the techniques to get direct customer feedback....\n\nReceiving communication from your customers is a critical part of being successful in this cycle... so how do you go about doing this? \n
  • I’m going to go through just six, as there are probably a lot more, practical tips for building an effective feedback loop\n
  • I’m going to go through just six, as there are probably a lot more, practical tips for building an effective feedback loop\n
  • I’m going to go through just six, as there are probably a lot more, practical tips for building an effective feedback loop\n
  • The first tip I’ve got is all about reducing friction. \n\nIt’s important to remember when your thinking about getting feedback, that they are doing you a favour. They’ve got their job to get along with and to encourage them to give you feedback, you really need to make it as frictionless as possible for them.\n\n\n\n
  • The first tip I’ve got is all about reducing friction. \n\nIt’s important to remember when your thinking about getting feedback, that they are doing you a favour. They’ve got their job to get along with and to encourage them to give you feedback, you really need to make it as frictionless as possible for them.\n\n\n\n
  • Quick story about Confluence 4 editor:\n\nWho here used Confluence before 4.0, when it had Wiki Markup.\n\nYou’ll know it was a significant change.\n\nWe knew we HAD to to make easy to get feedback. \n\nExample: "Got Feedback" at Atlassian (All started in Confluence 4.0) and then got shipped to customers in our milestone releases - with over 270 feedback submissions from external customers and over 1,000 from internal customers. \n\nIn addition, Team Calendars 1.0 EAP shipped with a fat "feedback" button, and all around Atlassian now on internal and external sites we’ve deployed this strategy.\n\n\n\n
  • Quick story about Confluence 4 editor:\n\nWho here used Confluence before 4.0, when it had Wiki Markup.\n\nYou’ll know it was a significant change.\n\nWe knew we HAD to to make easy to get feedback. \n\nExample: "Got Feedback" at Atlassian (All started in Confluence 4.0) and then got shipped to customers in our milestone releases - with over 270 feedback submissions from external customers and over 1,000 from internal customers. \n\nIn addition, Team Calendars 1.0 EAP shipped with a fat "feedback" button, and all around Atlassian now on internal and external sites we’ve deployed this strategy.\n\n\n\n
  • Quick story about Confluence 4 editor:\n\nWho here used Confluence before 4.0, when it had Wiki Markup.\n\nYou’ll know it was a significant change.\n\nWe knew we HAD to to make easy to get feedback. \n\nExample: "Got Feedback" at Atlassian (All started in Confluence 4.0) and then got shipped to customers in our milestone releases - with over 270 feedback submissions from external customers and over 1,000 from internal customers. \n\nIn addition, Team Calendars 1.0 EAP shipped with a fat "feedback" button, and all around Atlassian now on internal and external sites we’ve deployed this strategy.\n\n\n\n
  • Quick story about Confluence 4 editor:\n\nWho here used Confluence before 4.0, when it had Wiki Markup.\n\nYou’ll know it was a significant change.\n\nWe knew we HAD to to make easy to get feedback. \n\nExample: "Got Feedback" at Atlassian (All started in Confluence 4.0) and then got shipped to customers in our milestone releases - with over 270 feedback submissions from external customers and over 1,000 from internal customers. \n\nIn addition, Team Calendars 1.0 EAP shipped with a fat "feedback" button, and all around Atlassian now on internal and external sites we’ve deployed this strategy.\n\n\n\n
  • Quick story about Confluence 4 editor:\n\nWho here used Confluence before 4.0, when it had Wiki Markup.\n\nYou’ll know it was a significant change.\n\nWe knew we HAD to to make easy to get feedback. \n\nExample: "Got Feedback" at Atlassian (All started in Confluence 4.0) and then got shipped to customers in our milestone releases - with over 270 feedback submissions from external customers and over 1,000 from internal customers. \n\nIn addition, Team Calendars 1.0 EAP shipped with a fat "feedback" button, and all around Atlassian now on internal and external sites we’ve deployed this strategy.\n\n\n\n
  • Quick story about Confluence 4 editor:\n\nWho here used Confluence before 4.0, when it had Wiki Markup.\n\nYou’ll know it was a significant change.\n\nWe knew we HAD to to make easy to get feedback. \n\nExample: "Got Feedback" at Atlassian (All started in Confluence 4.0) and then got shipped to customers in our milestone releases - with over 270 feedback submissions from external customers and over 1,000 from internal customers. \n\nIn addition, Team Calendars 1.0 EAP shipped with a fat "feedback" button, and all around Atlassian now on internal and external sites we’ve deployed this strategy.\n\n\n\n
  • How do you do this? There are a few principles you need to stick by:\n\n1. Less clicks\n2. Less fields to fill out, especially “required” fields”\n- Automatically capture as much information (javascript etc.)\n3. make it easy to express themselves\n4. no context switching\n5. Reduce barrier to entry as much as posssible \nNo account, automatically detect acouunts \n
  • How do you do this? There are a few principles you need to stick by:\n\n1. Less clicks\n2. Less fields to fill out, especially “required” fields”\n- Automatically capture as much information (javascript etc.)\n3. make it easy to express themselves\n4. no context switching\n5. Reduce barrier to entry as much as posssible \nNo account, automatically detect acouunts \n
  • How do you do this? There are a few principles you need to stick by:\n\n1. Less clicks\n2. Less fields to fill out, especially “required” fields”\n- Automatically capture as much information (javascript etc.)\n3. make it easy to express themselves\n4. no context switching\n5. Reduce barrier to entry as much as posssible \nNo account, automatically detect acouunts \n
  • So how do you go about doing this? Well, with our GotFeedback, button, I actually created that with a simple\nWuFoo form. A free service, \n\n(WuFoo, JIRA issue collector, whatever it is - having less clicks, low barrier to entry, automatically capture as much information as possible to save manual data entry for the user etc…)\nExample: "Got Feedback" at Atlassian (All started in Confluence 4.0) and then got shipped to customers in our milestone releases - with over 270 feedback submissions from external customers and over 1,000 from internal customers. In addition, Team Calendars 1.0 EAP shipped with a fat "feedback" button \n
  • So how do you go about doing this? Well, with our GotFeedback, button, I actually created that with a simple\nWuFoo form. A free service, \n\n(WuFoo, JIRA issue collector, whatever it is - having less clicks, low barrier to entry, automatically capture as much information as possible to save manual data entry for the user etc…)\nExample: "Got Feedback" at Atlassian (All started in Confluence 4.0) and then got shipped to customers in our milestone releases - with over 270 feedback submissions from external customers and over 1,000 from internal customers. In addition, Team Calendars 1.0 EAP shipped with a fat "feedback" button \n
  • So how do you go about doing this? Well, with our GotFeedback, button, I actually created that with a simple\nWuFoo form. A free service, \n\n(WuFoo, JIRA issue collector, whatever it is - having less clicks, low barrier to entry, automatically capture as much information as possible to save manual data entry for the user etc…)\nExample: "Got Feedback" at Atlassian (All started in Confluence 4.0) and then got shipped to customers in our milestone releases - with over 270 feedback submissions from external customers and over 1,000 from internal customers. In addition, Team Calendars 1.0 EAP shipped with a fat "feedback" button \n
  • So how do you go about doing this? Well, with our GotFeedback, button, I actually created that with a simple\nWuFoo form. A free service, \n\n(WuFoo, JIRA issue collector, whatever it is - having less clicks, low barrier to entry, automatically capture as much information as possible to save manual data entry for the user etc…)\nExample: "Got Feedback" at Atlassian (All started in Confluence 4.0) and then got shipped to customers in our milestone releases - with over 270 feedback submissions from external customers and over 1,000 from internal customers. In addition, Team Calendars 1.0 EAP shipped with a fat "feedback" button \n
  • But there’s more you can do other than looking at reducing friction to encourage feedback from your end users. \n\nAnd second tip I’ve got is all about making the feedback experience more engaging and fun.\n
  • But there’s more you can do other than looking at reducing friction to encourage feedback from your end users. \n\nAnd second tip I’ve got is all about making the feedback experience more engaging and fun.\n
  • But there’s more you can do other than looking at reducing friction to encourage feedback from your end users. \n\nAnd second tip I’ve got is all about making the feedback experience more engaging and fun.\n
  • Who here has watched the biggest looser? Well, in Australia we’ve had the biggest looser come down under as well. We have this habit of copying the TV shows you guys have. I think we’ve had so many different editions of the biggest looser I’ve lost count. \n\nBiggest looser the original, \nBiggest looser singles\nBiggest looser couples\nWe’ve had a biggest looser celebrities as well...\n\nThroughout the Confluence 4.0 development lifecycle I came home one day from work and was watching TV, and the Biggest Looser was on and at the same time, I’d been spending a bit of time trying to figure out mechanisms to encourage feedback during Confluence 4.0.\n
  • Who here has watched the biggest looser? Well, in Australia we’ve had the biggest looser come down under as well. We have this habit of copying the TV shows you guys have. I think we’ve had so many different editions of the biggest looser I’ve lost count. \n\nBiggest looser the original, \nBiggest looser singles\nBiggest looser couples\nWe’ve had a biggest looser celebrities as well...\n\nThroughout the Confluence 4.0 development lifecycle I came home one day from work and was watching TV, and the Biggest Looser was on and at the same time, I’d been spending a bit of time trying to figure out mechanisms to encourage feedback during Confluence 4.0.\n
  • How did we do this?\nBlogging - updates for the ladder pool,\nWe ended up all the feedback went into JIRA for us, so it was super easy for us to generate a report to work out who the winners were \n\nFor Team Calendars - we told our beta customers the most helpful feedback would get a free license\n\nFo internal and external release notes, we call out specific thanks with @mentions \n\nPeople recognise and feel they are contributing \n
  • How did we do this?\nBlogging - updates for the ladder pool,\nWe ended up all the feedback went into JIRA for us, so it was super easy for us to generate a report to work out who the winners were \n\nFor Team Calendars - we told our beta customers the most helpful feedback would get a free license\n\nFo internal and external release notes, we call out specific thanks with @mentions \n\nPeople recognise and feel they are contributing \n
  • How did we do this?\nBlogging - updates for the ladder pool,\nWe ended up all the feedback went into JIRA for us, so it was super easy for us to generate a report to work out who the winners were \n\nFor Team Calendars - we told our beta customers the most helpful feedback would get a free license\n\nFo internal and external release notes, we call out specific thanks with @mentions \n\nPeople recognise and feel they are contributing \n
  • How did we do this?\nBlogging - updates for the ladder pool,\nWe ended up all the feedback went into JIRA for us, so it was super easy for us to generate a report to work out who the winners were \n\nFor Team Calendars - we told our beta customers the most helpful feedback would get a free license\n\nFo internal and external release notes, we call out specific thanks with @mentions \n\nPeople recognise and feel they are contributing \n
  • How did we do this?\nBlogging - updates for the ladder pool,\nWe ended up all the feedback went into JIRA for us, so it was super easy for us to generate a report to work out who the winners were \n\nFor Team Calendars - we told our beta customers the most helpful feedback would get a free license\n\nFo internal and external release notes, we call out specific thanks with @mentions \n\nPeople recognise and feel they are contributing \n
  • How did we do this?\nBlogging - updates for the ladder pool,\nWe ended up all the feedback went into JIRA for us, so it was super easy for us to generate a report to work out who the winners were \n\nFor Team Calendars - we told our beta customers the most helpful feedback would get a free license\n\nFo internal and external release notes, we call out specific thanks with @mentions \n\nPeople recognise and feel they are contributing \n
  • Conclusion find a way to make to make it fun\n - For us it was running a competition \n - You might look at other ways at adding some game mechanics to it \n\n
  • Conclusion find a way to make to make it fun\n - For us it was running a competition \n - You might look at other ways at adding some game mechanics to it \n\n
  • Conclusion find a way to make to make it fun\n - For us it was running a competition \n - You might look at other ways at adding some game mechanics to it \n\n
  • So we’ve talked about reducing friction and making the feedback experience more fun and enjoyable....\nAnd part of making that experience enjoyable is being able to get individuals involved at a personal level.\n\nSo my third tip as all about getting personal..... and no, it’s not that kinda personal...\nLet me explain what I mean \n
  • So we’ve talked about reducing friction and making the feedback experience more fun and enjoyable....\nAnd part of making that experience enjoyable is being able to get individuals involved at a personal level.\n\nSo my third tip as all about getting personal..... and no, it’s not that kinda personal...\nLet me explain what I mean \n
  • So we’ve talked about reducing friction and making the feedback experience more fun and enjoyable....\nAnd part of making that experience enjoyable is being able to get individuals involved at a personal level.\n\nSo my third tip as all about getting personal..... and no, it’s not that kinda personal...\nLet me explain what I mean \n
  • Hopefully you guys will recall yesterday you might have seen the Confluence notifications and tasks in the Keynote yesterday, or maybe some of you were also in the Confluence state of the Union and saw this.\n\nBut very quickly, we had lots of unknowns when we first started this project. We wanted to know what types of users would find this helpful, should we also integrate with other development tools, like Bamboo or Crucible... who would find this feature the most helpful and why. \n\nAnd Atlassian is getting quite big now, with over 500 staff, so when we launched this internally one of our engineers came up with a very creative way of helping us figure this stuff out...\n
  • Hopefully you guys will recall yesterday you might have seen the Confluence notifications and tasks in the Keynote yesterday, or maybe some of you were also in the Confluence state of the Union and saw this.\n\nBut very quickly, we had lots of unknowns when we first started this project. We wanted to know what types of users would find this helpful, should we also integrate with other development tools, like Bamboo or Crucible... who would find this feature the most helpful and why. \n\nAnd Atlassian is getting quite big now, with over 500 staff, so when we launched this internally one of our engineers came up with a very creative way of helping us figure this stuff out...\n
  • So we got personal, we put a face to the numbers. \n\nWhat you see here is a face of our top users by day. So each day, the analytics would get updated. And you’ll notice here we’ve got a few things:\n\nFirstly we have the persons face and name - we’re getting personal here. Connecting ourselves and our engineers with the actual user\n\nWe also put this in our wallboard. \n
  • So we got personal, we put a face to the numbers. \n\nWhat you see here is a face of our top users by day. So each day, the analytics would get updated. And you’ll notice here we’ve got a few things:\n\nFirstly we have the persons face and name - we’re getting personal here. Connecting ourselves and our engineers with the actual user\n\nWe also put this in our wallboard. \n
  • So we got personal, we put a face to the numbers. \n\nWhat you see here is a face of our top users by day. So each day, the analytics would get updated. And you’ll notice here we’ve got a few things:\n\nFirstly we have the persons face and name - we’re getting personal here. Connecting ourselves and our engineers with the actual user\n\nWe also put this in our wallboard. \n
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  • So we’ve talked about reducing friction, making the experience fun and getting personal.\n\nBut I want to pause for a minute and clarify something - you can do a lot to get feedback well before you start coding your final solution. \n\nThis is particularly helpful if:\n- you’ve got a customer that you know is constantly changing requirements\n- if you have a lot of unknonws\n- if its costly to implement the solution that you’re thinking of\n- you a business guy and you’ve got some spare cycles to explore a few things while your dev team is building stuff... \n
  • So we’ve talked about reducing friction, making the experience fun and getting personal.\n\nBut I want to pause for a minute and clarify something - you can do a lot to get feedback well before you start coding your final solution. \n\nThis is particularly helpful if:\n- you’ve got a customer that you know is constantly changing requirements\n- if you have a lot of unknonws\n- if its costly to implement the solution that you’re thinking of\n- you a business guy and you’ve got some spare cycles to explore a few things while your dev team is building stuff... \n
  • So we’ve talked about reducing friction, making the experience fun and getting personal.\n\nBut I want to pause for a minute and clarify something - you can do a lot to get feedback well before you start coding your final solution. \n\nThis is particularly helpful if:\n- you’ve got a customer that you know is constantly changing requirements\n- if you have a lot of unknonws\n- if its costly to implement the solution that you’re thinking of\n- you a business guy and you’ve got some spare cycles to explore a few things while your dev team is building stuff... \n
  • So we’ve talked about reducing friction, making the experience fun and getting personal.\n\nBut I want to pause for a minute and clarify something - you can do a lot to get feedback well before you start coding your final solution. \n\nThis is particularly helpful if:\n- you’ve got a customer that you know is constantly changing requirements\n- if you have a lot of unknonws\n- if its costly to implement the solution that you’re thinking of\n- you a business guy and you’ve got some spare cycles to explore a few things while your dev team is building stuff... \n
  • \nFake clothing Bali - \nStory of nephews clothing \n\nFake it - low cost, get feedback early and for a lot of things its viable \n
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  • Get feedback before a single line of code \n\nMockups, visual designs, prototyping, keynote - this is a whole other talk, but we've got plenty of examples of how we did this with the Confluence 4.0 editor (usability tests with developers), Team Calendars and Work Day (faked it all out in Keynote) \n\n\n\n
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  • Create new features\nTwist/bend existing features \n
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  • Video of faked out workday \n
  • Video of faked out workday \n
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Building Effective Customer Feedback Loops, AtlasCamp US 2012 Building Effective Customer Feedback Loops, AtlasCamp US 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • Building an EffectiveCustomer Feedback Loop Sherif Mansour
  • 2
  • ur@sh erifmanso 2
  • ur@sh erifmanso 2
  • ur@sh erifmanso 2
  • 2 ur@sh erifmanso
  • R.I.P wiki markup 2 ur@sh erifmanso
  • R.I.P wiki markup 2 ur@sh erifmanso
  • R.I.P wiki markup 2 ur@sh erifmanso ?
  • Agenda• Build, measure, learn• Five tips for effective feedback loops
  • 2.0
  • 2.0Build
  • 2.0Build Measure
  • 2.0 Build MeasureLearn
  • 2.0 Build MeasureLearn
  • 2.0 Build MeasureLearn
  • Five Tipsfor building effective feedback loops
  • 1
  • 1 friction
  • 1
  • 1 GOT FEEDBACK?
  • 1
  • 1 GOT FEEDBACK?
  • 1 GOT FEEDBACK?
  • 1 GOT FEEDBACK?900+ feedbacksubmissions
  • 1
  • 1 ↓ barrier to entry Avoid login, context switching...
  • 1 ↓ barrier to entry Avoid login, context switching... ↓ fields Less fields, reduce required fields * required Automatically populate where possible
  • 1 ↓ barrier to entry Avoid login, context switching... ↓ fields Less fields, reduce required fields * required Automatically populate where possible Rate this feature: bad Easily express yourself good Quick and simple great
  • 1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 2 make it fun!
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2 PRIZE movie tix
  • 2 FREE license BETA PRIZE movie tix
  • 2 FREE license BETA Release notes Thank you: • John Masson for reporting CONF-334 • Ryan Anderson for the feature PRIZE movie tix suggestion in CONF-4534 SAY THANKS
  • 2
  • 2 Incentivise Through prizes and awards
  • 2 Incentivise Through prizes and awards Thanks! Say thank you Provide recognition in release notes, @mentions
  • 2 Incentivise Through prizes and awards Thanks! Say thank you Provide recognition in release notes, @mentions Game mechanics Encourage feedback
  • 3
  • 3 get pers nal
  • 3
  • 23 ?
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3 get personal jkodumal name 2.0/4.0 key feature usage
  • 3
  • 3 = Put a face to the stat Make that customer connection
  • 3 = Put a face to the stat Make that customer connection Engage engineers Review it daily, get it on your wallboard, talk about it...
  • 3 = Put a face to the stat Make that customer connection Engage engineers Review it daily, get it on your wallboard, talk about it... KNOW the customer Use data to drive interviews
  • 4
  • 4 fee db ack w ritea gy strate
  • new vsexisting
  • new internal vs vsexisting external
  • new internal vs vsexisting externalspecific vsgeneral
  • new internal vs vsexisting externalspecific ad-hoc vs vsgeneral deadline
  • new vsexisting
  • new internal vs vsexisting external
  • new internal vs vsexisting externalspecific vsgeneral
  • new internal vs vsexisting externalspecific ad-hoc vs vsgeneral deadline
  • Feedback strategy new internal vs vsexisting externalspecific ad-hoc vs vsgeneral deadline
  • New Feedback strategy new• Techniques to encourage install internal vs vs• Finding BETAexisting customers externalspecific ad-hoc vs vsgeneral deadline
  • New Both Feedback strategy new internal (Internal+External)• Techniques to • Internal feedback: encourage install captured more data, vs vs easier to engage• Finding BETAexisting customers external • External feedback: increased privacyspecific ad-hoc vs vsgeneral deadline
  • New Both Feedback strategy new internal (Internal+External)• Techniques to • Internal feedback: encourage install captured more data, vs vs easier to engage• Finding BETAexisting customers external • External feedback: increased privacy Generalspecific• Placement of “feedback” button ad-hoc vs vs• Arranged casualgeneral interviews deadline
  • New Both Feedback strategy new internal (Internal+External)• Techniques to • Internal feedback: encourage install captured more data, vs vs easier to engage• Finding BETAexisting customers external • External feedback: increased privacy General Deadlinespecific• Placement of “feedback” button ad-hoc • Incentivise the feedback process vs vs• Arranged casual • Followup plangeneral interviews deadline
  • 4
  • 4 Write a plan of attack! Seriously, just do it.
  • 4 Write a plan of attack! Seriously, just do it. Consider setting numeric goals Especially if you’ve got a baseline.
  • 5
  • 5 e forey ou fe ed bac kb get START
  • fake it till you make IT
  • tools to help youfake IT
  • AUI User InterfaceAtlassianhttp://atlss.in/AUIFlatpackhttp://atlss.in/AUISandbox
  • AUI User InterfaceAtlassianhttp://atlss.in/AUIFlatpackhttp://atlss.in/AUISandbox
  • Speakeasy Per-user plugins Great for visual prototypes Quick and easy to hack up HTML + CSS + JS and you’re donehttp://developer.atlassian.com/display/SPEAK
  • + + ... = prototype
  • fidelity speed
  • fidelity speed
  • fidelity speed
  • fidelity speed
  • ?fidelity speed
  • fidelity speed
  • fidelity speed
  • Faking it: A recipe
  • dit ion eE Faking it: A recipe otK eyn
  • dit ion eE Faking it: A recipe otK eyn1 Make your base Take a screenshot with the main screen(s) you want to work with, paste in Keynote.
  • dit ion eE Faking it: A recipe otK eyn1 Make your base Take a screenshot with the main screen(s) you want to work with, paste in Keynote.2 Mix & match AUI-keynote goodness We’ve pre-prepared some ready-to-use AUI dialogs, menus, buttons... all in Keynote ready to to mix in with your recipe.
  • dit ion eE Faking it: A recipe otK eyn1 Make your base Take a screenshot with the main screen(s) you want to work with, paste in Keynote.2 Mix & match AUI-keynote goodness We’ve pre-prepared some ready-to-use AUI dialogs, menus, buttons... all in Keynote ready to to mix in with your recipe.3 Apply desired icing on top Link parts of the screen, transition slides show screen flows, animate to show interaction... it’s all up to you!
  • Atlassian User Interface Keynotehttp://bitbucket.org/sherif
  • 129 3 It’s okay to fake it Save time and money - validate your concepts, fast. 6
  • 129 3 It’s okay to fake it Save time and money - validate your concepts, fast. 6 Use the right tool High fidelity prototypes are not always what you want: Use the right tool to communicate.
  • Conclusion incase you forgot...
  • 2.0
  • 2.0 friction
  • 2.0 friction make fun! it
  • 2.0 friction make fun! itgetpers nal
  • 2.0 friction make fun! itget a fee dback write rategypers nal st
  • 2.0 friction make fun! itget a fee dback back be fore you write rategy get feedpers nal st START
  • Thank you! r@she rifmansou