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Balancing Local Control and Global  Performance: The Digital Marketing Shift
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Balancing Local Control and Global Performance: The Digital Marketing Shift

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Marketing has rapidly evolved over the past few years, with progressive technologies allowing brands to execute campaigns and strategies quickly and efficiently. Of all the changes, nothing has had …

Marketing has rapidly evolved over the past few years, with progressive technologies allowing brands to execute campaigns and strategies quickly and efficiently. Of all the changes, nothing has had such a dramatic impact as the continued adoption of Marketing Automation (MA) platforms.
These tools allow teams to move beyond program management to become revenue-generating machines, and according to Sirius Decisions, by 2015 up to 50 percent of B2B marketers will be leveraging a Marketing Automation platform.
Many global marketing organizations’ existing infrastructure inhibits the efficiencies Marketing Automation has promised.
MA systems are generally launched from a corporate marketing office, but most organizations still maintain in-country
teams responsible for program development and deployment. The unintended consequence is isolated marketing activities, corrupt/disjointed customer data and an overall a lack of brand consistency.
In the CMO Council Study “Integrate to Accelerate Digital Marketing Value,” 36 percent of marketers admitted their digital
marketing landscape was really a random embracement of poorly integrated point solutions. Herein lays the opportunity for
global marketing teams to realize the true value Marketing Automation can deliver by striking a new balance between global
and local marketing.


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  • 1. Structuring for SuccessBalancing Local Control and GlobalPerformance: The Digital Marketing ShiftMarketing has rapidly evolved over the past few years, with progressive technologies allowing brands to execute cam-paigns and strategies quickly and efficiently. Of all the changes, nothing has had such a dramatic impact as the contin-ued adoption of Marketing Automation (MA) platforms.These tools allow teams to move beyond program management to become revenue-generating machines, and accord-ing to Sirius Decisions, by 2015 up to 50 percent of B2B marketers will be leveraging a Marketing Automation platform.Many global marketing organizations’ existing infrastructure inhibits the efficiencies Marketing Automation has promised.MA systems are generally launched from a corporate marketing office, but most organizations still maintain in-countryteams responsible for program development and deployment. The unintended consequence is isolated marketing activi-ties, corrupt/disjointed customer data and an overall a lack of brand consistency.In the CMO Council Study “Integrate to Accelerate Digital Marketing Value,” 36 percent of marketers admitted their digitalmarketing landscape was really a random embracement of poorly integrated point solutions. Herein lays the opportunity forglobal marketing teams to realize the true value Marketing Automation can deliver by striking a new balance between globaland local marketing.CONSEQUENCES OF LOCAL CONTROLDriving efficiencies across global marketing efforts isn’t the onlymotivation for identifying the right central strategy. By opting outof a centrally developed program or campaign, in-country teamsare often unbundling a broader effort.Many organizations carefully develop global and regional strate-gies using a macro-lens, taking into account more than just theview of the marketing plan. When it comes to crafting a corporatestrategy from a multitude of market and customer insights, thereare many hands in the pot — from corporate executive leader-ship, to global sales and marketing and external consultants.When the tactical application of that strategy takes shape in theform of a centrally developed marketing program with a decen-tralized decision matrix, an in-country marketing manager canopt-out. They make that choice lacking any knowledge of the bigpicture and initial strategic planning process, translating to theunintended loss of regional market opportunities.STRIKING THE GLOBAL – LOCAL BALANCEFinding the right balance between what can be managed centrally and what needs to be executed locally is the firststep. For many global digital marketing efforts, what is localized is often language and imagery based cultural nuancesversus in-market rejection of the overall marketing initiative. Providing in-country teams the opportunity to opt-in to aninitiative based on their local knowledge can be an unnecessary step that causes a delay in time-to-market.A centralized effort around key digital marketing initiatives can increase the total output while decreasing the overalleffort and strengthening the cost per metric (lead, conversion, opportunity). The first step is to create rules for whichelements of digital marketing need to be localized and what can be globally standardized.The Business CaseWhy centralize digital marketing operations?Streamlining these efforts can increase campaigneffectiveness and contribution:• Drive greater messaging and brand consistencyacross diverse geographies• Increase revenue-generation, lead volume anddecrease cost-per-lead from existing efforts• Reduce the overall employee effort requiredto replicate the same campaign over multiplegeographies independently• Enhanced tracking and ability to develop globalbehavior insights
  • 2. Content• Develop globally neutral brand content that remainsstandard.• Identify which content and messages can be tailored toin-market nuances. Subject lines should be localized giventheir impact on email performance. Design• Create comprehensive email templates with globally neutralimagery, color pallets and fonts.• If imagery is needed to convey the core message, tailor it byculture. Landing Pages and Forms• Create universal landing page templates with globally neutralimagery, color palettes and fonts. The same imagery caveatfrom above applies here.• Website forms should be templatized for managing globaldata quality and enable consistent lead scoring. Operations• Global marketing best practices and operations should bemanaged across the platform, enabling greater productivityfrom an existing workforce.• Lead scoring and routing should be consistent worldwide.• Nurturing programs can be managed centrally, allowing forthe local content input referenced above. Targets, Lists and Segmentation• Due to the diverse sets of email, SPAM and privacy laws acrossdifferent countries, list development and ownership needs tobe managed locally to comply with opt-in regulations.• Segmentation is part of the strategic planning process andcan be managed centrally.The dynamics continue to change for marketing, both internallyand externally. Balancing global and local control has never beeneasy, but there are assumptions regarding digital marketing effortsthat need to be revisited, driven by the rapid adoption of Market-ing Automation systems. These platforms provide an opportunityfor marketing to drive efficiencies across their global efforts thatprovide increased performance, brand consistency, and betterdata quality and insights.GET STARTEDTo learn more about our Global EmailOperations solution, please contact us atglobalmarketingops.com/get-startedglobalmarketingops.comFollowLionbridgeA Perspective Beyond DigitalMarketing OperationsGiven the need to control the customer experienceglobally, there are opportunities beyond digitalcampaigns to start managing programs centrally.LOCAL• Content marketing (blogs, web content): Localinsights are needed to drive real-time, relevantcontent• SEM/PPC/display advertising: In-depthunderstanding of users, buyer-personas, searchterms and digital properties is required forchannel success• Social media marketing: Tied to a global SEOstrategy, but driven by local content marketing• Public/media relations: Requires cultivatingrelationships with an evolving landscape ofinfluencers• Event marketing (offline/online): Oftenconnected to regional associations,professional groups and client/partner groups• Sales promotion (B2B): Offers driven byregional, in-country sales teamsCENTRAL• Brand marketing: Programs and campaignsdriving core brand messages that are globallyneutral/relevant• Thought leadership efforts: Publications,initiatives and content that illustrate subjectmatter expertise• Product/solution marketing: General productpromotion and support messages, with roomfor locally “tailored” content• Websites/microsites: Centrally managed digitalproperties• SEO: Oversee organic search performancecentrally across all regions. Content drivingSEO can be developed locally